Skip to main content

tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  November 21, 2015 9:00pm-3:01am PST

9:00 pm
this is cnn, breaking news. hello and welcome to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. i'm rosemary church. >> and i'm errol barnett. thanks for joining us for special coverage of the terror attacks in france. we do want to get to major leads and developing stories across europe. brussels is on lockdown. belgian officials fear an attack in several places at once. >> we've also learned police in brussels arrested one person friday in the molenbeek suburb. >> and turkey arrested this
9:01 pm
belgian citizen of moroccan descent. >> and authorities are hoping to find this suspected attacker, salah abdeslam. he was last seen driving towards belgium. >> we want to get you live to paris now where our max foster is standing by to give us updates on not just the investigations under way in the region, but the mood there on the ground. max? >> reporter: errol, there was an eerie evening over in brussels where restaurants and bars closed early, because people had been advised with this alert level not to go to any sort of crowded places. very odd atmosphere there. of course, the context to that is salah abdeslam. he's still on the run. there are fears that he has a suicide vest with him, which may or may not have been intended for use in paris. he's still on the run and suspicion is he may with there
9:02 pm
in brussels. and the sense there could be multiple attacks planned for brussels. drew griffin is in brussels for us tonight. drew, just describe the atmosphere there at the moment. >> reporter: sunday morning here, of course, the streets are empty. but the juxtaposition between the decorating of the christmas lights that's been going on and the tourists wandering around and having no place to go, because most of the restaurants were advised to close by about 4:00 p.m. last night. many complaining that they just didn't have anywhere to eat last night. but as the investigation unfolds, the biggest question for the people of this city is, when will the subway reopen? there is going to be a re-evaluation of the security threat level. it's going to take place early this afternoon. that should determine if the subway is or is not going to be open for the start of business on monday. as for the investigation, max, there have been some
9:03 pm
developments. the person arrested friday night in friday night's raid, those weapons appear to be paintball guns. that person was released. they are mostly interested in a person picked up thursday night, said to be a friend of salah abdeslam. and there are also another investigation or search for two other people. this, according to the belgian interior minister who was on tv last night with a local broadcaster saying this threat is not necessarily -- this threat level i should say is not necessarily related to the search for salah abdeslam, but there is another plot or another information they have about another plot that inspired this. the interior minister said that he hopes to share more information with the public some time today. i would assume that's after the people of the capital of belgium learn whether or not this threat level will continue into today
9:04 pm
and tomorrow or whether or not there will be a lifting of these emergency procedures. in accordance? >> they say they have information about a specific attack in brussels, right? and if this extends the way it has, they're very worried indeed. >> reporter: that's absolutely right. the prime minister on friday specifically said we are concerned about a paris-style attack. saying multiple locations with gunfire and with explosives. he would not go into any further detail, but that is what the threat was, whether real or just precautionary, as to why this city was told to shut down. they are deliberately -- i talked with the prosecution, the federal prosecution spokesperson who said look, we are deliberately being vague for one reason -- we don't want these
9:05 pm
bad guys to know if we know anymore than we do. and on the salah abdeslam search, we don't want him to know who we're talking to on the ground here in brussels in case he is still here and on the run and looking to connect with any sort of support network. max? >> just tell us why there is this belief that he is there hiding out somewhere in brussels with a suicide vest? >> reporter: you know, they're still working on the same kind of information they had that he called friends saturday, the morning after the attack in paris, those friends say they drove him back to brussels. now we know he was stopped by belgian authorities. paper s checked. but they let him go. so the last assumption is that he was driven in to brussels by friends on saturday. that's the last we know that anybody has seen of him. an attorney for one of those two
9:06 pm
men who drove him is quoted in local belgian papers that her client said he believed he was wearing some sort of vest. again, this is very vague. the police have not confirmed this. but obviously they are being very cautious, just in case that salah abdeslam, now on the run, is on the run still wearing what could be an unexploded suicide vest meant to be used in that paris attack. max? >> frightening prospect, drew. here in paris, we're learning more about the raid in the saint-denis neighborhood on wednesday. here's our martin savidge with the latest on that. >> reporter: the latest from french investigators is that they say they have isolated the dna of a third person who was killed inside of that apartment that was raided by police last wednesday in saint-denis.
