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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  November 21, 2015 1:00am-3:01am PST

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hello again. you're watching cnn's continuing coverage of the paris attacks as well as attacks in mali. >> we'll have all the details on the deadly hotel siege in mali's capital. firefighter developments in europe -- first, developments in europe. the capital of belgium at the highest terror alert level possible because of "a serious and imminent threat." it comes after police conducted raid in search of link to the
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paris attackers. >> we've learned that the woman found dead after the police raid in saint-denis, france, did not blow herself up, as information earlier said. rather, a man of wearing a suicide device that detonated, and that killed her. sources say the woman was related to the paris attack ringleader. in west africa, two terror groups have claimed responsibility for killing 21 people including one american at a hotel in mali on friday. our max foster in the french capital. max, we're only a week after these terrible attacks, and there's still a person on the run. >> reporter: it'sit from new england, isn't -- it's frighteni frightening, isn't it brussels in lockdown, and paris in a state of emergency.
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100,000 police have been deployed, as well, as a result of the attacks just over a week ago here in paris. there's a sense of defiance. people were out in the bistros. there's a campaign to get people out in the bistros, and they lived up to that campaign. there's definitely an undercurrent of fear that anything is possible. even had the french prime minister yesterday talking about a possible chemical attack from isis. we should brace for that. we'll have more in a moment. first to brussels where people have been told to stay out of crowded areas, told to stay away from large events and away from the subway. absolute fear there at the moment because there is a terrorist on the run. a potential terrorist on the run. everyone's being told to be careful as a result of that. drew griffin has more on that. >> reporter: this mostly muslim
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area has terror relations. dozens of islamic foreign fighters in syria have come from here, and more and more terrorists come here to shop. the black market specializes in the tools of the trade. >> false passports, weaponly flouri flourishing. we have to counter these things with the help of local services, but also with the help of criminal just. >> reporter: the senior fellow at a brussels think tank forcing on immigration and security says illicit trade in guns has put belgium on the terror list. >> although there are gun laws, still there is a big black market of weapons in brussels that comes from everywhere in europe and also from the balkan countries. it's very easy for criminal
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gangs or for terrorist grouping to find weapons, even war weapons, here in our city. >> reporter: he says kalishni ko v rifles, used in the recent attack, can be purchased on the belgian blrk for as little as $1,000. you're getting a good deal. >> that's the problem. >> reporter: there's another problem, he says, that may be much bigger. >> what we say the last three, four, five years is that there is a merge between the jihadi radical world and between the criminal world. lots of jihadists meet with criminals in prison. i think that the role of the branch of islam with these young people is a mental mechanism. so some of them are hard-core
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jihadis since they were young, but some are not muslim at all. >> reporter: that appears to be the case for the man who operated this bar. ibrahim abdul salaam of known as a petty criminal. the bar he ran shut down a week before the paris attacks because of drugs and other illicit activity. family and friends say his involvement in radical islam came as a shock. last week, abdelhamid abaaoud blew himself up wearing a suicide vest. his brother still on the run. he, too, has a criminal past. in 2011 even spent time in prison with another terrorist leader. three criminals turned jihadist. >> here in france, the prime minister warned that terrorists could go as far as using chemical weapons in future plots. critics accuse the prime
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minister of invoking fear through that. the french government isn't taking any chances. fred pleitgen shows us how first responders are making sure that they're prepared. >> reporter: after the carnage of the paris attacks, french authorities worry in the future terrorists could go even further, possibly launching chemical attacks. while the possibility is remote, the government is ordering first responders to be prepared. at this hospital near versailles, the doctor is upgrading atropine stock, used to treat nerve gas. "from now on we will use military-grade atropine. it's more concentrated and easier to use in case of such attack." it's used in cases of sarin poisoning. it was used in the massive attack in syria's capital,
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damascus, in 2013, killing around 1,400, according to the state department. the emergency medical personnel here say they're well prepared with respirators and special protective suits. at least 75 first responders. just in case there should be a chemical attack, the hospital is equipped with three of these state-of-the-art ambulances that can deal with almost any emergency. it was france's prime minister who first warned of possible chemical terror plots. "i say it with all the precautions needed," he said, "but we know and bear in mind that there is also a risk of chemical or biological weapons." that drew criticism from some, accusing the prime minister of stoking fear. but the doctor in charge says it's better to be safe than possibly one day sorry. "it's part of our job as emergency doctors to be prepared for these kinds of attacks."
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after the attacks, france has faced this year alone, the nation wants to make sure its first responders are as ready as they can be for any scenario should terror strike again. fred pleitgen, cnn, france. and a journalist here, expert on french and defense -- french defense and diplomacy. the author of "geopolitically correct and incorrect." we're hearing from fled pleitgen saying how the french government are being accused of stoking fear. talk of a possible chemical attack when there doesn't seem to be specific intelligence relating to that. i guess they are invoking fear in people. they fear it's a necessary move right now in light of what's happened. >> reporter: >> you can't blame them for warning. if they didn't warn and something happened, it would be infinitely worse. they t must be said -- it must be said also, however, that the
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government is under great criticism for being overly p.r.'d, doing too much spin. obviously, anything they say now looks like spin. in this case, they do have to say something. the prime minister is prone to overstatement, but still, since "charlie hebdo," he's been pretty much on the mark. if he oversteps, he always has a junior minister -- >> there's a counter briefing following the comment about possible chemical attacks. that's what you're referring to. >> absolutely. absolutely. >> in terms of the state of emergency, we've got more than 160 people under house arrest. not directly linked to this paris plot. obviously in some way linked to terror. that's extraordinary. 100,000 forces on the streets
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now. are they acting in proportion to what happened on last friday? yes because the targets have become anywhere. they're no longer just synagogues or police, they're anybody. we're showing the flag, uniform everyplace. deep down this may not be the ultimate secret it success which is much more on the intelligence side. there's a new culture, it may be good, it may be bad, but the culture is to arrest suspects. to prevent even the beginning.
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there's still an attraction to the investigation. you have to have material evidence someone is planning something. now we have heavy suspicion. >> reporter: i want to ask about brussels today, as well, the city on lockdown. the terror threat at the top level. that happens when they don't actually know what's going to happen. they consider that anyone could be affected. if they have specific intelligence about a specific incident, they would have actually been much more localized in their response, wouldn't they? there's a great deal of concern it brussels today. >> well, brussels in belgium is a country where there are so many terrorist cells that the government itself is not sure which one is which. and since the attack on the jewish museum last year, they have arrested -- gone to arrest cells who fired at them and had gun battles. the country is already on edge. and they do is a problem of too much terrorists' presence.
