Skip to main content

tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  November 14, 2015 9:00pm-3:01am PST

9:00 pm
hello, everybody. we'd like to welcome our viewers in the united states and all around the world. i'm john vause. >> you're watching special coverage from "cnn newsroom" live from los angeles. >> authorities in france and belgium have made a number of arrest and have conducted raid after islamic terrorists brought life in paris to a standstill. a source says at least one raid near brussels is connected to the paris attacks. the video we're about to show you is graphic. take a look. it shows the sheer terror of the situation outside the theater on friday night. take a close look to the
9:01 pm
left-hand side of the screen. what you could see was a woman clinging by her fingertips to a ledge. there she is again. you see her just there right there. she's hanging from the window ledge. someone eventually pulls her up. and you see someone standing on the ledge, as well. they were there because they were trying to escape the gunfire inside. >> absolutely terrifying. people hanging on for dear life. at least seven attackers strapped to a suicide belt and equipped with automatic weapons assaulted six locations in coordinated attacks in paris. a french politician has identified one of the suicide bombers as ismail many whom are in hospital tonight, fighting for their lives. the french president is vowing a ruthless response to what he
9:02 pm
called an act of car. he declared three days of mourning. >> let's get more now from fred pleitgen. he is live in paris. we know the names, but we're learning more about the identities of the attackers who were involved in this terrorist attack in paris on friday. >> yes, certainly. it seems as though the investigation is moving forward and we saw the raids late yesterday in belgium that were going on, that were three people who were potentially connected to all this were taken into custody. also one person was taken into custody who was going from france to belgium. he remitted a black vw polo that was later found at the site of the bataclan, the place where the worst attacks took place. so there does appear to be that connection between france and belgium. and we have the one attacker
9:03 pm
identified by his fingertip. he was identified by the local mayor of that town. so slowly we are learning more about the identities of the attackers. we are certainly looking forward to see whether or not more information is going to come out today. again, this is an ongoing investigation. it appears as though that link to belgium is something that's becoming more and more important for the investigators, john. >> fred, it's isha here. this link to belgium narrowing down to a particular area, an area that's been known to authorities before. some going as far to describe it as a den of terrorists. what more can you tell us about the specific area and its significance? in when the "charlie hebdo" attacks took place. there were also raids in belgium
9:04 pm
outside of brussels. it does appear that in that town in the past there has been some activity by people who apparently were radicalized and one of the reasons they had those raids there yesterday. so it's something where, as during the last attacks with the "charlie hebdo," there was a lot of weapons found there. belgium does appear to be one of the countries that has a big problem with people who become radicalized and are able to acquire things like ak-47s and possibly traffic them all the way to here. so we are learning more as this investigation is going on. not only about belgium but also there's a possible link to germany, as well with a man who was arrested earlier this year and a lot of weapons found in his car in the head of german state of bavaria was saying there could be a link to that, as well. so slowly the pieces of this are
9:05 pm
getting put together. but it's unclear whether there's a bigger, larger organization behind this. whether or not this is a smaller cell that was operating. so a lot of work needs to be done. >> and fred, it seems that it's very slow identification process here. is it unusually slow, or is this to be expected given the high number of fatalities involved here? >> reporter: i don't think it's particularly slow. i just think that the information that is coming out about the victims of the attacks is just something that's taking longer. this is also of course an ongoing police investigation, as well. we do know that there was one american who was killed, 23-year-old student from california who was studying here in paris, studying graphic design. there's also some citizens of mexico that were killed, as well. of course, a lot of people from paris who were also killed.
9:06 pm
t the identities are coming out very close. in that bataclan venue, there were so many people killed. it is going to take some time for the victims to be identified and to be publicly identified. that doesn't mean that the city here wouldn't be in mourning. >> fred, the president is just arriving in turkey. we'll have to leave it there for a moment. we can see the u.s. president barack obama just touching down for that g-20 summit now in turkey. of course, the issue of terrorism will now top the agenda. >> undoubtedly. this is now going to be a very different gathering, this gathering of world leaders. the issue of isis and move beyond containing them and actually defeating them. >> the president offering the people of france all the help that they will need from the united states and we now now the u.s. president on the ground there for that g-20 summit.
9:07 pm
let's head back to fred pleitgen. right now there in paris, security incredibly high. some of the most iconic sites in the world are now closed as a result of the security measures which have been put in place. >> reporter: for instance, the eiffel tower which is closed. there was a bit of a scare around the eiffel tower last night. we had a hotel that seemed to be a police operation. that turned out to be a false alarm. if you look at the streets of paris over the past days since this has happened or right here where i'm standing light now, there is noticeably a lot more law enforcement on the streets as well. we do know that until around tuesday, there's going to be at least 3,000 french soldiers that have been mobilized to keep security in place, in paris and if other places, as well. there's at least 500 who are already on the streets. so certainly you can feel an incross in security. you can feel it especially in
9:08 pm
places considered to be vulnerable, like public transport, of course, also public places and iconic places. so certainly that is something that you can truly feel here. it doesn't mean people aren't going out on the streets. we did note yesterday that the french authorities had told people it might be better to stay outside, not to venture out, but it feels to me people are venturing out, saying we're not going to be intimidated by terrorism. you can feel that there is, even after this has gone on, still life here and that people are not allowing their way of life to be halted by all this. >> okay, fred, thank you. fred pleitgen there with the latest at this early hour just on 6:00 a.m. there in paris. >> the fbi is sending reinforcements to paris. joining us is steve moore, a retired special agent for the fbi. thank you again for spending time with us. >> sure. >> as we look at this investigation, it is now taking on a broader european dimension.
9:09 pm
>> it's worrying but not surprising. this is what we're up against now. as the president said, we have physical containment on them, but that's like saying we have physical containment on a cancer in the body. there are going to be billions of cells moving around the body, trying to metastesize. that's what happened here. unless you wipe out the original cell, it's going to keep coming. >> see, we're hearing from our justice correspondent that u.s. law enforcement are running a batch of names, trying to get some positive i.d. right now none of the names are none to the u.s. terrorist suspects. one, is that a surprise? and talk to us about the identity of identifying the suicide bombers. >> well, it kind of surprises me that they're not on u.s. radar
9:10 pm
at all. but then again, there might be some names we don't know about. you're not going to hear everything that's going on for one reason, they don't have time. the other thing is that when you get the bodies, and when they say we found a body, you found parts of a body. so now you're looking for fingerprints. what the terrorists are looking for is somebody that's never been involved in terrorism before so that they can get through boarders, they can get through all sorts of security measures, and their fingerprints may or may not be on file in a country, as you know in pakistan, fingerprint records, yeah, think about it. >> you mentioned identification of the attackers, but you also said you don't feel the authorities necessarily have a full grasp of that. >> i cannot believe that eight people did all of this. when you look at the two cafes, there was not a resolution of
9:11 pm
the situation by authorities, the violence just stopped. so it is very possible that after the shooting and the bombing, the shooters disappeared into the crowd. >> we have a situation where the frenchman who stopped at the belgium border on saturday, driving another car with two other people, there is a suspicion that may have been another cell, which was trying to get out of the country. does that make sense to you? >> it could be another cell, or it could be part of this cell trying to escape. when we get into discussing cells, what we have to realize is that one cell may not know what another cell's doing. and it's going to be hard to even define a cell. you saw that the fbi is looking at 900 terrorist cases. they don't even sometimes know if they have a cell or if they
9:12 pm
have a single radicalized individual. that's how difficult these investigations are. so whether there's a cell here or three individuals who were affiliated, we don't even know that now. and they may not even know that. >> steve, many unanswered questions, much we don't know. but one thing we do know, the types of explosives used by the seven attackers. tatp. >> right. >> talk to us about that. >> tatp, those are the type of explosives that we would expect terrorists to come out with from the middle east. they're used all through europe for different things, for industrial purposes. you can get them, but who has what? that kind of tells us who might have supplied these explosives. if we know that a certain group has a supply of tatp or has used tatp in the past or used whatever, this helps the investigators to narrow down who
9:13 pm
the cell might be dealing with, because somebody is supporting them. they didn't make this explosive in their living room. >> this is all about not just finding out who did this, but stopping the next one. we'll talk to you again soon. many in paris are taking time to visit makeshift memorials at the scene of the attacks. >> atika scubert spoke to some of the mourners about the horrible violence and how it might change the city. >> reporter: the sound of paris has been reduced to a murmur of mourning, as parisians come to this tiny corner of the city to see the aftermath. alexandra was supposed to meet her friend here last night. >> maybe i catch you later, guys, and i never catch them. they died. she was my friend. and i didn't say to my family, i said to my family i go there and
9:14 pm
i didn't say i'm changing my plans. so my mom came to the hospital to see if she can find my body. >> reporter: they stair at the bullet holes and look in disbelief at the sidewalks covered in sawdust and sand to absorb the blood. they come with their dogs and bicycles. they hold their children. the police allow people to linger close to the crime scene. they share an intimate grief. you can still see here the measuring tape used by the forensics team to measure the bullet holes here. and this is just how raw the emotion is. people have been coming here throughout the day, dazed and shocked, trying to understand why a place like this would become the target of a terror attack. mother and daughter, vivian and caroline, live around the corner. do you think this will change paris? >> yes, of course. >> reporter: we're scared, says caroline. i'm worried for my neighbors and
9:15 pm
this will change our daily lives. but we are stronger than this, she says. noah nieman from california was enjoying a glass of wine when he heard shots ring out. >> i heard lots of gunshots and i stood up to sort of peek around. and i saw terrified people running at me. >> reporter: in this neighborhood, everyone is a local. alexandra says they struck at the city's warm heart. >> people this morning were crying and i just -- they didn't touch -- they touch my heart. it's just like missing something. >> reporter: the heart of a city that still beats with life, even as it grieves for its dead. atika scubert, cnn, paris. >> let's get more now how paris
9:16 pm
is coping after these terrorist attacks. >> thank you for joining us. according to some of the things i read, there's a lot of grief in paris after these attacks and post "charlie hebdo" attacks. but some people we have spoken to said paris feels different. it's not quite the same emotion. how would you describe it? i know you've been out and speaking to people. >> reporter: yeah. i think -- i mean, obviously there's a lot of emotion here in paris. i think the difference between now and the "charlie hebdo" attacks is that there is a lot more anger. anger at the islamic state and anger from some organized parisians that their government got involved in the war in syria and brought it home to france.
9:17 pm
we were here yesterday and at the site of the bataclan were killed. many people were living flowers and candles, but mixed with the sadness is this residual anger. >> mirren, there will be more grief and pain in the coming hours, because we have this national service planned sunday. how will the people of paris be dealing with that grief? >> reporter: well, i think it's going to be difficult. i think the memories and the images are going to linger for a very long time here. these are the worst attacks in paris since world war ii and the worst in europe since the 2004 madrid bombings. so it's going to be a difficult week for paris. a national day of mourning is part of the collective three days of mourning and it's going to take a long time for the
9:18 pm
wounds to heal here. >> i know you've been speaking to members of the muslim community in paris. what is their response to these horrific attacks? >> reporter: yes, we went specifically to speak to the muslim community. they're scared of there being a backlash against muslims. they've all expressed outrage at the attacks. the gunmen just shot and killed anyone that got in the way. and that may or may not have included other muslims. the overwhelming message was, this is not something that should have been done in the name of islam. islam is a peaceful religion. it was something that everyone we spoke to, and we spoke to about four or five people, they utterly condemned it.
9:19 pm
>> and mirren, for the first time this century, passports are being checked at the french border crossings. that's a powerful symbolic measure that something here has changed, because those measures could be in place for some time. >> reporter: yes, absolutely. i mean, i believe it's the first time since 2005 when paris had riots that they had declared a state of emergency. but the tightening of border controls does make sense. we're hearing that belgium made three arrests of men believed to be linked to the attacks. and also we're hearing that a syrian passport was found with one of the gunman, who is believed to have come in to france through the greek islands disguised as a refugee.
9:20 pm
so we can see these tight border controls as france works out who these men were and how they got into the country. >> mirren gidda, thank you for joining us so early in the morning. >> thank you. coming up here, a father and his joining son describe how they survived the massacre in paris and what one of the shooters told them. that's up next. plus, we're learning the names of some of the victims. their stories coming up. do stay with us. at ally bank no branches equals great rates. it's a fact. kind of like shopping hungry equals overshopping. the possibility of a flare swas almost always on my mind. thinking about what to avoid,
9:21 pm
where to go... and how to deal with my uc. to me, that was normal. until i talked to my doctor. she told me that humira helps people like me get uc under control and keep it under control when certain medications haven't worked well enough. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers, including lymphoma, have happened; as have blood, liver, and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure. before treatment, get tested for tb. tell your doctor if you've been to areas where certain fungal infections are common, and if you've had tb, hepatitis b, are prone to infections, or have flu-like symptoms or sores. don't start humira if you have an infection. raise your expectations. ask your gastroenterologist about humira. with humira, control is possible.
9:22 pm
bounty is two times more absorbent. more "sit" per roll. so one roll of bounty can last longer than those bargain brands. so you get more "life" per roll. bounty. the long-lasting quicker picker upper.
9:23 pm
hello, everyone. all of france is 234 mourning after terrorists carried out the worst violence france has seen since world war ii. at least seven attackers working in three teams targeted six locations across paris friday night. 129 people were killed and 352 wounded. >> a french politician has identified one of the terrorists. isis claimed responsibility and the french president has vowed there will be a ruthless response. >> belgium authorities made a number of arrests after conducting raids in connection with the attacks. >> more than 100 people were killed in friday's terror attack.
9:24 pm
there was no singling anybody out. there was just random victims. >> and so many lives cut short. each of those people with futures, with dreams, with so much ahead of them. energetic, that's how nohemi was described. the 23-year-old was studying abroad in paris. she was meant to return home after one semester. >> she had a very joyous personality. she was extremely lively. extremely energetic. >> reporter: british citizen nix alexander worked with the band eagles of death metal, which was playing at the bataclan theater. according to his family, he died doing his job he loved. they said nick was not just our brother, son and uncle, he was everyone's best friend. generous, funny, and fiercely loyal.
9:25 pm
his girlfriend tweeted, sleep tight, my sweet prince. three victims were from chile, including lewis fi lipe, a musician who lived in paris for eight years. valentine ribet also lost his life. the paris bar tweeted, our heartfelt thoughts to the relatives to a talented young lawyer, murdered. president of youn versal music france tweeted universal music family is in mourning. thomas maria, manu, our thoughts are with their families. rest in peace. a french soccer was on the field friday night when terror struck there and hit very close to hem. his cousin was there to support
9:26 pm
him and lost her life. on his facebook page, he wrote that she was a guide and support, a big suser. and he urged people to remain respectful saying it's important for all of us who are representatives of our country and its diversity to speak and to remain united against a horror that has no color nor religion. lynda kinkade, cnn. the bloodiest scene from that terrible night was the bataclan hall. many fans were held hostages for hours. >> our senior enter nab correspondent spoke with a father and son inside the concert hall.
9:27 pm
>> like everybody else, we thought it was fireworks or part of the show. then i felt something go past my ear. i didn't know was it a bullet or something, i don't know what it was. avenltdz then i realized something is coming out, something is going towards the stage. at that point, everybody understood, everybody threw themselves on the ground. i stuck my head up to see what was going on and i saw the two shooters. one was changing his mag zone, so he had a big vest on. >> reporter: what did he look like? >> a young fellow, nothing in particular at all. >> reporter: did you hear him speak at all? >> i did. i heard at one point he said something about syria. i think you heard it better. >> yeah, he said you need to think about syria, but in french like there wasn't any accent or anything. >> obviously a native french speaker. i could see one of the guys was
9:28 pm
covering, doing crowd control. the other guy was executing. so there was no chance. there was a terrorist incident in europe. there was no chance of anybody being a hero. one was covering the crowd, the other doing the shooting. >> that must have been one of the worst moments of your life, fearing your son could have been hit. >> yeah, because i was screaming out his name and i thought he couldn't be far away. so he should shout out dad or something or stop, and he wasn't there. >> reporter: had you ever seen a dead body before? >> no, it was my first time, and i was lying just next to one. which i really was not in a comfortable position at that moment. >> reporter: you must have been very, very frightened. >> yeah. >> reporter: and you heard
9:29 pm
there, erin, they said spoke french like native french speakers, and the french have identified one of those attackers as a native. he had a criminal record. this really raises questions about how it's possible that french authorities were not more aware of this individual. we also know now that he was considered to be a radical, although he wasn't directly affiliated with any terrorist groups, certainly in light of everything that happened with "charlie hebdo," both of those young men had a history of radicalism but also had criminal records. these things surely should have been a red flag for the french authorities. >> our thanks for that report. >> it was tough listening to the young boy give his account. >> cnn's website has more details on the worldwide response we've seen to the series of shootings and bombings
9:30 pm
across the french capital. we'll continue to update you with ways that you can help. a short break here. when we come back, authorities say friday's bloodshed was the result of careful planning and we'll take a closer look at the coordinated terror attacks across paris. and security has been beefed up for this weekend's g-20 summit. we'll have a live report from turkey in a moment. you're watching cnn. nd directv . which means you can watch in the house, in a treehouse, or even in miss pepperpie's house. pause in your pjs and hit play during a pb&j. nice! and enjoy some cartoons instead of listening to dad's car tunes. (dad) ♪meet you all the way! get directv at home and 2 wireless lines for under $99 a month. from directv and at&t. advisor and team who understand
9:31 pm
where you come from. we didn't really have anything, you know. but, we made do. vo: know you can craft an investment plan as strong as your values. al, how you doing. hey, mr. hamilton. vo: know that together you can establish a meaningful legacy. with the guidance and support of your dedicated pnc wealth management team. some neighbors are energy saving superstars.
9:32 pm
how do you become a superstar? with pg&e's free online home energy checkup. in just under 5 minutes you can see how you use energy and get quick and easy tips on how to keep your monthly bill down and your energy savings up. don't let your neighbor enjoy all the savings. take the free home energy checkup. honey, we need a new refrigerator. visit pge.com/checkup and get started today.
9:33 pm
there is shock and mourning in paris as france reels from the worst violence there since world war ii. >> indeed. let's take a look now at how those attacks unfolded. the coordinated effort targeted busy areas across paris, including a soccer match, a concert and several restaurants. nic robertson reports on the timeline of those attacks. >> reporter: the first attack came at 9:20 p.m. local time. an explosion at the stadium during a soccer friendly between the french and german teams. the match continues. five minute later, gunmen open fire at a cambodian restaurant.
9:34 pm
>> we heard gunshots, so we ducked onto the noor with all the other diners. >> reporter: at least 14 people were killed at the restaurant. at approximately 9:30 p.m., more shooting. this time at a pizza restaurant. four more people are killed. at about the same time, a second blast goes off at the stadium. president hollande is among those in the crowd. he was quickly evacuated. a chaotic scene follows, as thousands of fans flee the stadium just before 9:40, another shooting at a bar in the 11th district. at least 19 people were killed. minutes later, an explosion at 253 boulevard, near the bataclan
9:35 pm
concert hall. it's then at 9:49, shots are reported at bataclan. an american rock band, eagles of death metal, was on stage when the attacks started. a witness told radio france attackers fired pump rifles into the crowd, shouting "allah akbar." some were able to flee the concert hall. others were trapped inside. the feeling was like a bloody mess. like there was blood everywhere. people were covered with blood. >> reporter: the siege lasted several hours. dozens of people were killed at the bataclan. four attackers also dead, three of them were wearing explosive belts. at 9:53, a third explosion
9:36 pm
outside the stadium here. four people are killed in the area around the stadium. at least one of the attackers believed to be a suicide bomber, and now there is blood and pieces of flesh stuck on the wall here in what is now being called the worst terror attack in europe in ten years. nic robertson, cnn, paris. >> u.s. president barack obama has just touched down in turkey for the g-20 summit. >> security has been ramped up since the paris attacks. >> let's go to michelle kaczynski with the very latest on this. michelle, now that we have this reenergized g-20 summit with this renewed focus not just on terrorism, but isis in syria, is there a rethink coming from the administration on how to deal with isis and syria?
9:37 pm
>> reporter: well, i think doubtless we are going to see the conversation turn to it be almost out that. there are other sessions about climate. the g-20 is supposed to be about economic cooperation, inclusive growth was the big theme for this year. but even before these leaders were heading to this meeting and before the tragedy in paris, they were already talking about -- so that ground work -- [ audio difficulties ] >> apologies. we are clearly having some connectivity issues with michelle there in turkey. we'll work to reestablish contact and get her back for some insight into this g-20 summit. >> michelle was making a good important. normally the g-20 is about the
9:38 pm
economy. terrorism and security not really their thing, but an indication how pressing these issues are right now. it's now top of the agenda. it will be interesting to see, because there does seem to be this push for some kind of stepped up military intervention. michelle, you were explaining how the g-20 is often more to do with economic issues rather than security and terrorism like we have at the moment. >> reporter: -- this summit for this year -- [ audio difficulties ] one of the items put on the agenda was syria and isis. so that was already going to be the subject of the dinner tonight. so that is the first time a more political issue was formally placed on the agenda. so people were thinking that's interesting. there's going to be a renewed focus on how the coalition and
9:39 pm
other countries can look at the isis problem. but obviously now that this has happened in paris, you can only imagine the intensity of those discussions and we'll -- what is going to be the resolution, if there is one, coming out of this meeting of nations, and what is that going to be? is there going to be a change in strategy or intensification of what's already being done as has been talked about for a couple of weeks. >> michelle, thank you. michelle kaczynski there. 7:38 on a sunday morning in turkey. thank you. >> thanks, michelle. well, the battle against isis and friday's terror attacks in france were a central theme at the democratic candidate's debate. >> during the second showdown, hillary clinton said the bulk of the responsibility in fighting the terrorist group does not belong to the united states. bernie sanders disagreed.
9:40 pm
>> it cannot be an american fight. and i think what the president has consistently said, which i agree with, is that we will support those who take the fight to isis. that is why we have troops in iraq that are helping to train and build back up the iraqi military, why we have special operators in syria working with the kurds and arabs, so we can be supportive. but this cannot be an american fight, although american leadership is essential. >> we only have one area of disagreement. she said the bulk of the responsibility is not ours. in fact, i would argue that the disastrous invasion of iraq, something that i strongly opposed, has unraveled the region completely and led to the rise of al qaeda and to isis. >> well, the debate opened with a moment of silence for france and the victims of the attacks.