9:07 pm
where they stop short is to say who that dna belongs to, because apparently authorities do not know at this time. it raises even perhaps more questions. another person that was perhaps part of this plot. there is reports that there is a surveillance video that showed not just two attackers but a third person inside a vehicle. but where is that person now? well, maybe the dna that's been isolated is that person. right now, authorities haven't made that link, but it's certain hi something that comes to mind. speaking about that raid, new photographs that have come to us through i-tv show just how violent that raid was. and the man who led that raid for french authorities said they had gone in with surprise on their side. but when they blew the door to enter the apartment, they found that the door didn't give and the people inside, which had
9:08 pm
reinforced it, which able to get their weapons and explosives and there began the long and violent attack as these photos attest. back to you. >> martin savidge there. we've heard many moving stories of people trying to help the wounded during the paris attacks. when the cafe was bombed, an off duty nurse tried to save a man who was lying amongst the overturned tables and chairs, but he soon discovered he was trying to resuscitate the suicide bomber. here's the incredible story. >> translator: i go to this man that i could see out of the corner of my eye. i take him out of this tangle of chairs and tables and put him on the floor. he had nothing special, he was just unconscious. but i noticed there was an enormous hole on his side. but there again, i don't think at all it's a suicide bomber.
9:09 pm
at that point, for me, it's a client like others who suffered from a gas blast and who must have hurt himself in something. but his wound was huge. i put him on the ground and i start performing cpr. the other guy who was with me takes over for me, and at that point we had just unbuttoned the jacket, we kept his t-shirt on. it was not really thick. when i was performing cpr, i didn't feel anything. at some point, the other guy tells me maybe we should remove the t-shirt. i tell him yes, you are right. then i ripped the t-shirt and when i did, i saw some wires. i looked up at these heating lamps and noticed there was nothing wrong with them. they are made of a material that becomes distorted quite easily. there was nothing wrong with the three of them. on the ground there was blood and i noticed the first bolts on the ground. then i understood immediately. i told myself it's an explosion that made the wound.
9:10 pm
it's a suicide bomber. and i knew it was him. at that moment when i realized what he was, the emergency services arrived. >> one of the incredible stories that only now really emerging after those horrific attacks. no one was killed in the cafe except the bomber, and reports say he's believed to have been involved in the attack on the nearby theater, as well. a little later in the program, we'll talk about how people here in paris are trying to get back to normal, but there is this underlying current of fear that something could happen again. there have been two attacks this year. >> max, just an incredible story from that nurse. i remember also just the footage of the security footage from that cafe. one of the gunman firing his weapon but it getting jammed and a woman escaped. we'll get back to you later this hour, max. thank you very much. in fact, france is set to host the european football championship next year.
9:11 pm
coming up, we'll show you what the country is doing to quell new fears amongst sports fans. >> and we are learning more about how gunman carried out friday's attack on a popular hotel in mali's capital. we're back in a moment. i'm there for bessie. i'm there for ray. ted loved baseball. dr. phil likes to watch football. renne, who wants sloppy joe on the menu every day. rosie's my best friend. evelyn likes to dance. harriett wants her fried shrimp as well. alice anne likes vanilla ice cream with chocolate syrup and rainbow sprinkles. they give me so much back. i can't even imagine how i could possibly give them what they give me.
9:12 pm
and then santa's workers zapped it right to our house. and that's how they got it here. cool. the magic of the season is here at the lexus december to remember sales event. this is the pursuit of perfection. for called "squamous adnon-small cell",er previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy, it's not every day something this big comes along. a chance to live longer with... opdivo, nivolumab. opdivo is the first and only immunotherapy fda approved based on a clinical trial demonstrating longer life... ...for these patients. in fact, opdivo significantly increased the chance of living longer versus chemotherapy. opdivo is different. it works with your immune system. opdivo can cause your immune system to attack normal organs and tissues in your body and affect how they work. this may happen any time during or after treatment has ended,
9:13 pm
and may become serious and lead to death. see your doctor right away if you experience new or worsening cough; chest pain; shortness of breath; diarrhea; severe stomach pain or tenderness; severe nausea or vomiting; loss of appetite;... ...swollen ankles; extreme fatigue; constipation; rash; or muscle or joint pain, as this may keep these problems from becoming more serious. these are not all the possible side effects of opdivo. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions including immune system problems or if you've had an organ transplant, or lung, breathing or liver problems. a chance to live longer. ask your doctor if opdivo is right for you. bristol-myers squibb thanks the patients and physicians who participated in the opdivo clinical trial. can't afford to let heartburn get in the way? try nexium 24hr, now the #1 selling brand for frequent heartburn. get complete protection with the new leader in frequent heartburn. that's nexium level protection.
