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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  November 20, 2015 9:00pm-1:01am PST

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presents the world with a danger that is impossible to fully assess and a danger that grows by the month. >> this is cnn breaking news. >> hello and welcome to our viewers in the united states and all around the world. i'm rosemary church. >> i'm errol barnett. thanks for joining us this weekend for cnn's continuing special coverage. we are following major developments and stories across europe and reft africa at this hour. in belgium, the capital brussels is at the highest terror alert because of a, quote, serious and imminent threat. officials there say people should avoid large gathering and public places. this comes after belgium police
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conducted raids for the paris ataerks. one of those suspects remains at large. >> we also learned of the woman who found dead after the police raid in saint denis france did not flow herself up. rather a man was wearing a suicide device that detonated and killed her. sources say the woman was related to the paris attack ringleader. and an islamist group says it and an al qaeda affiliate attacked a hotel in mali on friday, killing 21 people, including an american. and we will have more on the terror attack in mali in just a moment. but first, let's go to our own max foster for the latest on the security situation in france. he joins me now from plaza plaza de republique in to paris. so many unanswered questions in relation to the aftermath of the paris attack, and particularly the identity of this third individual found dead in that
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saint-denis apartment. what all do you know at this hour? >> we're waiting for that information, one a lot of people are very focused on is some of these attackers lived in belgium and that state of alert in brussels is something we're following very, very closely. there is someone still op the run. and we're trying to get as much information on that as possible. a lot of talk about the woman in that apartment in saint-denis. many people thought she was the suicide bomber. europe's first female suicide bomber, but it turns out she was not the suicide bomber, trying to distance herself from the rest of the group in there. these are the sorts of conversations people are having. the christmas lights have gone up. there's a strange atmosphere, the christmas shopping season is beginning here. today is saturday. wait to see if those christmas shoppers come out as these bits of information from the investigation come out. people trying to come to terms with it, trying to move on and try to get as much information
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as possible about what happened. this man on the run is very much a concern, even though in's a sense there that he's over there for brussels. >> the search for abdeslam is intensifying. the search now includes the netherlands. abdeslam now one of the most wanted men in the world is being sought in connection with the attacks which have now taken the lives of 130 people. it's believed he spent time in the netherlands. also, new information about this woman heard in saint-denis. where is your boyfriend? he's not my boyfriend. french prosecutors now say
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16-year-old hasna was not the one wearing the vest. cnn has learned that abdelhamid abaaoud was spotted on cctv footage the night of the attacks. at the same time, the attacks were going on at a metro station in a paris suburb. that is the same area one of the cars used in the cars used in the attack was abandoned. he was killed in a raid wednesday in saint-denis, one of nearly 8le 00 raids around france in the past five days. the siege lasted more than seven hours. here, you can see the police advancing before the final confrontation which also killed his female relative.
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french authorities now say a third body, an unidentified male has been found in the rubble of the razed apartment building among the devastation. >> knick robertson there speaking about this latest investigation. all of these small pieces of information coming through. he's the author of geopolitically correct ter ror. how would you describe the atmosphere here a week on? >> defiant and scared. >> the day after the attacks, people, which myself, went out purposefully into the bars and had a bit of a party. it was a nigh norty, but a vocal and very warm one. otherwise, there is a decrease in the amount of people who go out.
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it's been increasing in the last five or six days. you hear a large amount of conversations about what happened. we're standing between three areas that were hit. in the cafes and everything, people were saying i was here, i was there, i heard this. so the city is tense tense, but there's sort of a defiance by parties. and even the president said culture is a culture of life and a culture of parties and a culture of sport and a culture of culture itself. so we're trying to do all this. >> you hope there will be parties and back to normal. i was back in a restaurant and it felt like it was busy last night. not as busy as it normally is, but do you feel people generally do feel safe? or they're just trying to show this defiance? >> they're trying to be defiant. everyone knows you're a target any place.
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a cafe terrace is a depletely harmless and exposed place. you're not going into a bank or a government building or next to a police station. or in front of a house of a politician or a synagogue. all of those places already are guarded and have been the last year. >> you were talking about the moss that can put a sign up around the side. >> it's the omar mosque, which is about 600 yards from two of the attack sites. it has a large number of people hanging around all the time. this is right in the center of the hipster neighborhood. so this is juxtaposition. i have no idea whether the feel in the mosque are involved. there's police surveillance and has been for a very long time. some people went and did a jihad in that mosque to afghanistan and died. this has been going on for a long time. i think the police are watching them, but still, an attacker can mix in the neighborhood there not really be seen. >> what kind of community is that between the community and
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the attackers. they feel they have to be on the defensive in paris and make it very clear they're separate identity, completely. >> speaking of the people who live there, only a tiny fraction would be involved in jihad. but the mosque in question is surrounded by bookstores, which are quasi fronts 2456 sell maybe three books a day. people look at you, people have spoken to me and know who i am. so there is a presence of a network. however, that network may only be 50 people out of 5,000, but of course, there's a nervousness so you don't always know if somebody is dressed up like a turban and the pakistani vest standing next to the mosque, you ask yourself. >> that's lasting damage, isn't it, to the culture. the suspicion of people around you all the time, based on the way they lurk. >> yes, of course, i know an elected official who is of arab origin.
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and she's, in fact, in the conservative party. and her sister stopped wearing the veil because she was getting dirty looks in the subway. so, of course, there's a fear of the backlash. and we've all been trying to avoid backlash so far. >> just in terms of investigation, is the sense of the people you're speaking to, official sources, they feel that the end of the search for suspects is just one more on the run? >> yes, they feel like the belgian connections is the soft underbelly of the whole setup and has been since the attack on the jewish museum a year ago. it's a franco-belgium effort. the wing you always hear is there's nothing more than what we can be doing to prevent a further attack. they ramped up as much as they could security and arrests and the emergency laws, but there is
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a sense that it can and probably will happen again. >> have a party is what the government is saying. errol and rosemary, back to you. >> that seems to be the message, the defense of defiance, not being fearful, not being intimidated. the more people can return on and try to return to normalcy. that's the best weapon. >> as we monitor developments in europe, there's also big news in the west african nation of mali. >> heavily armed gunmen stormed a hotel in the capital on friday, killing at least 21 people. one american is moj the dead. and just a short while ago, u.s. president barack obama condemned the attack which one islamist militant group is taking partial responsibility for. jim schutto has the latest.
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>> guests and hotel staff were held hostage in bamako, mali. the situation began around 7:00 a.m. at the radson bleu hotel in the west african capital. the attackers arrived carrying ak-47 assault rivals. they came with diplomatic plates. they came and immediately they started shooting at people, at least sb before entering the hotel. >> the approximately 150 hotel staff and guests were trapped inside, trying to escape. >> i heard bullets, so i closed the door. i went back to the gym.
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and at the gym, the side door, i left the hotel. >> bodies were found in the halls of the hotel and at least six who were injured were taken to a local hospital. according to the malian health minist minister. the remaining hostages freed after malian soldiers and u.n. special forces stormed the hotel, guiding them to safety. a member of the u.s. special operations forces in bamako at the time assisted. among those who were arrested were american, as well as air france and turkish airline crew member, and international guests from around the world. >> about a dozen americans including chief of mission personnel in that dozen were rescued. >> reporter: the hotel popular amongst werners was hosting a large delegation for peace talks in the former french colony, has been battling islamic extremists with the help of the u.n. and french forces. two al qaeda-linked groups claimed responsibility for the attack. >> these attacks are taking place at a time when the peace
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process in mali is making good prolg. the secretary general deploys any attempt to derail the implementation of the agreement. >> the french president francois hollande reeling from the terrorist attacks in france pledged to provide necessary support to help mali resolve the situation. >> later this hour, i'll speak with with an expert about what some of the root causes may have been behind this. we're still looking for all the details, but it may have something to do exclusion, the country doing everything it can to get back on its feet. >> france beeves up its security as the investigation into the paris attacks continues. coming up, we will speak to is a security expert about the steps both europe and the united states should take to battle terrorism in the long run. oh no... (under his breath) hey man! hey peter. (unenthusiastic) oh... ha ha ha!
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>> welcome back. france's prime minister has warned terrorists could go as far as using chemical weapons in future plots. of course, you have critics accusing the prime minister of invoking fear with that, but in
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this climate, the french government isn't taking any chances. we show you how first responders are making sure they're prepared. >> after the carnage of the paris terror attacks, french authorities fear in the future terrorists could go even further. possibly launching chemical attacks. while the possibility after peers remote, the government is ordering first responders to be prepared. at this hospital near versailles, the doctor is stocking up on an the anti-serum for terror attacks. >> before we had a military dose, but now we will use military grade. it's more concentrated and easier to use. it's used, for instance, in cases of serin poisoning. serin gas was used in a massive attack in damascus in 2013,
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killing around 1,400 people according to the state department. the emergency medical personnel here say they're well prepared with respirators and special protective suits for at least 75 first responders. >> just in case there should be a chemical attack, the hospital is equipped with three of these state-of-the-art ambulances that can deal with almost any energy. it was france's prime minister who warned of possible terror plots. we know and bear in mind there's also a risk of chemical or biological weapons. that drew criticism from some, accusing the prime minister of stoking fear. but the doctor in charge says it's better to be safe than possibly one day sorry. the risk isn't major, he says, but it exists. it's part of our job as emergency doctors to be prepared for these kinds of attacks. after the attacks france has
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faced this year alone, this nation wants to make sure its first responders are as ready as they can be for any scenario should terror strike again. fred pleigen, cnn, france. >> now for discussion on security nez sures, we're joined by aaron cohen, the chounder of cherries covert officer apparel. they manufacture covert ops gear for special mission units. aaron, thanks so much for joining us on cnn today. we won't focus on the chemical potential for an attack, that's really speculative at the moment. but for the special forces raid at the bataclan in paris, plus friday's attack in mali, we have now all witnessed special ops teams at work, saving lives. and that is your area of expertise. so just tell me what is the strategy when special ops forces have to go into a place and save people held by heavily armed militants. how do you do that?
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>> well, first, you have to make sure that your police agencies are equipped. some people have called it the mill tarization of police. it's not the case. you simply -- here in the states we don't have the ability to have tier one assets operating. however, what we saw was two units that were essentially operating in an b extremely dangerous operation, the type of tactic that these s.w.a.t. teams will deploy, the gign in france, you had their local national s.w.a.t. team, equivalent to the fbi hostage rescue team. and highly trained units selective shooting thousands of rounds on the range in tactics and movement. what they were essentially doing is what we would call a slow and deliberate clear. unlike what we've seen on the discovery channel, where have delta forces are running in the room. that's just not the case in the real operational world when it
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comes to serving a high-risk warrant for a terrorist. the reason why is because the terrorist will fire at you. they are committed. they will blow themselves up. they want to die, abc louly zero fear. they're not afraid to die because of theirs. >> the female suspect who was believed blew herself up did not. instead there was a man apparently inside the apartment. he was wearing a suicide vest. that somehow detonated. how are special ops force supposed to react when they encounter a scene like that? >> well, here's what happens. what they're doing is their training is designed to literally enable these operators to be able to be able fire into a room without ever actually entering. slow and methodical clearing. it's almost like peeling a can open, if if you will. the foal goel is to be able to get their barrel in their eye
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with as much cover over their auththoracic cavity as possible they're not exposed. what they're doing is called a pressure cooker technique. the goal is to be able to open the door frames, be able to fire into the rooms as needed. they're standing, not running in, they can fire more selectively. they can actually have multiple guns without crossing the threshold. once they move from that room and they cleared all of the threats they're going to move as quickly as they can to the next door frame and again start to slow it down. the reason why is they don't want to get caught in that area of dry wall. it's dangerous. rounds can go through it, explosives can go through it. so it's incredibly dangerous. but the tactics again are designed specifically for terrorism. this is what i've been pushing into the market for the last 15 years. i was trained in israel and we've learned that you have to -- there's just no point on risking yourself if it's not a hostage scenario. >> let me ask you this.