9:41 pm
a u.s. air strike takes out a top isis leader in libya. >> also ahead, the pope condemns the paris terror attacks. he said it's part of a new piecemeal world war. withof my moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis... ordinary objects often seemed... intimidating. doing something simple... meant enduring a lot of pain. if ra is changing your view of everyday things orencia may help. orencia works differently by targeting a source of ra early in the inflammation process. for many, orencia provides long-term relief of ra symptoms. it's helped new ra patients and those not helped enough by other treatments. do not take orencia with another biologic medicine for ra
9:42 pm
due to an increased risk of serious infection. serious side effects can occur including fatal infections. cases of lymphoma and lung cancer have been reported. tell your doctor if you're prone to or have any infection like an open sore, the flu, or a history of copd, a chronic lung disease. orencia may worsen your copd. if you're not getting the relief you need... ask your doctor about orencia. orencia. see your ra in a different way.
9:43 pm
digestive core.r so choose ultimate flora by renewlife. it has 30 billion probiotic cultures. feel lighter and more energized. ultimate flora. more power to your gut.
9:44 pm
welcome back to our special coverage of the paris terrorist attacks. one suicide has been identified from friday's assault. authorities say they made a number of arrests after kuking raids in connection with the attack. >> officials say at least seven attackers working in three teams targeted six locations across paris friday night. 129 people were killed and 352 others were wounded in the shootings, as well as the bombings. >> the pope has condemned the attacks. >> he called it part of a new world war being waged and he finds the violence hard to understand. here's our vatican correspondent. attacks part of a piecemeal
9:45 pm
third world war. this is a phrase he's used in the past when he describes the numerous conflicts that we see throughout the world today. but unlike world wars in the past, they are without clearly defined parameters of one country declaring and waging war. so the pope says we have the sense of living through a third world war with all of these conflicts that are happening today and he included the paris terrorist attacks among them. his comments were made in a telephone interview early saturday morning. the pope also said that there was no religious or human justification for the attacks in paris. he said this is inhuman. he also expressed his closeness to the french people, to the family of the victims and said he was praying for them. after the attacks on friday evening, the vatican released a
9:46 pm
statement which they condemned in the most radical way these attacks. they also said -- >> okay. we have a few problems there with delia's report from the vatican. the pentagon says a u.s. air strike has killed a top isis leader in libya. the iraqi national was a long-time operative for al qaeda. >> it's believed he carried out the gruesome decapitation of p coptic christians. joining us now is colonel rick francona. always good to have you with us. let's pick up on this situation in libya and the killing of this isis leader. give us some perspective on the significance of this. of course they're saying it will degrade isis' capabilities, but will it? >> yeah, it will.
9:47 pm
isis' presence in libya is relatively new, and they're just starting to expand operations there. this demonstrates the united states has opinion able to develop a good intelligence on the ground there, and was able to strike at the leadership. so i think this is a positive step at a time when we're seeing isis have successes outside of its normal area in syria and iraq. >> the french president, if he's true to his word and takes the fight to isis in syria and iraq, doesn't that run the risk of inviting more attacks on france like the ones we saw friday night? >> well, i think it's important that we look at the root cause and the root issue here, and that's isis and the islamic state, which is head quartered in iraq and syria.
9:48 pm
if i understood the president correctly, he'll be stepping up his attacks against that. i think that's a good thing because if we can take the fight to isis, they may not be able to conduct these overseas operations. i think that's important. so we'll see what happens with the president. i hope he does, in the framework of the u.s. coalition. what we don't need is another actor on the stage without coordinating, like we had with the russians for some time. so i think you'll see increased french participation in the coalition. which would be welcomed. >> colonel francona, we appreciate the analysis. a few technical problems with our connection, but we will leave it here and get you back next hour. thanks for the insight. countries are decorating landmarks to show their solidarity with paris and world leaders are speaking out, as well. we'll tell you what they've been
9:49 pm
saying. plus, an anonymous pianist gives parisians a glimmer of hope with a song from the past. you can't breathed. through your nose. suddenly, you're a mouthbreather. well, just put on a breathe right strip which instantly opens your nose up to 38% more than cold medicine alone. shut your mouth and say goodnight mouthbreathers. breathe right ♪ just look at those two. happy. in love. and saving so much money on their car insurance by switching to geico... well, just look at this setting. do you have the ring? oh, helzberg diamonds. another beautiful setting. i'm not crying. i've just got a bit of sand in my eyes, that's all. geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance.
9:50 pm
9:51 pm
hello, everyone. the heart of the city is still beating with life, because of people like these. hundreds lined up outside a blood bank saturday. >> more than 300 people were
9:52 pm
wounded in this attack. there's been a shortage of blood. many hospitals have been stretched to the limit. so as you can see right now, many have turned up to donate blood. and we should note that more than 90 people remain in a critical condition. and more parisians united to do what they can, but the attacks have stunned the city leaving a somber mood. >> heartache permeates one of the most beautiful cities in the world. >> reporter: in sunnier times, millions come here looking for it, but these are not sunnier times. these days, they have another expression that fits. it means both nausea and heartache. to be sure, there are still plenty of people posing for selfies along the sand and stealing a kiss in front of the eiffel tower. but there are also the police
9:53 pm
stops. in fact, all the chris markets in town were just opened in early november and have been closed down. the terrorists have managed to steal a little bit of joy out of christmas. horses have taken their place here. here and there, restaurants remain open and you can still hear a laugh or two. but cinemas are dark and shuttered. flags flow at half staff. the gates are locked at the upscale stores. some commentators have called this the french 9/11, just like they did after the attacks in january at the magazine "charlie hebdo." in sheer numbers, the new york tragedy was clearly much worse than france, but all three show some things in common. they all make people feel vulnerable, just like people do in paris today. they all took away a little innocence.
9:54 pm
when the symbol of paris, the eiffel tower went up, it was called at the time a crazy idea. the tower tonight is closed and dark. no one seems in the mood just now for crazy ideas. jim bittermann, cnn, paris. >> world leaders have been voicing their support for paris. dana has this story. >> but first, a warning. this piece includes video you may find disturbing. >> reporter: in the early hours of a long and awful night, landmarks the world over lit for france. social media filled with symbols of solidarity under the #prayforparis. tears shed for a nation in shock. the u.s. president briefed as the attack was unfolding, expressed outrage and pledged
9:55 pm
his support. >> this is an attack not just on paris and the people of france, but this is an attack on all of humanity and the universal values that we share. >> reporter: russia's president vladamir putin still reeling from the plane crash in egypt which killed so many of his own, sent his condolences in the early hours. and as the true horror of what happened here became clear, europe's leaders coming out one by one, united in sympathy, determined not to let the terrorists win. >> translator: we are crying with you. we will join you in the fight. >> translator: we stand with you, united. >> let's stand up and let's pray. >> reporter: a moment of silence at the g-20 summit in turkey and prayers for families from pope francis.
9:56 pm
>> reporter: for those fleeing syria, a feeling they must defend themselves and their religion in the wake of this attack. >> in syria or america or germany, not allowed to do that. [ inaudible ] it is not our islam. >> reporter: scenes in a land where they may have hoped to find ref judge similar to the carnage they fled. an act of war france's president said, on european soil. >> the world united, standing by france's side. >> yeah. >> thank you for watching cnn
9:57 pm
newsroom live. i'm isha sesay. asks and i'm john vause. we'll be back with another hour of the latest news in our continuing coverage. we will leave you with a ageless song by john lennon and with the message which seems more appropriate now than ever before. ♪ ♪
9:58 pm
[ screaming ] rate suckers! [ bell dinging ] your car insurance goes up because of their bad driving. people try all sorts of ways to get rid of them. [ driver panting ] if you're sick of paying more than your fair share... [ screams ] get snapshot from progressive, and see just how much your good driving could save you. centrum brings us the biggest news... in multivitamin history. a moment when something so familiar... becomes something so...new. introducing new centrum vitamints.
9:59 pm
a multivitamin that contains a full spectrum of essential nutrients... you enjoy like a mint. new centrum vitamints. the coolest way yet... to get your multivitamins. at&t and directv are now one. which means you can watch in the house, in a treehouse, or even in miss pepperpie's house. pause in your pjs and hit play during a pb&j. nice! and enjoy some cartoons instead of listening to dad's car tunes.
10:00 pm
(dad) ♪meet you all the way! get directv at home and 2 wireless lines for under $99 a month. from directv and at&t. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm isha sesay. >> i'm john vause. you're watching special coverage from cnn newsroom live from los angeles. >> a somber day across france and around the world after terrorists tore apart paris in coordinated attacks. authorities in france and belgium have since made a number of arrests and conducted raids. a source says at least one raid near brussels is connected to those attacks. the video we're about to show you is graphic. but it does bring home the sheer terror of the situation outside the bataclan theater friday
10:01 pm
night where the majority of people lost their lives. you can see a woman on the left, hanging from a balcony. you see it highlighted on your screens there. people below her scrambling out of the door as gunman opened fire and take hostages inside. >> she was eventually pulled back into the building by somebody, we don't know who, but she was on that ledge with somebody else just to her right because they were trying to escape the bullets firing inside by at least seven attackers who were strapped with suicide belts and automatic weapons. a french politician has identified one of the bombers. in total 129 people killed and 352 people wounded. the french president has declared three days of mourning.
10:02 pm
let's get more from fred pleitgen. it is the start of another somber day there in the prench capital. >> reporter: that is going to be another reminder just how horrible the events were that transpired here on friday. the mood here in paris is one that is very subdued. you're seeing people laying down flowers, lighting candles, but also of course in the places where these attacks happened. you know, the people who managed to get out of those venues, where the attackers struck, they are, of course, still very much in shock, john. i was able to speak to one of them. here's what he had to say. forensic experts continue investigating the scene at the bataclan theater where the deadliest of the attacks took place. self-dozen people were killed by
10:03 pm
four gunmen here alone. those who survived say they're traumatized. he and several others managed to hide in a small room, frightened the terrorists might find and kill them. >> we didn't see anything, but we couldn't hear very precisely the sounds of the machine guns. >> reporter: the american band eagle of death metal was playing at the venue when the gunmen forced their way in, taking hostages and executing many according to police. french s.w.a.t. teams later raided the building and all attackers were killed. this man says he will never forget the carnage he saw after police freed him and the others. >> it's a bloody mess, like there was blood everywhere. even people alive were covered with blood. >> reporter: concern among those
10:04 pm
who live in the area around the scene of the attack. of course, the people who witnessed the attacks are shocked by what happened here. residents that we have spoken to said they want a strong response from the authorities to make sure the french capital is safe for them to live in. anna recently moved to paris in new york. she says the thought that isis is behind the attack scares her. >> what are they going to do after that? are they going to bomb other cities, like the eiffel tower? what is going to be next? i'm afraid. >> reporter: fear mixed with anger at those who have hit this european capital with a major terror attack for the second time in less than a year. you guys mentioned that the president here has vowed a ruthless response to these attacks. meanwhile, the investigation is ongoing. you already noted that one of the attackers has apparently
10:05 pm
been identified. also, there's been raids that took place in belgium where at least three people were taken into custody. there were three raids in belgium and one of them is directly related to the attacks that happened here in france. of course, one of the ones in custody is apparently a person who remitted a vw polo that was found at the site of that bataclan attack which killed so many people, john and isha. >> fred, we look ahead now to this memorial that will be taking place at the cathedral of notre dame a short time from now, a time for paris to come together and remember those directly impacted by this. >> reporter: yeah, absolutely. and it's something, of course, that will play a very big role here today and something that reflects the mood here for the french capital at this time. if you look at the areas where these attacks happened, you speak to the people and they are
10:06 pm
all shocked and they're absolutely saddened by what happened, that so many people lost their lives and something like this happened in such a short time span after the attacks of "charlie hebdo" that happened earlier this year. so i wouldn't say there's fear, but there's a lot of concern, sadness and a lot of anger among many parisians here. but there is also a lot of defiance with people saying they are not going to allow this to impact their lives. they are going to carry on and we see that in scenes in paris during the day. however, we also have to take note of the fact that there is a major presence of security forces here on the ground as the authorities are trying to display that they have the situation under control. >> fred, thank you. fred pleitgen live this hour in paris. the fbi sending reinforcements to its paris bureau. joining us now is steve moore, retired special agent for the fbi. so steve, let's just -- exactly
10:07 pm
what will these agents bring to the investigation that the french can't do? >> well, the french can do just about everything that we can do. what they are bringing is the knowledge of what our cells have done historically. and they can compare'9" to what the flench cerench cells have d. they can also help in deconstructing the lives of these people. they can go back through his financial records, his phone calls, travel records and find everybody he's spoken to, whether in the united states, whether it's in germany. and they can go back, as i said before, you're not going to make tatp in your living room. because it's got such a huge instability, it has such strong fumes, that people could be kid or you could be discovered. so somewhere out there, people will know that there were fumes
10:08 pm
from something that was disturbing. they're going to be searching for things like that. >> and the tatp was the type of explosive found in the explosives vest that. is a key signature the fbi will be looking at. what are the other key elements to focus on? >> they'll be looking at the tactics that were used. whether these people went in and had one person firing while another one was reloading. whether they fired first, then detonated their belts. it's going to be how they're trained. and the fbi might be able to say that is part of the training that we have seen given in this training camp in yemen or this training catch in afghanistan. this is part of that type of training. so it might give the french an idea of a ballpark where they can start looking.
10:09 pm
but again, you're going to find that these are homegrown terrorists, most of them. >> with that in mind, was this ordered by isis in raqqa or was it simply inspired by isis? out of those two, which is more terrifying, the fact that they were inspired and did it by themselves or they received direct help from the head office in syria? >> the new world is, leaderless resistance. the lone wolf attacks. what the people in raqqa do is say, these are our enemies. this is what should happen to them. and if you were a loyal muslim, you will do these things. people who have not even been trained are going to be out there saying, i need to go and do this. so yes, that is a very terrifying thing. and it keeps isis from having to
10:10 pm
manage 40 or 50 different attacks around the world. what should concern us is, there are people like that in every western country. >> your specialty was al qaeda. al qaeda had a chain of command which was disrupted. >> yes. >> isis doesn't really have the same setup. do you now have to go back and rethink the whole counterterrorism playbook? >> you have to learn their mode of operation, and you have to attack their mode of operation. you can't find the last war. you learn what tactics they are using, and you interdict them ruthlessly. >> that being said, the counterterrorism play pobook ise thing. about their anti-radicalization program, how does that need to change? >> that is more political than it is investigational. i think part of the plan is for
10:11 pm
law enforcement and everybody involved to make a strict differentiation about who we are after. we are not after islam. we are not after muslims. muslims by and large are on our side in this kind of situation. but the radical muslims we have to excise like a cancer, and without killing the entire body. >> from a practical point of view, the french -- it's obvious the french are having trouble tracking every radical jihadist. is that job being made a lot harder now because the french have cut off all association and all cooperation with the assad regime in syria? because there used to be a lot of cooperation between these two bodies before, now they're not talking to each other. has that made the job harder? >> it is always hard when you lose a partner. it's always harder when you lose
10:12 pm
a partner, regardless who it is. and there's also problems when you, as we have done lately, kill some of the leaders of isis. then that gives you another problem, who is stepping in to their shoes? because somebody will. and you begin having to start over in learning tactics again. >> okay. steve, good sharing with you. appreciate you being with us. s despite the glad shed, many parisians have been hitting the streets. >> despite law enforcement saying please stay indoors. but a few of them did speak to ben wedeman and had a simple message for the terrorists and the world. >> reporter: in times like these, it's far better to light a candle than curse the darkness. darkness fell on paris friday evening. but the lights haven't gone out. with hundreds flock here with a simple message. >> we are not afraid. don't stay at home. be out, be outside in the air.
10:13 pm
say to the world, we are not afraid. >> reporter: the signs say it all. resistance, not afraid. >> we are in shock, but we're not scared. this is not how we're going to give up on our values. today, more than ever, we will stand up against, as painful as it is, in a day such as this one, again, that those words have meaning for all of us as a community. and again, this is something we have to do together. >> reporter: the posters on the monument from last january's attack fading. that pain fading with it now revived. after the attacks, the police advised people to stay at home and here at this square, through a loud speaker, the police have been advising people to leave
10:14 pm
this square, to leave the area. but they're just not leaving. but the attacks bring into sharp focus a jarring truth says this paris resident ben cramer. >> we have to realize we're at war. >> reporter: a war against dark forces in the city of light. ben wedeman, cnn, paris. >> we have more now on how the muslim communities in france are reacting to these attacks. >> we're joined from paris. thank you so much for joining us. what is the feeling right now in the muslim community after these events of friday evening? >> the reaction, we still don't know who these people were. right now for the muslim community, we are -- some of us lost relatives and we keep receiving news of hate speech
10:15 pm
being spread throughout social media. regardless of that, we are still receiving a huge amount of solidarity from our fellow countrymen. so the muslim community still belongs to this country and we will for a long time. but we are still mixing the muslim community and somehow affiliating with the terrorists. we are being asked to choose our camp. our camp is a french one, make no mistake about it. >> yasser, why it that no one in the muslim community in france knew what these guys were up to? it was a pretty big plan and someone would have had to have something, probably in the muslim community, but no one said anything? >> sir, the muslim community has nothing to do with these guys. nothing. we cannot justify ourselves for
10:16 pm
the actions of someone who just claims to be muslim. the secret service knew about these guys and just like the january attacks, it turned out they were all on a blacklist on a desk. so right now we can't take responsibility for anything. right now -- >> why not? what is the responsibility within -- >> the french nation -- >> sorry to interrupt, yasser -- [ overlapping speakers ] >> -- when it comes to people who are training and preparing to carry out mass murder? >> no, no, no, no. they were not from our ranks. what these terrorists are blaming our country for is its failed foreign policy. but they will use people with social insecurity and being cast
10:17 pm
aside, so we cannot accept the idea that these people are from us. they were not. they are just a byproduct of our societies, exporting their wars abroad and expecting no repercussion back home. >> but yasser, let's talk about the bigger issue, the fact that france does have a large number of muslims that have gone over to join isis and be part of their ranks. why is that? why is that? you may say there's no responsibility for these attacks that took place on friday, but there is that outstanding issue that we must come to terms with. help us understand that. >> okay. france is home to the biggest muslim minority in europe. at the same time, it has the greatest number of laws targeting the muslim community and france has exported more foreign terrorist fighters than any other european country. so the reason is related to foreign policies and failed domestic policies.
10:18 pm
when it comes to the muslim community, everybody knows that radicalization does not take place in mosques, it takes place on the internet or the streets away from organized communities. that's something we keep repeating. so that's why the muslim community, when they say we cannot be held responsible, that's the government's job. when you have criminals running around in the country, you do your job and arrest them and somehow, again, everybody came to agree that those people were known by the police and the secret services. what were they doing in the meantime? and at -- >> yes, but -- >> one more thing. those terrorists targeted everybody. >> given the fact that the finger of blame is pointed at the muslim community, rightly or wrongly, does that not shift the situation where the muslim community and the leaders should step up and take a greater role in looking at the young people and the roads that they're going
10:19 pm
down? you have to accept that responsibility to prevent the bigger backlash that comes your way when these things happen. >> okay, all right, all right. let's speak about our leaders. we have a whole generation of people who are trained in islamic education, and they are put aside and replaced by imams coming from abroad. what they do is they go on the internet to seek answers with very simplistic narratives. at the same time, the muslim community keeps asking the government, stop interfering with our religious affairs, stop blocking us from having our own schools and first and foremost stop with the discriminatory policies. in france, every single report
10:20 pm
says it, our schools in france and our places of work are places of massive discrimination. >> okay. yasser, thank you for being with us. this is a very complicated issue. unfortunately we didn't have enough time to get into it. i'm yet to hear the condemnation from the muslim community on this. >> again, the point he's making is, it's notç our fault. but the fact is, when these things happen, the finger blames is pointed to the muslim community. you've got to take a stand -- >> the word responsibility comes to mind. >> you can't shirk that. france's president says its response will be ruthless. next, we'll show you how governments across europe are ramping up anti-terrorism measures. i don't want to live with
10:21 pm
10:22 pm
the uncertainties of hep c. or wonder... ...whether i should seek treatment. i am ready. because today there's harvoni. a revolutionary treatment for the most common type of chronic hepatitis c. harvoni is proven to cure up to 99% of patients... ...who've had no prior treatment. it's the one and only cure that's... ...one pill, once a day for 12 weeks. certain patients... ...can be cured with just 8 weeks of harvoni. with harvoni, there's no interferon and there are no complex regimens. tell your doctor if you have other liver or kidney problems, or other medical conditions. and about all the medicines you take including herbal supplements. harvoni should not be taken with any medicines containing amiodarone, rifampin, or st. john's wort.
10:23 pm
it also should not be taken with any other medicine that contains sovaldi. side effects may include tiredness and headache. i am ready to put hep c behind me. i am ready to be cured. are you ready? ask your hep c specialist if harvoni is right for you. welcome back, everybody. it is a new day in paris. but the devastation of friday's deadly assault by isis is still widely felt across the country. at least seven attackers targeted six locations across paris friday night, killing 129 people, wounding 352 others.
10:24 pm
>> one terrorist has been identified. belgium authorities made a number of arrests after conducting raids in connection with the attacks. well, the bloodiest scene from that terrible night was a concert hall. at least 89 people were killed there. many of the music fans were held hostage for hours. >> our senior international correspondent ka lisa ward spoke with a father and son and they described how they survived a massacre. >> reporter: we spoke to a father and son who were inside that theater at the time of the attack. john leader, an australian citizen, and his 12-year-old son oscar, toad us they were close to the attackers but managed to live to tell the tale. >> we heard this bang, bang, bang. like everybody else, we thought it was fireworks or part of the show. and then it felt something go past my ear. i didn't know if it was a bullet or what it was.