9:14 pm
plan well and enjoy life... ♪ or, as we say at unitedhealthcare insurance company, go long. of course, how you plan is up to you. take healthcare. make sure you're covered for more than what just medicare pays... consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company... you might give this a try... the only medicare supplement plans that carry the aarp name, and the ones that millions of people trust year after year. plan well. enjoy life. go long.
9:15 pm
welcome back, everyone. the president of mali visited the hotel where attackers killed 19 people on friday. >> six nationals from russia, three from china, two from belgium and one each from israel and the u.s. are among the dead. cnn's david mckenzie brings us the latest on the investigation. >> reporter: the guests are gone. the cracked glass and bullet holes remain. now now details emerging of a devastating attack. they started at 7:00 in the morning here at the radisson hotel. now foreign investigators are here trying to piece through exactly what happened. what we're learning is new information. they didn't in fact come inside a diplomatic vehicle. the u.n. is now saying they snuck behind on foot, and then moved rapidly into the hotel to
9:16 pm
start shooting. the guards were unprepared. their weapons unloaded. everyone was running scared, he says. they were shooting at anyone that moved. he says he then looked terror in the eye. the gunman had a cap, blue shirt and jeans. he pointed the gun at me, stared, and then i ran. but many rid, doing everything they could to survive. did you barricade the doors? >> yeah, we barricaded the doors. we put a lot of heavy stuff so that nobody can enter. >> reporter: did you hear the noises getting closeer? >> yeah, we hear a lot of gun noise firing around the door. and they were trying to knock the door and enter in the door. but thanks to god we were evacuated at that time.
9:17 pm
>> reporter: the quick action by malian and foreign forces saved many but the threat still remains. david mckenzie, cnn, mali. >> keeping our focus in the region now, at least ten people are dead and 12 others wounded after a suicide attack in cameroon. four suicide bombe erers blew themselves up on saturday. >> the army suspects boko haram is behind the attack. amnesty international says the nigeria based militants killed at least 3500 people in the first nine months of this year. now some other stories we're following. four people were wounded in southern israel on saturday. police arrested a palestinian teenager who allegedly carried out that attack. two other teens were arrested for trying to hide the suspect. this is just the late nest in a wave of violence between
9:18 pm
israelis and palestinians. two top bangladesh opposition leadersexecuted sunday. they were found guilty of war crimes committed over 40 years ago. those crimes included killings, abductions and tortures during the war for independence from pakistan in 1971. the executions could draw protests after the president of bangladesh denied appeals for clemency. brussels is on lockdown after authorities raised the city's terror alert level to the highest ranking. the prime minister says that are indications several people are planning attacks in multiple locations. >> now, this comes a week after the deadly paris attacks.