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the search for salah abdeslam continues on. he was stopped shortly after the attacks because he wasn't i.d.'d as a sus yet. are those major failures? how do you correct them. you don't get to the point of the raid if you don't have the intel. >> that's the tricky part about counter terror direct action operations, which is what the gign, or the special operations unit of the french military and the french national s.w.a.t. team was doing. you don't have the graeest information. we're dealing reactively at this point right now. the intelligence failure is obvious. the fact is that almost a dozen terrorists were able to strike multiple locations with a relative amount of ease, with weapons that were not that sophisticated. we know the intelligence failure
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was there. because there was a lack of good intelligence, you really have to treat every structure where the terrorists are hiding out or collaborators could be hiding. every one of those structures has to be treated as if a terrorist was in there. and the reason why is because, again, it's unlike the hostage siege at the bataclan for where every second wasted, another innocent person will get killed. when you're talking about serving terrorists warrants in the aftermath, you want to take your time and move slowly. the rational thinking is not one of those french police officers is worth 1,000 of those abdeslam. so slow and deliberate. you only have as good of information you need real time.
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>> a lot of work goes into the operations. and all we get sometimes at the end is grainy cell phone footage. thank you for joining us from l.a. to talk about how all this really works. >> thank you very much. we're going to take a break here. we're shedding more light on a district in brussels that many terrorists are calling home. >> plus, ak-47s storm a south african hotel.
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>> welcome back, everyone. we are following developments in two major terror attacks. in west africa, gunmen killed 21 people, including an american at a hotel in mali on friday. an islamist militant group is claiming joint responsibility with an al qaeda affiliate. >> we also learned the woman found dead after the police raid in saint-denis near paris did not blow herself up as was earlier believed. instead a man was wearing a suicide device that detonated, killing her. official sources say she was related to the paris attacker ringleader. one suspect in those attacks remains at large. it's 6:30 in the morning right now at paris. we want to get you back to our max foster standing by with more live coverage and updates. max? >> errol, the sun is coming up here in paris as people try to get back to normal, the chris lights are up.
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normally it would be a shopping day. in belgium, meanwhile, brus sells is in lockdown, the highest terror threat level has been reached there effectively, which would suggest they believe a terror attack is in the works. we know some of the paris terror attacks lived in paris and one man is on the run. so many people asking questions about why brussels has become this hot bed of jihadism. this mostly muslim group is becoming synonymous to terror. local prosecutors say dozens of islamic foreign fighters in syria have come from here and more and more terrorist comes here to shop. the black market that specializes in the tools of their trade.
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>> false passports, weapon trade. we absolutely have to counter these things with the help of local service, but also with the help of criminal justice. >> a senior fellow at a brussels think tank, focusing on immigration and security says illicit trade especially in guns has put belgium on the terror map. >> still there is a big black market of weapons in brus sells that come from everywhere in europe. and also from the balkan countries. and it's very easy for criminal gangs or for krift groupings to find weapons, even war weapons here in our city. >> ka lish that kof rifles can be purchased on the belgian black market for as little as $1,000. >> you're getting a good deal here, good money price. >> indeed. >> that's the problem. >> and there is another problem
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that may be much bigger. >> what we see, the last three, four, five years is that there is emerged between the jihadi radical world and between the criminal world. lots of jihadists meet with criminals in prison. prison. i think with these young people it's like a mental detonation mechanism. so some of them are hard core jihadists socialized in this branch of islam since they were young. but some of them are not that muslim at all. >> that appears to be the case for the man who operated this bar. ibrahim abdeslam was known as a petty criminal here. the bar he ran shut down just a week before the paris attacks because of drugs and other illicit activity. family fraends say his involvement in radical islam came as a shock.
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last week abrosimova flew himself up with a suicide vast. his brother is still on the run. he, too, has a criminal past. and in 2011, even spent time in prison with another criminal, the paris attack ringleader, abdelhamid abaaoud. three criminals turned jihadists. >> if you're in area of work, you algs become an expert in the neighborhood of bru brus sell where is they came from. why have nay not got a grasp on
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that? >> brus suburbs has a heavy population. there was the algerian civil war in the '90 nz which the precursors of al qaeda entered into those neighborhoods and use the it as a sort of hiding place for their civil war, which was partially conducted here in fraen s and which gave us the first terrorist attacks in the metro in 1995. so there's this tradition. and there's so many of them, and the belgium state being a democratic state, they ended upsetting up shop to some degree. belgium didn't feel threatened until an attack on a jewish museum last year. either you round up thousands of suspects or you do real police work pit's a very slow wakening which they've had maybe a little bit after we've had it here in france. >> i'm not an expert in intelligence techniques, be uh if you know all the threats are in one particular area of town,
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can't you find some way of monitoring what they do the whole time and not let something like this in paris happen. >> there are many people who are as dangerous as the ones who have operated. >> by used to be petty criminals and they went to syria and got training. >> there's so many that we could round up maybe in western europe 3,000 people. but the way the police and the secret service surveil them is to put them on this list. and every time they crossed an s list, a security risk list, whenever they take an airplane or cross a border, their movement is announced. that's why it's ridiculous the police knew they were here or they were there. they can't arrest them on a pure suspicion. now with the emergency measures you can detain them for several days, just on suspicious.
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>> just explain what sort of costs and resources is involved in putting proper surveillance on just one person. that really shows the proper authority. >> it's said if you really want to watch somebody 24 hours a day, you need 17 policemen. >> and we've got how many threats in this part of the world? thousands. >> yes. you have jihad, maybe 3,000 people on the s list. >> so you need tens of thousands of security officers to be doing the sort of monitoring that many members of the public want to see. >> three policemen smoking cigarettes in cars. >> there's this fear that if you have massive arrests you're going to kick up more and more hatred and you'll spur more and
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more, let's say, jihad in the hearts of people who would not have thought of it otherwise. >> thank you very much indeed. so many debates coming oit of what happened, the search is still continuing, of course for one of the attackers still on the run. >> it certainly is. many thanks to you, max. we will return to you next hour. >> you are watching "cnn newsroom." a deadly siege by gunmen in a hotel in west africa. a look at who is claiming responsibility. we'll be back with that in just a moment.
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>> welcome back to "cnn newsroom." we are following a deadly terrorist siege that claimed the
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lives of at least 21 people inside a hotel in the west african country of mali. >> there's a ten-day state of national emergency. heavily armed gunmen fired indis-christmas nitly at guests hosting diplomats and others there in bamako. an al qaeda-affiliated group is taking partial responsibility for the assault. >> bamako you should attack. -- under attack. these were the scenes as gunmen stormed the radson bleu hotel, firing shots and taking hostages. >> a spokesman said at least one of the cars had diplomatic license plates. the siege that left scores dead prides itself on his tight security. >> translator: the authorities need to take strong measures. we leave our houses every day to
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buy bread, but if something like this can happen, then i'm worried. >> for west africa, this is the third fatal terror attack in a week. two days ago, it was isis affiliated group boko haram suspected of a bombing that left more than 40 people dead. in one town 30 people were killed. 24 hours later, in a market, authorities say two young girls, one only 11 years old detonated suicide vests, killing more than a dozen people. boko haram pledged allegiance to isis earlier this year, becoming their largest affiliate. at the time, the nigerian-based terroristist group controlled up to 20,000 kilometers of northeastern nigeria. northern mali, however, has been traditionally an al qaeda strong hold.
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with al qaeda and the aqim being the most predominant terror group in the west african nation. in august this year, a splinter group of aqim claimed responsibility for a hotel attack in central mali. in a similar pattern, gunmen entered the hotel, killing 17 people including u.n. personnel, werners and malian soldiers. a counter assault was launched as malian troops stormed the hotel. in march, the same faction attacked a restaurant that killed five people, including a french citizen and a belgian security officer. >> mali islamic militants were scattered and much of their power eroded by a military offensive that that began in 2013. but pockets of insurgents remain. able to launch sophisticated asimilar met trick assaults. attacks like these and the one at the radisson are horrific
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reminders of the terror threat in the region. >> we're joined by the fellow at the institute of policy stud disand a u.s. foreign policy expert. thanks so much for your time this weekend. we should say a peace deal was signed back in june between the new government in mali and insurgent group, but it didn't stop an attack in august where some 12 people were killed and obviously didn't prevent friday's attack. why is that? >> well, i think we have to go back to the root causes of this crisis. you have a real disaffected group in the northern part of mali that have been excluded from political participation, from economic development. so what you had, actually going back to 20 11 after the ouster of gadhafi and the flood of weapons in the region, you had people taking up arms and essentially declaring the
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northern part of the country to be an aton mouse region and demanding change. those root causes, the flil crisis, those have not really been dealt with. instead, i think the international community has taken a very sort of narrow lens on countering terrorism. and i think we have to underscore that it is not goek to be by increased drones or boots on the grown or bombs from the sky. that will bring a resolution to these kinds of extremist tactics. it will be addressing the root causes of this seasons sense of ail nation. >> there's also a power vacuum in the country. you have the western minority in south africa, they say they've been alienated. you also have at play the al qaeda affiliate and batoum who claimed responsibility for this attack. do you think that group is, in fact, responsible? or do you think this has been a coordinated effort? what's your theory on that. >> i think there's a lot to be
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moan, and we will know more in the comes daying, but clearly what you have in the northern part of the country, the touregs have been excluded politically. and in spite of the richness of mali from gold to oil to uranium in the neighborhood there, their communities have been really depleted. i think in a fundamental way, addressing the needs for political inclusion and economic development in those regions would be critical to having a firm path to peace in the country. >> but is that really happening right now? you wonder what to expect in the future. the government in mali is still quite fragile. if anything, this attack has really exposed that. >> i think this is the problem. i think what we need is to create an elevated plane where the voices of peace, whether it's faith-based leaders or civil society organization, you know, women's groups, those that
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have been clamoring for peace, have been working for peace since 2011, their choices have been really pushed a i side. and i think we need to create a space where they're elevated, and that the path to peace is made with the social fabric that pays attention to some of the root causes, issues of inequality, issues of ail nation. particularly young people who are finding really a sense of hopelessness. and not able to control their destiny or their future. and it's fair breeding ground now for these types of extremists. >> we certainly hope those things get stamped out. stu so much for your time today. >> after the break, we will take a look back at this tragic week, as the people of paris try to recover.
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>> one week ago, terrorists
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attacked paris killing dozen os of peopling and wounding others. >> but out of the tragedy came moving displays of solidarity from french people all around the world. many left messages to honor the victims of the horrific attacks. and here's a look at some of the poignant moments. >> it's an act of war committed by a terrorist army, an army of jihadists against france.