10:25 pm
and then i realized somebody is going towards the stage. at that point everybody understood. everybody threw themselves on the ground. i stuck my head up from the desk, i saw the two shooters. one was changing his magazine. so he had a whole other magazine in front of him. he had a big vest on. >> what did he look like? >> he looked like a young fellow, nothing in particular at all. >> reporter: did you hear him speak at all? >> i did. i heard him at one point say something about syria. i think you heard it better, oscar. >> he said you need to think about syria, but in french. there wasn't any accent or anything. >> obviously a native french speaker. i could see one of the guys was doing crowd control and the other guy was executing. so there was no chance, there was a terrorist incident here in europe a few months ago, there was no chance of anybody being a hero. these guys were organized. one was covering the crowd, the other was doing the shooting. >> reporter: it must have been one of the worst moments of your life, fearing your son could
10:26 pm
have been hit. >> yeah, i was screaming out his name and thought he couldn't be far away so he should shout at dad or something. >> reporter: have you ever seen a dead body before? >> no, it was my first time and i was -- i was lying just next to one, which really was in a very uncomfortable position at that moment. >> reporter: you must have been very, very frightened. >> yeah. >> as you heard, the attackers spoke without a trace of an accent. french authorities have said that at least one of the attackers was indeed a french national with a criminal record. this really weighs in questions how it's possible french authorities were not more aware of this individual. he was considered to be a
10:27 pm
radical, though he wasn't directly affiliated with any terrorist group. certainly in light of everything that happened with "charlie hebdo," both of those young men had a history of radicalism and had criminal records. these things surely, john and isha, should have been a red flag for the french authorities. >> thank you for that. there was an alarming incident at one of europe's busiest airports highlighting the tensions. >> we have more on that and what governments in europe are doing to prevent terrorists from striking again. >> reporter: brute terror is contagious. just hours after the paris attacks, a terminal in london was closed and cleared. police arrested a 41-year-old frenchman seen acting
10:28 pm
suspiciously. with what appeared to be a firearm. they were treating it all seriously because of the events in paris. >> a horrifying and sickening attack. >> reporter: the british prime minister promised lessons would be learned from paris. >> it is clear that the threat from isil is evolving. last night's attacks suggest a new degree of planning and coordination and a greater ambition for mass casualty attacks. >> reporter: david cameron said british police have been training for this style of terrorism ever since the mumbai attack of 2008, where multiple gunmen massacred 164 people. >> this summer in london, we did a massive exercise for exactly the type of scenario that tragically has happened in paris in the last 24 hours. we're looking at automatic weaponry, parallel events across a major city. >> reporter: these forces are patrolling a french airport. it's also triggered increased
10:29 pm
security measures across western europe. the italian prime minister, along with officials in germany and the netherlands announced they would do more to prevent further attacks. and now there's extra security at large events. leaders of g-20 nations gather in turkey this weekend and france is due to host the next climate change conference in just two weeks. the french government says it will go ahead securely, despite the vulnerabilities so brutally exposed in paris. phil black, cnn, london. still to come here, we will return to france where authorities say friday's bloodshed was the result of careful planning. we'll take a closer look at the coordinated terrorist attacks in paris. and the democratic presidential debates went on as planned in the u.s. on saturday. but the paris attacks radically changed the discussion between
10:30 pm
the candidates. whatever you're doing, plan well and enjoy life... ♪ or, as we say at unitedhealthcare insurance company, go long. how you plan is up to you. take healthcare. make sure you're covered for more than what just medicare pays... consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company... the only medicare supplement plans that carry the aarp name, and the ones that millions of people trust year after year. always have a plan. plan well. enjoy life. go long. to prove to you that aleve is the better choice this is claira. for her she's agreed to give it up. that's today? we'll be with her all day to see how it goes. after the deliveries, i was ok. now the ciabatta is done and the pain is starting again. more pills? seriously? seriously. all these stops to take more pills can be a pain. can i get my aleve back? for my pain, i want my aleve. get all day minor arthritis pain relief with an easy open cap.
10:31 pm
the drought is affecting at pg&e we've definitely put a focus on helping our agricultural customers through the drought. when they do an energy efficiency project and save that money they feel it right in their pocket book. it's exciting to help a customer with an energy efficiency project because not only are they saving energy but they are saving water. we have a lot of projects at pg&e that can help them with that and that's extremely important while we're in a drought. it's a win for the customer and it's a win for california. together, we're building a better california.
10:32 pm
life... is unpredictable. life is deaths. and births. sickness and health. love and heartbreak. and covered california is there for it all. not just to help keep you well. but to make sure the cost of being unwell doesn't ruin this whole life thing. because it's more than just health care. it's life care. there's shock an mourning in paris as the country tries to deal with the worst violence seen there since world war ii.
10:33 pm
>> cnn's pamela brown reports now on how those attacks unfolded. >> reporter: three teams of terrorists armed with kalashnikov rifles launched coordinated attacks at six locations, unleashing chaos across the streets of paris. it starts at 9:20 p.m. a soccer match between france and germany is rocked by a thunderous explosion. french officials say an apparent suicide bomber detonates, killing himself and an innocent bystander. france's president on site is taken away to safety. >> the ground shook and i thought there's something wrong here. >> reporter: five minutes later, the second attack at two paris restaurants. terrorists opened fire, killing at least 15, seriously wounding 10 more. french officials say the killers wore masks and arrived by car. shell casings indicate they fired more than 100 rounds.
10:34 pm
>> we heard huge gunshots and lots of glass coming through the window. so we ducked onto the floor with the other diners. >> reporter: 9:30, a second explosion outside the soccer stadium. thousands of fans flee the scene. the body of a second suicide bomber is found. 9:32, a team of terrorists open fire outside a bar. five people are killed, eight others wounded. 9:36, at least 19 people are shot and killed outside another restaurant. inside where the american band eagles of death were playing, more explosions of gunfire. witnesses say the attackers came in firing and at least one person he heard yelling "allohu akbar." the terrorist hold a living hostage for several hours before police stormed the hall. at least 89 killed.
10:35 pm
four attackers also dead, three wearing explosive belts. >> from the ground floor, a lot of dead bodies and blood and some people had dinner and had to stay for several hours among dead corpses and they went out covered with blood. >> reporter: then 9:53, a third explosion near the soccer stadium. police later find the body of another suicide bomber. a siege of gunfire, explosions and blood shed, leading to the deadliest terror attack in europe in more than a decade. pamela brown, cnn, washington. friday's attacks were the central theme at a presidential debate saturday. >> hillary clinton said the bulk in the responsibility of
10:36 pm
fighting the terror group does not belong to the united states. her democratic rival bernie sanders does not agree. >> it cannot be an american fight. i think what the president has consistently said is that we will support those who take the fight to isis. that is why we have troops in iraq, that are helping to train and build back up the iraqi military, why we have special operators in syria working with the kurds and arabs so we can be supportive. but this cannot be an american fight, although american leadership is essential. >> we only have one area of disagreement with the secretary. she said something like the bulk of the responsibility is not ours. well, in fact, i would argue that the disastrous invasion of iraq, something that i strongly opposed, has unraveled the region completely, and led to the rise of al qaeda and to isis.
10:37 pm
>> the debate began with a moment of silence for france and the victims of the attacks. joining us now is a political commentator and author. thank you so much for joining us. some are calling friday's attacks your nation's 9/11 moment. a country forever changed. how do you see it? >> well, unfortunately, there were a lot of attacks only a few months ago. and then we also said it was 9/11 in france. we are lost for words to describe it. president hollande said this is an act of war, but it was already an act of war in january when radical islamists assassinated france's best cartoonists, journalists, and
10:38 pm
then went on to target french jews. what we witnessed in the streets of paris is another dimension, another level of war. perhaps what we haven't realized is the depth of the hatred and also the logistic ability. you imagine in 40 minutes, nine separate attacks coordinated, planned in the streets of paris. every day or every week, intelligence services in france thwarts attacks. but this one was extraordinary in its ambition. so this is what we're facing now, just another level of horror. >> each attack does seem to be a furlough for the next, which seemsing to bibber and more
10:39 pm
destructive than the one before it. do you think france will take the same road the united states took after 9/11 where it's a choice between civil liberties and national security and the americans chose national security. is france going to go that way? because they started going that way after the "charlie hebdo" attacks. >> well, it's a very delicate balance to strike for democracy. democracy is fragile, because it values freedom of speech and freedom of movement. so of course, you -- the same thing happened in britain, if you look at the debates in parliament. that's something we have to face every day. on the other hand, of course, you can also -- you have to protect your citizens. it's also a question of if there's a war. indeed, i think there's a war against democracy and all the democrats in the world are actually concerned by what's
10:40 pm
happened in the streets of paris. what do we do, do we keep bombing? or do we send troops on the ground? and that's a very big challenge for democracies and for the west. >> the french president talking tough, saying france will be ruthless in its response. but how much faith does the french citizenry have in hollande to keep you all safe? he was already deeply unpopular. his numbers went up post "charlie hebdo." but what is the feeling now about president hollande and his ability to walk this line going forward? >> well, i mean, there are two different things. president hollande not being popular at home mainly has to do with the economy and employment. this is an entirely different
10:41 pm
thing. the nation is always behind its president beyond any partisan bias. so president hollande, in january and in the last two days, has done the work and he's done it well. so i don't think there will be any questions about his leadership now. of course, questions are raised about intelligence gathering and sharing. could we have prevented those attacks and now how do we deal with it? so yes, of course. and now with elections why just a few weeks, it looks as if the extreme right leader will strengthen her electoral hold on france. so those are the questions that france is facing. >> agnes poirier, thank you for joining us and sharing your insight and perspective. much appreciated. thank you.
10:42 pm
american football players at west point, the united states military academy, paid tribute to the victims of the paris terrorist attacks. >> we'll be right back.
10:43 pm
10:44 pm
10:45 pm
here is the latest. a french politician has identified one suicide bomber. belgium authorities say they made a number of arrests after conducting raids in connection with the attacks. >> officials say at least seven attackers targeted six locations on paris friday night. 129 people were killed. 352 others were wounded in the shootings, as well as the explosions. among the dead, a young american woman described as one with great potential. >> nohemi gonzalez was at a restaurant friday night when gun fire erupted. >> reporter: john, isha, here at long beach state university, they're using words to characterize the mood here as tragic, sad, heart broking. nohemi was a 23-year-old design student. her professors describing her as
10:46 pm
a shining star. i asked one of her professors who knew her well about her personality. >> she was a shining star, and she brought joy, happiness, laughter to everybody she worked with, and her students, her classmates, she functioned like a bit of a mentor to the younger students. she was a deep, profound presence in our department and she will be extraordinarily, profoundly missed. >> reporter: and a close family friend describing gonzalez as the apple of her mother's eye. beautiful and should be remembered for her spirit. now, as a design student, she had received some acclaim. she was part of a biomimicry contest in which she designed a snack that included fruits and nuts and was biodegradable and you could put a plant into it when it was done. clearly environmentally conscious. she finished with three colleagues in second place out
10:47 pm
of 71 entries and gonzalez and her team received $3,000 here at long beach state. again, sadness pervades and tomorrow, they will memorialize her in a special afternoon vigil. back to you now, john and isha. >> a life cut short and so many others. >> it's just amazing to think she was over there on a student experience to enjoy a different country. and will come home in a coffin. >> yeah. our thoughts and prayers are with her family and all the others impacted by this. security has been ramped up for the g-20 summit. >> u.s. president barack obama arrived a little more than an hour ago. the french president canceled the meeting, sending the country's finance and foreign ministers. the fbi is sending reinforcements to paris to
10:48 pm
assist in the investigation. joining us for more is steve moore. steve, when you're out there fathering intelligence, how important is it in trying to stop these attacks before they happen in getting information from the community? how valuable is that? a lot of people have said, how would the community know what was going on if the paris intelligence or the french intelligence officials did not? >> the community is the eyes and ears. the fbi, the french authorities, they don't have crystal balls. they're looking for somebody to come in and say i smell a strong odor of peroxide. >> how often would a break from a community be used in stopping some kind of an attack opposed to intelligence gathered by an official? >> i don't think that there has
10:49 pm
been, in my investigations, a single cell uncovered where community involvement hasn't played a major role. >> talk to me about how counterterrorism officials, how they interact with the community in an attempt to get those successful breaks. >> we are looking to provoke a dialogue, and especially with local police who actually speak to these people on a daily and weekly basis. right now the problem is what do we do with the cases we have? they're prioritized and at the end of the day, you have to say, is it worth now accelerating the investigation and taking this group down without knowing what they were planning on doing. or should we -- should we put more surveillance on them? there's so much going on right now. >> and the fine line to walk, right? this is the whole thing, the fine line to walk, engaging in
10:50 pm
the community and feeling as if you are being targeted. >> that is the hard part. you want to speak to the muslim organizations and people at the mosques. knowing at the same time that there are radical mosques out there. doing this all without giving the impression that you are fighting a war against islam is very difficult. but that is the challenge. >> is it possible that this operation was ongoing somewhere in paris or france, and it was so tightly soled that only the people directly involved knew anything about it, or is that just simply beyond the realms of possibility, somebody would have had to have known something is up? >> it is almost impossible, not completely, but almost impossible to do an operation of this size without a large number of people knowing. however, as i've said before, they looked at how we defend it, how the french defend it and
10:51 pm
look for seams in the defense. they did this all without communicating in ways that were being followed. >> steve, thank you for that. we appreciate the clarification and the insight of how these things work. are decorated to show solidarity with paris. world leaders are speaking out on this tragedy, as well. we'll tell you what they said when we come back. plus, how a pianist used a famous strong to comfort mourners in paris. the details are next. you're watching cnn. this holiday season, get ready for mystery. what's in the trunk? nothing. romance. 18 inch alloys. you remembered. family fun. everybody squeeze in. don't block anyone.
10:52 pm
and non-stop action. noooooooo! it's the event you don't want to miss. it's the season of audi sales event. get up to a $2,500 bonus for highly qualified lessees on select audi models.
10:53 pm
10:54 pm
welcome back, everybody. world leaders have been vocal in their support of france after the deadly terror attacks across paris. >> first, a warning, this report contains video you may find disturbing. >> reporter: in the early hours of a long and awful night, landmarks the world over lit for france. social media filled with symbols of solidarity under the hash tags #peaceforparis, #prayforparis. tears shed for a nation in shock. the u.s. president briefed as the attack was unfolding, expressed outrage and pledged
10:55 pm
his support. >> this is an attack not just on paris and the people of france, but this is an attack on all of humanity and the universal values that we share. >> reporter: russia's president vladamir putin still reeling from the plane crash in egypt which killed so many of his own, sent his condolences in the early hours. and as the true horror of what happened here became clear, europe's leaders coming out one by one, united in sympathy, determined not to let the terrorists win. >> translator: we are crying with you. we will join you in the fight against those who did something so unfathomable to you. >> translator: we stand with you, united. >> please stand up and let's pray. >> reporter: a moment of silence at the g-20 summit in turkey and prayers for families from pope
10:56 pm
francis. >> reporter: for those fleeing syria, a feeling they must defend themselves and their religion in the wake of this attack. >> even in paris or syria or america or germany, anywhere, not allowed to do that. god did not say to kill the people. it is not our islam. >> reporter: scenes in a land where they may have hoped to find ref judge similar to the carnage they fled. an act of war france's president said, on european soil. thank you for watching cnn
10:57 pm
newsroom live from los angeles. i'm isha sesay. >> and i'm john vause. we will be back with another hour of news from paris and for more around the world after a short break. you're watching cnn. whatever you're doing, plan well and enjoy life... ♪
10:58 pm
or, as we say at unitedhealthcare insurance company, go long. of course, how you plan is up to you. take healthcare. make sure you're covered for more than what just medicare pays... consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company... the only medicare supplement plans that carry the aarp name, and the ones that millions of people trust year after year. it's about having the coverage you need... plan well. enjoy life. go long. glad i could help you plan for your retirement. alright, kelly and promise me that you'll try that taco place on south street. and we have portfolio planning tools to help you manage your ira. yeah, you're old 401k give me your phone. the rollover consultants give you step-by-step help. no set-up fees. use your potion. sorry, not you. my pleasure. goodnight, tim. for all the confidence you need. who's tim? td ameritrade. you got this.
10:59 pm
the possibility of a flare swas almost always on my mind. thinking about what to avoid, where to go... and how to deal with my uc. to me, that was normal. until i talked to my doctor. she told me that humira helps people like me get uc under control and keep it under control when certain medications haven't worked well enough. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers, including lymphoma, have happened; as have blood, liver, and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure. before treatment, get tested for tb. tell your doctor if you've been to areas where certain fungal infections are common, and if you've had tb, hepatitis b, are prone to infections, or have flu-like symptoms or sores. don't start humira if you have an infection. raise your expectations. ask your gastroenterologist about humira. with humira, control is possible.
11:00 pm
hello, everybody. thanks for being with us. we would like to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm john vause. >> and i'm isha sesay. >> in the next hour, we'll get to the unfolding investigation into the attacks, who was behind them as well as the dozens of victims. but first, the latest from the streets of paris. authorities are working to track down any suspected accomplices. at least 129 people are dead after friday's shootings and explosions. a french politician have
11:01 pm
identified one suspect. >> a course says these one raid near brussels is connected to the paris attacks. earlier, poppy harlow spoke with the paris deputy mayor. >> of course, we are very concerned. the threat is still going on. the risk is very high. and nothing says that this sequence, this terror sequence is over yet. so of course we are very concerned. and all the day and all the evening, we have some information stating that there may be rifle here, explosion there. of course, most of this is false information, but the threat is still very high. and again, we are ready to face anything after what happened yesterday. >> well, we want to show you some graphic video now and bring
11:02 pm
this home for you. you can see what it was like for some of the people trying to escape the assault inside the bataclan theater where the most number of people died. one woman hangs from a ledge of the concert hall. you see her there on the left hand side. someone was able to pull that woman back up, thankfully. >> we low her, people were shot. we don't know if they were killed or wounded. let's get more now from fred pleitgen who is in paris. fred, there is obviously a strong connection to what happened in paris and also in belgium. so there have been a number of arrests there. what else do you know? >> reporter: yeah, really is a fast-moving investigation at this point in time. as we already noted, one of the suicide bombers has been identified by the mayor of a town about an hour to the
11:03 pm
southwest of paris. he was apparently identified by his finger. also one of the things that happened is a syrian passport was found decide one of the attackers. that's been traced to having been registered in greece, just a little over a month ago. it's unclear, however, whether or not the person that this passport was found on was the actual person whose identity that was or whether this passport was real or not. belgium seems for a very important link in the investigation. there were major raids in belgium, three of them last night. at least one of those raids was directly related to the attacks that happened in paris. three people were taken into custody. and there seems to be a relation between a rental car that was found at one of the sites, at the bataclan theater, a black vw polo registered in belgium and
11:04 pm
driven over here to paris. the person who rented that car has since been apprehended by the authorities. he is now in detention and being questioned. the raids that happened in belgium, again, at least one of them was directly related to what happened here in paris on friday night. all of this, of course, as the authorities are trying to piece together what sort of cell this might have been, whether or not they had sort of ties to others, how big an operation all of this was, or whether or not it might have been just those seven people who were killed who carried out these horrible attacks, john. >> fred, isha here. as the investigation goes on, this is a nation in mourning, and i understand that there will be a memorial at the cathedral of notre dame a short time from now. >> reporter: it's in the
11:05 pm
afternoon hours of today. it's about eight hours away at 6:30 p.m. local time, ten hours away. that is going to happen. certainly of course, this is indeed a nation of mourning. there's been three days of mourning officially implemented by the french government. and you can really feel it here on the streets of paris as well. i'm standing here where we've been seeing people lighting up candles. the same thing is happening at the various sites where these attacks happened, especially at the bataclan theater where at several different entry points, that site is cordoned off, widely cordoned off. on the fringes of that, there are many people paying 245their respects as well. there is also a lot of anger within many people for these attacks that have happened, for the way many people believe that the french way of life has been
11:06 pm
attacked and people are vowing not to allow that way of life to be influenced by terror attacks. >> fred, the way of life is already being influenced with a huge security presence in place. describe some of those security measures the residents of paris will have to deal with for quite a few days to come. >> reporter: the way of life certainly has been influenced in a major way by what's happened and the security measures is something you see here in plain sight wherever you go. there's a big increase in the amount of security personnel that we see, especially of police we're seeing here a lot of police officers walk around. many of them carrying long rifles rather than just the pistols or the machine pistols they would normally carry. there is also a lot more in the
11:07 pm
way of soldiers patrolling the streets. we understand from the french authorities that by tuesday they want an additional 3,000 soldiers to be mobilized. and also to help keep the peace and order here on the streets, not just of paris but other places, as well. you look at places that are deemed to be vulnerable, like the subway system. for instance, airports and public places like this one, tourist attractions, some of which have been shut down together. the eiffel tower out of security concerns and last night there was a bit of a scare, but it was a false alarm. but it shows how on edge authorities are here. >> fred, thank you, live in paris at this hour. as the investigation continues, officials are trying to track down the identities of the attackers known to have been involved. as fred pleitgen mentioned, one
11:08 pm
suicide bomber has been identified. a source close to the investigation says officials have the passports of two attackers. isis has claimed responsibility for the deadly attacks which the french president has called an act of war. our counterterrorism analyst says there's still so much work left to do. >> step one of the investigation we've seen in the past 24 hours, that is chaos. then the initial identification of the attackers. we have one identification. as soon as you get that name, that's going to mean an e-mail, a cell phone number. the amount of information is going to blow up, so you can start picking up other people. fathers, brothers, co-conspirators. you don't know who those other people are yet. but you as a counterterrorism investigator are going to say, we want to talk to anybody who has touched this individual in the recent past to find out anything they know. so we'll find in the coming days a lot of people are picked up and questioned. believe me, in the next week, a
11:09 pm
lot of those people will be released, because right now we're in stage two where the information is coming in so rapidly, you can't figure out what's fact and fiction yet. >> phil mudd speaking earlier. the pope has also spoken out, calling the attacks part of a piecemeal third world war. and there have been arrests in france and belgium. >> around the word, many people are showing their solidarity with france. major cities across the united states, canada and throughout europe changed lights on historic buildings to represent the colors of france. >> many in paris are visiting makeshift memorials at the scenes of the attacks. atika scubert shock to some of the mourners about the violence. >> reporter: the sound of paris has been reduced to a murmur of mourning.
11:10 pm
as parisians come to this tiny corner of the city to see the aftermath. alexandra was supposed to meet her friends here last night. >> maybe i catch you later, guys. and i never catch them. she died. she was my friend. and i didn't say to my family -- i said to my family, i go there and i didn't say i change my plans, so my mom came to the hospital to see if she find me body. >> reporter: they stair at the bullet holes and look in disbelief at the sidewalks covered in sawdust and sand to absorb the blood. they come with their dogs and bicycles. they hold their children. the police allow people to linger close to the crime scene to share an intimate grief. you can still see here the measuring tape used by the forensic team to measure the bullet holes here. this is just how raw the emotion is.