9:19 pm
and for a look at the steps authorities are taking to cry to avert another potential tragedy, let's bring in steve moore, a former supervisory special agent with the fbi. thank you, sir, for joining us. how specific must this intelligence be, for the whole of brussels to be shut down in this manner, and what happens if authorities don't find the perpetrators, how long can a city remain on lockdown? >> how long it can last is a good question. but this information had to be very specific and credible for them to have taken the extraordinary step of shutting the subways down. they must have some type of information on individuals, if not by name, the fact that there are individuals on the loose, and they have some type of insight into their planning. so they know that these people are probably threats right now. >> and it's worth noting belgium
9:20 pm
is a big problem for europe. it generates more jihadist per capita than any other nation, and belgian authorities admitted they dropped the ball on this. so what steps node to be taken to avoid another attack on the scale what we saw in paris, given brussels can't remain on lockdown for days or weeks? >> what you'll need to do is in the same way as the country is united, you're going have to unite in a centralized intelligence system where you can't just say the belgians dropped the ball on this. everybody has to be part of everything. the boarders are just too easy to cross. they're no different than crossing states in america, and there has to be an america only encompassing one intelligence organization to handle that. that's what they need in europe. >> lit be interesting to see if this is a game changer for that. we know that one person was arrested in brussels friday in
9:21 pm
connection with the paris attacks. turkey also arrested a belgian citizen connected to the paris attacks. now, these men, along with those arrested directly after the attacks in paris, will of course all shed some light how the attacks were planned and carried out. we don't know that at this point what intelligence they've received from this. but the eighth attacker, salah abdeslam, is still on the run. what do we know about his likely role? did he panic and flee or might he have another role to play here? >> my read on this, looking from outside in, is that he did not have plan b in mind. i think he is probably trying to determine in his own mind whether he flees, whether he goes to syria, or whether he stays and becomes a martyr and fights on where he is. this is going to have a lot to do with how easily he can
9:22 pm
travel, how deep the dragnet goes for him. and the good and the bad news is, the better you protect against him traveling, the more likely he is to make a stand in europe. >> all right. steve moore, thank you so much for joining us with your analysis and perspective. we appreciate it. heightened security may become the new normal at sporting events in the aftermath of the paris attacks. france is hosting next summer's euro 2016 tournament, a major football event spread across the whole country. >> while there are fears about safety, the tournament will go ahead as planned. we look at the preparations underway and the history of terror attacks at sporting events. >> reporter: last summer, they were on top of the world. but last friday, the german football team and their opponents, france, were under attack. [ explosion ] a chilling sound of suicide bombers blowing themselves up outside the stadium in paris.
9:23 pm
part of a coordinated strike that brought terror to the streets of the french capital. [ gunfire ] france and germany were playing in front of a packed stadium of 80,000 fans. they were all lucky to escape unharmed. but some of the players knew people who witnessed or were killed in the attacks elsewhere. amid so much uncertainty, the teams stayed together in the stadium until the next morning. >> translator: football is a symbol of society. it represents many values, and at times like this, it takes on an even greater importance. everyone has a responsibility to make sure those values are respected. >> reporter: targeting the stadium was significant. next summer, france is due to host the european championships, a major tournament involving 24 teams from all over the continent. but there are now major
9:24 pm
concerns. paris has fallen to two terrorist attacks in 11 months. next year they'll try to guaranty the safety of an event that covers nine different cities. >> it is possible to identify the broad lines of threat development. but the threat is developing in such a complex moment that the terrorist only has to succeed once. it only has to succeed in one place and suddenly we have what appears to be a game-changing activity. in my view, this is just the developments of an existing threat line rather than a game changer. >> reporter: the teams and the venues would be a prime target for any terrorist. 2 .5 million supporters will be in the stadiums. but the tournament's organizers, uefa, said the tournament will go on as planned. friday's attack wasn't the first time a sports event has been
9:25 pm
targeted. there was carnage at the boston marathon in 2013. three were killed and more than 200 injured. tokyo's football team was ambushed in 2010. three people, including the assistant manager, were killed. the cricket team from sri lanka were shot at in 2009. but it was in munich, 1972 at the olympics that cast the longest shadow. 11 members of the israeli team were massacred. he told me why sports events have always been such a tempting target. >> they are looking for a stage where their awful actions should be visible and viewed by everybody. at the olympic games, it was because they had the highest concentration of reporters and
9:26 pm
other media there. >> reporter: and he says anyone thinking of going to the tournament next year should carry on as planned. >> i give them advice to go, because by showing fear, they are playing into the hands of the terrorists where they disturb our way of life. >> reporter: for the french team, hosting the tournament is a sort of immense national pride and a chance to repeat the success of previous home tournaments. france were back in action at wembley same in london tuesday night. beneath the colors in a display of solidarity, this was the scene. heavily armed police officers on patrol. this may be the new normal for all major events.
9:27 pm
>> and you are watching cnn special coverage of the paris terror attacks. still to come, brussels on high alert. the latest on the manhunt for one of the suspects. across america, people like basketball hall of famer dominique wilkins... ...are taking charge of their type 2 diabetes... ...with non-insulin victoza®. for a while, i took a pill to lower my blood sugar. but it didn't get me to my goal. so i asked my doctor about victoza®. he said victoza® works differently than pills. and comes in a pen. victoza® is proven to lower blood sugar and a1c. it's taken once a day, any time. victoza® is not for weight loss, but it may help you lose some weight. victoza® is an injectable prescription medicine that may improve blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes when used with diet and exercise. it is not recommended as the first medication to treat diabetes... ...and should not be used in people with type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis. victoza® has not been studied with mealtime insulin. victoza® is not insulin.