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>> reporter: noble one neighborhood. >> all in mohenbique, but there was a shoot-out last year when they were looking to suspect connected to the jewish museum. >> reporter: thank you very much indeed, harold. george and natalie, we're following development closely in belgium. if there is any update on this man on the run because that's very much at the center of this live investigation now, then we'll bring that to you. >> max foster, thanks. yes, paris trying to get back to normal. brussels very much not so at the moment. thank you. we want to turn to west freeway now. a gunman killed 21 people including an american at a hotel in mali on friday. dozens were trapped in the building for hours before malian security forces launched a counterattack and rushed the guests away. an islamist militant group is
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claiming joint responsibility with an al qaeda affiliate. the government there has declared a ten-day nationwide state of emergency. we have more on the story live from nairobi, kenya. robin, good to have you with us in mali. they are also honoring three days of mourning following this siege. >> reporter: yes, we're learning more about the victims. the 41-year-old american aid worker who was killed, we understand she was a peace corps volunteer. she'd spent an inordinate amount of time trying to take the continent forward in terms of health care revision for all. here's a wrap of what we know happened yesterday. gunmen stormed the radisson blu hotel in bamako around 7:00 in the morning, firing automatic rifles and taking dozens of
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hostages. as many as 170 people were inside at the time. >> two to three people entered with ak-47s. they came and immediately started shooting at people. at least before entering the hotel. >> reporter: the hotel is popular with foreigners, guests from france, china, india, turkey, and the u.s. staying there at the time. witnesses reported hearing gunfire and explosions coming if inside. >> i saw bullets on the floor in the lobby. >> reporter: a chinese tourist shot video from the window as mali forces surrounded the building. with the help of u.n. troops, they launched a counterassault to rescue the hostages. at least two u.s. military personnel assisted outside the hotel. a state department spokesman says about a dozen americans were rescued. by late afternoon, all the hostages had been freed or escaped.
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two groups have claimed responsibility, as you said. this spark concerns amongst anles that this could ignite a jihadi competition of sorts between isis coming back -- coming on the heels of the paris attacks. worry that this could result in more striking of soft targets such as hotels and malls, for example. >> robin, al qaeda has claimed responsibility, mainly being active in the northern part of the country. are malian authorities getting help from other groups as well outside of the country? >> reporter: definitely malian authorities have operated with the french, for example. the french went in in 2013 at the request of the malian
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government to try and stamp out the different insurgent groups taking the -- the fanatical islamic groups taking control of the country. they did manage to scatter them. however, it's acts like these very sophisticated. they used diplomatic plates to get inside. well-planned attacks that strike fear into the hearts of malians because there were a number of ma mal malian casualties. and the hotel is american owned. this shows they can still strike at will. >> in creole live, nairobia, kenya. thank you very much for your reporting. coming up, some fear that european borders are not secure enough. we will hear from europe's law enforcement director. cnn asked whether europeans can trust his agency to keep them safe. stay with us. the pursuit of healthier. it begins from the second we're born. because, healthier doesn't happen all by itself.
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welcome back to our special coverage of the praaris terror attacks. in brussels, the metro is closed for the day as belgium's capital
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is put under the highest terror alert possible. belgian officials say people there should avoid large gatherings in public places. >> also, we are learning more about two attackers who blew themselves up outside the national stadium of france. prosecutors say they entered europe through greece on the same day. and european security is in the spotlight. our hala gorani spoke with rob wayne right, director of the law enforcement agency of the european union. listen. >> reporter: i've got to ask you here with respect, i mean, if a man like abdelhamid abaaoud can slip through in such a way, who can't in that case? if citizens in europe cannot expect their law enforcement intelligence agencies to keep track of the -- of really literally probably one of the most wanted terrorists in europe, how can they trust their agencies to do any kind of job to protect them at this stage?
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>> it's the number-one terrorist group now. it wasn't necessarily the case one or two week ago. there's a fragmented intelligence picture. security authorities around europe trying to deal with significant amounts of intelligence about a significance number of possible suspect. it's simply not possible to monitor all of them 100% all of the time. what we have to do is learn the lessons of this incident, double our efforts. it's important that the ministers establish a bureau at interpol. this will provide a better platform for intelligence sharing and operational cooperation in the future. >> fascinating. we're learning more about a powerful drug isis is giving to troops to help them carry out horrific attacks. >> yes, this is a drug that sis
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extremely powerful. an amphetamine that make fighters feel invincible on the battlefield. more from brian todd. >> reporter: a captured isis militant named kareem tells cnn how he got his battlefield courage. >> translator: gave us drugs. hallucinogenic pills help you not care whether you live or die. >> reporter: when our team interviewed kareem last year, he was being held by kurdish militants in northern syria. was impossible to know if he was telling the truth or being coached by captors. now a u.s. official tells cnn it's believed some jihadist fighters are using the drug captagon. how would it fuel things on the battlefield? >> keeps you awake. you don't have to sleep. it gives you a sense of well-being and euphoria. and you think you're invincible and that nothing can harm you. >> reporter: recently the u.n. drug czar said isis and the
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nusra front were believed to be smuggling the drug. a u.s. law enforcement official says there's a robust black market for the drug in middle east. analysts say the profits fund weapons purchases for jihadist groups. >> hezbollah, affiliated with hezbollah, have a long history of sales. there was a fight between hezbollah-affiliated persons, some angry they weren't getting a cut of the business. >> reporter: captagon was developed in the '60s and was used to treat people with hyperactivity. it's been banned in the u.s. and elsewhere. while some question the use by fighters, some find justification. is it a critical? is it a violation of religious principle? >> jihadists would argue this is not hypocritical. first of all, it's not a drug that's being taken to get high. >> reporter: psychiatrist robert kesling, who treats addicts, say
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it's so hallucinogenic, it can make a user hear voices and see things that aren't there. that can hurt you on the battlefield. >> absolutely. i think they have made the decision that keeping these guys awake for four or five days at a time and giving them the sense of invincibility is worth whatever harm or effects the drugs have. >> reporter: whatever sense of euphoria it might produce, the doctor says there are horrible downsides. users, he says, can become psychotic, brain damaged, and of course can get addicted to the drug for years to come. brian todd, cnn, washington. another sickening aspects of this story. coming up here, a message of hope in the midst of horror. a doctor's powerful photos goes viral after the paris terror attacks. plus, many french citizens feel compelled to defend their country. we'll take you to an army recruitment center.