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>> we are reminded in this time of strategy that the bonds are not only values that the french people care so deeply about, but they are values that we share. >> we stand with you, united. >> and then suddenly in a flash, there was chaos. friday was a night of shock. saturday was a day of mourning, but on sunday, we felt determined today to come out, to take our lives back. >> the headline of it is i will not succumb to hate.
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friday night you stole an exceptional life, the love of my life, the mother of my son. but i will not hate. >> we stand free, we stand with the test of life, we stand with happiness. we play games with my son, and no they don't win. >> incredible resilience and defiance there from the people of paris. thank you so much for joining us. i'm rosemary church. >> i'm errol barnett. the coverage of the attacks in paris and mali continues next. stay with cnn. who wants to try? before earning enough cash back from bank of america
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that's why i switched from u-verse to xfinity. now i can download my dvr recordings and take them anywhere. ready or not, here i come! (whispers) now hide-and-seek time can also be catch-up-on-my-shows time. here i come! can't find you anywhere! don't settle for u-verse. x1 from xfinity will change the way you experience tv. >> hello, and welcome to our viewers in the united states and all around the world. i'm rosemary church. >> and i'm errol barnett. we're following major developing stories across europe and west africa right now.
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in belgium, the capital of brussels is at the highest terror alert level because of a, quote, serious and imminent threat. this comes after belgian police conducted raids and searches with links to the paris ataerk. >> and we also learned the woman fount dead in saint-denis france did not blow herself up as originally thought. rather a man was wearing a suicide device that detonated and killed her. the woman was related to the paris attack ringleader. and then in west africa, two terror groups have claimed responsibility for killing 21 people, including one american at a hotel in mali on friday. we will have more on the terror attack in mali in just a moment. but first, we do want to go back to our max foster for the latest on the security situation in france.
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he joins me live from paris. talk about the latest information you have. >> it's incredible being in this country under a state of energy. you've got 10,000 military personnel 100,000 deployed all across the country as they try to come to terms with the situation. 164 people, rosemary, are under house arrest. they're deemed dangerous at this point. this is the atmosphere that paris is in right now. but consider brussels today, whi which is the a the very highest level of alert. a man on the run, they believe, and a possible terror attack imminent. a sense of fear a week after the paris attacks. all sorts of new development comesing in in terms of the investigation. knick robertson has the latest on that. >> tonight, the international
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manhunt for the eighth attacker is increasing in scope. the search area for france and belgium now includes the netherlands. abdeslam, now one of the most wanted men in the world is being sought in connection with the attacks, which have now taken lives of 130 people. it's believed he spent time in the netherlands. also new video about the woman in this video. where's your boyfriend? he's not my boyfriend. french prosecutors now say the 26-year-old was not the one who detonated the suicide vest as seen in this video obtained by abc. rather prosecutors say the vest was worn by a man and the woman was killed with the results blast. and we are learning more about the suspect ringleader of last week's attack in paris.
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cnn has learned abdelhamid abaaoud was spotted on cctv footage the night of the attacks at the same time the attacks were going on at a metro station in a paris suburb. that is the same area one of the cars used in in the attack was found abandoned. abaaoud was killed in a raid wednesday in saint-denis. one of nearly 800 raids around france in the past five days. the siege lasted more than seven hours. the police advancing for the final confrontation, which also killed his female relative. french authorities now say a third body, an unidentified male has been found in the rubble at the razed apartment build, mopg the devastation. >>. >> harold, this state of energy
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is going to go on for three months. it's an extraordinary situation. because of what happened, the french people are allowing these sorts of powers to be handed to the police, the military. and they're using it, aren't they? >> yes. they're do you think house arrests and -- >> endless searches. >> endless searches. you don't have to go to a judge with a war rabbit as you used to. the army doesn't have powers yet. that would bringing us to a state of siege pep and also the number of troops that are deployed is only a slight increase over what was already deployed. we' been on maximum alert since charlie. we've been upping the maximum even further. it brings us to a conceptual
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sense of ceiling. >> that's been stopped immediately. >> not a one more person will be made redundant in the armed forces. there was a downsizing that was in traen and that's been completely stopped and reversed. now we're wiring 1,000 custom fishes and so many thousands intelligence people. and we're really beefing it up massi massively. o. >> you need that, though. you w elearned you need those resources in order to be prepared, at least for the response to an attack. >> well, the response to the attack, yeah, that's classic military police things.
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>> that was disor six years ago. >> the french military and intelligence never really believed in that. so they've been sort of complaining off the record about this downsizing. i mean, they need people to be speak all the arab dialects. and all of people exist in paris. they're all around us. you just have to hire them. >> brussels' underground has been closed, the transport system. there's an imminent threat of a terror attack. you look at the threat level inform that country right now. and that's presumably wlinked to the fact that there was a mannen ott run and he's seen heading towards belgium. >> yes, and there's the capacity to carry out terror attacks.
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we're talking bombs, we're talking suicide bombs. it's complicated to make a suicide bomb, i'm told. belgium is considered a soft underbelly, but not for much longer. so the state of mrnl in belgium is sort of there belgium might be an overreaction. we've been been in a state of emergency for the last nine months. 'in terms of the massive amount of the weaponry that police have managed to gather during that process, are they taking this as an opportunity for basically going at anyone they've been watching for a while now? >> i don't get that impression
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quite yet. we have so much weaponry because we have a gangland situation in which anyone can get a clish a kalashnikov on line and then blow themselves at saint-denis. we're getting the sort of narco jihad phenomenon where people sell drugs, will sell guns to the jihad people who will talk to them and that's really the nightmare. they will have to break that up. >> there's narco intelligence that fed into the terrorist investigation this time around, right? >>y, that did happen. >> obviously a somber attitude here. christmas lights are coming up, though. people are trying to get back to normal. i a rooifed last night and the government has been encouraging people to get out and party in defiance of what happened here a
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week ago. and you see that happening. people are starting to fill the cafes and restaurants again. >> people just refusing to be intimidated. max foster reporting there. just after 7:00 in the morning in paris. and max, we'll come back to you in about 20 minutes from now. appreciate it. >> as we mon stoitor the developments in europe, there's major news in the west african nation of mali. >> the government there has declared a ten-day nationwide state of energy. we broke that to you last hour. this after gunmen stormed a hotel in the capital friday, killing at least 21 people. one american is among the dead. an islamist group is claiming joint responsibility with an al qaeda affiliate. >> guests and hotel staff were held hostage during a several hours standoff in mali. the situation began around 7:00
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a.m. at the radisson bleu hotel. the attackers arrived carrying ak-47 assault rifles. immediately shea started shooting at people before entering the hotel. >> when i open the door, i saw on the floor bullets. i walked back into the gym and at the gym on the side door, i left the hotel. >> bodies were found in the halls of the hotel and at least six who were injured were taken to a local hospital, according to the malian health minister. the remaining hostages freed
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after soldiers and u.n. special sforss stormed the hotel, guiding them to safety. a member of the u.s. special operations forces at the time assisted. among those who were arrested were american and international guests from around the world. >> about a dozen americans, including chief personnel were rescued. >> the hotel was hosting a large delegation for peace talks in the former french colony. they've been battling islamic extremists with the help of the u.n. and extreme force ps . two al qaeda-linked groups claimed responsibility for the attack. >> these attacks are taking place at a time when the peace process in mali is making good progress. a secondary general deploys any attempt to derail the implementation of the agreement. the french president hollande
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pledging necessary support to help mali relieve the situation. >> the investigation into the paris attacks continues as france extends its state of emergency. coming up, we will speak to a security expert about the steps both europe and the united states should take to battle terrorism in the long run. we're back in a moment. real milk vs. almond milk protein show down milk wins. 8 times the protein, less bathroom breaks. for called "squamous adnon-small cell",er previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy,
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if officials have their way, brussels could soon look like a ghost town because the belgium capital is at the highest terror threat level possible. sources say the city faces a, quote, serious and imminent threat. >> and people are encouraged not to gather in public places like sporting events or transit stations. this comes after a week of raids in belgium connected to the paris terror attacks. and for a discussion on security measure, we are joined by security exbetter aaron cohen. he's the founder of cherries covert ops apparel, a company that special iizes in developing and manufacturing covert ops gear for special mission units.
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he also spent three years in israel's counterterrorism unit and provides tactical training in the u.s. military, local police departments as well as s.w.a. tmt units around the country. thank you so much for talking with us. what steps need to be taken to fight back from these sort of attacks on soft targets? >> there's three steps that i believe need to be taken needily. the first thing is you have to identify exactly what this threat is. you need to call it radical islam. not all muslims are not bad people, but this is a radicalized form of islam. you can not begin to put together target packages, operational, macro pictures until you identify it. that's number one. the u.s. is leading, our leadership needs to come out and call it what it is. that's number one.
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two, with esneed to consolidate our international intelligence efrtds. the way a corporation who's struggling gets to the bottom line cuts all of the fat out of the company so they can get back to profitability. we need to get the intelligence. we have over 60 countries right now that are battling terror on a global level. and that global war on terror, those 60 nations need to come together, open source of intel between all of these government agencies, cia, fbi, mi-6, spain, poland, italy, paris, everybody need to get on the same page. no more egos. number three, we need to dial up the aggression. there's two parts to this third one. defensive and offensive operations. defensive, just like william bratton did, the chief in new york, he just put together a 100-man tactical response specialty response teammate of 100 officers of new york city. their job is to patrol high crowded areas and targets that
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are opportunities for terrorists. their job, trained use of car beam tactical equipment. they run the building. for every second you wasted another innocent person will be kill just like in paris. the rest of the world needs to follow that new york tone being set by bratton. we have multiple special response teams. and then offensively, with enood to get boots on the ground. i know that that's what isis wants. there's no way around it right now. you have to meet them with aggression. it's the only thing they understand. >> it looks like this attack in paris and indeed in mali, this could perhaps be a game changer of sorts. it could bring all of the nations involved on to this one page. we will see. and some interesting points you raised, of course, we have seen the extraordinary work of special forces units responding to the paris and the mali attacks.
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after each response, are assessments made on how things could have been done differently perhaps? or are there very much set procedures on how to respond to each set of circumstances? >> excellent question. there's two different responses that we've learned in israel when it comes to terrorism. you have the active shooter, which we saw at the bataclan at that cafe, at the bataclan that turns into a hostage siege. i do not believe that was a hostage siege because there weren't any negotiations happening. the situation is still active, that patrol unit, or those patrol officers who were outside sensually, had that been the states, they would have ran in. they wouldn't have waited for a s.w.a.t. team because it takes 15, 20 minutes to specialize after special ops units and the french national s.w.a.t. team to that showed up. the lesson that one is they just can't wait. in israel we learned for terrorists for every second you waste, another innocent person is killed. that's number one. two, the raid we saw in
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saint-denis was different. the reason why, there's no hostages, no innocents. we can take our time with that operation and they did. they went in with shields. they did a slow and deliberate clear, which means the unit can take as much time as they need. no bullets are being fired on innocent civilians. and no putting risk on police officers and soldiers. in lee brew we call that slow and deliberate clear. they did it right at both. the pa riggss need to get it a little bit more tightened up with their active shooter tactical response protocol. because i believe that more innocent lives would have been saved had they not waited for this french special operations response team to show up. having said, i don't want to armchair quarterback those this thing. there was an incredible amount of bravery there. over 20 rounds of clish that kof
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fired into that shield. it's an incredible response. but as we come together collectively on this operation, we're going to share more tactics. we just run around and develop products and bring that training from israel so everybody can be safer at the end of the day. . >> thank you so much for sharing your perspective on these matters. >> appreciate your time. thank you. >> now, there are new details, fresh information coming out about the 26-year-old woman who died during wednesday's raid in saint-denis. >> paris prosecutors say hasna aitboulahcen did not blow herself up. now they're examining her life.