9:28 pm
do not take victoza® if you have a personal or family history of medullary thyroid cancer... ...multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2, or if you are allergic to... ...victoza® or any of its ingredients. symptoms of a serious allergic reaction... ...may include itching, rash, or difficulty breathing. tell your doctor... ...if you get a lump or swelling in your neck. serious side effects may happen in people who take victoza®... ...including inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis). stop taking victoza®... ...and call your doctor right away if you have signs of pancreatitis such as severe pain that will not go away in your abdomen or from your abdomen to your back... ...with or without vomiting. tell your doctor about all the medicines you take... ...and if you have any medical conditions. taking victoza® with a sulfonylurea or... ...insulin may cause low blood sugar. the most common side effects are headache, nausea... ...diarrhea, and vomiting. side effects can lead to dehydration... ...which may cause kidney problems. if your pill isn't giving you...
9:29 pm
...the control you need... ...ask your doctor about non-insulin victoza®. it's covered by most health plans.
9:30 pm
welcome back to our special coverage of the terror attacks in france and the widening impact across europe. brussels is on lockdown right now. the belgian prime minister says there's fear of an attack in "several places at once." and the terror alert is at its highest level there. >> separately, turkey arrested this belgian citizen of moroccan descent. he's believed to have scouted
9:31 pm
sites for the paris attacks. >> and we're also learning more about the raid outside of paris on wednesday. sources say investigators isolated the dna of a suicide bomber. it's believed that french police did not know that attacker. >> and that's an international manhunt for this suspected attacker, salah abdeslam. he was last seen driving towards belgium. >> and our max foster is standing by live in paris with more on the manhunt for that eighth attacker. we also know, of course, that brussels is in lockdown. >> reporter: it was like a ghostown last night with all the restaurants and bars closing early, and this fear that they could be in their midst, possibly with a suicide vest, as well. so that's a frightening
9:32 pm
situation for people living in brussels right now. there's been a heavy influx of police and soldiers, just to keep the city and the people safe. >> reporter: seeing reinforcements coming into brussels town center. police searching just a few roads up from where we are, we saw them using flashlights to look into all passing vehicles, including buses, taxis. they are clearly looking for someone. a few moments ago, sirens were just crossing behind us here. definitely you get the sense oh of a city on high alert. there is still some traffic, but given this is the european capital on a saturday night, not what you would expect. it is absolutely astonishing to see belgian soldiers surrounding hotels. they've asked people not to congregate in the center of town. this morning, we were in one of the main shopping districts
9:33 pm
where some of the few shops there that had opened were very quickly closed by police. you could see this very contained effort to not raise panic, to not scare people. but at the same time they're dealing with something very serious here. >> so that's the situation over there in brussels. here in france, people are desperatery trying to get some sort of normality and also to do their part to help france. many citizens are feeling compelled to help their country by enlisting. >> reporter: young men are signing up. "i wanted to join already," this 19-year-old tells me. "when i heard about the attacks, it motivated me even more." a few miles from last friday's attack, men and women lining up to find out if they've got what it takes. recruiters are busier than ever.
9:34 pm
>> translator: today, i received three times the number of completed forms that i would normally have by this time friday. >> reporter: the writing on the wall here, france's people need protection. the president says the country is at war. the citizens are listening. "the number of people who have contacted us has gone up dramatically since last friday's attacks." officials here say this spike in recruitment has already exceeds those that came to sign up after the "charlie hebdo" attacks in january. my question for the commanding officer is simple -- can the army, can the french army defeat daesh? "of course," he says.
9:35 pm
"the french soldier, he has a mission to fill. he will fulfill his mission. he will put all his mission into fulfilling his mission." a mission that will have more firepower, if needed, in the wake of last week's barbaric attack. nic robertson, cnn, paris. >> the french prime minister saying in these times of austerity, the cutbacks of french military are not going to go ahead. some people are taking up the gun to try to do something for their country. some in paris have chosen music as their way to show defiance in the face of terror. i spoke to a few of them. ♪ every saturday, they play. there was no exception the day after the attacks. they picked up their instruments and played in the usual way.