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welcome back to cnn's special coverage of the terror attacks in paris and mali. i'm george howell. >> i'm natalie allen. the west african nation of mali has declared a ten-day state of emergency after gunmen stormed a hotel in the capital friday killing at least 21 people. an islamist militant group is claiming responsibility for the attack along with an al qaeda affiliat affilia affiliate. in europe, brussels, all underground transportation is closed today. belgium's capital under the
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highest terror alert level possible. sources they that brussels faces a "serious and imminent threat." we'll continue to follow that story. the search for suspected terrorist salah abdelslam was seen driving toward the poureder, but his current where-- border, but his current whereabouts are unknown. we'll turn to our max foster live in paris. it must be frustrating for officials, max, so many military, there's police. both of these countries. yet they don't know where the suspect is who got away. >> reporter: send sp10,000 memb the military deployed and the president saying all these cutbacks planned for the
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security services aren't going happen. no more people are going to be in the forces. that gives a sense of the feeling here and within government, slrks where there's a tough austerity drive, but the safety of the french people is always a priority of the government. they can't guarantee it if they keep making cutbacks. gives a sense of how people feel and the state of emergency now in place for three months, allowing police to search at will really -- they don't have to justify it to the courts after the event. a huge amounts of searches taking place in paris and around france. 106-odd people currently under house arrest, as well. not directly linked to the paris attacks, but in some way linked to terrorism, we assume, and isis, there's a massive clampdown in this country. of course over in brussels, the immediate concern is there's a man on the run. brussels literally in lockdown this hour. people told to stay away from
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crowded places, stay away from the subway. extraordinary situation there as this live investigation continues the week after the paris attacks. now in terms of the military, no more cutbacks. a recruitment drive. an unusual and intriguing manner as nic robertson reports. >> reporter: at a french army recruitment center, young men are signing up. "i wanted to join already," this 19-year-old tells me. "when i heard about the attacks, it motivated me even more." a few miles from last friday's attack, men and women lining up to find out if they've got what it takes. recruiters busier than ever. "today i've received three times the member of completed forms than i would normally have by this time friday," the recruiter tells me. the writing on the wall here, france's people need protection.
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the president says the country's at war. its citizens are listening. "the number of people who have contacted us," the commanding officer of recruitment tells me, "has gone up dramatically since last friday's attacks." officials here say this spike in recruitment has already exceeded those that came to sign up following the "charlie hebdo" attack in january. they add all those that volunteered then stayed the course. my question for the commanding officer is simple -- can the army, can the french army defeat daesh? "of course," he says. that simple? "the french soldier," he continues, "has a mission to fill. he will fulfill his mission. he will put all his energy into fulfilling his mission." a mission that will have more firepower if needed in the wake of last week's barbaric attack.
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nic robertson, cnn, paris. >> reporter: i'm joined by an expert on the radicalization behind the paris attacks. director of the school of higher studies in social sciences here in paris. you've written extensively on what we can learn from what happened last friday. what's your biggest thought around that, how france has changed and how france must respond? >> my guess is that this is a european problem. you know, europe has what might be called jihadist europe that have been able to build up the kind of jihadist network in different countries and got related -- and get related to each other. national security agencies have a culture of, you know, secrecy. and they don't divulge
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information. so that they could do it without any problem in belgium. it was sponsored, it was thought. it was -- just implemented in france -- >> reporter: they can cross the border. >> exactly. that's european ambiguity. what's been done is kind of mending things, but not reviewing them radically. what's need sudden not that. it's a kind of european intelligence. >> reporter: we heard the united nations talk yesterday talk about how the groups are working more closely together. that's a tough call, isn't it, for any spence agency? >> of course. >> reporter: even within a country they don't always work well together. what you're saying is if the -- freedom of movement in europe has to be accompanied by intelligence sharing, otherwise this is not going to be solved? >> a structure that would be independent of the nation. >> reporter: it's not going to happen. >> no. it's not. european ambiguity --
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>> reporter: this is a danger? >> it will be stopped for a few month. then if nothing else, nothing new happens. you know, it will be restored up to the time before the attacks. so -- >> reporter: would you advocate bringing back border controls? >> no, i'm not. i'm saying either you have controlled at the frontier, or you have an agency that could overcome the resistance of the intelligence services, national intelligence services in sharing information. >> reporter: the way intelligence sharing would work most effectively is if you put your intelligence on a data base that other intelligence agencies could come and look at. the way it works is you have to go to the other intelligence agency and ask for information. that it takes a long time to get and you don't get all of it. >> at the same time, they have a kind of, i would say, identity contrary of secrecy. based on the national territory. >> reporter: i'm suspicious of why you're coming to me asking for information, aren't i? if i'm one intelligence agency,
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you're another intelligence agency, why do you want this informatio information? >> it takes time. at the same time, people are set to do so. my guess is it's not a real solution. it's a kind of mending things, you know, for the time being. and that's european ambiguity almost in every respect. look at the monetary policy. there is a common currency but no common economic policy. you have a sort of common borders with migrant and so. on there's no common policy migrants. so that's europe in a kind of i would say total unaccomplishment and ambiguity and cultivated. policy maker know that in the european nations they don't want something which could look like federal. at the same time, they are involved in this sort of casual federal system. that's the sort of ambiguity that makes up europe nowadays.
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>> so much analysis off the back of this once things have calmed down. thank you very much indeed for bringing us your insight. i arrived here last night, and there's opinion a campaign here to get people back out to the bistros in defiance really of the sense of fear that isis is trying to instill in people here in paris. poppy harlow, my colleague, has been here for last week. here's a piece she put together for us today. >> reporter: they say a picture is worth a thousand words. this one is worth countless. have you ever seen anything like you saw on friday senate. >> never. never. >> reporter: the doctor was off duty when the shots rang out across paris. he raced to the hospital. >> i went directly to the hospital where there was the most injured people. >> reporter: how many people did you treat on friday night? >> there was 27 person who came to the hospital.
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the kind of injuries here -- in our country we don't see gunshots. >> reporter: you're not used to treating gunshots? >> not so much. a few a year. not people coming all month one place. there was many people we tried to treat. there were injuries to the face, the thorax, the belly, some -- war scenes. >> reporter: it was a war screen? >> yeah. to see the fear in the eyes of the people coming which was most young people, was everything -- >> reporter: all different religions? >> all different religions. just everybody. >> reporter: what was the message you were trying to send with the photograph? >> there was a big organization for everybody to save people. we came here it help people.