11:11 pm
people have been coming here throughout the day, dazed and shocked, trying to understand why a place like this would become the target of a terror attack. mother and daughter vivian and caroline live around the corner. do you think this will change paris? we're scared, she says. i'm worried for my neighbors and this will change our daily lives, but we are stronger than this, she says. noah nieman from california was enjoying a glass of wipe when he heard shots ring out. >> we heard lots of gunshots, and i stood up to sort of peek around the sidewalk and i saw terrified people running at me. >> reporter: in this neighborhood, everyone is a local. alexandra says they struck at the city's warm heart. >> i just fell down on the street.
11:12 pm
they didn't touch -- they touch my heart. it's like missing something. >> reporter: the heart of a city that still beats with life, even as it grieves for its dead. atika scubert, cnn, paris. >> we are starting to get a few details about the identities and the lives of some of the victims. >> we take a moment now to honor a few of them. so many lives cut short, each with a different story. lynda kinkade reports. >> reporter: vibrant and energetic, that's how nohemi was described. the 23-year-old was studying abroad in paris. she was meant to return home after one semester. >> she had a very joyous personality.
11:13 pm
she was extremely lively. extremely energetic. >> reporter: british citizen nick alexander worked with the band eagles of death metal, which was playing at the bataclan theater. according to his family, he died doing his job he loved. they said nick was not just our brother, son and uncle, he was everyone's best friend. generous, funny, and fiercely loyal. his girlfriend tweeted, sleep tight, my sweet prince. three victims were from chile, including lewis filipe, a musician who lived in paris for eight years. vlen tine ribet, a lawyer, also lost his life. the paris bar tweeted, our heartfelt thoughts to the relatives to a talented young lawyer, murdered. marie was one of three known universal employees who died in the attacks.
11:14 pm
president of universal music france tweeted universal music family is in mourning. thomas, maria, manu, our thoughts are with their families. rest in peace. a french soccer player was on the field friday night when terror struck there and hit very close to home. his cousin was there to support him and lost her life. on his facebook page, he wrote that she was a guide and support, a big sister. and he urged people to remain respectful saying it's important for all of us who are representatives of our country and its diversity to speak and to remain united against a horror that has no color nor religion. lynda kinkade, cnn. >> u.s. law enforcement officials tell cnn the fbi is running through an initial batch of names which could turn out to be the paris attackers or nip associated with them. though they stress it is still
11:15 pm
early in the investigation. >> european governments are looking how to beef up anti-terrorism measures. >> reporter: proof terror is contagious. >> a horrifying and sickening attack. it is clear that the threat from isel isil is evolving.
11:16 pm
>> this summer in london, we did a massive exercise for the type of scenario that tragically has happened in paris in the last 24 hours. we were looking at automatic weaponry, parallel events across a major city. >> reporter: these forces are patrolling a french airport. the terror has also triggered increased security measures in western europe. the italian prime minister, along with officials in germany and the netherlands, announced they would do even more to try to prevent further attacks. and now there's extra attention on security at large, imminent international events. leaders of g-20 nations gather in turkey this weekend. and france is due to host the next big climate change
11:17 pm
conference in just two weeks. the french government says it will go ahead securely, despite the vulnerabilities so brutally exposed in paris. phil black, cnn, london. >> we have seen world leaders starting to arrive at that g-20 summit. and the paris attacks high on the agenda. a live report from turkey when we come back. ♪ ♪ (under loud music) this is the place. ♪ ♪ their beard salve is made from ♪ ♪ sustainable tea tree oil and kale... you, my friend, recognize when a trend has reached critical mass. yes, when others focus on one thing, you see what's coming next. you see opportunity. that's what a type e* does. and so it begins. with e*trade's investing insights center, you can spot trends before they become trendy. e*trade.
11:18 pm
opportunity is everywhere.
11:19 pm
11:20 pm
welcome back, everybody. world leaders have been vocal of their support of paris after the terror attacks across the city. >> first, a warning, the following piece contains video you may find disturbing. >> reporter: in the early hours of a long and awful night, landmarks the world over lit for france. landmarks the world over lit for france. social media filled with symbols of solidarity under the #prayforparis. tears shed for a nation in shock. the u.s. president briefed as the attack was unfolding, expressed outrage and pledged his support. >> this is an attack not just on paris and the people of france, but this is an attack on all of humanity and the universal values that we share. >> reporter: russia's president vladamir putin still reeling
11:21 pm
from the plane crash in egypt which killed so many of his own, sent his condolences in the early hours. and as the true horror of what happened here became clear, europe's leaders coming out one by one, united in sympathy, determined not to let the terrorists win. >> translator: we are crying with you. we will join you in the fight against those who did something so unfathomable to you. >> translator: we stand with you, united. >> please stand up and let's pray. >> reporter: a moment of silence at the g-20 summit in turkey and prayers for families from pope francis.
11:22 pm
>> reporter: for those fleeing syria, a painful association with the terror they left whi behind, and a feeling they must defend themselves and their religion in the wake of this attack. >> even in paris or syria or america or germany, anywhere, not allowed to do that. god did not say to islam to kill the people. it is not our islam. >> reporter: scenes in a land where they may have hoped to find refuge similar to the carnage they fled. an act of war france's president said, on european soil. >> the pair terrorist acts will dominate at the g-20 summit this weekend. security has been ramped up in the wake of the violence that rocked paris friday night. >> the french president will not attend the meeting. he's sending the country's
11:23 pm
finance and foreign ministers in his place. let's go to michelle kaczynski with the latest on this summit. michelle, they've really changed the agenda here away from the economic issues to security and terrorism. >> reporter: even before the paris attacks, they had in an unprecedented move made the dinner about syria and isis. so already that was a topic. this is an opportunity to get all of these leaders in one place to really focus on the problem, to look at what's working and not working. but you can imagine how intense that discussion is going to be right now. you can just see how this is going to overshadow this meeting. this is the first time ever that a political issue instead of an economic one is the subject on the formal agenda for this dinner tonight. also, what everyone is watching. if you hear what president obama is going to say about this in
11:24 pm
this setting, when he has an opportunity to talk to others in the coalition against isis, we heard him give that somewhat emotional address before he left for turkey saying that this is an attack on all of humanity and universal values. the white house didn't say much on the flight over here. sometimes they have a meeting. they're going to be facing a lot of questions about strategy here. in fact, even before president obama left for turkey, he was taking a lot of heat frankly about the statement he made that isis is contained. since then, the white house has clarified that the president meant only on the battlefield in syria and iraq. in terms of isis' ability to take more land. but there are plenty of questions about that. in fact, there was a democratic debate among the candidates for 201 for president last night. and former secretary of state hillary clinton said, you know, isis can't be contained. they must be destroyed. so you're seeing some strong
11:25 pm
statements coming off of that statement that the president himself gave earlier. so we expect to hear from president obama briefly after he meets one on one with the turkish president and then we may not be able to question him or the white house for another day, but we're hoping that there's a briefing at some point today. so some of those questions can be asked and there are lots of tough questions. >> we hope you get those questions to the president. michelle kaczynski on the line. she mentioned that isis did come up in that presidential debate. hillary clinton said the bulk of the responsibility in dealing with isis does not belong to the united states, but her rival bernie sanders disagreed. >> it cannot be an american fight. and i think what the president has consistently said, which i agree with, is that we will support those who take the fight to isis.
11:26 pm
that is why we have troops in iraq that are helping to train and build back up the iraqi military, why we have special operators in syria working with the kurds and arabs, so we can be supportive. but this cannot be an american fight, though american leadership is essential. >> i think she said something like the bulk of the responsibility is not ours. in fact, i would argue that the disastrous invasion of iraq, something that i strongly opposed, has unraveled the region completely. and led to the rise of al qaeda and to isis. >> well, the debate opened with a moment of silence for france and the victims of the attacks. coming up, a country racked with sorrow but resolve to move forwa forward. ahead, what happens next for the people of france. actually be exactly what i am.
11:27 pm
i got to hang a picture. it may not seem like much, but to that resident it was the best thing in the world. it's amazing to me because it takes me seconds. but yet, when i go into the apartment, i'm there for half an hour. it is not just hanging a picture, it is conversing, it is being a friend. there aren't old people there. there are actually young people with old clothing on. ♪ just look at those two. happy. in love. and saving so much money on their car insurance by switching to geico... well, just look at this setting. do you have the ring? oh, helzberg diamonds.
11:28 pm
another beautiful setting. i'm not crying. i've just got a bit of sand in my eyes, that's all. geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance.
11:29 pm
hello, everybody. welcome back to our continuing live coverage of the deadly
11:30 pm
terror attacks in paris, france. the country is in mourning after terrorists carried out the worst violence the country has seen since world war ii. here's what we know so far. >> officials say at least seven attackers working in three teams targeted six locations across paris on friday night. 129 people were killed and 352 others were wounded. isis has claimed responsibility. a french politician has identified one of the attackers. the french president is vowing a ruthless response to what we called an act of war and declared three days of mourning. belgium authorities made a number of arrests after conducting raids after the attacks. the coordinated effort targeted busy areas across paris, including a concert hall, several restaurants and a football stadium. >> nic robertson walks us through the timeline of what happened. >> reporter: the first attack came at 9:20 p.m. local time.
11:31 pm
an explosion at the stadium during a soccer friendly between the french and german teams. the matontinues. five minute later, gunmen open fire at a cambodian restaurant. >> we heard gunshots, so we ducked onto the noor with all the other diners. >> reporter: at least 14 people were killed at the restaurant. at approximately 9:30 p.m., more shooting. this time at a pizza restaurant. four more people are killed. at about the same time, a second blast goes off at the stadium. president hollande is among those in the crowd. he was quickly evacuated. a chaotic scene follows, as usdsf fans flee the
11:32 pm
stadium jusfore 90, another shooting at a bar in the 11th district. at least 19 people weild. minutes later, an explosion at 253 boulevard, near the bataclan concert hall. it's then at 9:49, shots are reported at bataclan. an american rock band, eagles of death metal, was on stage when the attacks started. a witness told radio france attackers fired pump rifles into the crowd, shouting "allah akbar." some were able to flee the concert hall. others were trapped inside. >> the feeling was like a bloody mess. like there was blood everywhere.
11:33 pm
people alive were covered with blood. >> reporter: the siege lasted several hours before police stormed the building in a rescue operation. dozens of people were killed at the bataclan. four attackers also dead, three of them were wearing explosive belts. at 9:53, a third explosion outside the stadium here. four people are killed in the area around the stadium. at least one of the attackers believed to be a suicide bomber, and now there is blood and pieces of flesh stuck on the wall here in what is now being called the worst terror attack in europe in ten years. nic robertson, cnn, paris. >> paris has a long recovery ahead and the french president has encouraged the entire country to stand united. >> joining us now is the deputy editorial director at paris news
11:34 pm
magazine. part of that long recovery ahead will be ensuring that there is not a backlash against the muslim community. what needs to be done to ensure that does not happen? >> well, you know, there is a certain resilience in the parisian people. we've had the "charlie hebdo" terror attack at the beginning of this year, and a number of other smaller attacks. and i think people are not going to react violently. it's not their way of doing. of course, we have -- there's tension between communities. there have been for quite some time. but i think people are able to determine who are the hard liners and the extremist. we have a huge muslim community and we've gotten used to living with them and a lot of them condemn totally what happened.
11:35 pm
>> indeed. but how will france, how will it change as a result of these attacks in your view? >> it's a little hard to tell right now. you know, paris is still in mourning. last night, i was driving in the downtown paris. i've never seen anything like that. the roads were all quiet. there were no traffic jams on a saturday night. it's really surprising to see things like this. so people are still very much shaken. they don't know, you know, they need reassurance at the moment. to know what will be the future, the unity of the government, the country's unity that is praised by our president, whether this is going to last for a long time, i don't know. it's still a little early to
11:36 pm
know what's going to happen. >> you say the people of paris and france need this reassurance. is that what you're getting right now from the french president, does he have the -- i guess the leadership and the popularity and i guess the following and the ability to bring this country together? >> well, that's one of the key problems with hollande. his ratings have been very, very low for a long time. you know, in some occasion, people stand and they're game changers. i don't know if this will be happening to hollande at this time. he's proved he was a good commander in chief on a number of occasions, including conducting war. now as a uniter, it's debatable. we don't know if he will be able
11:37 pm
to gather people. he's certainly going to meet today with all the leaders, which is certainly going to capitalize on what happened. and we can expect one of the change will be the next election that can coming up in three weeks. >> we already see her trying to exploit this moment. what has been the response to friday's events from these far-right politicians? >> she has said that france and the french people were no longer secure. yesterday, i was talking to a number of people going to market place, you know, on saturday, and there's definitely a feeling
11:38 pm
of anger for a number of french people, because we've known terror attacks at the beginning of this year in january. january 7 was a moment of unity. january 11, there was this huge crowd pouring in the streets of paris. and gathering millions of people around the country. and people think now what had been done to prevent such attacks, and they see what they saw on november 13 is a much wider and much more spectacular attack occurring in the heart of paris once again. so it's hard for them to say what -- not to think what has the government been doing, you know, it was predictable, which is amazing. we've been hearing especially from our intel people that such a thing could happen. the scenario is already written. they said they will come in
11:39 pm
paris, they will be suicide bombers and this happened. so it's really an eerie feeling to see such a thing can happen twice in the same year and definitely for the politicians, there is -- from the people, there is a definite feeling of anger and questions of what have you done, are you able to secure the country. so of course they're going to play on that and win more votes in the next election. that's obvious and something i can see other than people realizing that they have to stand united. but it's a really crucial moment for france at the moment. >> it really is. thank you for being with us. the deputy editorial director for paris french news magazine. we'll take a short break.
11:40 pm
when we come back, a father and his joining son describe how they survived the massacre in paris. we'll tell you what they saw and heard when we come back. i don't want to live with the uncertainties of hep c. or wonder... ...whether i should seek treatment. i am ready. because today there's harvoni. a revolutionary treatment for the most common type of chronic hepatitis c. harvoni is proven to cure up to 99% of patients... ...who've had no prior treatment. it's the one and only cure that's... ...one pill, once a day for 12 weeks. certain patients... ...can be cured with just 8 weeks of harvoni. with harvoni, there's no interferon and there are no complex regimens. tell your doctor if you have other liver or kidney problems, or other medical conditions. and about all the medicines you take including herbal supplements. harvoni should not be taken with any medicines
11:41 pm
containing amiodarone, rifampin, or st. john's wort. it also should not be taken with any other medicine that contains sovaldi. side effects may include tiredness and headache. i am ready to put hep c behind me. i am ready to be cured. are you ready? ask your hep c specialist if harvoni is right for you.
11:42 pm
welcome back, everybody.
11:43 pm
you're watching our special coverage of the paris terror attacks. belgium authorities say they made a number of arrests after conducting raids. at least one of which is directly connected to the paris attacks. a french politician has identified one suicide bomber. >> officials say at least seven attackers targeted six locations across paris friday night. 129 people were killed and 352 wounded in shootings and explosions. the bloodiest scene from that terrible night was a concert hall where 89 people. >> our correspondent spoke with a father and son who were there. >> we heard this bang, bang, bang. like everybody else, we thought it was fireworks or part of the show. and then i felt something go past my ear. i didn't know if it was a bullet or what it was. and then i realized somebody is
11:44 pm
going towards the stage. at that point everybody understood. everybody threw themselves on the ground. i stuck my head up from the desk, i saw the two shooters. one was changing his magazine. so he had a whole other magazine in front of him. he had a big vest on. >> reporter: what did he look like? >> he looked like a young fellow, nothing in particular at all. >> reporter: did you hear him speak at all? >> i did. i heard him at one point say something about syria. i think you heard it better, oscar. >> he said you need to think about syria, but in french. there wasn't any accent or anything. >> obviously a native french speaker. i could see one of the guys was doing crowd control and the other guy was executing. so there was no chance, there was a terrorist incident here in europe a few months ago, there was no chance of anybody being a hero. these guys were organized. one was covering the crowd, the other was doing the shooting. >> reporter: it must have been one of the worst moments of your
11:45 pm
life, fearing your son could have been hit. >> yeah, i was screaming out his name and thought he couldn't be far away so he should shout at dad or something. >> reporter: have you ever seen a dead body before? >> no, it was my first time and i was -- i was lying just next to one, which really was in a very uncomfortable position at that moment. >> reporter: you must have been very, very frightened. >> yeah. >> well, there's still a good deal of shock in paris, as there was simply chaos around so many people on friday night. let's talk about this more with oscar lopez. >> he's a spocorrespondent with "newsweek." thank you for joining us. what did you see?
11:46 pm
>> i got outside the concert hall at approximately 11:00 p.m. and the situation was just incredibly tense. the police were yelling at the media, trying to get even out of the way. there was just people in restaurants, shut down. the lights were off. people were just holding each other, trying to understand what was going on. no one could really leave. none of the transport was moving. it was just an incredibly intense situation. >> oscar, we've had a day and a half to move beyond the events of friday night. has this sunk in yet? a processing what happened, have you made any sense of it? >> yeah, it's definitely starting with a sense of shock. i feel like the whole city was in shock, trying to comprehend what was happening. as the day progressed yesterday, there was definitely that sense
11:47 pm
of shock moved into grief and seeing people outside the concert hall where i had been, you know, 18 hours before, and what had been a place of complete fear and chaos and tension was now just a place of grief. people from all different countries, all across the city coming to lay flowers to light a candle, trying to process what had happened just 24 hours before. >> oscar, amongst the many questions people are asking is how this will affect france going forward, what the long-term impact will be. this was an attack on french way of life, on things people love to do on a friday night. i mean, how do you see it in terms of the long-term impact of all of this? >> it's difficult to say. i think it will impact different communities in different ways.
11:48 pm
yesterday, i went out to the suburbs on the outskirts of paris. and i spoke to the muslim community there to gauge their reactions. and again, for them, they find it difficult to see another attack that is immediately associated with islam. with an islam they don't identify with, and they feel a real sense of fear of what will happen. i spoke to some people that talked about a number of attacks on the muslim community in france, and people are concerned what could happen now after this even more dramatic attack. it just seems like oil to the fire. >> i'm just wondering, you live there, you are a resident in paris. will you change what you do? will you avoid gathering, will you stay indoors more? >> i don't live in paris.
11:49 pm
i've been here about two weeks and i'll be here for another few weeks. i think in terms of how it will change my perception of the city, you know, i've spoke on the a lot of friends actually, and i asked them the same question, how will this change, how you interact with the city? and i agree with them in that they say these people want us to be afraid, they want us to change our lives. they want us to not go to restaurants, they want us to not go out for a drink. but if we do that, then these people have won. so the message that i feel from my friends and that i certainly share is that we want life to continue, because we did survive and if we let fear overtake us, then this attack achieved its goal. >> very quickly, when you went out to the muslim communities in france, they were very vocal in
11:50 pm
condemning what happened. did they talk to you about what needs to be done to stop these things from happening? >> absolutely. they were definitely condemning of the attacks. they did see a sense of responsibility on two fronts. first of all, there was a sense that the french involvement in syria sort of brought on these attacks, and that was definitely something that we heard across the community. but on a deeper level, they felt what needed to be done is to deal with the fundamental fear that they experienced within french society towards islam. and until the french government finds a way to really bridge the gap between the islamic community and the community at large, they feel there's no way that this wound could be healed. >> okay. oscar lopez, correspondent there with "newsweek," we appreciate your reporting an insights.
11:51 pm
people saying they won't change, but everything around them is changing them. >> just the physical way the place looks with the police and that kind of stuff. the french government urged people to stay at home saturday for their own safety, but some took to the streets any way. they told cnn's poppy harlow it's important to show terrorists they are not afraid. >> we have to -- we have to strike back. we have to do something and show that they cannot win over us. if it's war, yeah. >> war is war? >> yeah, something has to be done. >> you're going to the theater now? >> yeah. >> why? >> just to look at the different flowers for the people. >> and the best way to avoid it is to help people, the know each
11:52 pm
other. to connect with each other. >> know each other so you don't kill each other. >> yeah. >> you're not afraid of different people. >> the message we're hearing over and over again, they'll stand up and be defiant and they're not afraid. >> it's what happens after all these attacks. >> the world is showing it stands with paris, with vigils being held from sydney to new york. 10 some of those scenes next.
11:53 pm
11:54 pm
11:55 pm
people around the world are showing their support for paris by holding vigils. this was the scene in a public square in jerusalem where small crowds spelled out paris in candles. thousands of miles away, a similar display in sydney, australia where people laid flowers and lit candles before the french flag. >> and in the united states, here is the reaction in new york. >> reporter: much of new york sending a message to the people of paris, one of strength and solidarity. here at george washington square park, if you look over my shoulder, there is evidence of that. as you see that familiar french flag flying over george washington square park here obviously tremendous symbolism
11:56 pm
as it flies off a structure that mirrors the french capital. many people here really praying for paris, that includes the new york mayor bill de blasio. >> we can teach a lesson to the world because of what we went through on 9/11, 14 years ago. the only answer to terrorism is to be resolute, to not allow the terrorists to change who we are. we must refuse to be terrorized. we won't change our democracy. we won't change our values. >> reporter: the mayor's message to remain resolute coming with a word of warning from people to remain vigilant in light of this attack in paris. he says you can expect an increased police presence and the so-called soft targets, museums, theaters.
11:57 pm
expect more new york police office officerss to be stationed at those places. >> cnn's impact your world website has more details on the response around the world. we've been seeing to that series of shootings and bombings in the french capital. >> we'll continue to update you with ways that you can help at cnn.com/impact. that you can for watching cnn newsroom live from o'. i'm isha sesay. >> and i'm john vause. cnn's coverage continues after a very short break. diabetes, steady is exciting. only glucerna has carbsteady, clinically proven to help minimize blood sugar spikes. so you stay steady ahead.