9:36 pm
though they admit they were scared. >> it was good for us to do our thing and to say that people were happy to see that life was going on and music was going on. >> something has changed. >> reporter: can you articulate that? >> yeah, something has changed but i think we're going to be stronger. i think we realize we need to fight for what we believe in, and it's not given to us. we must realize our freedom is something we have to fight for. >> reporter: you're going to keep playing? >> yeah, we are. >> it's not like a war where you see the other guys coming. they're already here, but you never know where or when they're going to strike. you just have to keep on living. >> reporter: a band in one street and a stitch in the tapestry of life in paris. without their music, life just wouldn't be what it was.
9:37 pm
they're doing their bit amid a new reality. >> it's a very strange thing, you have those moments that are so parisian, but then you see the soldiers with the weapons walking past. they're trying to be normal, but you have this sense of insecurity at the same time. >> indeed. max, just before you go, it is 6:37 in the morning there. you've been in paris for a few days. you've been to france many, many times. you've been there, going to the restaurants, eating, mixing with people, talking to people. is that the sentiment that you heard from those musicians overall? is that how other parisians are feeling, just keep on moving on? it changed their lives and their approach to life, but what does it mean for them going forward? >> it's interesting, because there was a lot of anger after
9:38 pm
the "charlie hebdo" attacks earlier in the year. and we're not going to let this happen. but almost a sense of resignation after this terror attack, because there is this new reality. you have to imagine that france, they hold freedoms and liberty very dear. but they're accepting that our ideas, our culture has to change and we have to give up some of our freedoms to protect ourselves. they're struggling a bit with that. there's depression around that, i think. the idea of having to give up liberties just to stay safe and that idea you can have armed police and soldiers just walking through a restaurant and cafe and it's normal. that is the new normal, rosemary. >> certainly that new reality. but they're facing it so defiantly. max foster reporting there live from paris. we'll come back to you next hour. you're watching special coverage of the terror attacks in paris. still to come, after losing her son to isis, a mother turns
9:39 pm
grief into a personal battle against the militant group. innovative sonicare technology with up to 27% more brush movements versus oral b. get healthier gums in 2 weeks guaranteed. innovation and you. philips sonicare save when you buy the most loved rechargeable toothbrush brand in america. withof my moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis... ordinary objects often seemed... intimidating. doing something simple...
9:40 pm
meant enduring a lot of pain. if ra is changing your view of everyday things orencia may help. orencia works differently by targeting a source of ra early in the inflammation process. for many, orencia provides long-term relief of ra symptoms. it's helped new ra patients and those not helped enough by other treatments. do not take orencia with another biologic medicine for ra due to an increased risk of serious infection. serious side effects can occur including fatal infections. cases of lymphoma and lung cancer have been reported. tell your doctor if you're prone to or have any infection like an open sore, the flu, or a history of copd, a chronic lung disease. orencia may worsen your copd. if you're not getting the relief you need... ask your doctor about orencia. orencia. see your ra in a different way.
9:41 pm
9:42 pm
as we learn more about the terrorist who carried out those attacks in paris, we are hearing from one mother who knows firsthand about losing a child to radicalism. christiane boudreau says she felt helpful after her son found islam after a failed suicide attack. >> but then he left canada to die fighting for isis. she's now made it her mission to keep other families from living that nightmare. cnn's drew griffin has her story. >> reporter: chris boudreau may not look like it, but right now she's battling isis. >> these recruiters are really slick, and they make you believe that it's something different
9:43 pm
than what it is. and they kept stalking her online. a couple of times she would ignore him and he would blow up. >> reporter: close to joining isis and traveling to syria, the woman's family contacted boudreau and an intervention began. in less than two hours in her calgary home, three families reach out to her, desperate for help. they call, they find her for one reason -- she has lived this nightmare. >> there's damian raiding the pantry in the fridge again. >> reporter: three years ago, it was her son that became the target of a radical islamic recruiter. authorities believe damian and several other young muslims were recruited straight out of a downtown calgary mosque and literally led to the battlefield without their families suspecting a thing.