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it's our job. >> reporter: we are all together. >> all together, yes. everything was the awful. the only thing that was great was the mobilization of everybody. >> reporter: somehow with this photograph, you found the good -- >> in the middle of this tragedy, there was a bit of hope. and we were all there for -- to show that. we will be always there. >> reporter: you won't give up? >> never. never give up. >> reporter: poppy harlow, cnn, paris. >> reporter: step by step, we're getting a truer picture of really what happened more than a week ago here in paris. remember, there's still a live investigation, a man on the run. and brussels today is in lockdown whilst france remains in a state of emergency. natalie and george? >> so many uncertain things. you know, certainly a terrifying situation. that image in poppy harlow's piece just a moment ago really -- really says it all.
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it's amazing how an image, one image can capture so many thing. >> and just knowing that he ran to the hospital as soon as he heard to help out. wow. thanks. >> reporter: we're going to now go to the belgian prime minister who will be speaking. let's go to that directly. >> translator: areas are being operational. the first area is reduction of the number of large events because of security bawls because of capacity. i explain to you. when we cancel large events, it make it possible to make police available to secure the whole territory. both in brussels where there were four security alerts and elsewhere. there's a high security level, as well.
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in this framework the organizers of the events can contact the crisis center to receive complementary information. so the first thing that was the reduction of large events. the second is a strong mobilized station for public transport. mainly the metro. given the large number of people going to metro stations, the capacity needed for security. this recommendation was addressed to stop the metro until tomorrow afternoon because tomorrow afternoon there will be a new evaluation of particular
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attention for brussels, of course, also to maintain a level of maintenance and level three elsewhere in the country. the fourth point, fourth item, we have a telephone number -- 17 1771 -- in order to make it possible that we can address the crisis centers and questions for
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advice to have access to different information. initiati initiatives -- this means that we recommend to the population respect all the security advice that's made throughout the country, recommend the population to remain informed mainly by using
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official communication channels. the government and police services mainly use official channe channels. we are following the situation permanently these last few days. a u.n. security council meeting will take place tomorrow afternoon following the next evaluation and the next meeting of the crisis center. they're likely to complement the measures. we need to be clear, there are inquiries taking place in france and in belgium. there's no question for us of making the slightest commentary
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on the inquiries for obvious reasons, obvious security reasons. if there are any questions, we will respond to the events. to the inquiries. we have been faced since yesterday, moreover, with the terrorist operation in bamako in a hotel, the rad sisson blu. foreigners are following the situation there with the authorities in bamako. the european union security services and partners are there about this first communication from last night.
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quite simply unfortunately. >> and again we heard the belgian prime minister speaking about the situation in brussels. again, there is concern there about chemical agents being used. there's concern because of a suspect who is on the run and authorities telling people to basically stay away from large gatherings. again, there is still a search for this man. that search continues. again, people are being told to stay away from large public gathering as a precaution. the metro is shut down. and the prime minister said that evaluation will be made tomorrow whether to continue to shut it down. this suspect somehow slipped away, and it very much has people on edge in belgium. there again is the person that they will be looking for. you're watching our special coverage here on cnn.
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and we are also covering another attack that happened in mali. attacker with ak-47s stormed a west african hotel. security forces rushed in to rescue guest. ahead, find out who is claiming responsibility. and i quit smoking with chantix. i don't know that i can put into words how happy i was when i quit. it's like losing some baggage, i don't have to carry it around with me anymore. chantix made it possible for me to quit smoking. along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. chantix definitely helped reduce my urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. some had seizures while taking chantix. if you have any of these, stop chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of mental health problems, which could get worse or of seizures. don't take chantix if you've had a serious allergic or skin reaction to it. if you have these, stop chantix and call your doctor right away as some can be life-threatening. tell your doctor if you have heart or blood vessel problems, or develop new or worse symptoms. get medical help right away if you have symptoms
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welcome back. we're following a deadly terrorist siege that claimed the lives of at least 21 people inside a hotel in the west
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african country of mali. >> it is over now, but heavily armed gunmen fired indiscriminately at guests at the luxury hotel hosting diplomats and others in bamako. an al qaeda-affiliated group is taking partial responsibility. the government there has declared a ten-day nationwide state of emergency in response to the attack. u.s. president barack obama is condemning the mali attack and says more must be done to root out terrorist networks. cnn's reporter joined us on what else they had to say. >> reporter: president obama took to the stage in which was meant to be a discussion on the transpacific partnership. mali and those dreadful attacks there dominated his speech. he said that he con doled to families in particular, at least
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one american killed. he said this won't stop the united states or the world from standing against terrorism. take a listen. >> like the heinous attacks we saw in paris and attacks we see all too often elsewhere, this is another awful reminder that the scourge of terrorism threatens so many of our nations. once again, this barbarity only stiffens our resolve to meet the challenge. we will stand with the people of mali. >> reporter: president obama went on to say how he believed that countries around the world are now united in their resolve to stand up to isis, to defeat what he called a heinous ideology, harmful ideologies. let's remember, this isn't just about terrorism. this is about the extremist mindsets that's seeping through. now we've seen it going right through into europe, as well. natalie? >> reporting from cakuala lumpu.
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this just in to cnn. turkey has arrested three people suspected of having ties with isis. this according to turkey's semi
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official news agency. our affiliate in turk believes that they've helped choose sites to attack in paris. a 26-year-old was reportedly detained in southern turkey and is of moroccan descent. cnn turk reports two syrian nationals were arrested after they came from syria. authorities believe that they had planned to help move domani into syria. we'll continue to get details and follow that for you. we thank you for watching. i'm george howell. >> i'm natalie allen. more for you after this break. announcer: if you'd give thanks for a better night's sleep...