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>> these were the last words of hasna aitboulahcen. earlier, police say she detonated an explosive vest. but now it was learned the bomb was triggered by either the alleged ring leard or the other so far unidentified suspect killed in the operation. investigators are now struggling to understand how a young woman described as modern and fun loving feared into the path of this deadly terror network. >> this is the neighbor where she was living. it's a rough neighborhood at the best of times. but and as we approached her building, we were threatened by her neighbors. at her old high school and at the local market, many knew the
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family but none would talk to us on camera. by the dance school she once attended, one vendor claimed to have dated her and described her as a party girl who liked to drink and smoke. the local pharmacist described her as a normal modern young woman. the mayor where she moved as a teenager said she had, quote, a chaotic upbringing, brought up in to a foster home after her parents divorced. >> she's really a girl who was a bit crazy. she loved life, loved having fun. she was a girl who had very little to do with islam and we never saw her practicing her faith. so when i see this about her, the image of the veil and everything that happened on sunday, that's what really surprised me. she was a girl that had nothing to do with islam. so that image of her is opposite because she didn't represent islam. >> but investigators still don't know how she became so deeply voed with ringleader abdelhamid abaaoud and why she was there on that fateful night the police closed in. atika schubert, cnn, paris.
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>> you are watching cnn news room. heavily armed gunmen stormed a hotel in west africa, killing at least 21 people. next, a look at who's claiming responsibility. >> plus, an international manhunt intensifies for a suspected paris attacker. and we are learning more about what happened in a raid that killed the ringleader. hi i'm heather cox on location with the famous, big idaho potato truck. our truck? it's touring across america telling people about idaho potatoes. farmer: let's go boy. again this year the big idaho potato truck is traveling the country spreading the word about heart healthy idaho potatoes and making donations to local charities. excuse me miss, have you seen our truck? you just missed it. ahhh! aw man are you kiddin' me? what makesheart healthysalad the becalifornia walnuts.r?
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together, we're building a better california. we are following major developments across europe and west africa at this hour. in belgium, the capital brus sells is at the highest terror alert level, this because of a quote serious and imminent
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threat. this comes after belgium police conducted raids in search of links with the paris attackers. at least one oof the suspects remains at large. >> we also learned that the woman found dead after wednesday's police raid in st.-denis in france did not blow herself up. french officials now say a man was wearing a suicide device that detonated and killed her. sources say the woman was related to the paris attack ring leard. and in west africa, mali has declared a ten-day nationwide state of energy after the two terror groups claimed responsibility for killing 21 people at a hotel in the capital on friday. >> let's get back to our max foster live in paris where the search continues for one of the suspects as people try to go about a typical weekend. o. >> the feeling is that he's in
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belgium, which is why brus sells is on lockdown at this hour, as the sun rises leer in europe. that's very much the focus. one more man on the run, and the transport system closed down in brussels and effectively, the message is a terror threat could be imminent there. it's the very highest level of alert that belgium can have. a great deal of concern over there, obviously linked to the paris attacks. we know some of the paris attackers lived in belgium in a particular neighborhood of brussels. and we know that last attacker or suspected attacker was seen heading towards belgium. he was stopped by police. he's linked with attacks here in paris. a great deal of concern about brussels. people try to get back to normal. last night went out and saw people in bistros as the social media campaign for people to go out to the bistros, to show defiance. at the same time, we've got a state of the emergency in the country, which's been extended
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for three months. massive amounts of searches taking place in vierous addresses around paris and france. you can just get a sense there of how this nation is feeling. very, very concerned. rabbit follow-up attacks. chemical attacks as well. howard hienman is a journalist and diplomacy expert as well. just describe how the government is trying to respond to this. the response seems so widespread. we've br r already been on maximum alert since charlie hebdo. the new response is to bring in new police powers. >> this is a state of emergency in place for three months. the state of emergency allows administrative searches and detention. so we're already coming outside
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of the purely judiciary system where there were warrants. so that's one change. >> the police can just effectively search wherever they like. >> well, it has to be before, an anti-terrorist magistrate would initiate. and they always complained in the anti-terrorist imagine traits that they did not have enough mean, there weren't enough of them. they didn't have enough powers. and now suddenly they say, well, all right, this is the response. you're handing it over to police. it's a bit of a shame. >> the united nations last night a country should be sharing intelligence more effectively. all the intelligen agencies in e agree on that. you get the sense they don't want to make others available. do you think that's going to be resolved effectively in europe.
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>> not in the present case, because there won't be enough time to institute a culture of sharing. because state secrets are so sensitive that no secret service can allow itself to give another state a secret that would then work against its own original state. so the politicians have to get into this condition. if you take europe on a simple level, there's extremely little intelligence unity. so they still just exchange a few things and they have a few databases with europol. and they have the european arrest warrant, but they have to go so much further. and the political system is not there for them to go further. >> what's interesting, though, the african intelligence agencies in morocco, for instance, have been feeding a lot in the french intelligence agencies and helping with the follow-up series of investigations.
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so many of the terrorists are morocco extraction. and morocco itself have had terror attacks. they're sharing in this very specific case the information that they have, which is helping us here. but it's not such an ongoing natural thing. and never was. so the debate has to take place at a high -- at the highest level. and then we have to actually change the way we function, because we're really into state secrets now. >> yeah, thank you sfr joining us. the situation focused on bem jerusalem today. they look for that final man on the run. and brussels is in lockdown this hour. >> all right, max, we will check in with you, again b, 7:30 in the morning where you are. we'll see you again shortly. >> thanks, max. we are also, as you heard,
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following a deadly terror siege that claimed the lives of at least 21 people inside a hotel in the west african country of mali. >> heavily armed gunman fired indis-christmas nitly at guests at the luxury hotel. it was a radisson blu hosting diplomats. an al qaeda affiliated group is taking credit for the attack on friday. a state of emergency in response to the attack and three days of national mourning. >> reporter: bamako under attack. these were the scenes in the malian capital on friday morning as gunmen stormed the radisson bleu hotel. a u.n. spokesman says at least one hof the cars had diplomatic license plates.
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>> the authorities need to take strong measures. we leave our houses every day to buy bread, but if something like this can happen, then i'm worried. >> for west africa, this is the third fatal terror attack in a week. two days ago, it was an isis affiliated group blamed for bombing in nigeria, and expected in another, leaving more than 40 people dead. the town of yola was struck first when more than 30 people were killed. 24 hours later at a market in northern nigeria, authorities say two young girls, one only 11 years old, detonated suicide vests, killing more than a dozen people. a. >> boko haram pledged allegiance to isis earl yor this year, becoming their largest affiliate. at the time, the nigh year january based terror group controlled up to 20,000 kilometers of northeastern nigeria. northern mali, however, has been
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traditionally an al qaeda strong hold. with al qaeda and the aqim being the most predominant terror group in the west african nation. >> in august of this year, a splinter group claimed responsibility for a he tell attack in central mali. in a similar pattern, gunmen entered the hotel, popular with foreign guests including u.s. personnel, werners and modern soldiers. a counterasalt was launched as malian troops stormed the hotel. mali islamic militants were scattered and much of their power eroded by a french military offensive that began in january 2013. but pockets of insurgents remained, able to launch sophisticated asimilar met trick assaults.
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these are horrific reminders of the region. >> wur you are watching cnn special coverage of the terror attacks in mali and paris. a massive manhunt is you have under way for the attackers. we'll look at heightened security in paris when we come back. when it comes to helpingu reach your financial goals, taking small, manageable steps can be an effective... and enjoyable approach... compared to the alternatives. push! i am pushing! sfx: pants ripping how you doing eddie? almost there. small steps. at axa, we'll help you take the next steps, with more confidence. for advice, retirement and insurance, talk to axa today.
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>> a week after a devastating terror attack, a manhunt is under way for terror suspects. despite nearly 800 raids conducted by french police, his exact whereabouts are still unknown. the french parliament has given approval to extend the state of emergency for three months. paris has 10,000 military personnel deployed across the country, in addition to 100,000 police officers.
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>> thank you, sir, for being with us. now, we're still piecing together what happened at the st. denis raid. and french authorities now say three suspected terrorists died in that raid. and that it was one of the two men that set up that suicide bomb, not the woman. clearly, it's a very fluid situation, but why is it taking this long to figure out exactly what happened. >> what we're talking about is a small flat in a set of row houses. i think your viewers have seen pictures of the same. when you set off a suicide belt in a confined space like that, it does an enormous amount of damage. the blast was followed by an assault, you know, the french
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police fired about 5,000 rounds in that assault. so it takes quite some time to sift through the damage, almost the rubble of an attack like that. it's not a surprise at all it's taken this long. i would also not be surprised if french police not necessarily share publicedly everything they know given that it's treated with the ongoing terrorist threats. >> u.s. officials are now saying that one of the paris attackers could have traveled, not saying he did, but what are we to make of the state like that, and the implications there are gaps in u.s. security. >> i think there's certainly a radical concern in the united states able people infiltrating the refugee and asylum seeker flow and trying to come into the united states. i think we have to put that into
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perspective. people coming into europe are fingerprinted, they're asked a couple of questions and then they're literally allowed to leave within minutes. someone trying to come into the united states is subject to much more rigorous screening and vetting and in a number of other players like australia and canada and so opinion. so yeah, it's certainly possible that someone may try to infiltrate that flow into the united states, and i'm sure that border protection agencies are very aware of that risk, but i do think we've got to put it into perspective that it's a couple of orders of magnitude smaller than the risks we're seeing in europe which, of course, has had 800,000 refugees and asigh luchl seekers just this year. >> this all come, we've got the mali attack, the paris attack, and this sense that isis is surrounding us, that they're everywhere.
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and, of course, meantime in belgium, the government is saying there's a serious and imminent terror threat in brus sells. they're telling people to avoid crowded public places. understandably people are scare 37d what needs to be done to reduce the threat of isis? a threat that does appear to be everywhere right now. >> again, i think we don't want to overstate that threat. and i think in europe, we are dealing with what amounts to a paramilitary jihadist underground that has cells in denmark, the netherlands, belgium, france, a number of other place, germany is another concern. and it's certainly out there as a threat and is the subject right now of a major security crackdown. what happened in mali seems to have been the work of aqim, and a group call ed al mourabitoun. i think we're talking about multiple different threats merging from different sources.
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and the most important thing to do right now is to keep calm, not overreact and mount an appropriate response to ensure the protection of population and infrastructure, primarily in europe right now. >> many thanks to you. we appreciate it. >> and now a scene of hope in the midst of tragedy. >> during the chaos of last week's attacks, a man managed to snap a photo of doctors and nurses saving lives. he sat down to talk about the message he hoped his image will tell the world. >> they sigh a picture is worth 1,000 words. >> have you ever seen anything like you saw on friday night? >> never.