11:58 pm
bounty is two times more absorbent. more "sit" per roll. so one roll of bounty can last longer than those bargain brands. so you get more "life" per roll. bounty. the long-lasting quicker picker upper. and i had a gentleman i wasstop me and ask me ifom, you ki made his dinner.esidents he had lost his wife recently, but i didn't know that. he made a remark to me about not sure he wanted to be there anymore, but he said something to me that has stuck with me to this day. after having your dinner, i think i want to stick around a while and that really meant something to me. i never had an experience like that and it just let me know that what i'm doing is much more important than just food. for called "squamous adnon-small cell",er previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy, it's not every day something this big comes along. a chance to live longer with... opdivo,
11:59 pm
nivolumab. opdivo is the first and only immunotherapy fda approved based on a clinical trial demonstrating longer life... ...for these patients. in fact, opdivo significantly increased the chance of living longer versus chemotherapy. opdivo is different. it works with your immune system. opdivo can cause your immune system to attack normal organs and tissues in your body and affect how they work. this may happen any time during or after treatment has ended, and may become serious and lead to death. see your doctor right away if you experience new or worsening cough; chest pain; shortness of breath; diarrhea; severe stomach pain or tenderness; severe nausea or vomiting; loss of appetite;... ...swollen ankles; extreme fatigue; constipation; rash; or muscle or joint pain, as this may keep these problems from becoming more serious. these are not all the possible side effects of opdivo. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions including immune system problems or if you've had an organ transplant,
12:00 am
or lung, breathing or liver problems. a chance to live longer. ask your doctor if opdivo is right for you. bristol-myers squibb thanks the patients and physicians who participated in the opdivo clinical trial. live from atlanta, welcome to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell. >> i'm amara walker. thanks for joining us. >> over the next hour, we take a look into the active investigation into these attacks, who was behind them, and tell you about the victims. but first, the very latest new video just in to our newsroom from inside the bataclan as the attacks started there. look. ♪ [ gunfire erupts ] >> you can hear the gunfire as
12:01 am
the band performs on stage. that is just the beginning of what was a three-hour hostage situation and massacre that killed 89 people and wounded dozens. just listen to that. the band stops playing as they try to work out just what's happening. >> now authorities are working to track down any suspected accomplices. at least 129 people are dead and more than 350 are wounded after friday's shootings and explosions. a french politician has identified one of the suicide bombers. >> officials say they have arrested a number of people and conducted raids. a source says at least one raid near brussels is connected to the paris attacks. earlier, our poppy harlow spoke with the deputy mayor. >> of course we are very concerned. the threat is still going on. the risk is very high, and nothing says that this terror
12:02 am
sequence is over yet. so of course, we are very concerned. and all the day and all the evening, we have some information stating that there may be a rifle here, explosion there. of course, most of this is false information, but the threat is still very high. and again, we are ready to face anything after what happened yesterday. >> again, that was deputy mayor from france. let's get more from fred pleitgen. fred, good to have you with us. there is more security on the streets. there is a sense of uncertainty in the air. how are these things changing how people live in paris? >> reporter: good morning, george. i think they are to a certain extent changing the way people
12:03 am
live in paris, but i don't think that's going to be going on for a long time. we're seeing and talking to a lot of people saying they're not going to allow their way of life to be influenced. for a short time, many people were shocked and certainly they are still shocked by what happened here. in the immediate hours after the attacks, some people were told to stay indoors and not to venture out. but now we're seeing the city come to life more and more and there will be a memorial service for those killed at the notre dame cathedral here in paris a little later today where the city pays respects to those who have suffered from these terror attacks. of course, people are still very much in a state of shock, especially those on hand as some of these attacks unfolded. i was able to speak to one man who was inside the bataclan theater when that attack unfolded. let's listen to what he had to say.
12:04 am
forensic expects continue investigating the scene at the bataclan theater where the deadliest of friday's terror attacks took place in paris. several dozen were killed by four gunmen here alone. and those who survived say they're traumatized. this man was one of them. they managed to hide in a small room. >> we didn't see anything but we could hear precisely the sounds of the machine guns. the room we went, the walls were kind of shooting. >> reporter: the band was playing when the gunmen forced and executing many.g hostages - french s.w.a.t. teams later raided the building and all attackers were killed. this man says he will never forget the carnage he saw after police freed him.
12:05 am
>> a bloody mess. like this was blood everywhere, even people alive were covered with blood. >> reporter: concern among those who live in the area around the scene of the attack. of course, the people who witnessed the attacks are absolutely shocked by what happened. residents say they want a strong response from the authorities to make sure the french capital is safe for them to live in. this woman recently moved to paris from new york. she said the thought isis is behind the attack scares her. >> what are they going to do after that? are they going to bomb other cities, like the eiffel tower? what is going to be next? >> reporter: fear mixed with anger at those who have hit this european capital with a major terror attack for the second time in less than a year. that anger also shown in the
12:06 am
form of the french president saying that will be a merciless response to the attack. you mentioned some of the things that have been going on, the raids in belgium. one of the attackers already identified and the french praising the cooperation with the belgian authorities. in this investigation, the lead investigators say is moving along quickly but is still very much in the early stages. >> fred, what's the latest on the investigation? do we know anything more about the people behind this? >> reporter: yeah. a couple of things have come to light, especially over the last 12 hours or so. on the one hand, one of the attackers has now been identified. a man from a town about an hour to the southwest of paris. he apparently lived in that town
12:07 am
until about 2012. the other thing that came out yesterday which was significant, was apparently a syrian passport was found. and that passport has been linked to someone coming into the european union by greece, only a little over a month ago. it's unclear, however, whether or not any of the attackers who conducted those raids are the person who that passport belongs to. now, the other thing, of course, that's major is those links to belgium. the fact that we had those raids, in the belgian down of mullenback, these one of those raids was in direct relation to the attacks here in paris. several people have been apprehended. one is a person who hired a rental car, a french national. that car was later found at one of the crime scenes, at the bataclan theater right after those attacks took place. that man has been apprehended
12:08 am
and also with a couple of other people, as well. so the investigation, george, moving forward very quickly. but again, not clear whether or not there was a wider network behind all of this, george. >> 9:07 in paris. there is also a memorial that will be set up for people at notre dame to grieve. fred, thank you for your reporting. despite the bloodshed and the state of emergency now across the city, many have been hitting the streets. >> people are holding vigils and declaring that they are not afraid. a powerful message in a city that's seen so much pain. senior international correspondent ben wedeman has more. >> reporter: in times like these, it's far better to light a candle than curse the darkness. darkness fell on paris friday evening. but the lights haven't gone out.
12:09 am
with hundreds flock here with a simple message. >> we are not afraid. don't stay at home. be out, be outside in the air. say to the world, we are not afraid. >> reporter: the signs say it all. resistance, not afraid. >> we are in shock, but we're not scared. this is not how we're going to give up on our values. today, more than ever, we will stand up against, as painful as it is, in a day such as this one, again, that those words have meaning for all of us as a community. and again, this is something we have to do together. >> reporter: the posters on the monument from last january's attack fading. that pain fading with it now revived. after the attacks, the police advised people to stay at home
12:10 am
and here at this square, through a loud speaker, the police have been advising people to leave this square, to leave the area. but they're just not leaving. but the attacks bring into sharp focus a jarring truth says this paris resident ben cramer. >> we have to realize we're at war. >> reporter: a war against dark forces in the city of light. ben wedeman, cnn, paris. >> sending a strong message that we are not afraid. and with that in mind, let's bring in our senior political correspondent for bf mtv. terry, it's great to have you on the program. i want to first ask you if you can give us a sense of what the average parisian has been going through over the last couple of days and what it's been like for you, as well. >> well, it's very unusual and very reminiscent of what september 11 was like in new york. i was living in new york at the time, and this feeling that, you
12:11 am
know, almost eerie that in most of paris streets are empty. people are not going out. also the feeling that anybody can be a threat. you can sit at a cafe and be shot at. that is really happening for the first time. the feeling that slowly but surely we are entering a war. you see military soldiers everywhere in paris. that used to be the case since the former attacks back in january. but there are many more security forces out in the street, and soldiers, as well. and what i should add as well and we heard that earlier in the broadcast, what every parisianer is wondering this morning is is this thing over? we are told by french law enforcement authorities that we should stay at home today. the latest news we are reporting at bf mtv is that a car
12:12 am
belonging to the terrorist has been found this morning in a paris suburb, which is suggesting that some of these guys are still at large. so what are they going to try to do now? are they going to flee and leave the country or at least leave paris or will they still be trying to carry out further attacks? that is the heavy question on everyone's mind this morning. >> i imagine there is definitely a sense of vulnerability there. i'm going to give you a moment to put in your ear piece. can you talk about these raids and what the connection is that the belgian connection, especially with the fact that this is a country that has been struggling with islamic radicalism. >> yes. this particular area of brussels is not news to us. the terrorist who carried out an attack in the train, you know, this train between paris and brussels a few months ago, came
12:13 am
from this particular area of brussels. an earlier terrorist attack was also carried out by a guy coming from this particular neighborhood in brussels. so it is well known by french law enforcement authorities as being a potential location that is one that terrorists are going to be based in or go through before they carry out attacks in france. one of the terrorists that was killed by french authorities was carrying allegedly a syrian passport, or it was found next to his body. that passport was carrying a greek visa, suggesting that he might be entering -- he might have entered upand then france as part of this big wave of migrants that have been coming through europe of the past few months. so there is still to be determined whether that syrian
12:14 am
passport is a natural document and whether it was belonging to that particular person. but if it were to be the case that a terrorist was infiltrating through europe as part of this wave of immigrants, that might be another very difficult political problem for the french government to solve. >> absolutely. we're going to have to leave it right there. great having you on the program. thank you for your insight. >> and now we are starting to get details about the victims, their identities and the lives they lived. >> we're going to take a moment to honor a few of them. lynda kinkade has their stories.
12:15 am
>> reporter: vibrant and energetic, that's how nohemi was described. the 23-year-old was studying abroad in paris. she was meant to return home after one semester. >> she had a very joyous personality. she was extremely lively. extremely energetic. >> reporter: british citizen nick alexander worked with the band eagles of death metal, which was playing at the bataclan theater. according to his family, he died doing his job he loved. they said nick was not just our brother, son and uncle, he was everyone's best friend. generous, funny, and fiercely loyal. his girlfriend tweeted, sleep tight, my sweet prince. three victims were from chile, including lewis filipe, a musician who lived in paris for eight years. valentine ribet, a lawyer, also lost his life. the paris bar tweeted, our heartfelt thoughts to the relatives to a talented young
12:16 am
lawyer, murdered. marie was one of three known universal employees who died in the attacks. president of universal music france tweeted universal music family is in mourning. thomas, maria, manu, our thoughts are with their families and friends. rest in peace. a french soccer player was on the field friday night when terror struck there and hit very close to home. his cousin was there to support him and lost her life. on his facebook page, he wrote that she was a guide and support, a big sister. and he urged people to remain respectful saying it's important for all of us who are representatives of our country and its diversity to speak and to remain united against a horror that has no color nor religion. lynda kinkade, cnn.
12:17 am
>> an act of war. that's what france's president is calling the attacks that left 129 people dead. >> coming up, we will focus on the investigation in paris.
12:18 am
12:19 am
we have this just in to cnn. afp reports a second car used in
12:20 am
the attacks has been found in the east of the french capital. earlier saturday, belgian's justice minister says a car linked to the massacre was linked to someone in the brussels suburbs. >> this was a vw polo left outside the bataclan concert hall in paris. of course, that was a scene where we saw the most carnage with more than 80 people killed in that. again, the new development is that a second car has been found. of course, this is an investigation that been fluid and continuing. of course, it's a developing story as french and belgian authorities are working together and sharing intelligence with countries around the world to figure out exactly if these terrorists were part of a wider network. >> as we get more information, we will pass it on to you here on cnn. as this investigation continues, people around paris and the world grieve a heavy loss.
12:21 am
129 people were killed with 352 others wounded. >> one of the suicide bombers has been identified. a source says officials have the passports of two attackers. isis has claimed responsibility for the attacks, which the french president called an act of war. in the last 24 hours, there have been arrests in france and belgium. >> the french president saying he will be merciless. christiane amanpour and john burman spoke to a french senator and asked what is known about the paris attackers. >> they got an earful about why french authorities failed to prevent this massacre. >> how did france get this wrong? i'm sorry to ask you this, but this is a point of heightened intelligence, heightened security, waiting for the
12:22 am
climate summit with all the world leaders, ten months after "charlie hebdo." how could these people come here and do this with all of this weaponry? >> well, because we have no border in europe, first of all. then we have a lot of foreign fighters, a lot. and then we have material to this radicalization, because we have 7 million muslims here, and a lot of them are getting radicalized. so there is some concern really. >> and do you have any idea about this specific case? are you hearing anymore than what we are being told right now about this, who these attackers might be? >> it's a team, a squad, half from syria, half from france. obviously they were very professional. that is a little bit new, the way that they were behaving,
12:23 am
behaved, okay, sorry. and also the way they organized this attack. >> the french president said it was planned abroad. this attack was planned abroad, perhaps in syria or iraq, carried out by people inside this country. you say it was a mixed group, french and maybe -- >> because we find somebody -- we discover that one of the people from the soccer place, with the fingerprint was french. >> so you know that for sure? >> oh, yes. >> can you confirm that? >> yes, for sure he was french. one french, one syrian, one egyptian for the time being. >> for sure? >> for sure. >> just the passports? they found an egyptian and syrian passport. >> the french is absolutely french, because we find his fingerprints on our databases. so there is no way that he is not french. >> all right. so you are head of this
12:24 am
investigative committee into jihadism and radicalization. do you have -- are you able to have the tools to stop the radicalization? the british intelligence have made incredibly scary comments about how it's almost impossible these days to stop it, because of online. >> not online, and then because the situation is not clear, you know. it's almost -- also impossible, as i told you before, because of the boarders. and then we have 700 people, you cannot put a policemen behind everybody. >> one of them apparently was known to the police. >> you knew of him before. >> yes, of course, because all the french people do not have their finger print on the
12:25 am
database. >> you knew about him before, how did he slip through? [ speaking french ] >> all the big murderers we had last time, but known they were acting like that. >> that's a real problem. >> it's a hell of a problem. >> quite a conversation there. that was the french senator. we will have her on the program next hour live, so make sure to join us for that. of course, the paris attack also dominate the agenda at the g-20 summit this weekend. >> and security has been ramped up in wake of the violence that rocked paris on friday night. cnn's michelle kaczynski joins us live from turkey. let's talk about the fact that terrorism, it's not typically the major topic of the g-20, but without question it is front and sent they are round.
12:26 am
>> reporter: absolutely. this is supposed to be about economic cooperation. that is the point of the g-20. and the big theme this year was supposed to be inclusive development. economic issues of all kinds come up, but even before the paris attacks they did, for the first time, put a political issue formally on the agenda and not an economic one. for the dinner tonight, that was originally supposed to be about syria and isis. so you can imagine now that this has happened, how intense that discussion and others will be. there will be self-meetings one on one among world leaders. president obama is meeting with several, he just added another one with saudi arabia too. it is a packed schedule for president obama. but you know he's going to face questions about the fight against isis and his leadership of that coalition. will we see any changes in the strategy? that's going to be a real focus. most interesting today, we'll hear from president obama, but possibly only briefly.
12:27 am
it is hard to imagine that he won't mention paris, at least in some form in that brief statement. we won't see him take questions until tomorrow. but today, his security advisers will be making the rounds on the sunday morning news shows. so that will be interesting to see this administration take those tough questions on what exactly to do next. and those tough questions that they have been facing on what is working and what isn't. especially since just one day before paris happened, president obama said that isis is contained. of course, the white house says he meant only on the battlefield, and in iraq and syria in terms of what kind of territory isis is being able -- is able now to control. but the questions are going to go well beyond that. >> for sure. michelle kaczynski live for us in turkey. michelle, thank you so much.
12:28 am
we're going to take a short break. when we come back, a father and his young son describe how they survived the massacre in paris and what one smohooter said. that's next. you can now use freeze it to prevent new purchases on your account in seconds. and once you find it, you can switch it right on again. you're back! freeze it, only from discover. get it at discover.com. at ally bank no branches equals great rates. it's a fact. kind of like playing the boss equals the boss wins. wow!
12:29 am
12:30 am
welcome back to our special
12:31 am
coverage of the paris terror attacks. here's what we know right now. belgian authorities say they made a number of arrests after conducting raids. at least one of those is directly connected to the attacks. belgian authorities say that they conducted these raids in at least one of those they found a car that was earlier rented in belgium. a french politic identified one suicide bomber as ismael omar mostefai. >> officials say at least seven attackers targeted six locations across paris friday night. 129 people were killed. 352 wounded in shootings and explosions. now, as the world mourns, we are slowly beginning to find out more about those victims. some of them include a parisian lawyer, a woman who worked with a roller derby team, a 23-year-old american college student and a newlywed architect. let's take a closer look at how the attacks unfolded and they
12:32 am
all happened within 30 minutes. >> this effort targeted busy efforts, including a soccer match, a concert at the bataclan and several restaurants. cnn's pamela brown has more. >> reporter: three teams of terrorists armed with kalashnikov rifles and matching explosive devices launched coordinated attacks at six locations, unleashing chaos across the streets of paris. it starts at 9:20 p.m. a soccer match between france and germany is rocked by a thunderous explosion. french officials say an apparent suicide bomber detonates, killing himself and an innocent bystander. france's president on site is taken away to safety. >> the ground shook and i thought there's something wrong here. >> reporter: five minutes later, the second attack at two paris restaurants. terrorists opened fire, killing at least 15, seriously wounding
12:33 am
10 more. french officials say the killers wore masks and arrived by car. shell casings indicate they fired more than 100 rounds. >> we heard huge gunshots and lots of glass coming through the window. so we ducked onto the floor with the other diners. >> reporter: 9:30, a second explosion outside the soccer stadium. thousands of fans flee the scene. the body of a second suicide bomber is found. 9:32, a team of terrorists open fire outside a bar. five people are killed, eight others wounded. 9:36, at least 19 people are shot and killed outside another restaurant. 9:40, another explosion near the bataclan concert hall. inside where the american band eagles of death were playing, more explosions and gunfire. witnesses say the attackers came
12:34 am
in firing and at least one person he heard yelling "allohu akbar." the terrorist hold a living hostage for several hours before police stormed the hall. at least 89 killed. four attackers also dead, three wearing explosive belts. >> from the ground floor, a lot of dead bodies and blood and some people had dinner and had to stay for several hours among dead corpses and they went out covered with blood. >> reporter: then 9:53, a third explosion near the soccer stadium. police later find the body of another suicide bomber. a siege of gunfire, explosions and blood shed, leading to the deadliest terror attack in europe in more than a decade. pamela brown, cnn, washington. and we are just get thing news in.
12:35 am
that six relatives of one of the identified suicide bombers, ismael omar mostefai, we are being told has been put into custody. again six persons, family members related to ismael omar mostefai. this is happening in the paris region. we should note that when family members of supposed criminals are placed into custody, that is actually typical practice. at this point we should highlight that the family members have not been arrested or charged. we'll stay on top of that and bring you more information. while parisians unite to do what they can, the attacks have stunned the city leaving a somber move. >> our jim bittermann reports there is great heartache in one of the most beautiful cities in the world. >> reporter: in sunnier times, the french call it the joy of life. many come here looking for it. but these are not sunnier times.
12:36 am
these days, they have another expression that fits, which means both nausea and heartache. to be sure, there are still plenty of people today posing for selfies, and stealing a kiss in front of the eiffel tower. but there are also the police stops. in fact, all the christmas markets in town were just opened in early november and have been closed down. the terrorists have managed to steal a little bit of joy out of christmas. here and there, restaurants remain open and you can still hear a laugh or two. but cinemas are dark and shuttered. flags fly at half staff over half empty streets. the gates are locked at the upscale stores. some commentators have called this the french 9/11, just like they did after the attacks in
12:37 am
january at the magazine "charlie hebdo." in sheer numbers, the new york tragedy was clearly much worse than france, but all three show some things in common. they all make people feel vulnerable, just like people do in paris today. they all took away a little innocence. when the symbol of paris, the eiffel tower went up, it was called at the time a crazy idea. the tower tonight is closed and dark. no one seems in the mood just now for crazy ideas. jim bittermann, cnn, paris. >> so sad to see that tower dark. but at the same time so many other buildings around the world that were lit up to -- >> show solidarity and support for what the french people are going through right now. >> you're watching cnn newsroom.
12:38 am
france beefing up security. and other european nations are following france's lead. details next.
12:39 am
with a 100% electric nissan leaf... what will you do? how far will you go? how much will you see? electrify the world. now with a class-leading 107 miles on a charge, the nissan leaf is the best selling electric car in america. is the staying awake part... challeng( gunshot ) your day sleep train has your ticket to a better night's sleep. because when brands compete, you save during mattress price wars.
12:40 am
and through veteran's day weekend, save up to $400 on beautyrest and posturepedic. get interest-free financing until 2019 on tempur-pedic. plus, helpful advice from the sleep experts. but mattress price wars and this special financing offer - ends sunday. - ♪ sleep train ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ welcome back, everybody. all of france is in mourning after terrorists carried out the worst violence france has seen since world war ii. french police have now found a second car used in the attacks
12:41 am
just east of paris. >> this investigation certainly ongoing. the first car was found near the bataclan concert hall. it turned out to be a belgian rental vehicle. that led to raids and arrests in belgium saturday. >> six family members of one of the attackers have been taken into custody. they are the relatives of ismael omar mostefai, the only suspect that's been identified so far from the attacks. they have not been arrested or charged. >> at least seven attackers targeted six locations across the city friday night. a total of 129 people were killed. 352 people were wounded. >> isis has claimed responsibility for the bloodshed and the french president vows his country will be ruthless in its response. >> your peen ceuropean capitalsg up security. >> and there was an alarming incident in london on saturday. phil black has more on that and what governments are doing to
12:42 am
try to keep their citizens safe. >> reporter: proof terror is contagious. just hours after the paris attacks, a terminal in london's airport was closed and cleared. police arrested a 41-year-old frenchman seen acting suspiciously and found him where what appears to be a firearm. police didn't know if it was a working weapon or what the man's intentions were, but they were treating it seriously because of the events in paris. a horrifying and sickening attack. the british prime minister promised lessons would be learned from paris. >> it is clear that the threat from isil is evolvin. last night's attack suggest a new degree of planning and coordination and a greater ambition for mass casualty attacks. >> reporter: david cameron said british police have been training for this style of terrorism ever since the mumbai attack of 2008, where multiple
12:43 am
gunmen massacred 164 people. >> this summer in london, we did a massive exercise for exactly the type of scenario that tragically has happened in paris in the last 24 hours. we're looking at automatic weaponry, parallel events across a major city. >> reporter: these forces are patrolling a french airport. it's also triggered increased security measures across western europe. the italian prime minister, along with officials in germany and the netherlands announced they would do more to prevent further attacks. and now there's extra security at large events. leaders of g-20 nations gather in turkey this weekend and france is due to host the next climate change conference in just two weeks. the french government says it will go ahead securely, despite the vulnerabilities so brutally exposed in paris. phil black, cnn, london.