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we are back with another hour of cnn's special coverage of the terror attacks in france and mali. there are new development this hour. i'm natalie allen. >> i'm george howell. we will bring you the latest on the deadly hotel siege in mali's capital in a moment. first, let's get to the developments in europe. we just learned that turkish authorities have arrested three people in italia with suspected ties to isis and possibly friday's paris attack. cnn turk says one suspect was a belgian national, accused of scouting target sites for the attacks. two other suspects are accused of trying to transport the first man to syria. >> now to belgium. the capital, brussels, at the highest terror alert level because of a "serious and imminent threat." the city's metro is closed until at least sunday afternoon. this comes after belgian police conducted raids in search of links to the paris attackers. >> we've also learned that the woman found dead after
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wednesday's police raid in saint-denis, france, did not blow herself up as information had earlier stated. rather, a man was wearing a suicide device that detonated, and that device killed her. sources say that the woman was related to the paris attack ringleader. in west africa, two terror groups claimed responsibility for killing 21 people, including one american at a hotel in mali on friday. let's go to the very latest that's happening in europe with our max foster joining us live in paris. and max, as paris, of course, continues to regroup from this tragedy that happened a week ago, we just heard from the prime minister of belgium asking people to take precautions and stay away from large public gatherings. >> reporter: they're in lockdown. it's frightening. they're told not to go near the subway or to big events this weekend. they've opinion canceled, as well. it's effectively entirely in lockdown. this is still a live
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investigation. some are still on the run. they're seen going from france into belgium. the assumption is they have concrety evidence in brussels. we'll bring you updates as they come through. >> in france they're under a state of emergency, lasting for three months. an extraordisituation. mobilization going on -- extraordinary situation. mobilization going on after the events. they have extra powers and are using them. more than 160 people under house arrest, we understand, in france. this is a massive response to a massive event that happened in paris just more than one week ago. here's nic robertson, though, on the live investigation and on the man on the run. >> reporter: the international manhunt for the eighth attacker, salah abddabddealam, now one of
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most sought in connection with the attacks which have taken the lives of 130 people. it is believed he spent time in the netherlands. also new details about the woman heard in this audio in saint-denis. "where is your boyfriend?" "he's not my boyfriend." now prosecutors say hasna aitboulahcen was not the one who detonated the suicide vest, as seen in video obtained by abc. [ explosion ] >> reporter: the prosecutors say the vest of worn by a man, and the woman was killed in the resulting blast. and we are learning more about the suspect ringleader of last week's attack in paris. cnn has learned that abdelhamid
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abaaoud was spotted on footage at the time of the attacks at the same time attacks were going on at a metro station in a paris suburb. that is the same area one of the cars used in the attack was found abandoned. abaaoud was killed in a raid wednesday in saint-denis. one of nearly 800 raids around france the past five days. the siege lasted more than seven hours. here you see the police advancing before the final confrontation which also killed his female relative. french authorities now say a third body, an unidentified male, has been found among the devastation. >> reporter: we're joined now. harold is a journalist and expert in french defense and diplomacy, author of "geopolitically correct and incorrect." what we're seeing here is extraordinary, isn't it, in the sense that you've got two countries with one issue, but
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two different jurisdictions. france and belgium having to work together. how closely are they working together as you understand on it on this? >> there's a spat between the two capitals. the minister of the interior here said we did not get the file on some of the terrorists when it would have been useful, and -- without naming belgium. and the prime minister said about france, we have nothing to be ashamed of. we've been open since the beginning. we're leading the fight the correct way. there's a spat. the two countries have not completely coalesced when it comes to intelligence. they're not original in this. nobody has coalesced in intelligence because these are state secrets, and paris is not going to be able to look at the brussels state secrets and vice-versa. >> they've got to find some way, haven't they, of responding
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quickly to situations like this which is not the way they did it in the past. applying for intelligence and going right up to the prime ministerial level and back down in order to get. it. >> this is the novelty, the very thing which will be devadedn in a few days, weeks. how do we bring intelligence closer and, therefore, why don't we have a european intelligence agency. for the most we have europe pol to track european offenders. and there's shengan that does work if you don't really close the borders of the exterior of shengan so nothing's really working. >> reporter: quickly, i had an e-mail saying david cameron is
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coming for talks about countering isil in syria and iraq. he goes to washington, doesn't he, to have the same conversations. what are they talking about there? what's the response there? >> the united kingdom and france have a special relationship which is different from the united states where they consider each other to have vital interests in the other's defense. anyone touches france touches britain, anyone who touches britain touches france. immediately we have the highest level of cooperation. these are two nations about the same size. it's not like lopsided with the united states. >> reporter: so whatever they decide is going to be taken to washington. and hollande says this is what the u.k. and france are doing. let's hook up with washington and deal with isis in syria and iraq? >> the diplomatic nicety of today is that the french side says, oh, the fbi has been so open and so wonderful with us. but okay, that's a nicety. and on the other hand, with
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belgium which is like a sister country, we're having a spat. probably much more cooperation day to day with belgium than anywhere else. >> reporter: they will have to cooperate more, won't they? thank you very much, indeed, for joining us. natalie, back to you. >> all right. max foster for us there in paris. thank you very much. we're going to talk with another expert now. counterterrorism expert rafaela pontuci, director of national security study for the royal services institute. joining us live via skype from london. thank you very much for joining us. i want to talk about what we heard our guest say. this is not a french problem. we have belgium pretty much on lockdown. turkey just made arrests, as well. this is not a french problem, this is a european problem. the question is how does europe approach it? >> reporter: i think you're right, it's a european problem.
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we see this network of people that seem to be appeared in the paris plot with links to other countries. mostly belgium, but we see strands going to other places. i think it's worth remembering in the week prior to the horrendous paris atrocities, we saw european security forces undertake a large operation across the continent to support the group that seemed to mostly emanate from italy but had link to the united kingdom, norway, france, all across the continent. i think that's the way we've seen the threat picture going in europe in particular. given in part the free space be the free movement space that you have, people operating feely in this area. i think on top of that, you have links across every border. they'll be dealing with issues that are unique to a country but tend to be across the continent. >> how many potential jihadists
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are we talking about? >> i think the numbers are unclear. in each country there are different levels that people are concerned about. people talking about the low thousands. we have to not fixate too much on the numbers. the suggestion might be that every one of these individuals is a paris attacker, that's not the case. in some situations, you're dealing with people who want to go abroad and fight in syria and iraq. other people passive supporters. if someone asks for help, they will do that. they don't necessarily believe the sort of atrocity we saw in paris were the right thing to do. i think the issue is that you've got networks now across the continent. and that makes it a pan-european problem. you don't really have a pan-european security force to deal with this. >> right. our last guest said we need european intelligence agency. what do you think about that? >> i think there's lots of
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difficulty surrounding the agency. there are such structure in place. in the european union there's a situation center, the sit cen, an intel-sharing thing that operates at the e.u. level. and there's europe pol, the european-based agency. these are institutions that are only allowed to go as member states will allow them to go. i think this is a key issue. each member state has a different form of legislation they're operating under. and also has a different kind of threshold for these sorts of issues, different perception of what the threat picture looks like. and that means that you have very different approaches. i don't know that we need to create brand new ones again. in some ways, they want to open up or give greater access to ones that already exist. you might be able to deal with some of these issues. >> thank you for your time and expertise.