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>> this doctor was off duty when his shots rang out across paris. he raced to the hospital. >> i went to the hospital where there were the most injured people. >> how many people did you treat on friday night? >> there was 27% who came to the hospital. and and we can see this kind of thing maybe people use guns. here, no the. >> you're not used to treating people with gunshots? >> no, not so much. a few people a year. but all in one case. for each person, there was injuries to the face, injury from the thorax, of the belly. some. >> it was a war scene. >> it was exactly that. to see the fear of the eyes of the people who were coming, most of them, it was everything,
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everybody was there. >> all different religions? >> all different religions. just everybody. >> what was the message you were trying to send with the photograph? >> it was an organization for everybody to save people. we came here to save people, it's our job. >> we are together? >> we are all together, yes. >> somehow with this photograph, you found the good? >> in the middle of this tragedy, there was a bit of hope. >> you won't give up? >> never. never give up. >> papi harlow, cnn, paris. >> often times the first responders are some of the unsung heros in the aftermath of the attacks.
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good to see those images and to give those people their due as well. still to come here on cnn. one week aftering. co-ing under attack, the city of light struggles to pull itself out of the darkness. ♪ ♪ ♪
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>> a full week after the paris attack, resilient parisians struggle to get back to life as they knew it. >> here's cnn's jake tapper. >> the horror that started last week is still not done. with at least two terror suspects still on the loose. there's tragic news that the death toll has risen to 130. dozens of victims of the terrorist attacks remain in hospital with many in intensive care. and there are those wounds that may never heal. >> those words saved my life
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because the people who ran shot. >> the weather here in paris today matching the mood of the country as armed police, soldiers and extra security are sprinkled throughout the city. while at the same time, barriers that had surrounded the sites of the horrific isis terrorist murders calm down. paris is struggling to return to normal. the eiffel tower has reopened, but initial surveys suggest the terrorist attacks have had a huge economic impact on the city with some estimates showing tourism down almost 60%. the signs that some have indeed been terrorized are clear. usually there are throngs of tourists, today there is only open space. tour buss are empty. the french unanimously voted to extend the current state of emergency to three months, lasting well until february. in some ways it's hard to imagine it's only been a week. the band is still being advertised as performing at
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bataclan, the venue where 89 people were so senselessly slaughtered. even though no one will be performing this night, there is a push for france to return to normalcy. the hash tash, everyone to the bar is trending on social media. it should be noted thursday at midnight, the was released as planned. this cafe, even creating a rustic french countryicide on the sidewalk in the heart of the city and the shops that christmas village closed after the paris attacks are open.
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>> jake tapper there. more than 80 million people from around the world visit france each year and i get the sense that won't change too much after this year. >> i hope not because the best force is normalcy. >> we appreciate you spending a bit of time with us this weekend. >> and our coverage of the attacks in both paris and mali continues next hour. do stay with us. who wants to try? before earning enough cash back from bank of america
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this is cnn breaking news. >> hello and welcome to our viewers here in the united states and all around the world. >> thanks for joining us for special coverage of the terror attacks in france and in mali. first, we want to get to major leads in developing stories across europe. belgium's capital brussels is under a high terror alert because of a serious and
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imminent threat. they say people should avoid large gathering in public places. >> and they're looking for this man. he was last seen driving towards belgium. french police stopped him but didn't realize he was linked to the attacks, so they let him go. >> and we're learning more about two attackers that blew themselves up outside the national stadium of france. they entered europe through greece on the same day. >> and matt will bring us the latest and it's just past 7:30 in the morning. i see the son coming up there, max, how are things from your vantage point? >> reporter: it's interesting. i arrived last night and a lot of the restaurants and cafes were bustling and not the same
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sort of excitement you would get on a friday night in paris. and there's a #beast row and tha that's to the bistro. and go out, have a party, this is what we do in france and they're trying to do that, although there is a somber tone to it. over the course of the week, the numbers out and about has increased. that is a positive here but we are in a state of emergency in this country. for three months police will have extra powers to search buildings and they're doing so in great numbers. 164 people are currently under house arrest. they're seen as a threat to the public. that's the sort of atmosphere we've got here. 10,000 military personnel have been deployed. so, this is a country still very much on edge. and thoughts with brussels as the sunrises there and that
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particular city is at the very highest level of alert. authorities believe an attack is imminent. we're following early developments out of there. bound to be linked to the paris attacks because we know the one on the run was on his way from france to belgium when stopped by police but he continued the journey because the police didn't know he was linked to the attacks. and thoughts very much with belgium today. also, small bits of information coming out all the time about the investigation and what happened in saint-denis where the ring leader of the attack was killed. and the woman in the flat we were initially told was a suicide bomber, turns out she did not have a vest on but she blew up in the flat. >> reporter: these were the last
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wor words. earlier police had said the 26-year-old had detonated an explosives vest as police closed in. but now forensics teams have determined that the bomb was actually triggered by either the alleged ring leader, abdul abaaoud or the other suspect in the operation. they're strug struggling to understand how a woman described as modern and fun leaving veer understood path of this terror network. police brought her mother and brother in for questioning. >> this is where hasna was living. it's a rough neighborhood at the best of times but even as we approached her building, we were threatened by her neighbors. at her old high school, at the local market, many knew the family but none would talk to us
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on camera. and one vendor claimed to have dated her and described her as a party girl who liked to drink and smoke and the farmicist described her as a normal, modern young woman and she was brought up in a foster home after her parents divorced. >> translator: she's really a girl who was a bit crazy. loved life, loved having fun and very little to do with islam and never saw her practicing the faith. so, when i see this about her, the image of the veil and everything that happened on sunday, that really surprised me because she was a girl who had nothing to do with izlaslam and that picture is opposite. >> reporter: but they still don't know how she became involved with ring leader,
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aabaaoa aabdul abaaoud. >> reporter: we always look back and try to work out why these people did what they did. and we always hear these stories about how they were perfectly normal as young children and at some point there was a tipping point and they turn into these radicals and these murderers. >> one of the things is that there is a big tendency to have petty delinquents do the jihad switch. so, probably much more a majority of these who commit the attacks have a delinquent petty criminal past and the next thing, we're not seeing the present attacks that many converts. in the last batch, there's been
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no converts, like they suddenly changed their names and identities and thinking but we're still not able to track them down because in their entourage, people didn't really know that they were radicalizing. it's like with a sect, you don't know that your child is suddenly getting into scientology or sth something and also there's a lot of comparison with people's kids who commit suicide. when your child is preparing suicide, the parents always say we didn't know. we had no idea. so, that's one typology. the other one we have to think about is the conspiracy within the family. you get these groups of brothers and they aren't going to rat on their brothers, so they say he's a nice guy and he will cover the others. so, it's really horribly
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difficult to predict who is going to cross the other side, go jihad and go killer. >> in terms of the wider european project, obviously france has been in the center of that, but on a day like today where we have someone on the run and went very freely between the borders of france and belgium, people are genuinely beginning to question that, aren't they and not just people from the far right, this sense that the free movement of people through europe is a huge risk. to just bring back some restriction of the borders. and today, that's relevant when we look at what's happening just over the boarder. >> this is a rhetorical thing, let's bring back order that borders p. the amount of traffic jams would be fantastical between france and belgium.
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and what would be a first step and what they really need, the politicians who bring this up is to check people who get on international trains, like the train where there was the attack about two months ago. and to check people who go on trains and not just on airplanes. on airplanes, there's a little bit of screening and on the high speed trains, nothing at all. so, bring it in to the tgvs. and people who are crossing, cross border workers they're not going to be stopped. you're not going to stop 400,000 people a day and even in the old days, you'd geto a border and show your pass like this. so, we're going to have to have rfid's on the passports to make any sense about this and we haven't even begun to think about this. so, the rhetoric has gone way out in front of our physical
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capacities. >> reporter: and better intelligence sharing between countries and between agencies within countries. because you were describing earlier about how narcotics, the industry there is being linked to terrorism and we're seeing that with this particular case, haven't we? getting information on key people available to more agencies. but by the very nature of security and intelligence, that's not going to happen, is it? >> well, i almost feel like saying maybe you're wrong on that one because the internal security, the dgsi and the external, the dgse have been speaking to each other, more more than in the past and they're old rivals. now they're beginning to exchange. this is maybe one bureaucratic place where something good has been done. what's lacking is the local
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spies. we have these little fellas who would hangout in cafes and listen and meet their delinquent tip off people, their stool pijens, they had this whole system and that broke down. that's the real achilles heel of the whole system is that we don't have eyes in the cafes and -- >> it's expensive. >> but look what's happening now. this isn't cheap. >> reporter: harold, thank you very much indeed. brussels could soon be like a ghost town. the belgium capital is now under the highest terror threat possible and sources say the city faces a very serious and imminent threat. people are encouraged not to gather in large amounts. and there's a particular area in
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belgium where they seem to meet and talk and plot and it's a frightening situation where so many people wondering why it was possible and many of the people who carried out the attacks here, some anyway, were based in the same area. and here is a look at that area in belgium where so many jihadists are coming from. >> reporter: this mostly muslim community in brussels is quickly becoming sinonmous with terror p. and they say dozens of foreign fighters from syria have come here and more and more they come there shop in the black market that special isizes in t tools of their trade. >> and in flourishing, certain places in brussels and we have
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to counter these things with the help of criminal justice. . >> reporter: he says elicit trade, especially in guns has put belgium on the terror map. >> although belgium has very tough gun laws, still there is a big black market that come from everywhere in europe and from the balcon countries and it's very easy for criminal gangs or terrorist groupings to find weapons, even war weapons here in our city. >> reporter: high says the gun of choice in recent attacks can be purchased on the belgium black market for as little as a $1,000. >> and you're getting a good deal here. >> indeed. >> reporter: and there's another problem that may be much bigger. >> what we see the last three, four, five years is that there's
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a merge between the jihady radical world and the criminal world. because lots of jihadests meet with criminals in prison. and it's like a mental detonation mechanism and so some of them are hard core jihadists who were socialized in this branch of islam since they were young and some are not that muslim at all. >> that seems to be the case for the man who operated this bar. abdul abaaoud was here. and family and friends say his involvement in radical islam came as a shock. last week, his family was stunned. his brother, is still on the
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run, he too has a criminal past and in 2011, even spent time in prison with another criminal, paris attack ring leader, . >> so, this is still a live investigation and we still have a man on the run. he's in belgium and that's the theory at least. that's why that terror threat level is so high at the moment. and we monitor everything as it comes through to us here on cnn. >> we'll check back with you later in this hour and see how some of the first responders are preparing for what could come next. >> and you are watching cnn special coverage of the terror attacks in paris and mali. heavily armed gunman stormed a hotel in west africa and who is
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claiming responsibility. >> and we'll have more on that after this. you know, meeting the residents
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the west african nation of mali has declared a state of emergency after gunman stormed a hotel in the capital friday. >> and cnn's robin has the latest. >> reporter: bamako under attack. these were the scenes in the malia nirks hotel and at least one of the cars had diplomatic license plates. and the hotel prides itself on its tight security. >> translator: the authorities need to take strong meseasures. we leave our houses every day to buy bread but if something like
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this can happen, i'm worried. >> reporter: two days ago, it was isis affiliated group, boekboek -- boekau huh rom and more than 30 people were killed and at a market in northern nigeria, they say two girls, one only 11 years old detonated a suicide vest. at the time the nigerian based terror group consistently rough to 6,000 fighters and northern mali has been traditionally an al qaeda strong hold with al qaeda and the aqim being the most predominate terror group in the west african nation.