9:44 pm
chris' son damian would be dead in months, killed fighting for isis just outside of aleppo, syria. >> how can somebody take such a bright mind and twist it and convince them that they're doing the right thing? they believe they're doing right. >> earlier, cnn's poppy harlow spoke with chris boudreau. >> a lot of it has to do with they're spending a lot of time and resources and focusing on our youth and developing a relationship. so they take the time to connect with them, surround them 24-7, building those relationships, manipulating their motivations, and guiding them in a different path and different direction, answering all those different questions. that's not something that we're doing. we're not entintercepting or guiding our youth, and we're not
9:45 pm
spending our resources on them. >> reporter: i think some people watching this might think, how can a part not know, right? this child lives under your roof, et cetera. how can you not know? you've lived that firsthand, not knowing. actually feeling hopeful when your son found islam and started, you thought, turning his life around. what do you say to those people? >> the difficult part is not -- sometimes they are living somewhere else. as parents, we pay so much attention to our relationship, that it's so easy for us to miss all these other signs of them going astray or we just don't want to really believe them or we don't want to seem like we're panicking for nothing. and there's a stigma placed on parts, too. if we say we need help with our
9:46 pm
youth and there's something going wrong, where do we go to get that outside point of view? so it's very challenging and difficult. this is a new type of movement that we're not really comprehending. it's being run through computers, social media, other venues that we didn't understand before. so there needs to be education and awareness there for the parents and the support for them to recognize what they're saying and where they can go for that help. >> cnn's poppy harlow speaking with christiane boudreau. >> she mentions much of this is happening on the internet and we haven't caught up to those efforts. you could call this the unauthorized war on isis, a small army of hackers working in the shadows to disrupt how terror groups operate on the web. >> and cnn correspondent laurie siegal talks with the leader of one of these hacking groups. >> reporter: anonymous, shrouded in secrecy, has declared war on
9:47 pm
isis following the attacks in paris. >> this is a message to isis. you have reached a limit. >> reporter: they claim to have disabled thousands of pro isis quitter accounts. but there's another sophisticated group fighting an online war with isis. they call themselves go security group. it's lesser known but has a track record. the leader a man who calls himself digita shadow. >> we receive death threats, so that's why we can't use our names. there's 110,000 social media accounts for isis and 6,000 propaganda videos. >> reporter: cnn cannot verify this information. he says he's one of 14 members of the group who says it's been infiltrating private isis communications since the "charlie hebdo" attack earlier this year.
9:48 pm
>> they're murdering people, persecuting them for religious beliefs. just appalling. something has to be done and they have to be stopped. >> reporter: ghost security members say they're a global mix of ex-military and i.t. specialists. so what makes them different from anonymous? they share their intel with the u.s. government. they funnel potential threats and information on isis operatives through one man. intelligence adviser michael smith, who then passes the info on to u.s. law enforcement officials. >> they use me to present information to federal authorities here in the united states. that information is sometimes shared with officials abroad. >> reporter: smith says the group has thwarted several isis attacks. >> in tunisia, they identified communications targeting british tourists and jews in tunisia. there were more than a dozen arrests made as a result of the information collected by ghost security. more people were apprehended
9:49 pm
than were known to be involved in the plot in paris. the loss of life could have been greater than what just occurred in paris. >> reporter: even though ghost security says they use hacking securities for good, they may be breaking the law. >> fighting isis to stop threats and stop their propaganda, would that be considered illegal? it just falls into a giant gray area. >> reporter: you're telling me you're working 24-7 on this. are you compensated? >> we are not. we're an independent organization. >> reporter: decembhe says they stop. >> to stop now, lives are at risk. it's more of a way of life for us now. >> we'll get you back to our top story after this short break. many u.s. governors responded to the paris terror attacks by
9:50 pm
refusing to accept ref jugees i their states. we'll show you one town that couldn't be more different. s mo. i'm new ensure active high protein. i help you recharge with nutritious energy and strength. i'll take that. yeeeeeah! new ensure active high protein. 16 grams of protein and 23 vitamins and minerals. ensure. take life in. advil pain relievers are used by more households than any other leading brand. to treat their aches and pains more people reach for advil. relief doesn't get any better than this. advil.