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thank you. we attorney west africa where mali has declared a ten-day nationwide state of emergency after gunmen stormed the hotel in the capital. 21 killed. >> one american is among the dead. an islamic group is claiming responsibility with an al qaeda affiliate. >> reporter: gunmen stormed the radisson blu hotel in bamako at around 7:00 a.m. friday morning, firing automatic rifles and taking dozens of hostages. as many as 170 people were inside at the time. >> two to three people entered the hotel with ak-47s. they came and immediately started shooting at people before entering the hotel. >> reporter: the hotels popular with foreigners, guests from france, china, india, and turkey staying there at the time.
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guests heard gunfire and explosions coming from inside. >> i saw bullets on the floor in the lobby. >> reporter: a chinese tourist shot this video from a window of the hotel as mali security forces surrounded the building. with the help of u.n. troops, they launched a counterassault to rescue the hostages. at least two u.s. military personnel assisted outside the hotel. about a dozen americans were rescued. by late afternoon, all of the hostages had been freed or escaped. >> and robin joins us live in nairobi, kenya, covering the story. good to have you with us. just to give context, an al qaeda affiliate has claimed responsibility. al qaeda has mainly been active in the northern part of the country. are malians authorities getting help from outside the country to deal with the terrorism that is gripping the north?
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>> reporter: definitely. they asked france to intervene back in 2013, january 2013, and france did. effectively fracturing a lot of the islamist-based groups. the fundamentalist groups that were working there to try and take over the country. however, with attacks like this, it's a reminder that these small splinter groups can launch attacks on soft target such as hotels or bars or restaurants and still kill a lot of people. westerners which goes to show that mali was getting assistance from outside, including the united states. i want to go into detail, george, about the female american citizen killed in the attack. she was a 41-year-old manager at palladium, an international development firm. her name was anita detar. we understand she had served in the peace corps and going to mali which is under threat of these attacks. she cared a lot it her job. we understand she was
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particularly involved and interested in public health, family planning, and hiv according to her linkedin profile. her brother saying in a statement everything she did in her life she did to help others. as a mother, public health expert, daughter, sister, and friend. while we're angry and saddened that she has been killed, we know that she would want to promote education and health care to prevent violence at home and abroad. i think we'll hear more stories about people caring out there who were gunned down and those who escaped in the coming days. >> robin live from nairobi, kenya. thank you very much. we heard from the belgian prime minister earlier and now in belgium is also being linked to weapons and explosives. the prime minister asked people to avoid public places, also that there is a concern abouting
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can agents that could be used. the latest we're hearing from the belgian prime minister that the terrorist link linked to explosives. >> the suspect in the attacks is believed to be perhaps in belgium. part of the reason for the concern. you're watching our special coverage of the terror attacks. still to come, condolences and condemnation. u.s. president obama weighs in on the deadly attack at that luxury mali hotel. well, right now you can get 15 gigs for the price of 10. that's 5 extra gigs for the same price. so five more gigs for the same price? yea, allow me to demonstrate. do you like your pretzel? yea. okay, uh, may i? 50% more data for the same price. i like this metaphor. oh, it's even better with funnel cakes. but very sticky. now get 15 gigs for the price of 10.
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with abreva. welcome back to our special coverage of the paris terror attacks. turkish authorities have arrested three suspect who may be tied to the last week's attacks in paris. one of the suspect is a 26-year-old belgian national. he's accused of scouting target site for the attacks on the french capital. >> also suspected attacker salah abdesalam of last spotted driving toward belgium. his current whereabouts unknown. >> belgium under the highest terror alert possible as officials warn civilians about a "serious and imminent threat." metro stations is been shut down as a precaution. officials asked people to avoid
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public gatherings. isis apparently has another dangerous weapon this its arsenal. we're learning more about a powerful drug that the terror group is reportedly giving their troops it help them carry out historic attacks. it's an amphetamine that fighters say make them feel invincible on the battlefield. brian today has more about it. >> reporter: a captured isis militant named kareem tells cnn how he got his battlefield courage. >> translator: they gave us drugs, hallucinogenic pills that sent you into battle not caring whether you live or die. >> reporter: last year he was being held by militants in northern syria. it was impossible to know if he was telling the truth or being coached by his captors. now a u.s. official tells cnn it's believed some jihadist fighters are using the drug captagon, a dangerous and powerful amphetamine. how would it feel them on the battlefield? >> keeps you awake.
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you can stay awake for days at a time. you don't have to sleep. and it gives a sense of well being and euphoria and nothing can harm you. >> reporter: recently the u.n.'s drug czar said isis and the al qaeda affiliated nusra front were said to be smuggling the precursors to captagon. a law enforcement official says there's a robust black market in the middle east. the profits fund weapons purchases for jihadist groups. >> hezbollah, people affiliated with hezbollah have a long procedure in the production and sale of captagon. at one point, this was a fight between hezbollah-affiliated persons. some were angry they weren't getting a cut of some of the business. >> reporter: captagon was developed in the '60s and was first used to treat people with hyperactivity. it's been banned in the u.s. and elsewhere. while some question the drug's prevalence among fighters who preach purity, jihadists can find justification. is it hypocritical, a violation
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of culturalies are -- cultural religious processes? >> it's not taken to get high. >> reporter: a psychiatrist who's treated thousands of addicts says captagon's so hallucinogenic it can make a user hear voices and see things that aren't there. >> i think they have made the decision that keeping these guys awake for four or five days at a time and giving a sense of invincibility is worth whatever harm or side effects the drugs have. >> reporter: for whatever sense of euphoria and invincibility captagon might produce, the doctor says there are horrible downsides. users, he says, can become psychotic, brain damaged. and of course can get addicted to the drug for years to come. brian todd, cnn, washington. after the financial aid saint-denis, paris, earlier this week, it was believed that hasna aitboulahcen had become europe's first suicide bomber.
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now prosecutors are backtracking and another theory is amerging. authorities looking into why she was in the neighborhood that night in the first place. atika schubert has the story. >> reporter: these were the last words of hasna aitboulahcen. [ gunfire ] earlier police had said the 26-year-old had detonated an explosives vest as police closed in. now forensics team have determined that the bomb was actually triggered by either the alleged ringleader, abdelhamid abaaoud, or the other so far unidentified suspect killed in the operation. investigators are now struggling to understand how a young woman described as modern and fun loving veered into the path of this deadly terror network. until a funk ago, she lived here with her family. police brought her mother and brother in for questioning on thursday.