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in august of this year, a splinter group claimed responsibility for a hotel attack in central mali. in a similar fashion, gunman entered the hotel with popular guests and killing 21 people. a counter assault was launched as malian troops stormed the hotel and in march, the same faction attacked people. they were scattered by a military offensive that began in january 2013 but pockets remained able to have asymmetric assaults and ones like this at the r are reminders. and a fellow at the
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institute of world policy stdies and a u.s. foreign policy expert. we should say a peace deal was signed back in june between the new government in mali and insurgeant groups but it didn't stop an attack in august where some 12 people were killed and didn't prevent friday's attack. why is that? >> i think we have to go back to root causes of this crisis. you have a group in northern part of mali that have been excluded from political participation and economic development and going back do 2011, after gaddafi and the flood of weapons in the region and people declaring the northern part of the country to be an autonomous region and demanding change. those root causes, the political crisis, those have not really
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been dealt with, instead, the international community has taken a very narrow lens on countering terrorism and i think we need to underscore that it's not going to be by increased drones or bombs from the sky that will bring a resolution to these kinds of extremists tactics, it will be by addressing the root causes of the sense of alienation, especially in young people. >> and it's a power vacuum in the country. and you have at play, the al qaeda affiliate and also another group who have claimed responsibility for this attack. do you think that group is in fact responsible or could this have been a coordinated effort? >> i think there is a lot to be known and we will know more in the coming days.
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and the marginalized group, the ones who have been excluded politically and inspite of the richness in mali from gold, to uranium, their communities have been really depleted, left out of any kind of issues of economic advancement. so, in a fundamental way, addressing the needs for both political inclusion and economic development in those regions would be critical to having a firm path to peace in the country. >> but is that really, really happening right now? you wonder what we can expect in the future because the government in mali is still quite fragile and if anything, this attack has exposed that. >> i think what we need is to create an elevated plain where the voices of peace, whether it's civil society organizations or peace leaders, those that have been clamering for peace really since 2011, their voices
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have been pushed aside and i think we need to create a space where they're elevated and that path to peace is made with the social fabric being rebuilt by those that are paying attention to some of these root causes, issues of alienation and by particularly young people who are finding a sense of hopele hopelessness and not able to control their destiny, their future. and it's breeding grounds for extremists. >> and we hope those things get stamped out. and thanks so much for your time today. >> a pleasure. thank you. >> and we'll take a very short break here. but coming up, france beeves up its security as authorities intensify they search for the terror suspect. >> and the precautions health
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welcome back to our viewers here in the states and those of you watching from around the world. i'm errol barnett. >> and i'm rosemary church. the french senate has unanimously approved a state of emergency and it's likely to be approved by the counsel. and the 26-year-old, abdeslam salah was last seen near the belgium border before they realized he was a suspect. >> let's go now to max foster for the latest on the security situation in france. he joins us now from paris.
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>> reporter: i think people are watching very closely what's happening in belgium because this is an ongoing investigation and still someone on the run and the suspicion is that that last man is there and a great deal of thought as well with the city of brussels as that city goes into lock down with this imminent terror threat which authorities have warned of. france has stepped up its security in the wake of those attacks as well. there are now about 10,000 military personnel deployed across the country and that's in addition to 100,000 police officers, 164 people have been placed under house arrest and there's been a whole sweep of raids and searches on all sorts of properties under those powers you were talking about and the prime minister has also warned that terrorists could go as far
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as using chemical weapons in future plots and the french government isn't taking any chance chances. now here is how first responders are making sure they're prepared. >> reporter: after the carnage of the paris terror attacks, french authorities fear in the future terrorists could go even further, possibly launching chemical attacks. while the possibility appears remote, the government is ordering first responders to be prepared. and they're upping an antiserum for nerve gas. >> translator: before we had a civilian dosage but from now on we will use military grade, it's more concentrated and easier to use in case of such an attack. >> reporter: it's used for instance in saren poisoning.
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it was used in damasks in 2013, killi ki killing people. and they say they have protective suits for at least 75 responders. it was france's prime minister who first warned of possible chemical terror thoughts. we know and bear in mind that there is also a risk of chemical or biological weapons. that drew criticism of some who said he was invoking fear and the doctor said it's better to be safe than one day sorry. the risk isn't major he says, but it dpexists. it's part of our job as
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emergency doctors to be prepared for these kinds of attacks. and the attacks france has faced this year alone, france wants to make sure their first responders for ready for any scenario, should terror strike again. >> reporter: and a journalist and expert on french diplomacy and now they're talking about gas. ambulances equipped with the antidote effectively. there is -- i mean, the government is instilling fear in people but feels as if it's appropriate. >> well, imagine if something were used and they hadn't warned people and it was found out. the crazy thing, if you want to get diplomatic for a moment is that two years ago, we were ready to bomb assad because he was using gas and now we're talking openly about how the
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rebellion and isis was using gas. so, we're back to the point where everyone was using gas in syria and so we expect it to be used here. >> reporter: what sort of evidence is there that isis has access to chemical weapons? >> it's always been thought that they could buy it, especially when they use the mustard gas type which is much less complicated to make than the one used in a tokyo subway. it's very hard to make. and the evidence they have is intelligence and isis, as we know, has enormous amount of munitions makers and chemists who make all kinds of diabolical things. >> reporter: in term s of the state of emergency, and crucial to the sense of french is liberty and it does feel as
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if -- they're willing to sacrifice that for now, which is a huge shift in french culture, isn't it because this was such a shocking event? >> yes, of course, it's extremely important to go out and party and for women meant to be totally equal, i'm not eve. going into gay rights because isis, you can imagine what they think of that. and the president said in his big speech to the houses of parliament that france is a culture of life, sports, partying and culture itself. so, everyone wants to keep that up, however there is, as you were saying, this knowledge that we will have to undergo more police powers to be able to overcome this. we just cannot be sitting ducks all the time when we're out doing these things, culture, sports, etc. so, there will be a sacrifice. it will be accepted and the
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novelty of the attacks of the past week was that they aimed at everybody, whereas charlie hebdo, it was the list of the journalists. >> they were targeted. >> correct. >> reporter: thank you very much. indeed. so, i think rosemary and arrol, just grappling with this and the idea that we will give up personal freedoms. >> it's a matter of -- we'll be watching to see how parisians respond. and you are watching cnn special coverage of the terror attacks in paris and m arkmali and comi, find out who is claiming responsibility. >> plus, u.s. president obama
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welcome back to cnn's special coverage. and mali has cl d clairdeclaredf emergency. >> dozens of people were trapped in the building for hours before a counter attack came in and rushed guests away. and militant group is claiming
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joi joint responsibility with an al qaeda affiliate. >> president obama said more must be done to root out terrorist networks. and here now from lampur malaysia with this part of the story and we're live and on air right now. the u.s. president is there to attend two regional summets but now deals with the reality that an american was killed in the attack in mali. what did he say about the attack and the response? >> reporter: it was meant to be a talk about the transpacific partnership, instead it was predominantly dominated by those hideous attacks in mali, the president saying the american people give their condolences and saying that this will not deter the united states and other countries' fight against terrorism. let's listen. >> like the heinous attacks we saw in paris, and attacks we see
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all too often elsewhere, this is another awful reminder that scourge of terrorism threatens so many of our nations. and once again, this barbarity only stiffens our resolve to meet this challenge. we will stand with the people of mali. >> reporter: this is a part of what the white house really wants the world to know, that they will stand up and defeat terrorism in every way they can. president obama went on to talk about how all countries, including the leaders of the countries here today are united in standing against terrorism and he said also against harmful ideologie ideologies. this is extremism that is
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seeping into the mindset of communities all over the world as we see in paris, mali and other par other parts of the world. >> and it's being reported that president obama was his most emotional when commenting on the ref uugee controversy in the united states and some saying that there needs to be a test or data base for muslims. what did he have to say about that debate? >> this is an extraordinary moment. this is where young children from low income families locally and refugee families are brought in, given an education and given what they need, which is love and that's what president obama pointed out. and the credibincredibly emotiod these children are the kind of kids that need our support.
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we need share our love and we will create more good people around the world and they represent the opposite of terrorism and hatred and we've seen the president throughout this tour in manila and really trying to rise above the panic we're seeing at home in the united states. trying to have a more patient tone, trying to balance that fight against terrorism while also recognizing that there are people fleeing that terrorism and america should be a home for people like that, accepting people who want to find refuge and love. >> an important message for the u.s. president. and and a quarter to 4:00 in the afternoon there. thanks. >> joining me now to talk more about the terror attacks in mali and in paris and the threat of
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isis and al qaeda linked groups is david ross and he's a senior fellow at and a counterterrorism expert. well, the attacks in paris and mali and the terror threats now being directed in washington d.c. and brussels, give the impression that isis and other foreign fighters like them are everywhere and nowhere is safe. what is the real story and how do authorities and citizens around the world respond to the uptick? >> we've seen a rising threat for years. to be clear, the group in mali is linked to al qaeda and not isis and that being said, the it's very alarming. not only do you have one in syria and you have a conflict on
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the ground in yemen and the saudi arabian air force are trying to stop their advance and they control libya of course has fallen apart and never put back together and mali, for years you've had a burgeoning insurgeoncy and tunisia has had two major terrorist attacks over the course of this year that have all but upended the tunisian economy and then you have the paris attack where so many attackers were under intelligence radar. this is a situation that's of concern. >> indeed it is and what is your reading of what happened in mali and the timing of that attack and how well equipped mali authorities are to deal with attacks like this? >> it almost certainly was planned in advance. the timing may have been designed to coinside with paris.
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once the paris attack occurred, they may have decided to do it because the french play a major role in mali as well. so, part of it may have been designed to make the french make a choice. if they decide to devote resources to syria, this shows the consequence of pulling away from mali. that may have been a part of it, but in any rate, it was certainly planned in advance and isis and al qaeda have been locked in a competition to be the recognized leader of the jihadist movement. it may be linked to that competition, although i don't see al qaeda becoming too much more aggressive, at least not right now and that's because the counterterrorism resources are devoted to isis and that has advantages for al qaeda. >> thank you for sharing your perspective. we appreciate it. >> you're watching cnn special
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coverage of the terror attacks in mali and in paris. after the break, we'll take a look back at this tragic week as the people in paris recover [cat meows] ♪meow, meow, meow, meow... it's more than just a meal, it's meow mix mealtime. with great taste and 100% complete nutrition, it's the only one cats ask for by name. other wireless carriers make families share data. some way to say happy holidays. switch to t-mobile now and get 4 lines with up to 6gb each, and no sharing. just $30 bucks a line at t-mobile.
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. one week ago, terrorists attacked paris, killing 130 people and wounding dozens of others. >> but out of the tragedy came moving displaces of solidarity for the french people from around the world. here is a look at some of those poignant moments. ♪ >> translator: it's an act of war committed by a terrorist army, dash, an army of jihadists against france.