12:44 am
joining me now is international diplomatic consultant christian mallard. good to have you with us. >> good morning, george. >> we just heard phil black a moment ago talking about increased security across european cities, especially in paris where the french president said that the military will be patrolling the streets. my question to you is this, what is the effect on life in paris? sitting at cafes, do you get a sense that things are very different given what happened? >> doing to your paris bureau this morning, i took a cab. i was talking to the man who said i'm scared. i'm scared. after what happened, we have to make our living. and i said, life goes on, but i'm so scared. so probably a lot of french people are scared. all the more so when the french president told the population,
12:45 am
if you don't have the necessity to go out, please stay home. so it's true, even if it's not too early or too late, it seems like it's dead. and you have a few cars going around. and i think the french people any way was used to having this kind of terrorist attack in their mind. because since the "charlie hebdo" terrorist attack of last january, the prime minister at several times came on television saying we are at the highest level of islamic threat in the country. things may happen again. and it happened. yesterday evening after the french president said we will be ruthless in our way of reacting towards these barbaric islamic terrorists, the prime minister said we will eradicate in france, europe, syria. do we have the means to do it? no. we have to be definitely -- everybody knows about that, with
12:46 am
the united states, and vladamir putin. vladamir putin said yesterday, i want to remind you, he said yesterday we have to get rid of all terrorists. they have no place on earth. if america and france and other countries like saudi arabia or qatar, go all together, according to the specialists i have heard, eradication could be on the way and go quicker than expected. in france, people start be fed up with being lax, which has been observed the last few years, east we are the right wing or left wing government. for the french public opinion, all these governments have been responsible for laxism. we do know we have a lot of islamist cells in the country, in paris, in the suburbs, in the big cities. and we know where they are.
12:47 am
so people say why don't we go to action? this is what the french people are expecting now. >> you say they are expecting action. i want to talk about action that we have seen since january, since the "charlie hebdo" attack as far as security that has been stepped up there in paris. has it been noticeable and do you get a sense that security was heightened before this attack? >> yes and no, because i think we do need to tighten the security more. when president hollande said we have 2,000 more military and the police are complaining, the authorities are complaining they don't have enough means of acting. so they are just fed up with the secretary of justice saying what are we doing? we are not firm enough with the muslim fundamentalists in this
12:48 am
country. how many radical imams do we have in this country? plenty of them. it's time to clean our politics in this country. this is what people could tell you in the streets. >> christian, thank you so much. >> thank you. countries worldwide are using their famous landmarks to show their solidarity with paris. that's next.
12:49 am
12:50 am
12:51 am
paris terror attacks, six family members of one of the attackers has been taken into custody. they are the relatives of ismael omar mostefai, the only suspect, a suicide bomber, that has been identified so far. those relatives have not been arrested or charged. >> the bloodiest scene on friday night was at the bataclan concert hall. fans were watching an american band perform when this happened. ♪ [ gunfire ] >> you hear the sound of gunshots fired into the crowd. >> at least 89 people were killed there. survivors were held hostage for hours before being rescued.
12:52 am
our senior international correspondent spoke with father and son who described how they survived. >> we heard this bang, bang, bang. like everybody else, we thought it was fireworks or part of the show. and then i felt something go past my ear. i didn't know if it was a bullet or what it was. and then i realized somebody is going towards the stage. at that point everybody understood. everybody threw themselves on the ground. i stuck my head up from the desk, i saw the two shooters. one was changing his magazine. so he had a whole other magazine in front of him. he had a big vest on. >> what did he look like? >> he looked like a young fellow, nothing in particular at all. >> reporter: did you hear him speak at all? >> i did. i heard him at one point say something about syria. i think you heard it better, oscar. >> he said you need to think about syria, but in french. there wasn't any accent or anything. >> obviously a native french
12:53 am
speaker. i could see one of the guys was doing crowd control and the other guy was executing. so there was no chance, there was a terrorist incident here in europe a few months ago, there was no chance of anybody being a hero. these guys were organized. one was covering the crowd, the other was doing the shooting. >> reporter: it must have been one of the worst moments of your life, fearing your son could have been hit. >> yeah, i was screaming out his name and thought he couldn't be far away, so he should shout out dad or something or stop or something and he wasn't there. >> reporter: have you ever seen a dead body before? >> no, it was my first time and i was -- i was lying just next to one, which really was in a very uncomfortable position at that moment. >> reporter: you must have been very, very frightened.
12:54 am
>> yeah. >> cnn has more details on the response we've been seeing to the series of shootings and bombings that happened in paris. >> we'll continue to update you with ways you can help those affected by the attacks, all at cnn.com/impact. around the world, leaders have been vocal about their support for paris following these attacks. >> first, we want to warn you the following piece contains video you may find disturbing. >> reporter: in the early hours of an early and awful night, land marks the world over lit for france. social media filled with symbols of solidarity under the hash tags #peaceforparis, #prayforparis. tears shed for a nation in shock. the u.s. president briefed as the attack was unfolding, expressed outrage and pledged his support. >> this is an attack not just on paris and the people of france, but this is an attack on all of
12:55 am
humanity and the universal values that we share. >> reporter: russia's president vladamir putin still reeling from the plane crash in egypt which killed so many of his own, sent his condolences in the early hours. and as the true horror of what happened here became clear, europe's leaders coming out one by one, united in sympathy, determined not to let the terrorists win. >> translator: we are crying with you. we will join you in the fight against those who did something so unfathomable to you. >> translator: we stand with you, united. >> please stand up and let's pray. >> reporter: a moment of silence at the g-20 summit in turkey and prayers for families from pope francis.
12:56 am
>> reporter: for those fleeing syria, a feeling they must defend themselves and their religion in the wake of this attack. >> even in paris or syria or america or germany, anywhere, not allowed to do that. each god did not say to islam to kill the people. it is not our islam. >> reporter: scenes in a land where they may have hoped to find ref judge similar to the carnage they fled. an act of war france's president said, on european soil. >> thank you for watching cnn newsroom. i'm amara walker. >> and i'm george howell. we'll be right back after the break with more coverage of the paris attacks. you're watching cnn.
12:57 am
12:58 am
12:59 am
1:00 am
. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm amber walker along with george by my side. we want to show you the live pictures. french president hollande meeting with former president nicholas sahr coes -- sarkozy. you heard from the president over the past 24 hours that his response to the attacks will be ruthless and that this was an act of war and he blames isis for the attacks. >> an investigation under way. again, we know very few details at this point. as the days progress, i'm sure that we will learn much, much more about the many people behind this attack. we have some new developments to tell you about. the paris prosecutor's spokeswoman says six relatives the identified suicide bomber have been taken into custody and
1:01 am
those family members, however, have not been arrested, nor have they a massacre that killed 89 people there and wounded dozens. the band stopped playing as they tried to work out and figure out what was happening. >> terrifying. now authorities are working to track down any suspected accomplices. at least 129 people are dead and more than 350 are wounded after friday's shootings and implosion. earlier, our poppy harlow spoke with patrick klugman.
1:02 am
>> of course, we are very concerned the threat is still going on. the risk is very high and nothing says that the sequence is over yet. so, of course, we're very concerned. all the day and all the evening we have some information stating that there may be explosion there and most of this of course is false information. but a threat is still very high. again, we are ready to face anything now that we are knowing what happened yesterday. >> again, that was the deputy mayor of paris speaking to our own poppy harr lou. let's go live to paris now to fred. glad to have you with us on a somber day in paris.
1:03 am
how are are people coping? >> it is a somber day. today is going to be a memorial service that happens, george, at 6:30 p.m. local time at the notre dame saturday dral. the city still in shock over these attacks that happened here. there's a lot of people coming to the main squares of paris to lay down flowers and light candles to pay respects. there's a makeshift memorial in the center of the same thing is happening in several places, the crime scene where these attacks happened, especially of course at the bataclan theater where those dozens of people were killed in those attacks. several entry points towards that point -- the theater is cordoned off. many coming to pay respects. so many we have been speaking to who have loved ones affected and wounded in all of this. all of them are reeling and very much in sorrow.
1:04 am
there is a great deal of anger at the people who are behind this, george. >> fred, i'm not sure if you have specific information about why this is happening. we saw at the top of the show, that our current president hollande is meeting with the former president sarkozy. do you have any information about what's going on with that and also the significance of the two leaders coming together? >> reporter: it is very significant, because, of course, this is a country that does have a lot of divisive politics here. especially with francois hollande and nicolas sarkozy, running towards elections coming up here in this country. it's one of the big things, after something like this, for these two politicians who are at odds showing political unity. especially as the attacks are still very fresh and as the investigation is still going on. of course, there has been new information that's come out in the past couple of minutes that's very significant. one of the things you mentioned
1:05 am
is that car that was found. it was a black lee yoen. it's one of the cars apparently used by one of the terrorist teams in the attacks. that, of course, indicates that one of those members of one of those teams managed to escape the scene and dump that car to the east of paris. there was that second car, the vw polo that was apparently rent by a french national in brussels and brought to paris which was later found outside one of the places where the attacks took place. outside the bataclan theater. that was the one of the reasons that sparked the raids in belgium. that you had the three raids, one of which was directly linked to the attacks. there's a major investigation going on. it's a fast moving investigation, an investigation where the authorities say it's still in its early stages. there's still a lot of things they don't know at this point. of course, in a situation like that, it's important for a
1:06 am
divisive political scene to be showing a great deefl unity at this point. >> seeing nicolas sarkozy coming more to the right and meeting with the current french president and as you say, the investigation really in its infancy. we know some things but in the coming days we'll learn much more about who is behind this. fred pleitgen, thank you for your reporting. one of the bombers has been identified. a source close to the investigation says officials have the passports of two attackers. they suspect those passports are fake. >> isis has claimed responsibility for the attacks, which french president francois hollande called an act of war. >> belgian authorities made arrests after conducting anti-terror raids. at least one of the raids is directly connected to the paris attacks. belgium's justice minister
1:07 am
says a belgian car found near the hall attacks was rented by someone in a brussels suburb. this comes as the belgian government raise sz the threat level from high to moderate. let's dive more into what paris has to do now and how long the investigation can take. we're joined by a french senator and she has the commission of inquiry into french and european jihadi networks. thanks for joining us here on the program. if we can start off with what the latest is on the investigation getting bits and pieces of new information that a second car related to the attacks has been found. also, that all the members, six family members of the suicide bomber that has been identified have been taken into custody for questioning. i would imagine the priority right now is to determine whether or not there were more attackers who actually got away during these attacks. >> well, we don't know how many
1:08 am
people were in paris because you already understand that the team was a very proficient one. we're gatheriregarding the way behaving. >> talk to us about the -- >> maybe we still have some people on the -- >> sorry about our delay there. right. my apologies. we have quite of a bit of a delay so we're jumping on each other's conversation. let me ask you about the belgian raids that have taken place. one of the raids is directly connected to these attacks. what more can you tell us approximate that? >> well, the inquiries, the investigation is just making -- is absolutely open. everything that we discover day
1:09 am
by day, minute by minute is now on the network. you know exactly what i know. i don't know more than what you know. >> how is france been fighting islamic radicalism, especially after what happened about ten months ago with the "charlie hebdo" attacks? >> well, i'm afraid we didn't do enough. in the mission that i had in this report that we did on the extremism, we wanted to implement more serious issue and more serious regulation against extremism. and spatially against the network but we didn't success. i think we try again to implement a new regulation and especially against the network. we have a lot of people to kick out of the country. >> is that feasible? you're talking about citizens, french citizens that you're hoping to kick out of the
1:10 am
country when you talk about serious action? >> not french. because we are not going to kick out some french citizens. but we have a lot of those preaching who behave themselves and claim themselves as iman. we have to take the problem from the roots. the is roots is the people using islam as a weapon against citizens. we have to ask more -- we have to blame the enemy. the problem, we were a little bit ashamed to name the enemy. but i think that now the government is ready to name the enemy. if you don't name the enemy, you cannot fight properly. >> and who is the enemy? >> i think islam extremism
1:11 am
and -- definitely. >> what has been done to reach out to the muslim community? we have to work closely with the community because we have 7 million in france and -- we also have a very strange question with the people who are christian and convert to muslim. that is almost 40% of the 7,000 people that are under surveillance already. we have now under survey 7,000 people. more than 7,000 people and 40% of them are convert from christian into muslim. >> you're saying that this needs to be addressed at the grassroots level as you're saying. but we also heard from president hollande who is promising merciless reaction to this.
1:12 am
he said this is an act of war. what kind of response do you think will come from the french government? are we talking about stepped up military action in syria and iraq? >> that is very useful, of course. the fact that we fight in syria make our country more vulnerable. but the point is that we do not have, as you ask for, action. we need more data. we need more preparation. more concrete action. the people -- >> looks like we've lost the connection there with nathalie goulet. a french senator. we appreciate her time her. we're going to move on. while parisians stand in solidarity, it's left a somber mood. >> it's clear to see the
1:13 am
heartache among paragraphishians. >> here's a report. >> reporter: in sunnier times, they call it carefree joy of life. millions come here looking for it. but these are not those times. these days there's another expression that fits, the expression that means both nausea and heartache. to be sure, there are plenty of people posing for selfies along the senne and stealing a kiss in front of the eiffel tower. there are also police stops in front of the closed shops. in fact, all the christmas markets in town opened in early november have been closed down. the terrorists have managed to steal a little bit of joy out of christmas. the carousel horses are covered and stopped and other horses have taken their place along the avenue of the french think is the most beautiful in the world.
1:14 am
the champs did hely say. >> the gates are locked at the upscale stores. some commentators have called this the french 9/11 like after the attacks in january at the magazine "charlie hebdo." in sheer numbers, it was worse than numbers in france. they all make people feel vulnerable, like people in paris today. they all take a little innocence away. when the symbol of paris, the eiffel tower went up, it materialized that -- it was called a crazy idea. the tower tonight is closed and dark. no one seems in the mood just now for crazy ideas. jim bitterman, cnn, paris. the eiffel tower dark in
1:15 am
that image. but there's a sentiment, paris is still here. that's the message from the city's mayor. we'll find out with paragraphishians are saying we're not afraid. we're going to speak to a witness to one of the attacks. stay with us.
1:16 am
1:17 am
1:18 am
despite the bloodshed in paris and the state of emergency, many parisians have been going in the street. >> a few of them spoke with our ben wedeman and said they have a simple message for the world. >> reporter: in times like these, it's far better to light a candle than curse the darkness. darkness fell on paris friday evening, but the lights haven't gone out. with hundreds flocking with a simple message. >> we are not afraid. don't stay at home. be outside. we are not afraid. >> reporter: the signs say it all. resistance, not afraid. >> we are in shock but we're not scared. thises not how we give up on our values. today more than ever, we will
1:19 am
stand up for -- i guess as painful as it is, it is in a day such as this one, again, that those words have meaning for all of us as a community. again, this is something that will have to be together. >> reporter: the posters on the monument from last january's attack fading. that pain fading with it. now revived. after the attacks, the police advised people to stay at home and here at this square through a loud speaker, the police have been advising people to leave this square, to leave the area. but they're just not leaving. but the attacks bring into sharp focus, a jarring truth, says paris resident ben kramer. >> we have to realize that we are at war. >> reporter: a war against dark forces in the city of light. ben wedeman, cnn, paris. the bloodiest scene from that terrible night was at the
1:20 am
bataclan concert hall. >> that is where at least 89 people were killed. survivors were held hostage for hours before they were -- >> clarissa ward spoke with a father and son inside the concert hall. they described how they survived. >> we heard this bang bang bang and like everybody else, we thought it was fireworks. all part of the show. and then i felt something go past my ear, i didn't know was it a bullet or something. i didn't know what it was. then i realized something is coming out, something is going towards the stage. i think everybody understood. everybody threw themselves on the ground. i stuck my head up from the desk to see what was going on. i saw the two shooters, one was changing his magazine. he had a magazine in front of him and a big vest on. >> what did he look like? >> looked like a young fellow. nothing particular at all. >> did you hear him speak the all? >> i did.
1:21 am
at one point he said something about syria. i think -- >> he said you need to think about syria. in french like, there wasn't any accent or anything. >> it was a native french speaker. i could see one of the guys was covering, doing crowd control and the other guy was executing. so there was no chance. there was an incident some years ago in europe with a similar. these guys were organized. one was covering the crowd, the other one doing the shooting. >> one of the worst moments of your life hearing that your son could have been hit. >> well, yeah. i was screaming out his name. i thought he couldn't be far away. so he should shout out dad or something or stop or something and he wasn't there. >> had you ever seen a dead body before? >> no. my first time. and i was lying just next to one
1:22 am
which really was not in a collectible position at that moment. >> you must have been very, very frightend. >> yes. i can't imagine. other survivors of the terror attacks sharing their stories as well. there was another who witnessed a shooting from a restaurant. she's joining us from paris. erin, first off, i want to ask you where you were and what you witnessed. >> i was at a restaurant around the corner. we actually didn't see very much, but we heard the gunshots. they were incredibly loud and right outside of the restaurant. all of a sudden we got under the table as soon as it started. we immediately knew what it was. there were about 25 of us that had dinner together. we had been in town for a photo affair. as soon as it stopped, somebody got up and saw people were shot at the cafe around the corner.
1:23 am
>> i know you wanted to focus on some of the positive things that you experienced during this traumatic time and it looks like we've lost erin's signal. i should mention that she wanted to highlight the fact that there were some good happening during this really horrific time. she said that while they were barricaded inside a little restaurant, she saw strangers helping each other during this time and it really helped restore her faith in the world. we want to thank erin for sharing her story with us. sorry about that signal. that didn't really work out. >> you're watching "cnn newsroom" as parishians mourn and begin healing from the tragedy in paris. some wonder how they will recover. we'll hear from them next. security has been beefed up for the weekend's g-20 summit. a live report from turkey in just a moment. we stop arthritis pain, so you don't have to stop. tylenol® 8hr arthritis pain
1:24 am
has two layers of pain relief. the first is fast. the second lasts all day. we give you your day back. what you do with it is up to you. tylenol®.
1:25 am
1:26 am
here in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell. i'm a.m. per walker. thanks for being with us. we have new developments to talk about in the aftermath and investigation of the paris terror attacks. french police now have found a second car used in the attack. >> the first car was found near the bataclan concert hall. it turned out to be a belgian
1:27 am
rental vehicle. that led to raids and arrests in belgium on saturday. >> six family members much one of the attackers have been taken into custody. they're relatives of ismael omar mostefai. the only suspect identified so far. they've not been arrested or charged. >> what you hear there, that's the gunfire. that's new video that shows the moments that it happened as a band performed at the bataclan concert hall, which is the site of the deadliest assault. >> it's a terrifying sound there. at least seven attackers working in three teams. six locations across paris friday night including the bataclan, several restaurants and a football stadium. 129 people were killed, 352 others wounded. >> isis has claimed responsibility. french president is vowing a ruthless response at what he called an act of war. he declared three days of mourning.
1:28 am
>> around the world people are showing their solidarity with france. major cities across the u.s., canada and throughout europe changed lights on historic buildings to represent the colors of france. >> meanwhile, in many parts of paris, people are taking time to visit memorials at the scenes of the attacks. we spoke to some of the mourners about the horrible violence and how it might change that city. >> reporter: the sound of paris has been reduced to a murmur of mourning as parisians come to this tiny corner of the city to see the aftermath. alexandra was supposed to meet her friends here last night. >> maybe i catch you later guys. i never catch them. a few of my friends. and i didn't say to my family, i said to my family, i go to -- i
1:29 am
didn't say i change my plans. my mom she came to the hospital looking if she find my body. >> reporter: they stare at the bullet holes and look in disbelief at the sidewalks covered in sawdust and sand to absorb the blood. they come with their dogs and bicycles. they hold their children. the police allow people to linger close to the crime scene. they share an intimate grief. you can still see here the measuring used by the forensics to measure the bullet holes. this is how raw the emotion is. people have been coming here throughout the day, dazed and shocked, trying to understand why a place like this would become the target of a terror attack. mother and daughter, vivian and caroline, live around the corner. do you think this will change paris? >> we're scared she says. i'm worried for my neighbors and this will change our daily
1:30 am
lives. but we are stronger than this, she says. >> this woman from san jose, california was enjoying a glass of wine when he heard gunshots. >> we heard lots of gunshots. i stood up to sort of peek around and saw terrified people running at me. >> reporter: in this neighborhood, everyone is a local. alexandra said they struck at the city's warm heart. >> they just took this away this morning. were crying and i fell down on the streets. they didn't touch the -- they touched my heart. it's like we just missing something. we're missing something. >> reporter: the heart of a city that still beats with life even as it grieves for its dead. atika shubert, cnn. >> it's my wife and i, it's been a while since we visited paris,
1:31 am
the simplicity, the carefreeness of the city, it's hard to see people coping with dealing with such a terrible thing that happened on the streets there. >> the fact that it is a lively city and to see it plunged into this kind of grief right now. >> very sad. >> in the meantime, the g-20 summit opens in the shadow of the bloodshed there. it will dominate the agenda in turkey as world leaders focus on fighting terrorism. >> last hour, u.s. president barack obama met with turkish president erred won ahead of the summit. for the latest, let's go live to michelle kosinski live in turkey. michelle, good to have you with us. terrorism is not the basis for the g-20 summit. but given what happened in paris, there's no doubt terrorism will be front and center to world leaders.
1:32 am
>> reporter: absolutely. this meeting is supposed to be about economics and inclusive development. there are still sessions planned in which leaders are going to discuss development and discuss climate change. you can see how this is a dark shadow over this meeting. even before the paris attacks, they did put syria and isis on the formal agenda for the dinner tonight instead of an economic issue. that's the first time that happened. also, even before paris, the u.s. administration was talking about, with these leaders all in one place, the discussion would include how to intensify the fight against isis. you can only imagine how deep these discussions are going to get given what has just happened. president obama is also coming under some criticism in the u.s. for statements he made recently. a day before the paris attacks saying that isis was contained, among other statements. he's going to face questions like that. we're expecting to hear from president obama very soon.