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we're in the neighborhood where hasna aitboulahcen was living. it's a rough neighborhood at the best of times. even as we approached her build, weiner threatened by her neighbors. at her old high school and the local market, many knew the family, but none would talk to us on camera. at the dance school she once attended, a vendor said he date her and described her as a party girl who liked to drink and smoke. the farm test described her as a normal, modern young woman. the mayor told us she had "a chaotic upbringing. brought up in a foster home after her parents divorced." >> translator: she's a girl who was a bit crazy. she loved life, loved having fun. she's a girl who has little to do with islam. and you never saw her practicing the faith. when i see this about her, the image of the veil and everything that happened on sunday, that surprised me. she was a girl who had nothing to do with islam. that image is the opposite
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because she didn't represent islam. >> reporter: investigators still don't know how she became so deeply involved with ringleader abdelhamid abaaoud and why she there was on the fateful night that police closed in. cnn, paris. you're watching cnn special coverage of the paris terror attacks. coming up here -- >> we will be shedding more light on the district in brussels, where many terrorists call home. stay with us. i brto get us moving.tein i'm new ensure active high protein. i help you recharge with nutritious energy and strength. i'll take that. yeeeeeah! new ensure active high protein. 16 grams of protein and 23 vitamins and minerals. ensure. take life in. ...one of many pieces in my life. so when my asthma symptoms kept coming back on my long-term control medicine, i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment. once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms. breo is for adults with asthma not well controlled
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welcome back to cnn special coverage of the terror attacks in paris. i'm george howell. >> i'm natalie allen. we want to bring you the latest.
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we have developments. here is what's going on. a ten-day national state of emergency is in place in mali. it was declared following friday's deadly siege at a luxury hotel in the west african nation. heavily armed gunmen opened fire on guests. at least 21 died. an islamist militant group is claiming joint responsibility with an al qaeda affiliate. >> we're getting reports that turkey has detained a belgian citizen believed to have scouted sites for the paris attacks. cnn turk identifies him as 26-year-old ahmet domani. he was arrested in southern turkey. he is of moroccan descent. cnn turk also reports that two syrian nationals were arrested. they are accused of trying to transporting the first man into syria. now belgium. all underground stations in brussels are closed today according to the public transportation authority there. belgium's capital is under the highest terror threat level
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possible. the country's prime minister spoke moments ago encouraging people not to gather in large crowds. sources a brussels faces a "serious and imminent threat." back to our own max fosters live in paris this hour. certainly paris is regrouping after the terrible attacks. the focus on belgium now because the prime minister there telling people, as natalie mentioned, to stay away from large public gatherings, and there's a large investigation underway there. >> reporter: absolutely. major events have been canceled. the subway is being closed. that's where the crux of the investigation is. this is still a man on the run. fred pleitgen has been following this. this is still ongoing, right? >> reporter: certainly is. and very much one where they are seeking salah abdesalem.
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it's believed that he could be linked to everything going on in brussels. when we look at the attacks that happened last friday, the authorities had him in custody for a couple of hours. they questioned him. that was very, very close to the belgian border. he had rented vehicles there that were found here. he drove them down here. he has ties into the scene there. also what's interesting is that the heightened state of alert that's going on now in brussels comings more than a week after the attack took place in paris and after we saw a lot of raids in the brussels area and areas in belgium, as well, the area where you have high concentrate of extremes e treatmentists. apparently they -- extremists. apparently they believe the extremists still have the compass 270 strike. that's why they have drastic
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measures in place. >> reporter: and information, it's local to brussels, not a national alert level. it's in brussels. they must have something firm. >> you would think they have something firm especially when they're talking about a credible and imminent threat. they believe month could happen at any time. they would flood -- they believe one could happen at any time. they would flood the streets. we don't know if they had information as to what cell this originates from. presumably you would have seen raids well before. >> reporter: where it would happen, they would have warned anyone -- >> there's a lot of targets in brussels. it's the -- administrative capital, if you will, of europe. you have all these european union institutions, you obviously is belgian nation, as well. there are a lot of potential targets out this. the prime minister saying stay away from public gathering. very important. the subway system being shut down. always something that is
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vulnerable. i found interesting in the decree issued they said don't spread false information. listen to what authorities are saying. obviously that's the last thing they want is people panicking, going to places where they voontd be going to. -- shouldn't be going to. it is concerning. >> reporter: we've had old tweets, facebook reemerging and people saying we've just heard this. look at this picture. >> yeah. there's a lot of information that's proved to be wrong. old pictures have been out there not just pertaining to brussels but the things that have to do with the paris attacks, as well. the saint-denis raids. there was a lot of things including information coming out that's true. therefore, the authorities are saying, listen, we are going to issue information when we have the correct information, we believe it's important for you to know these things. otherwise, stay calm. at the same time, they're
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telling people don't go toward gatherings with many people. stay away from that. be careful on the streets. it does show that they are concerned about public safety. >> reporter: we'll bring you more information as soon as it comes in. there's a particular neighborhood in brussels where jihadis come from. and there are links to the attacks, some plans made there. and some of the attackers we know were based there, as well. drew griffin reports on one neighborhood where so many european jihadies have been placed. >> reporter: this mostly muslim community in brussels is quickly becoming synonymous with terror in europe. at least a half with link to ma molenbeq. the black market specializes in tools of the trade.
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>> false papers, false passports, weaponry flourishing in suburbs of brussels. and we absolutely have to counter these thing with the help of local services, but also with the help of criminal just. >> reporter: balil, a senior fellow at a brussels think tank focusing on immigration and security, says illicit trade especially in guns has put belgium and molenbeq on the map. >> although bull emhbelgium -- belgium has this, it's easy for criminal gangs or terrorist groupings to find weapons, even war weapons, here in our city. >> reporter: he says kalishnikov rifles, the gun of choice in recent attacks, can be purchased on the belgian black market for $,000.
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you're getting a good deal. good money price. >> that's the problem. >> reporter: there is another problem, he says. it may be much bigger. >> what we see the laugh three, four, five years is that there is a merge between the jihadi radical world and the criminal world. lots of jihadists meet with criminals in prison. i think that the role of the branch of islam with these young people is that it's like a mental debt mechanism. some are hard core jihadis who were socialized in this branch of islam since they were young. some are than muslim at all. >> reporter: that appears to be the case for the man who operated this bar. ibrahim sabdasalem ran a business here, but it shut down weeks before the attacks because of drugs and illicit activity.