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>> we're reminded in this time of tragedy that the bonds of liberte are not only values that the french people care so much about but they are values that we share. >> translator: we stand with you, united. >> and then suddenly in a flash there was chaos. friday was a night of shock, saturday was a day of mourning but on sunday, we felt determined to come out, to take our lives back. ♪
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>> the headline of it is i will not succumb to hate. friday night, you stole an exceptional life, the love of my life, the mother of my son but i will not succumb to hate. >> we stand with the tace of life, and haphappiness, we play games with my son and know that they don't win. >> the world standing united with france. thanks for watching. i'm rosemary church. >> and i'm errol barnett, we will see you here tomorrow. there's more of special coverage to come. we'll leave you with the memorial of last week's terrorist attacks. ♪
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this is cnn breaking news. >> and welcome to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. >> ourspeciour special coverage continues. let's talk about the imaginer headlines round europe. >> belgium's capital is under a most serious threat. >> and authorities are
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intensifying the search for this suspect, abdesam, who was last seen going towards belgium. >> and they called on member countries to take all necessary measures to defeat isis. let's go now to our max foster. he's keeping up with the development there live in paris where it's 9:00 in the morning. >> reporter: trying to get back to normal here. last night the cafes and bars were open. there were certainly people out and about. and there's a real resolve to continue life as normal and social media campaign getting people back out to the bistros and there's a sense of fear here and that's because this is a country still under crisis measures, really. the police have special powers for three months to continue searches and 163 people currently under house arrest and
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in belgium, brussels, the very highest terror threat level has been imposed and the transport system is closed and authorities are trying to take down the network that caused all that carnage in paris a week ago. a man is still on the run and here's nick robertson. >> reporter: the international manhunt for the eight lth attacker is increasing in scope. authorities have expanded their search area to now include the netherlands. and abdeslam is being sought in connection with the attacks that have now claimed the lives of 130 people. it's believed he's spent time in the netherlands and new details about the woman heard in this audio in the raid in saint-denis. where is your boyfriend?
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he's not my boyfriend. french prosecutors now say she was not the one who detonated a suicide vest as seen in this video obtained. and the vest was warn by a man and the woman was killed from the resulting blast and we're learning more about the suspect ring leader of last week's attacks in paris. cnn has learned abdelhamid abaaoud was spotted on cc tv footage the night of the attacks that same time the attacks were going on, at a metro station in a paris suburb. the same area one of the cars used in the attack was bound abandoned. abaaoud was killed in a raid wednesday, one of 800 raids around france in the coming days and the siege lasted more than seven hours. here you can see police advancing before the final
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confrontation, which also killed his female relative. and a third body, an unidentified male was found in the devastation. >> and harold is a jrournalist and expert in french diplomacy and this final suspect who's on the run was actually challenged by police at one point but they let him go. you can't blame the police, they didn't know he was linked to the paris attacks, which shows how swift they have to be. >> well, they'll have to be a lot swifter and arrest a lot of people that don't need to be arrested. and that's the risk we're running. of course, they catch people like this and they'll prevent more attacks. the belgium secret service has recently admitted that thwarted a great number of attempted
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attacks. so, some things are going right and some things are looking ridiculously wrong, like when you have the suspect and he escapes right under your nose. >> and the terror threat level at its maximum suggests they don't know what is going to happen. >> well, england had the same thing with imminent attack warnings that don't take place but this is that self fulfilling idea that so many precautions will be taken that you thwart the thing, so afterwards you might look ridiculous. but i don't think so anymore. no minister is going to look ridiculous for underreacting. >> and that's because of the current environment and we had that matched in germany and it was cleared and no device was found and actually in a couple of months time and they try and
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do that, then they will get criticism, won't they, because it won't be the same atmosphere? >> i don't think so. in france, i -- >> reporter: it's changed. >> there's been a change in the last week because there's no more excuses. people who are targets are innocent people. it's anyone sitting down and having a cup of coffee and going to a venue to listen to music. so, there's no reason not to imagine that you're a targ squt and no reason to make fun of police because they're paranoid. >> reporter: and it's a city that everyone relates to, everyone understands, if you attack paris, it's going to have the bang that you want, if you're isis in terms of pr. do you think the media is playing too much into that and
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has a responsibility here? >> well, actually i don't because i don't see how the media can not speak about these things and in fact, it's been balanced of late. we're not looking hysterically for terrorists under the bed. we understood where they are and how the police work, we understood the dynamics -- i say we because i'm a journalist too -- befwetween the muslim community and terrorism. and isis is getting sophisticated but their idea of sophistication is holding a head on a spike. so, it's a new world where every day we're learning little tricks on how to find the reasonable muslims. what i mean by reasonable wrone
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who are mouth pieces, who are articulate and have been committed against it. for years. and i know some of them have been preaching against hate for 20 years. they're under death threats. the imams have police guards and these people are coming out systematically and they feel like they're in a counter war against this jihad. >> reporter: thank you. with you throughout the morning p. a . for me, paris feels like it's getting back to normal. it's not quite there and there is this undercurrent of concern because of the state of emergency in the country. >> and given we're just a week on and still a suspect on the run. max foster, thank you and we'll be back with you in paris a little later in the news cast to get more from the french capital. you heard max speak about belgium. well, in brussels, all
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underground stations are closed today. that's the latest from the public transportation company there. >> and belgium's capital is now under the highest terror threat possible. they face a quote serious and imminent threat. police are encouraging people not to gather in public places. and terror suspects have link belgium. >> and cnn's drew griffin reports. >> reporter: this mostly muslim community in brussels is quickly becoming synonymous with terror. and they say dozens of fighters in syria have come from here and more and more terrorists come here to shop in the black market that specializes in the tools of
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their trade. >> pass ports, and we absolutely have to counter these things with the help of local services but also with the help of criminal justice. >> reporter: and the senior fellow at a brussels think tank focusing on immigration and security, says guns have put them on the terror map. >> there is a black market in brussels that come from everywhere in europe and from the balkin countries and it's very easy for criminal gangs to find wenz, even war weapons in our city. >> reporter: the gun of choice in recent attacks can be purchased on the belgium black market for as little as $1,000.
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you're getting a good deal here. >> indeed. that's the problem. >> reporter: and there's another problem that may be much bigger. >> what we see the last three, four, five years is that there's a merge between the jihadi radical world and the criminal world because lots of jihadists meet with criminals in prison. i think that the role of the branch of islam with these young people is that it's like a mental detonation mechanism and so some of them are hard core jihadi that are socialized in this branch of islam since they were young and some of them are not that muslim at all. >> reporter: that appears to be the case for the man who operated this bar. and abdelhamid abaaoud was known as a petty criminal here. the bar he ran shut down just a week before the paris attacks because of drugs and other
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elicit activity. family and friends say his involvement in radical islam came as a shock. last week, he blew himself up in paris wearing a suicide vest. his family was stunned and his brother is still on the run and he too has a past and spend time in priz prison, three criminals turned jihadists. from europe and now west africa, mali has declared a nation wide, 10 day state of emergency, this after gunman stormed a hotel. >> and a group claims joint responsibility with an al qaeda
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affiliate. here's more. >> reporter: bamako under attack. these were the scenes in the malian capital friday morning as gunman stormed the radisson blu hotel firing shots and taking hau hostages. at least one of the cars had diplomatic license plates and the hotel prides itself on its tight security. >> translator: the authorities need to take strong measures. we leave our houses every day to buy bread but if something like this can happen, i'm worried. >> reporter: for west africa, this is the third fatal terror attack in the week. two days ago, it was isis affiliated grurngs booup, boko leaving more than 40 people dead. the town of yola was struck first and 24 hours later at a market in northern nigeria,
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authorities say two young girls, one only 11 years old, detonated suicide vests killing more than a dozen people. and boko haram became isis's largest affiliate and at the time they consisted of roughly 6,000 fighters and northern mali has been traditionally an al qaeda strong hold and with aqim being the most predominate terror group in the west african nation. and a group, al mourabitoun, entered a hotel, and killing 21 people. a counter assault was launched
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as malian troops stormed the hotel and in march, the same faction attacked a restaurant that killed five people including a belgium security officer. they were scattered and much of their power eroded by a french military offensive that began in 2013 but pockets of insurgents remain, able to launch sophisticated attacks and the attacks in paris and ones like this remind us. >> we will have more on the mali attacks and reaction from president obama, still to come, also france's prime minister warns chemical terror attacks are a possibility. and now first responders are making sure they're prepared. >> and u.s. airports tighten security measures amid some news about the paris attackers. stay with cnn. i have asthma...
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welcome back to cnn live coverage. france's senate has approved extending the state of emergency for three months in the wake of
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the paris attacks. there are about 10,000 emergency personnel deployed across the country and that's in addition to 100,000 police officers. 164 people have been placed under house arrest since last friday. >> france's prime minister has warned that terrorists could go as far as using chemical weapons in future plots. and here how first responders are getting prepared. >> reporter: after the carnage, french authorities fear in the future terrorists could go even further, possibly launching chemical attacks. and while the possibility appears remote, the government is ordering first responders to be prepared. and in this hospital near varsigh, they're updating the atropine stock.
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>> from now on we will use military great atropine, it's more complicated and easier to use in an attack. saren gas was used in syria's capital, damasks in 2014, killing around 1400 people according to the state department. the emergency medical personnel here say they're well prepare for at least 75 first responders and they're equipped with three of these state of the art ambulances that can deal with almost any emergency. it was france's prime minister who first warned of possible terror attacks. he said we know and bear in mind that there is also a risk of chemical or biological weapons. that drew criticism from some
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accusing him of causing fear and the doctor says it's better to be safe than one day, sorry. the risk isn't major, he says, but it exists and it's part of our job as emergency doctors to be prepared for these kinds of attacks. after the attacks france has faced this year alone, the nation wants to make sure its first responders are as ready as they can be should terror strike again. >> now, in the wake of the paris terror attacks, european security has come under scrutiny. and rob wayinwrightwainwright. >> what we have is a challenge around the fragmented intelligence picture as security authorities around europe try to
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deal with significant amounts of intelligence about a significant number of possible suspects and it's simply not possible to monitor all of them 100% all the time. what we have to do is learn the lessons of this investigation, to rebuild on our efforts, it's important that the ministers decided a new counterterrorism center will be established first of januafebruary next year. so, we're building our capability all the time but let's face it, europe is facing the most significant international terrorists threat that i've seen for 10 years. >> and at least one of the eight paris attackers likely would have been able to travel to the u.s. under the visa waver
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program while there's no duk indication any of them tried, there's concern that one could slip through the screening system. >> and airport security checks are expected to tighten. renee marsh has the story. >> reporter: millions of passengers will pack on to planes to kick off the holiday travel season. from now until december first, it's estimated a total 25,000,000 people will fly on u.s. airlines. 3% more than last year. this as airports around the country remain on high alert. >> it's pretty simple mathematics. in the end, it's going to take more time to screen each person and that is going to add up to longer lines. >> reporter: tsa spends more time inspecting passengers and
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luggage. expect longer checks and, hand swabs to check for explosive residue and even precheck passengers may be required to remove their shoes and laptops. and they have called extra screening, leaving from overseas directly to the united states. and passenger planes remain a target for terrorists. and earl i this week, isis claimed this was the bomb that brought down a russian passenger jet. >> the next aircraft on -- >> reporter: two air france flights were diverted this week after bomb threats were called in. >> as a precaution, we're declaring an emergency. >> reporter: and thursday night, a spirit airlines flight was forced to make an emergency
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landing in fort lauderdale after another bomb threat. they turned out to by hoaxes but heightened airport security fee with holiday travellers will likely lead to long waits. >> the first priority is to be safe and with the new security concerns, you're really more than ever going to want to get to the airport early. >> and the other factor, tsa's full security staffing levels have steadily decreased due to a shrinking budget. >> there is no letup in the man hunt for one of the suspects from last week's terror attacks. we take you live to paris, next. and isis has another weapon in its arsenal. a drug that makes its fighters feel invincible on the battle field. we'll have the report.