1:33 am
right now, he's meeting with the turkish president. once that meeting wraps up, they'll give a few brief statements afterwards. it's hard to imagine that president obama won't again address what happened in paris. we'll have to wait and see. then from there, he will take questions from the press tomorrow. that's going to be the big opportunity for him to face those extremely difficult questions about strategy, what happens next and what these leaders together might agree on here on the fight against isis. >> it is interesting to point out that term contained. the president taking heat from that. did clarify he was talking about on the battlefield. still, given what happened in paris, people are still asking a lot of questions about that word that was used. let's talk also about security there. stepped up with so many world leaders coming together, are there noticeable differences that you've seen just given what happened in france? >> reporter: security here is
1:34 am
absolutely incredible. i'm not sure that i have ever seen anything quite like it in anything that i've covered in any other country. i mean, maybe the olympics. this isn't on the same scale in terms of the number of attendees of course. but because there are so many world leaders here and more than 20, even though it's called the g-20. you see it as soon as you get here. getting here is extremely difficult. i mean, the checkpoints and the different shuttles you need to get on and the number of times you need to get in security. at least five times through the magnetometers. 12,000 police and soldiers are on duty during this event. there are shift and patrol boats on the mediterranean. there is air defense 24/7 in case there's something from the air or even a drone. we know that security is extremely tight. you can absolutely feel it everywhere you go here. >> terrorism is going to be a
1:35 am
big topic there. but michelle, briefly, can you give us a breakdown of a laundry list of other topics covered in the g20. >> reporter: yeah. there are many of them. i mean, it's supposed to be about economic cooperation. so investment, trying to come up with plans individually among nations and then together in a broader picture of how to spur growth. that's been a question for a long thyme. inclusiveness is a big topic. that's supposed to be one of the themes here today. climate change. also the syrian refugee crisis, which now, given what has happened in paris, is facing a lot of questions in the united states. even though the u.s. has agreed to take far, far fewer refugees than other countries throughout europe. >> live in turkey, michelle kosinski live for us. michelle, thank you for your reporting there. friday's attacks and the battle against isis were also a central theme at a u.s.
1:36 am
presidential debate saturday. >> during the second showdown between the democratic contenders. hillary clinton said the bulk of the responsibility and fighting the terror group does not belong to the united states. her rival, bernie sanders disagreed. listen. >> it cannot be an a american fight. i think what the president has consistently said, which i agree with, we will support those who take the fight to isis. that is why we have troops in iraq that are helping to train and build back up the iraqi military, why we have special operators in syria working with the kurds and arabs, so that we can be supportive. but this cannot be an american fight, although american leadership is essential. >> one area of disagreement with the secretary. i think she said something like the bulk of the responsibility is not ours. well, in fact, i would argue that the disastrous invasion of iraq, something that i strongly
1:37 am
opposed, has unraveled the region completely. and led to the rise of al qaeda and to isis. >> now, the debate began with a moment of silence for france an the victims of the attacks. europe is on edge and world leaders say lessons will be learned from what happened in paris. the latest on how european capitals are beefing up security. >> and the world is showing that it stands with paris with vigils held from sydney to jerusalem to new york all remembering the lives lost. some of those scenes as newsroom continues.
1:38 am
1:39 am
1:40 am
welcome back to our special coverage of the terror attacks in france. a state of emergency remains in effect in that country and the country's interior minister says that people may not be able to move as freely as they did before these terror attacks. there are changes. other nations are ramping up security. phil black has more on that. >> reporter: proof terror is contagious. hours after the paris attacks, a terminal at london's airport as closed and cleared. police arrested a 41-year-old frenchman seen acting suspiciously and saw him with, quote, what appears to be a firearm. police didn't know if it was a working weapon or what the man's
1:41 am
intentions were. they were treating it all seriously because of the events in paris. >> a horrifying and sickening attack. >> the british prime minister promised lessons would be learned from paris. >> it is clear that the threat from isil is evolving. last night's attack suggest a new degree of planning and coordination and a greater ambition for mass casualty attacks. >> david cameron said british police have been training for this style of terrorism since the mumbai attack of 2008 where multiple gunmen massacred 164 people. >> this summer and in london we did a massive exercise for this exact scenario. tragedy has happened in paris in the last 24 hours. we were looking at ought mal matic weaponry. >> reporter: these forces are patrolling a french airport much the terror created so powerfully in paris has triggered increased security measures across western
1:42 am
europe. italian prime minister along with officials in germany and the netherlands announced necessity would do even more to try to prevent further attacks. now, there's extra attention on security at large imminent international events. leaders of g20 nations gather in turkey this weekend as france is due to host the next big climate change conference in just two weeks. the french government says it will go ahead securely despite the vulnerabilities so brutally exposed in paris. phil black, cnn, london. france has temporarily reinstated border controls suspending the schengen agreement. in europe's schengen -- people had been able to travel between states without border checks. 26 countries make up the schengen area.
1:43 am
>> not all schengen members are part of the european union and not all eu members fall within the schengen zone. people around the world are showing their support for paris by holding vigils and we want to show you the scene in a public square in jerusalem where a small crowd spelled out paris in candles. >> other displays in other countries. this was london's fell gar square. social media has been another platform for people to send well wishes to paris. for more on the worldwide reaction let's go to rosie who is in london. an outpouring of support and show of solidarity from around the world. >> absolutely. as you say, the pictures show the world has been awash with the colors. the colors which have come to
1:44 am
embody the stunning visual display of global solidarity with the french people for this atrocious series of events. that's happened on the streets at these vigils in terms of lighting up monuments around the world and it's also happened across social media with the colors, embodying that expression of solidarity. speaking of facebook, people have used a filter of the flag with their photos to show sympathy and support for france. what's been interesting about this, though, when it comes to social media, it's reminded us of the multifaceted role it plays in these events, not just in terms of a platform. people communicate their sympathy but to show -- one thing in focus is facebook releasing the safety check app which has been the first time it's been used in a nonnatural disaster. more than 4 million people
1:45 am
checking in to show -- >> that's interesting. the security notifications. i turned on my facebook on the commercial break and i saw that my friends who are in paris are doing okay without having me to reach out to them. it lets you know that they're fine. but also facebook taking heat for its response to the attack. >> it has been, yes. there's been some backlash, it wasn't deployed in recent y - events. beirut one example, bombings there. facebook released a statement. really what they said and wanted to highlight, it is the first time we've used this in a nonnatural disaster. the implication of it being a pilot for them. trying it out to see its effectiveness. the questions of whether it wasn't used like in beirut, they said and i quote, that it's a tool that's not particularly useful in war where there's not necessarily a start and an end
1:46 am
date. whether that's a direct response to beirut or not, we can't be sure. the point they're making is this was a specific instance in paris they felt was the right time to try out the tool. it's been very effective, obviously. >> playing a crucial role when it comes to communication. rosie tomkins, live in london. skbliefrnl still to come, we're learning about some of the victims killed in the paris attacks. their names, nationalities, who they are and who they leave behind. that's next.
1:47 am
1:48 am
1:49 am
welcome back. we take a closer look at how the attacks unfolded. all happening within about 30-minutes time. this coordinated effort targeted busy areas, including a soccer area and a concert at the bataclan and several restaurants. pamela brown has more. >> reporter: three teams of terrorists armed with rifles and matching explosive devices. launch coordinated attacks at six locations, unleashing chaos across the streets of paris. it starts at 9:20 p.m., a soccer match between france and germany is rocked by a thunderous explosi explosion. an apparent suicide bomber detonates killing himself and an
1:50 am
innocent bystander. france's president on site to cheer on his team whisked away to safety. >> i thought there's something wrong here. >> five minutes later, the second attack at two paris restaurants. terrorists open fire killing at least 15, seriously wounding 10 more. french officials say the killers wore masks and arrived by car. shell casings left behind indicate they fired more than 100 rounds. >> we had huge gunshots and lots of glass coming through the window. so we ducked on to the floor with all of the other diners. >> reporter: 9:30, a second explosion outside the soccer stadium. thousands of fans flee the scene. the body of a second suicide bomber is found. 9:32. a team of terrorists opened fire outside a bar. five people are killed. eight others wounded. 9:36, at least 19 people are shot and killed outside another
1:51 am
restaurant. 9:40, another explosion on boulevard voltaire another the bataclan concert hall. and five where the eagles of metal death were playing. >> witnesses say the attackers came in firing and one person heard one person yelling a la akbar. at least 89 killed and attackers also dead three wearing explosive belts. >> from the ground floor, a lot of blood. some people are -- had been -- had to stay for several hours among dead corpse and they went out covered with blood. >> reporter: then 9:53, a third explosion near the soccer stadium. police later find the body of another suicide bomber.
1:52 am
a siege of gunfire, explosions and bloodshed leading to the deadliest terror attack in europe in more than a decade. pamela brown, cnn, washington. sports teams across the united states took time out on saturday to express sympathy and solidarity with paris after the unprecedented attacks there. >> in the state of new york, the army black knights football field entered the field waving a french flag. >> in the state of maryland, a moment of silence observed at the beginning of the navy game. >> on the west coast, the los angeles clippers and the detroit pistons also paid tribute to the victims. ♪ >> what you hear there, the french national anthem. it was their way of commemorating the 129 people who were killed. as we continue to get more information about the attacks, we are also learning much more about the victims.
1:53 am
some their identities and the lives that they lived. we're going to take a moment now to focus on a few of them. so many lives cut short, each with a different story. lynda kinkade reports. >> reporter: vibrant and energetic. that's how american amy gonzalez was described as a classmate. a design student at california state university long beach was studying abroad in paris. she was meant to return home after one semester. >> she had a buoyant joyous personality. she was extremely lively. extremely energetic. sniet british citizen worked with the band eagles of death metal playing at the bataclan theater. according to his family, he died doing the job he loved. they told the guardian newspaper, he was not just our brother, son and uncle. he was everyone's best friend. generous, funny and fiercely
1:54 am
loyal. his girlfriend tweeted, sleep tight my sweet prince. >> three victims from chile. including luis philip -- musician who lived in paris for eight years. valentine rab someone who studied at the london school of economics. >> valentin ribet, a talented young loyer murdered. another who died in the paris attacks. president of universal music france tweeted, universal music family is in mourning. thomas, marie, manu. our thoughts are with their families and friends. rest in peace. french soccer player was on the field on friday night when terror struck there and hit very close to home. his cousin was there to support him and lost her life.
1:55 am
on his facebook page, the midfielder wrote that she was a guide, a support, a big sister. and he urged people to remain respectful, saying it's important for all of us who are representatives of our country and its diversity to speak and to remain united against a horror that has no color, no religion. lynda kinkade, cnn. let's go now live to -- we have the turkish president erred wan and u.s. president barack obama making comments in advance of the g20 summit. >> issues facing the globe. >> but as president erdogan noted, the skies have been darkened by the horrific attacks that took place in paris just a
1:56 am
day and a half ago. as was true with the terrible attacks that took place in ankrah, the killing of innocent people based on a twisted ideology is not just an attack on france, not just on turkey, but it's an attack on the civilized world. as we sure i'm sure each said to president hollande and the french people, we stand in solidarity with them and hunting down the perpetrators of this crime and bringing them to
1:57 am
justice. turkey has been a strong partner with the united states and other members of the coalition in going after the activities of isil or dash both in syria and iraq. as a nato ally, we have worked together to bring about pressure on isil even as we also try to bring about a political transition inside of syria that can relieve the suffering of so many people and eliminate the environment in which isil can
1:58 am
operate. so the discussion we had today, i think, was very helpful in helping to continue to coordinate the work that we're doing together to help to fortify the borders between syria and turkey that allow dash to operate. we discussed the progress that's been made in diplomatic talks in vienna led by our foreign ministers and an insistence that we will redouble our efforts working with other members of coalition to bring about a peaceful transition in syria and to eliminate dash as a force that can create so much pain and
1:59 am
suffering for people in paris and ankrah and other parts of the globe.we also had an opport discuss the burden of refugees that turkey has been bearing. the united states as the largest provider of humanitarian assistance to displaced persons and refugees stands shoulder to shoulder with turkey, europe and others in trying to help those
2:00 am
who need help right now even as we hope to reduce the flow of migrants because of the situation inside of syria. address other critical issues, climate change, inclusive development and growth and other topics that are of great importance to all the g20 countries. i want to once again thank president erdogan for his leadership in what i'm confident will be a very productive and important meeting.
2:01 am
>> and there you have it. you just heard the u.s. president barack obama sitting next to turkish president erdogan after their meeting and you just heard president obama kind of go through all the things that they were able to discuss. of course, the paris terror attacks dominated their talks and obviously, that's in the direction of what to do with isis and of course, a syrian civil war and the refugee crisis and able to discuss the climate change talks that are coming up in paris as well. obviously, the focus is how to fight isis and bring an end as well to the syrian civil war which is really allowed isis to
2:02 am
thrive in that part of the world and become a threat to people beyond the borders of syria and iraq. >> while in turkey, the u.s. president also mentioned the twin bombing that happened in ankara, the deadliest attack in that country that happened at a peace rally near the main train station. an important mention by the president ahead of the g20 summit happening in turkey. we have a lot to get to this hour. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. we begin with the latest from paris. the only identified suicide bomber had been taken into custody. the family members had not been arrested or charged. also confirmed, police found a second car used in the attacks east of the french capital. >> we have new video from inside the bataclan as the attacks started there. take a listen. >> you can hear the gunfire loud
2:03 am
and clear as the band performs on stage. that is the beginning of what became a three-hour hostage situation and massacre that killed 89 people and wounded dozens. now, authorities are working to track down any suspected accomplices. at least 129 people are dead. more than 350 wounded after friday's shootings and explosions. earlier, our poppy harlow spoke with paris deputy mayor patrick klugman. >> of course, we are very concerned. the threat is still going on. the risk being is very high and nothing says that this sequence, this terror sequence is over yet. of course, we are very concerned. all day and all the evening we have some information stating that there may be rifle here,
2:04 am
explosion there. of course, most of this is false information. but the threat is still very high. and, again, we are ready to face anything now that we have known what happened yesterday. >> again, that was the deputy mayor of paris speaking with our own poppy harlow. let's now bring in fred pleitgen who is in paris. we understand that the french president, hollande is meeting with the former french president, nicolas sarkozy. can you tell us about the significance of these two coming together, mr. sarkozy, much further to the right politically. >> reporter: they're very much, very far apart. sarkozy, more to the right and francois hollande, a socialist president. here in france, there's been a lot of political fighting here in this country over the past couple of years, running up to
2:05 am
elections. it's very important for these two leaders to demonstrator these two politicians to demonstrate that there is unity in these times when this country is, of course, facing something like the terror attack that happened here on friday. of course, we have to keep in mind that it's not only that. we're in a situation where france is facing the second major terror attack in this country this year. only a couple of months apart these two. at this point in time, these two will want to demonstrate that any sort of political wrangling going on between them is something they're willing to bury for the time. that they need to respond to all of us. francois hollande came out and said there would be a harsh response to the attacks that happened and at the same time, the investigation is very much going onment it's a fast-moving investigation. however, it's one where those leading the investigation say it's in its early stages and there has been significant new information that we've been getting over the past couple of hours. you mentioned it. one of the apparent cars used by
2:06 am
at least one of those three teams of attackers was apparently found. a black car found in a town a little bit to the east of paris. then we have one of the suicide bombers being identified as ismael mostefai. he's been identified and also some of his family members taken into custody for questioning as well. finally, you had the raids that happened in belgium, first and foremost, in a town with several suspects detained as well. at least one of the raids in direct connection with what happened here in paris. so it is a time here in this country where the country needs to overcome, where the country needs to show that it's strong and unified and it's very important for these two politicians that are very much at odds with each other in normal day-to-day political life show some sort of unity. >> with the world watching this and quite frankly, mourning the
2:07 am
loss of 129 people in these attacks, you can't help but just think about paris on any given day. the sitting at the cafes, the carefree nature of the city now juxtaposed with the stepped up security. how are everyday parys paris ans coping? >> reporter: it's interesting. i came into the city only a couple hours after the attacks. there was a lot of shock among the population here that many people were quite afraid, at least in the first couple of hours especially after the french president came out and said listen, we think it's better for people not to leave their houses, to stay inside. however, two days or almost two days removed now from in happening, you do feel a bigger sense of defiance, you feel that the people are showing that they're not going to be intimidated by terrorism. at the same time, of course, the people who witnessed all of
2:08 am
this, the people, some of whom were inside these venues when this was going on, even the ones who managed to escape are very much traumatized. i want you to look at one person who i managed to speak to who survived the raid at the bataclan. said he's absolutely terrified. let's have a look. >> forensic experts continue investigating the scene at the bataclan theater where the deadliest of friday's terror attacks in paris took place. several dozen people were killed by four gunmen here alone and those who survived say they're traumatized. this man was one of them. he and several others managed to hide in a small room, frightened that terrorists might find and kill them. >> we didn't see anything but we could hear precisely the sound of the machine guns. they were very loud. like the worst one we heard, they were kind of shaking. >> the american band, eagle of death metal was playing at the
2:09 am
venue when the gunmen forced their way in, taking hostages and executing many according to police. french s.w.a.t. teams later raided the building and all attackers were killed. he will never forget the carnage he saw after police freed him and the others. >> the actual bloodiness, like there was blood everywhere, even people alive were covered with blood. >> concern among those who laid in the area around the scene of the attack. of course, the people who witnessed the attacks are absolutely shocked by wlapd here. residents have said they want a strong response from the authorities to make sure the french capital is safe for them to live in. >> this woman recently moved to paris from new york. she said the fact that isis is behind the attack scares her. >> are they going to do?
2:10 am
like what's going to be next? it's just like i'm afraid. >> fear mixed with anger at those that hit this european capital with a major terror attack for the second time in less than a year. >> reporter: of course, one of the places where people are displaying that is behind me where people are comingment many to lay down flowers, to light candles or commemorate those who were killed. later today, around 6:30 p.m. local time here in paris, there is going to be a service at the notre dame cathedral once again as the city looks to overcome, looks to remember those who were killed in these terror attacks. george. >> fred pleitgen, live for us in parys. thank you for your reporting there. we know one of the suicide bombers has been identified as ismael omar mostefai. we also got word that a half dozen of his family members have been taken into custody.
2:11 am
now, a source close to the investigation says officials have the passports of two attackers or they found the passports near their bodies. but they suspect those passports are fake. in the meantime, isis claimed responsibility for the attacks which french president francois hollande called an act of war. belgium authorities made a number of arrests after conducting anti-terror rings saturday. a western intelligence source tells cnn at one of the raids is directly connected to the paris attacks. >> a belgium car found near the scene of the concert hall attack was rented by someone in a brussels suburb. this comes as the belgium government raised the overall threat level of the country from high to -- to high from moderate. >> the fbi is sending additional help to the paris bureau to assist. we are joined by tom fuentes.
2:12 am
he's a former fbi assistant director. tom, great to have you on the line. before we talk about the fbi's role, i want your take on the latest developments we're getting on the investigation. in particular, that second car found abandoned. fred pleitgen just referred to that in his report. what does that point to you? do you think that could show that more attackers or accomplices were able to get away? >> absolutely. at shows that there were more people involved in in than died at the scene or were apprehended shortly after. so there are more people involved. that means more vehicles to move them around. that means additional safe houses where the bombs were assembled. where the weapons were stored. possibly other locations in the countryside where they did some training to shoot the weapons. so i think that, yeah, as the investigation goes forward, there will be more suspects, more vehicles, more residences that come into play in the whole
2:13 am
scheme of the case. >> how confident are you that authorities will be able to hunt down everyone who was involved? >> not confident at all. there are so many people that could have been on the periphery of this whose names may not come up or were maybe going to get involved in this and are waiting for another attack another day. so we just don't know. you know, we know that france has thousands of people that have returned from the battlefields in syria, back to france and their neighboring european countries have large numbers of people that have returned. so when the president of france says this is war, i think he needs to be very careful. we heard that same rhetoric by our president george w. bush in the aftermath of 9/11. you know, the question is, where does that war get waged? in the neighborhoods of paris, in the suburbs of paris? do you further alienate the people that already feel alienated and, therefore, make
2:14 am
it easier for them, not only to recruit people into their chapters of isis in france and belgium and in the neighboring countries of europe, but to actually want to get revenge on the french. they have to be very careful. i know it's tempting to just strike back and do something because the people are so angry. but they have to be careful of an overreaction. it may back fooir and the consequences may be worse than they anticipated. >> that's a good point. you want to make sure you're measured in these kinds of moments, especially with emotions riding high. that's alarming to hear when you say you're not confident that the authorities will be able to hunt down all the terrorists/accomplices involved in the attacks. how can authorities deep the citizens safe -- keep the citizens safe in france? >> i think in one sense they can't completely guarantee their safety. that's a fact of life in the
2:15 am
modern europe. i've said before, you can contain a virus, like ebola, we didn't talk about it when it was on the verge of a pandemic two years ago. you can't contain the ideology that fuels this kind of hate all over the world. people have traveled to join isis from asia, from south america, from north america, from australia. they've gone and they've come back, in many cases to their home country filled with hate and filled with capability and i don't see how every one of them can be identified. every one of them be surveilled and monitored on a daily basis 24/7. none of the countries, the european countries do not have the security apparatus to do it. so i don't think -- i don't think you would want that. i don't think they'd want to have such a police state that would be capable of it. until this ideology is somehow neutralized. i don't know if that's going to take ten years or a thousand
2:16 am
years, but until this extreme ideology gets eliminated, then you're going to have terrorists and only need a few people to pull these attacks off. it took 12 kids in mumbai to hold a city of 20 million people hostage for three days. this has been referred to as similar to the mumbai attack. we had the movie theater attack here that was somewhat similar to the 2002 opera house takeover in moscow where 700 people were held hostage for a couple of days. when the authorities finally injected a nerve gas, which they've not wanted to identify, it ended up resulting in 133 hostages being killed. it did kilo owe subdue and kill all 40 terrorists that had taken over the facilities. these things are going to continue. these kind of attacks. and then he have time there is an attack and people die, that's
2:17 am
viewed as a success by isis. we may not view it as successful because the people that committed it died but to them that's a huge success. that gives them ideas for few if you remember attacks and one attack leads to copying those techniques in the next attack. using a variety of weapons, bombs, explosive vests and go to places where large crowds are contained, such as the stadium, such as the movie theater, such as train stations in mumbai. this is something that's going to be extremely difficult and i think the europeans are just way over their heads in this situation. they've had so many of their people go to syria, learn and then when they come back, it takes one or two people that have been to syria to train dozens of others in how to shoot the weapons. >> that's a scary thing about all this. like you said, you can only do so much militarily.
2:18 am
but you have to fight this ideology and that's the perplexing question in terms of how to approach that. tom fuentes, great having you as always. thanks for that conversation. >> shocking indeed that he does not have confidence in their ability to round people up and how long it will take to turn the tide on that radical ideology. you're watching "cnn newsroom" and coming up. a concert hall turned into a place of carnage. witnesses describe it as an organized bloodbath. we'll talk to an eyewitness whose brother wanted to attend that performance. the g20 summit begins in an hour from now. it will top the agenda at the meeting of world leaders. a live report coming up from turkey. this holiday season, get ready for homecomings. i see you brought a friend? i wanna see, i wanna see. longing.