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family and friends say his involvement in radical islam came as a shock. last week he blew himself up in paris wearing a suicide vest. his family was stunned. his brother is still on the run. he, too, has a criminal past. and in 2011, he spent time in prison with another criminal, paris attack ringleader abdelhamid abaaoud. three criminals turned jihadist. drew griffin, cnn, belgium. >> reporter: brussels in lockdown. france in a state of emergency for the next three months. these are the repercussions of what happened just over a week ago. natalie and george? >> all right. max foster, thank you, live from paris for us. >> thanks. now we want to bring in a professor with the department of war studies in kings college, london, there's a research professor with the paris
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institute of political studies. thank you very much for taking time with us today. the tightening of borders and tracking suspects shows how thing need to change when it comes to surveillance and the very dna of that zone for free travel between the nations. what do you make of the current policy, and what might change. >> reporter: what has been done already from the charles "harry potter" attacks in january show -- the "charlie hebdo" attacks in january show that a lot of what the police has been asking now has been accepted. one of the implements is how far it has been implemented or not, and if it has been implemented, maybe the techniques which is been asked by police and intelligence services to have more information are not the
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relevent information they need. we have a problem if we believe that this technology will help. >> i also want to talk to you about the simple fact of a new coalition coming together. we see david cameron planning to meet the french president and mr. hollande traveling to washington, d.c., to meet with u.s. president of the united states. what do you make of the strategy to create a more unified coalition to take on terrorism? is that the way to go? and will it be effective? >>. >> well, it will be effective only if we arrive at the deescalation of the reciprocity of violence. is it possible? maybe. how far is it connected to the limitation of freedom of movement is quite an important question. if we have more and more technology to control like the
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e.u. pnr, like the different data base, is it the solution to stop terrorism? i'm not sure about that. human intelligence is certainly more important. and that's on these lines that we have to think about. we have for the moment on the case in the u.s., in the u.k. and in fran the form of fetishization of technology. everything's through droids or aviation. everything's through technology and not so much in what has been consider able diminished, a form of intelligence that intelligence are releasing on their every day work can did. >> i want to talk about another
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situation, the migrant crisis in europe. also in the tuds's raised quite a debate between democrats and republicans. the question about whether to accept refugees from syria. a debate that's played out certainly in europe. given what's happened, where does this debates go now? >> reporter: well, i think on this debate we will always find one case under which a claimed refugee could have been involved in a case of terrorism. that's not a reason to block all the people who are coming because of what has been done previously. it's as if we block every diplomat to move in the world because it was done with a
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diplomatic call. of course we will not do that. i enthusiastic we need to disconnect -- i sthang think th need to disconnect these questions. it's important to consider refugee as refugees. we need to access them and to come to the country. freedom of speculation is key for the european union and is key to any form of democracy. >> are their are questions being raised about the group. it will be interesting to see where the debate goes given the security levels and concerns raised throughout europe. thank you very much for taking time with us and your insight. >> thank you. you're watching cnn special coverage. ahead, a deadly siege by gunmen at a hotel in west africa. we'll have a look at who is claiming responsibility. diabetes, steady is exciting.
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with could back. we're also following -- welcome back. we're also following a deadly terrorist siege in mali. a siege that claimed the lives of at least 21 inside a hotel there. >> heavily armed gunmen fired indiscriminately at guests at the luxury hotel hosting diplomats and other in bamako. an al qaeda-affiliated group is taking partial responsibility for friday's assault. the government there has declared a ten-day nationwide state of emergency in response. u.s. president obama is condemning the attack and says more must be done to roots out
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terrorist networks. cnn has more from kuala lumpur live with more on the story. >> reporter: natalie, president obama took to the stage today at the asean summit to offer condolences to the victims' families. of course he mentioned that one american victim, as well. he said these were many of the people who moved to mali to help change that country. to help it on its path toward democracy. they've fallen at the hands of terrori terrorism. this is what else he had to say. >> like the heinous attacks we saw in paris, attacks we see all too often elsewhere, this is another awful reminder that the scourge of terrorism threatens so many of our nations. once again, this barbarity only stiffens our resolve to meet this challenge. we will stand with the people of
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mali. >> reporter: and the president said that we will continue to root out terrorists. he said that the united states is not alone in that. nations around the world are committed to defeating isis in particular. we've seen a ramping up of rhetoric about isis, about taking them head-on by the white house. also the u.n. resolution unanimously passed by the u.n. security council. a resolution in the wake of the paris attacks saying they can use all necessary means to tackle isis. >> these incident vs. certainly mobilized the -- incidents have certainly mobilized the forces in other countries. thank you. president obama also continues to make his case for welcoming migrants fleeing global violence into the united states. mr. obama visiting children at the center? equ -- the center in kuala lumpur
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that services lower income minority families. >> as long as i'm president, we're going to keep on stepping up and making sure that america remains as it has always been. a place where people who were in other parts of the world are subject to their discrimination or violence that they have an america front and a place of refuge. >> mr. obama says he will veto legislation that would place new restrictions on refugees from iraq and syria. it's been a week since the deadly attack in paris. many are out to honor those who were killed. we look back at the tragic week. stay with us. want to survive a crazy busy day? sfx: cell phone chimes start with a positive attitude... and positively radiant skin. aveeno® positively radiant moisturizer... with active naturals® soy.
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they were out enjoying a night in paris with their families, with their co-workers, with their loved ones, eating, watching a football game, and dancing. >> right now paris remains in mourning for those killed in last week's attacks. despite a ban on public demonstrations, residents gathered friday at memorial service. we want to take a -- at memorials. we want to take a moment to remember and honor the victims, as well, and share the names that have been made public. ♪ ♪
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>> you can go on line at multiple sites to learn about each of these victims. they were artists, they were in school, they were chefs, and it's just really, really moving to read about them, as well. >> so many different walks of life. paris is grieve willing, but paris is re-- grieving, but paris is resilient. thank you for watching. i'm george howell. >> i'm natalie allen. "new day" is ahead. thank you for watching cnn.
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. . breaking news is out of turkey. three men suspected of having ties to isis arrested in an early morning raid, including alleged terrorists who may have scouted out targets for the attacks in paris. also breaking right now, brussels on high alert t. belgium prime minister saying just a short time ago the high terror alert is based on quote quite precise information about a possible attack. that's part of what's happening around the world, we are so grateful for your company. i'm christ city paul. >> i'm victor

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