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♪ welcome back to our viewers in the united states and around the world. >> we want to bring you up to date on the investigation into the paris terror attacks. the french senate has unanimously approved an extension of the state of emergency and likely to be approved by the country's constitutional counsel. >> and meanwhile, there's an international man hunt underway for this man, abdeslam, he was last seen driving towards the
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border before they realized he was a suspect. he's one of two brothers believed involved in last week's terror attacks. max, we're only a week on and there is still a manhunt for one of the people allegedly invau involved. >> reporter: you have brussels in lock down as this man is on the run. he was seen leaving france for belgium and the assumption is he's there and by the response of the authorities in belgium, they think he's most likely to be in brussels. and you have major events being canceled and people being warned to stay away from concentrated groups of people and the state of emergency in france extended for three months and that allows the police to carry out searches
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in properties and explain them selves to the court after the event instead of before and they have more than 160 people under house arrest as a result of these paris attacks or in light of them as they continue investigations into the broader concerns around isis. andiz izwe're finding out more t the modern threat they're posing. yesterday, we heard the prime minister in france talking about their possible access to chemical weapons. ambulances have been given an antidote, just in case that happens in paris. the concern is extremely high. and we're told they're using drugs on the battle field, some sort of amfphetamine. >> they gave us drugs, that would make you go to battle, not caring if you lived or died.
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>> reporter: he was being held by kurdish militants in northern syria. it was impossible to know if he was telling the truth or being coerced by his captors and now it's they're using a dangerous and powerful amfeet mean. >> you don't have to sleep and it gives you a sense of well being and you feuphoria and youk nothing can harm you. >> reporter: they say isis were believed to be smuggling the precursers to the drug and there's a robust black market for the drug in the middle east. >> people affiliated with hes belu, have a lot to do with the sale of the drug and at one
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time, there was a fight because people were angry they weren't getting a cut of some of this business. >> reporter: it was developed in the '60s and first used to treat people with hypersensitivithype. and they jihadists -- >> jihadist scholars would argue that this is not hypocritical. first of all, it's not a drug being taken to get high. >> reporter: and he's treated thousands of adicts says it can make people hear voices and see things not there. well, that can hurt people oen it the battle field? >> yes. but i think they've decided giving them the sense of inh
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invincibility is worth the risk. >> reporter: users, he says can become kcome psychotic, brain d and addicted to the drug for years to come. >> and he's a journalist and french diplomacy expert and studied isis in great deal as well. now, they're manufacturing drugs, they have labs and prime minister talking about gas. and they've collected a lot of weapons with the raids we've been seeing in paris. >> well, actually their sophistication isn't just in what you said but also in the scope of what they can do. they can take a 15-year-old and turn him into a human bomb or they can lead an attack with tanks, led by officers of the former army of saddam hussein and they also have people who can administer a certain
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district. so, their scope is simply incredible and this is what gives them strength. they have a strong leadership of which we don't know too much. and the kalif is a charismatic person and known for hating shiite muslims and this was the problem with the old al qaeda that was less interested in the war between sunni muslims. >> reporter: the ring leader was closely associated and was a senior member of isis, when normally the people who carry out these attacks are at the junior level. >> well, this must mean that he
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was very interested in having these attacks carried out in this city and for quite some time, paris has become one of the main targets altogether of what is called in their termology, "the crusade." so it's not that surprising that they should be involved and french are bombing him, so, it's not surprising either and there is such a muslim population in which they can hide and in which they can find recruits. >> reporter: and when you talk about crusades and follow that narrative, it brings you to r e rome. in terms of ideology, he has sites on rome, doesn't he, not paris? >> well, he should but the italians have not been involved in the coalition.
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>> reporter: he needs that narrative as well, that we're defending ourselves against a particular country? >> i think the crusaders were englishman and the franks, the old french. so, it's a very french thing, these crusades and since france colonized -- well, under a mandate, lebanon and syria, there's this old animosity that never died out and they're playing on and augmeanting as much as he can to make the chaos, which is really the backbone of his ideology, which is chaos. >> reporter: and heightened ale alert, not just in belgium but here in france as well. and the state of emergency will continue for three months as
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they try to figure out what this means for the battle of french culture and isis. >> u.s. president obama is lashing out against those who killed 21 people at a hotel in west africa. we'll have a live report coming next.
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and welcome back to cnn's continuing special coverage, the west african nation of mali has declared a 10-day state of emergency after gunman killed 21 people. >> hostages were trapped for hours. an islamic militant group known as al mourabitoun is claiming
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responsibili responsibility, an al qaeda affiliate. >> hello. >> reporter: the presidents was meant to give a speech here but it was dominated by events in mali. he spoke first, expressing his condolences to the victim's family, including, of course, one american citizen, saying they were making efforts to trace the rest of the american citizens they believe to have been in that hotel, saying this will not deter the united states or leaders from their commitment to drive out terrorist networks, to put a stop to them and he said we will not allow these killers to have a safe haven. and we've seen the white house reaching out to other nations saying that this is time now to come together and wipe out isis
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and of course, just a while ago, we saw that strike believed to have killed jihadi john, the isis leader. >> and we're hearing president obama on another part of the story. he's making an emotional case for welcoming refugees from syria. what did he have to say? >> reporter: this, if you like, is the flip side to that story p. we focus a lot on the terrorist attacks, where the terrorists are coming from but of course, the refugees that are fleeing these locations, flying the kind of terror we witnessed in paris, they are running for that and i think president obama has really tried to humanize the story and rise above the rhetoric being seen in the united states. >> anybody who had a chance to see those kids hopefully you understood the degree to which they're just like our kids.
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and they deserve love and protection and stability and an education. >> reporter: and the president said that this -- these children represent the opposite of terrorism and the kind of despicable violence, as he put it that we've seen in mali, paris and elsewhere around the world. he said we need to treat them with love, dedication and share our values with these kids who are going to be the future so there are more good people around the world against these what he called, darker, violent forces. >> and that has started a whole new dialogue here in the united states about that. and thank you. >> and certainly, divisive conversation in the u.s. while you have some states, many
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that have come out saying they will not accept refugees and in those states, you're seeing major cities, like the city of atlanta saying they will. so, it's divided on many levels. >> it is. >> and a survivor tells cnn how he managed to make it out alive. stay with us. i have asthma... ...one of many pieces in my life. so when my asthma symptoms kept coming back on my long-term control medicine, i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment. once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms. breo is for adults with asthma not well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. breo won't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden breathing problems. breo opens up airways to help improve breathing for a full 24 hours. breo contains a type of medicine that increases the risk of death from asthma problems and may increase the risk of hospitalization in children and adolescents. breo is not for people whose asthma is well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine,
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like an inhaled corticosteroid. once your asthma is well controlled, your doctor will decide if you can stop breo and prescribe a different asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. do not take breo more than prescribed. see your doctor if your asthma does not improve or gets worse. ask your doctor if 24-hour breo could be a missing piece for you. see if you're eligible for 12 months free at mybreo.com.
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♪ so many lives lost in paris and even to this day and many days to come, they're being remembered and there are so many stories of people who survived these terrible attacks and now we're hearing from a man who survived the bataclan theater. >> 89 inside were killed during the rock concert. one survivor spoke with poppy harlo about what he saw and how he escaped. ♪
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>> it was passing from happiness to nightmare. happiness and then nightmare when it's time to think to survive. >> reporter: being on the balcony, you believe that saved your life? >> yes, absolutely. because when i arrived to the concert, there were so many people on the ground floor and i wanted to dance and i said to myself, the only way to do so is to get on the balcony. >> reporter: you're still looking for the people you were with that night? >> yes, exactly. because it's very important for me to get back here in relation with those people who suffered the same as i did. >> reporter: do you remember the last person you spoke with that
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night before the gunman burst in? >> i met a guy, a 50-year-old and we had a conversation and the terrible thing is that when i got out, i walked over his corpse. >> reporter: you walked over his corpse? >> yes, so i was the last person to have a conversation with him. >> reporter: you took a video in the concert, right before. >> yes. and they came out like terrorists and with guns. >> reporter: he wants the band playing that night to come back to paris and play again, this time in peace. he told me about his close friend who is traumatized by the shooting who wrote a note to the band. >> please don't stop playing rock and roll, please come back to paris. we love you.
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sometimes i feel like a war veteran and -- >> >> reporter: like a war victim. >> yes, and my parents are 80-year-old, they were born in 1935 and 1936 and they experienced war and said you don't know your right to being a peaceful country because we experienced war but i told them i experienced war, you know, on friday night it was a modern war and i was in a bloody battle field. >> reporter: still he insists he will once again dance at the bataclan, the same place where he almost lost everything. >> i will go there and dance at the next concert in omauj to the victims. that's my way to pay the -- >> cnn, paris. >> and that man right there
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talking about feeling like he's a war victim, you can certainly understand that sentiment, a week after the paris attacks, resilient parisians are struggling to get back to life as they once knew it. here's cnn's jake tapper. >> reporter: the horror that started last week is still not done, with at least two terror suspects still on the loose and tragic news this afternoon. that the death toll from the attacks has risen to 130. dozens of victims of the paris attacks remain in hospitals with many in intensive care and there are those wounds that may never heal. >> the whole time he said don't run, just stay and those words saved my life because the people who ran were shot. >> reporter: the weather in paris matching the mood of the country as armed police, soldiers and extra security are sprinkled throughout the city.
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while that the same time, barris that had surrounded the sites of the horrific isis murders have calmed down. the eiffel tower has reopened and they have had a huge economic impacts on the city and some estimates showing tourism down almost 60%. and today there is only open space. tour buses are empty. the french senate unanimously voted to extend the current state of emergency to three months. in some ways it's hard to imagine it's only been a week and the band death eagles is still being advertised as being at the bataclan and even though no one will be performing at bataclan, there is a push for
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france to return to normalcy, the #everyone to the bar is tre trending in french social media and it should be noted, thirst at midnight, this cafe even creating a rustic french countryicicountry side in the heart of the city and the shops that christmas village closed after the paris attacks are open and attracting crowds of shoppers, all of them proving these latin words which have been a motto of paris officially since 1853 and are now plastered throughout the city. at the eiffel tower and here, they translate to mean she is tossed by the waves but does not sink. nor will she ever. >> paris is grieving but paris
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is resilient. >> paris is awesome. >> we thank you for watching. >> we'll have much more ahead in the next hour. please stay with us. announcer: if you'd give thanks for a better night's sleep...
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♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ hello again. you're watching cnn's continuing coverage of the paris attacks as well as attacks in mali. >> we'll have all the details on the deadly hotel siege in mali's capital. firefighter developments in europe -- first, developments in europe. the capital of belgium at the highest terror alert level possible because of "a serious and imminent threat." it comes after police conducted id

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