2:19 am
serendipity. what are the... chances. and good tidings to all. hang onto your antlers. it's the event you don't want to miss. it's the season of audi sales event. get up to a $2,500 bonus for highly qualified lessees on select audi models. like limiting where you earn bonus cash back.hings. why put up with that? but the quicksilver card from capital one likes to keep it simple. real simple. i'm talking easy like-a- walk-in-the-park, nothing-to-worry-about, man-that-feels-good simple. quicksilver earns you unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere. it's a simple question. what's in your wallet? same eyes. same laugh. and since she's had moderate alzheimer's disease, i've discovered we have the same fighting spirit, too. that's why i asked her doctor about new once-a-day namzaric™.
2:20 am
vo: new namzaric is approved for moderate to severe alzheimer's disease in patients who are currently taking, and can continue to take certain doses of both namenda and donepezil. new namzaric is the first and only treatment to combine 2 proven alzheimer's medicines into a single once-a-day capsule that works 2 ways to fight the symptoms of moderate to severe alzheimer's disease. once-a-day namzaric may improve cognition and overall function and may slow the worsening of symptoms for a while. namzaric does not change how the disease progresses. it shouldn't be taken by anyone allergic to memantine, donepezil, piperidine or any of the ingredients in namzaric. before starting treatment, tell the doctor about any medical conditions they have... including heart or lung problems, seizures, stomach ulcers, bladder, kidney, or liver problems. tell the doctor if the patient will have any procedures involving anesthesia, which may cause muscle problems. other serious side effects may occur, including slow heartbeat and fainting; increased stomach acid, which may raise the chance of ulcers and bleeding;
2:21 am
nausea and vomiting; difficulty passing urine, seizures, and worsening of lung problems. the most common side effects associated with namzaric are headache, diarrhea, dizziness, loss of appetite, and bruising. woman: mom and i share a lot of moments. and we're making the most of each one. vo: ask your doctor if new namzaric is right for your loved one. welcome back everyone. we want to recap the latest in the paris attacks. in attending the g20 summit in turkey, president barack obama said moments ago that the skies had been darkened, his words, by the horrific attack that took place in paris a day and a half ago. he said we stand in solidarity with them in hunting down the perpetrators of this crime and bringing them to justice. in france, police found a second car used in the attacks. the first car found near the bataclan con ert hall.
2:22 am
it turned out to be a belgium rental car. that led to raids and arrests in belgium on saturday. also, six family members of one of the attackers have been taken into custody. they're the relatives of ismael omar mostefai. the only suspect identified so far. they have not been arrested or charged. >> the sound of a concert, then you hear gunfire. that's the new video that shows the moment that gunfire erupted as the band performed inside the bataclan concert hall, which was the site of the deadliest assault. >> at least seven attackers working in three teams targeted six locations across paris friday night, including the bataclan, several restaurants and a football stadium. 129 people were killed. 350 others wounded. >> isis claimed responsibility. the french president is vowing a ruthless response to what he called an act of war.
2:23 am
>> now the bloodiest scene from that terrible night in paris was at the bataclan concert hall. fans just wanted to watch an american band. but at least 89 people were killed there. >> found themselves in a chaotic scene there. witnesses told cnn that shooters were organized as they shot into the crowd. another witness simply said it was a bloodbath. margo was outside that concert hall and joins us live from paris. margo, good to have you with us this day. you were near the bataclan when this happened. you were getting just out of the subway, yes? it was unusually calm as you described it. tell us what happened next. >> well, i was going out of the subway and it was as you said. there were -- i was going to a bar next to the subway. people were outside of the bar. it was crowded. then someone said they're just around the corner.
2:24 am
hurry up. so the security told us to rush in the bar and they lock us up in there. and then i found my experience inside, nobody knew what was going on. i asked if people knew anything, but no one could answer. no one -- the cell reception was really bad. the manager of the bar just told us to stop the music and said that there was a shooting next to the bataclan, which was 400 meters from where we are. they said the police ordered us to stay inside. we just were there and trying to figure out what was going on. we received a lot -- from our parents and friends. they were the ones who told us what was going on.
2:25 am
inside we didn't have tvs, we couldn't hear anything. >> you were just inside. i mean, were you crouched under a table? what were you doing? could you hear the gunfire? >> i didn't hear. i think i arrived -- i was outside when the two -- friends a little later, they heard the shots. i was in the basement. there was a room downstairs, and we just tried to stay calm and when we were in the basement, in the ground cellar, they were staying under the tables. at this time the security guards were outside and they started to rush in. and they shouted to everyone just everyone on the floor, so in one second everyone was just lying there and trying to know
2:26 am
what was going to be next. we didn't know how long we were going to stay there. >> that's terrifying. i also understand that your twin brother was supposed to go to the bataclan with his best friend, but he didn't go, yes? but his friend did? >> yes. his friend was there. took three bullets. since then, he received two surgeries. one of the bullets almost touched his spine. so now we are wondering if he'll be able to walk. he'll be probably paralyzed. i don't know. >> my best friend was at the concert hall. she didn't know what was going on. she received a text from our mother before the end of night saying that it was being evacuated. she told her to just leave. so she left with a friend before and rushed to her arms sitting
2:27 am
not far from there. >> terrifying. and also to understand that there were so many people who were close to you who were also affected by this. even on the other side of the city. thank you for sharing this with our viewers. still to come, we return to france where authorities say the bloodshed was the result of very careful planning. a closer look at the coordinated terror attacks across paris as "cnn newsroom" continues. also, how the world is showing solidarity with the french capital. that's next. when heartburn comes creeping up on you. fight back with relief so smooth and fast. tums smoothies starts dissolving the instant it touches your tongue. and neutralizes stomach acid at the source. tum-tum-tum-tum-tums smoothies, only from tums. at&t and directv are now one. so get ready to laugh here
2:28 am
and cry here. scream over here and freak out over there! and maybe go back to laughing here. and crying there. try not to laugh here though, it's rude. and maybe don't cry here, people will get the wrong idea. get directv at home and 2 wireless lines for under $99 a month from directv and at&t. hi! so it says here i can redeem my cashback bonus for discovercash.. do i need to have a certain amount? nope, you can redeem your cashback for any amount, any time. that's great. yeah, you can use it for a statement credit or even get the cash. nice. i could use that extra cash for a last-minute gift. one less thing hanging over your head, right? tell me about it. gary, you got to go. who's gary? a mistake from last year coming back around again. too much egg nog! yes! laaaaa... at discover we treat you like you'd treat you. redeem your cashback for any amount, any time. get it at discover.com.
2:29 am
2:30 am
welcome back to our viewers in the you state and around the world. i'm george howell. i'm amara walker. we have new developments to tell you about in the aftermath and the investigation in the wake of the paris terror attacks. police have found a second car used in the attacks. this follows a discovery of a vehicle outside the bataclan. it turned out to be a belgian rental vehicle. that led to arrest this is belgium. six family members of one of the attackers have been taken into custody. they're the relatives of ismael omar mostefai, the only suspect identified so far. they have not been arrested, nor
2:31 am
charged. >> what you see there is the concert and what you hear later, the gunfire. gunfire in this new video shows the moments that this happened in the performance hall. the bataclan concert hall, the site of the deadliest assault. >> at least seven attackers working in three teams targeted six locations across paris friday night, including the bataclan, several restaurants and a football stadium. 129 people were killed. 352 others wounded. >> isis claimed responsibility. the french president is vowing a "ruthless response" to what he called "an act of war." a short time ago at the g20 meeting site in turkey, president obama said the skies have been darkened by the horrific attacks that took place in paris a day and a half ago we said we stand in solidarity with them and hunting down the
2:32 am
perpetrators of this crime and bringing them to justice. in the shadow of what happened in paris, the g20 summit opens in turkey. we have a reporter there. we'll continue to gather information about what is being said between the u.s. president barack obama and between the turkish president erdogan. >> as you would imagine, the terror attacks dominating the agenda at the g20 summit. turkish president erdogan is scheduled to give opening remarks about an hour from now. we'll take that live when it does indeed happen. >> absolutely. the battle against isis and friday's terror attacks in france were also a central theme at saturday's democratic u.s. presidential debate. >> during the second showdown between the democratic contenders, front-runner, hillary clinton hilt said the bulk of the responsibility is fighting the terror group does nat belong to the united states. her rival, bernie sanders, disagrees.
2:33 am
>> it cannot be an american fight. i think what the president has consistently said, which i agree with, we will support those who take the fight to isis. that is why we have troops in iraq that are helping to train and build back up the iraqi military, why we have special praise tors in syria working with the kurds and arabs so we can be supportive. american leadership is essential. >> let me talk one area of disagreement with the secretary. i think she said the bulk of the responsibility is not ours. well, in fact, i would argue that the disastrous invasion of iraq, something that i strongly opposed, has unraveled the region completely and led to the rise of al qaeda and to isis. >> the debate opened with a moment of silence for france and for the victims the terror attacks.
2:34 am
now, people around the world are showing their support for paris by holding vigils and we want to show you the scene in a public square in jerusalem where a small crowd spelled out paris in candles. >> thousands of miles away a similar display in sydney, australia. people laid flowers and lit candles. this was london's trafalgar square in a display of solidarity. >> authorities are asking people to space out blood donations. so many are trying to help that some are being turned away at the moment. >> this is the scene outside of a blood bank on saturday. hundreds of people waited in long lines in order to donate blood to help the hundreds of people who had been wounded or hurt in these attacks. the world, of course, has been reacting to the paris attacks with messages of love and support. social media sites have been an
2:35 am
outlet for sending condolences and allowing people to talk about their safety. let's bring in rows i tomkins live from london. it's impressive and extraordinary to see the role social media has been playing in all of this. >> yes, absolutely. it's events like this that bring into focus the multifaceted role that it plays. as said, on the one hand, a crucial platform to express condolences and a crucial tool for communication. for people to find each other or offer help and show their whereabouts, show they're safe. get others to safety. the most interesting thing on this event has been the safety check app on facebook which many have noticed for the first time being used in a situation like this. now, facebook created this a few years ago after the tsunami in tokyo. but this is the first time they've released it dug a nonnatural disaster. it's been extremely effective.
2:36 am
more than 4 million people used the app. there's backlash why it hasn't been used before this. again, just highlighting the role that social media plays and how broad it's come. rosie tomkins, many thanks to you on that. we also want to head over to an italia turkey where president erdogan is welcoming others to the kbchlt 20 summit. michelle, president erdogan and president obama had a bilateral meetingment no surprise, what dominated the talks was the terror attacks in paris. >> yeah. absolutely. as expected. one of the most interesting things that happened during that brief remarks, they didn't take any questions, but at the end, someone yelled a question to president obama, what are you considering in terms of additional action against isis in the light of the paris
2:37 am
attacks? he wouldn't answer that. but he said wait until tomorrow's press conference. it sounds like he had something prepared. i don't know if this means there will be additional action. but of course, that's what the world wants to know right now. the dinner that's going to focus on syria and isis, the other meetings are taking place, that's really a chance for these discussions to be intense on that subject. also, though, in this one-on-one meeting with the turkish president, president obama said that he sees turkey as a strong partner. they don't always see eye to eye. in fact, the relationship is tense of late. turkey has been cracking down on journalists. it was late to join the coalition against isis, that border with syria has been -- had thousands of would-be fighters wanted to join up with isis in syria. president obama said that this meeting today an the time that
2:38 am
they spend together will help coordinate the work they've been doing as well as fortify that border. president obama said that they plan on redoubling efforts not only for a political transition in syria but as he put it, to eliminate isis. >> michelle, do you think that -- i guess short of speculation, do you think the announcement from obama will be ramped up involvement in syria. as we heard from francois hollande. he said this was an act of war, promising a merciless reaction. we've been hearing pledges of solidarity standing with france on this. especially when it comes to fighting terrorism. so what's the expectations on that? >> right. i was really surprised by the strong statements by the french government. saying we are at war and calling this an act of war. i think president obama, he had to say something about intensifying the fight against
2:39 am
isis. how meaningful it will be in terms of any changes to the strategy, that's the question now. you know, you think aboutt it's really been the question for many, many weeks. a certain part of that strategy have not done well. they've really had to take a hard look at that. admit that there have been some problems and what's coming next. we know going into this, even before the paris attacks, the obama administration was talking about these discussions and how they would intensify the fight against isis. so it's possible that he'll just speak very generally. the administration has been doing. of course, this is what everybody wants to hear. what happens now. there's a real call out there for something more to hannah this outrageous attack in paris. >> turkey, as we know where you are, this is a country dealing with a host of really complex issues. its borders were getting a lot of pressure to step up border
2:40 am
restrictions. isis is becoming a bigger and bigger threat. we've seen the terror attacks in turkey, in the capital there. obviously the refugee crisis is depleting many of turkey's resources. from your vantage point, in terms of security, what are you seeing? >> security here is incredibly tight. i would say it's not like anything i've seen before, even in covering other big events. i would compare it o a mini olympics just with the number of checkpoints and the number of times you have to go through a magnetometer. the number of bag searches. there are 12,000 police and soldiers that are on duty during this. you know, there are air defenses in effect, 24/7. there's a ship in the mediterranean. patrol boats. nobody felt greatnessly coming to this part of the world at this point in time. we're not very close to the
2:41 am
syrian border or anything like that. this is a resort area generally. but being here and seeing and feeling the security makes everyone feel a lot more calm about the situation, if there were any doubts. remember, just days before the g20, there were 20 isis suspects arrested in this same town. there were others arrested at the istanbul airport. so that happening only days before this. it did raise questions among many. how safe is this going to be? what is the scene really going to look like once you're there? >> global economic growth, which is typically the focus of a g20 summit. seems like the more pressing issue now is that the world leaders will be discussing is of course, terrorism and how to effectively fight isis which has been a question posed many times for quite some time now. michelle kosinski from an italia, thanks so much michelle. in france, paris is still
2:42 am
here. that is the message from the city's mayor. ahead, we'll find out why paris ans are telling terrorists, we're not afraid. >> people taken into custody. we'll have the latest on the investigation when we return. ♪ yeah. that's the one right? we forgot dave!
2:43 am
thank you. so, can the test drive be over now? maybe head back to the dealership? it's practically yours, but we still need your signature. the sign then drive event. zero due at signing, zero down, zero deposit, and zero first months payment on a new tiguan and other select volkswagen models.
2:44 am
2:45 am
for the terror attacks. but we're still lerpg more about the individuals, the attackers involved. >> i'm joined by the secretary of the senate committee on foreign affairs and defense forces. thank you so much for being with us on the line here. so going back some ten months since the attacks in january of this year, you had been on record talking about the issue of radicalization, that it involves "urgent, in-depth analysis followed by adequate response" for a report that you filed with the nato parliamentary assembly. the investigation is still ongoing, but how does government crackdown on this issue of radicalization. >> as general reporter of the nato particle metropolitanry assembly on terrorism is we need to really look into the reasons why people are turning into
2:46 am
radicals because we've been observing the consequences which we have to make a lot of effort in why they do so and how to counter that all these problems. we have a lot of -- some of them don't have the very thorough knowledge of islam and they are very not informed well enough. it's extremely important to crackdown on these people. it's extremely important to train so they teach another vision of islam. radicalization is an extremely important issue as we can't work solely on the national level. that's why we need to work -- during nato parliamentary assembly, we work to benefit
2:47 am
from the best practices in each country and there are measures -- many more police and people in the street. you know, france they are very stretched within the -- we've got troops in africa, the -- >> let me ask you on that. within paris itself, you're talking about the stepped up presence of police force, of military force. obviously people are angry and people are sad. they are upset given what happened in your fair city. how does government strike a balance here between working with the muslim community and at the same time tracking down and stamping out radical islam? >> yeah. that's an extremely difficult question.
2:48 am
because obviously, it's extremely important not to anger the -- the majority of the muslims living in -- a lot of them are nonviolent people. but some of the youngsters or many may be -- this is the difficult question to strike this balance and find the best solution by being extremely hard on the extremists and not allow any kind of -- to expel these people who are preaching hatred. we need to do that very quickly. we have any -- the government hasn't done, been talking a lot but no results on the ground. look at the refugees issue.
2:49 am
in four years, i've been saying we need to have refugee camps. i've been told this country, to libya, to turkey, iraq, to afghanistan. you know, in lebanon. you've got refugee camps. but the country, small country that's stretched financially and obviously these people can decide to try their last -- because that is insane that there would be terrorists who would come with a refugees to europe and this is what has happened. there has been a denial. i can't tell you the number of people who told me, no, no, no. we're extremely careful. we're checking everybody. how can you check everybody? you cannot. you know, there is this kind of theory of these people who want to -- because your problem is
2:50 am
not only french. one week ago, i went into a country, the same problems that we have there. we've got diplomatic attitude. we cannot all sit together around the table because -- socially diverse and different. this has to end. we've got to work together. >> right. at the same time, you do get a sense that -- i apologize. there's a -- you do get a sense that the political efforts are being made but at the same time as you mentioned, this migration crisis continues across many european countries. we thank you so much for taking time to give us your insights. some breaking news to bring
2:51 am
you. we are learning from bfmtv three were found inside the car. the second abandoned car found in montreal, the suburb east of paris. this is developing now. we're also reporting in this program that another car used by the terrorists was also found outside the bataclan concert hall in paris. that was a vw polo. now we're talking about a second car three ka lash any coughs were found in the vehicle. we'll get more information as it becomes available. >> things happen. still ahead, pope francis condemns the paris terror attacks calling it part of a new piecemeal warld waorld war. more from rome next. same laugh. and since she's had moderate alzheimer's disease, i've discovered we have the same fighting spirit, too.
2:52 am
that's why i asked her doctor about new once-a-day namzaric™. vo: new namzaric is approved for moderate to severe alzheimer's disease in patients who are currently taking, and can continue to take certain doses of both namenda and donepezil. new namzaric is the first and only treatment to combine 2 proven alzheimer's medicines into a single once-a-day capsule that works 2 ways to fight the symptoms of moderate to severe alzheimer's disease. once-a-day namzaric may improve cognition and overall function and may slow the worsening of symptoms for a while. namzaric does not change how the disease progresses. it shouldn't be taken by anyone allergic to memantine, donepezil, piperidine or any of the ingredients in namzaric. before starting treatment, tell the doctor about any medical conditions they have... including heart or lung problems, seizures, stomach ulcers, bladder, kidney, or liver problems. tell the doctor if the patient will have any procedures involving anesthesia, which may cause muscle problems. other serious side effects may occur, including slow heartbeat and fainting; increased stomach acid,
2:53 am
which may raise the chance of ulcers and bleeding; nausea and vomiting; difficulty passing urine, seizures, and worsening of lung problems. the most common side effects associated with namzaric are headache, diarrhea, dizziness, loss of appetite, and bruising. woman: mom and i share a lot of moments. and we're making the most of each one. vo: ask your doctor if new namzaric is right for your loved one. only abreva can heal it in as few as two and a half days when used at the first sign. it penetrates deep and starts to work immediately to block the virus and protect healthy cells.. don't tough it out, knock it out, fast. abreva. this holiday season, gewhat's in the trunk? nothing. romance. 18 inch alloys. you remembered. family fun. everybody squeeze in. don't block anyone. and non-stop action. noooooooo! it's the event you don't want to miss. it's the season of audi sales event. get up to a $2,500 bonus
2:54 am
for highly qualified lessees on select audi models. terror attacks, calling it part of a new world war. >> the pope is offering his prayers also. he said, like many people around the world right now, he finds the violence hard to understand. for more on the pope's comments, let's go to vatican correspondent delia gallagher live from rome this hour. good to have you with us. what is the vatican doing to talk to muslim leaders to address the problem from a religious angle?
2:55 am
>> reporter: well, george, that's actually an important aspect of this situation because the vatican engages year round in what they call interreligious dialog. that's something that sounds ho-hum until you realize many of the attacks are carried out in the name of god, in fact the vatican office for interreligious dialog a few months ago issued a statement calling on muslim leaders to address this problem, to look at some of the questions about where these teachings are coming from, to discuss what's going on in their schools and in their places of worship in terms of the content about learning about religion and history. so the vatican engages year round in discussions with muslim leaders. and indeed, in the last few months has come out even more strongly to encourage dialog amongst the leaders. pope francis as well, we heard him yesterday saying in this telephone interview, which he gave to the italian catholic
2:56 am
bishops' television station, it was a brief interview but he said there's no religious or human justification for the attacks in paris. he said this is inhuman. of course, his statement about being in a third world war, it's a phrase, george, that he has used before and what the pope means by that is that what we're seeing nowadays is a rash of conflict throughout the world of terrorist attacks, of massacres and destruction which give us a sense of being in a third world war. but unlike traditional world wars in the past, it doesn't have the traditional parameters of one country declaring war and waging war on another country. we have the conflicts giving us the impression of being in a third world war. george? >> delia gallagher, live for us in rome. thank you so much for your reporting there. weigh want to thank you for watching "cnn newsroom." i'm amara walker. >> i'm george howell.
2:57 am
cnn's kofcoverage continues liv from the french capital with chris cuomo. you're watching cnn, the world's news leader. this kid makes stains like crazy so we got our new he washing machine but it took forever turns out it wasn't the machine, it was our detergent. so we switched to tide turbo clean. now we get way cleaner clothes way faster he turbo clean. 6x the cleaning power in ½ the time at&t and directv are now one.
2:58 am
which means you can watch in the house, in a treehouse, or even in miss pepperpie's house. pause in your pjs and hit play during a pb&j. nice! and enjoy some cartoons instead of listening to dad's car tunes. (dad) ♪meet you all the way! get directv at home and 2 wireless lines for under $99 a month. from directv and at&t. hi! so it says here i can redeem my cashback bonus for discovercash.. do i need to have a certain amount? nope, you can redeem your cashback for any amount, any time. that's great. yeah, you can use it for a statement credit or even get the cash. nice. i could use that extra cash for a last-minute gift. one less thing hanging over your head, right? tell me about it. gary, you got to go. who's gary? a mistake from last year coming back around again. too much egg nog! yes! laaaaa... at discover we treat you like you'd treat you. redeem your cashback for any amount, any time. get it at discover.com.
2:59 am
3:00 am
good morning. we are in paris as part of cnn's continuing coverage. i'm chris cuomo with hale gorani. give us a sense how this city has changed. >> it's sunny and a beautiful day but yesterday, it was grimy and people were in shock still. saturday night, paris was empty. i've never

125 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on