9:51 pm
i absolutely love my new but the rent is outrageous. good thing geico offers affordable renters insurance. with great coverage it protects my personal belongings should they get damaged, stolen or destroyed. [doorbell] uh, excuse me. delivery. hey. lo mein, szechwan chicken, chopsticks, soy sauce and you got some fortune cookies. have a good one. ah, these small new york apartments... protect your belongings. let geico help you with renters insurance. for called "squamous adnon-small cell",er previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy, it's not every day something this big comes along. a chance to live longer with... opdivo, nivolumab. opdivo is the first and only immunotherapy fda approved based on a clinical trial
9:52 pm
demonstrating longer life... ...for these patients. in fact, opdivo significantly increased the chance of living longer versus chemotherapy. opdivo is different. it works with your immune system. opdivo can cause your immune system to attack normal organs and tissues in your body and affect how they work. this may happen any time during or after treatment has ended, and may become serious and lead to death. see your doctor right away if you experience new or worsening cough; chest pain; shortness of breath; diarrhea; severe stomach pain or tenderness; severe nausea or vomiting; loss of appetite;... ...swollen ankles; extreme fatigue; constipation; rash; or muscle or joint pain, as this may keep these problems from becoming more serious. these are not all the possible side effects of opdivo. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions including immune system problems or if you've had an organ transplant, or lung, breathing or liver problems. a chance to live longer. ask your doctor if opdivo is right for you.
9:53 pm
bristol-myers squibb thanks the patients and physicians who participated in the opdivo clinical trial. digestive core.r so choose ultimate flora by renewlife. it has 30 billion probiotic cultures. feel lighter and more energized. ultimate flora. more power to your gut. welcome back, everyone.
9:54 pm
right here in the u.s. state of georgia, one town is showing just what a diverse immigrant community can offer. >> cnn's nick walencia took a trip to a town near atlanta. >> reporter: it's friday, and refuge coffee truck in clarkston, dwa is georgia is in middle of the morning rush. ahmed arrived in the united states two months ago from syria. leon is from congo, and elaney was born in ethiopia. >> we are sharing our language. [ indiscernible ]
9:55 pm
>> reporter: clarkston is perhaps the most diverse square mile in the country after it was singled out for a good place for refugees to resettle. of the nearly 8,000 people who live here, more than half are foreign born. native born residents like katie murray are opening businesses to make sure it stays that way. six months ago, she started refugee coffee. >> i don't think we could do what we do if there weren't other groups assimilating refugees and working with them. >> day-to-day is welcoming the world here to the community center. >> reporter: as the director of the community center, mckenzie plays the biggest role in clarkston, she helps the thousands of refugees transition into american life. >> in the early days, about 25 years ago when clarkston began to change, people were not welcoming refugees with open arms. it's been a long evolution for people to see the benefits of a truly diverse community.
9:56 pm
>> reporter: just around the corner, at the local mosque, afternoon prayers. the topic of the lecture -- how to be nice to your neighbor. appropriate for the city known to locals as the ellis island of the south. in fact, the majority of those here are refugees. he's now a u.s. citizen. do you think refugees are treated well in clarkston? >> i'm happy, yes. >> reporter: how long have you been there? >> about two years. >> reporter: the mayor says one of his missions is to keep the city diverse. >> this is a great way for us to show the true principles of america. we are a welcoming nation. we've always been a nation of immigrants. >> reporter: clarkston is a town that counts on them. >> studies show communities benefit from immigrants coming in. they typically want to work and improve life. >> there's an inspiring example there. thanks for watch thing hour.
9:57 pm
i'm rosemary church. >> i'm errol barnett. that's more of cnn's special coverage to come after this short break. stay with us. when heartburn hits fight back fast tums smoothies starts dissolving the instant it touches your tongue and neutralizes stomach acid at the source tum, tum, tum, tum smoothies! only from tums (patrick 2) pretty great.ke to be the boss of you? (patrick 1) how about a 10% raise? (patrick 2) how about 20? (patrick 1) how about done? (patrick 2) that's the kind of control i like... ...and that's what they give me at national car rental. i can choose any car in the aisle i want- without having to ask anyone. who better to be the boss of you... (patrick 1)than me. i mean, you...us. (vo) go national. go like a pro.
9:58 pm
don't let it conquer you.. with the capability and adaptability of lexus all-weather drive. this is the pursuit of perfection. ♪jake reese, "day to feel alive"♪ ♪jake reese, "day to feel alive"♪ ♪jake reese, "day to feel alive"♪
9:59 pm
10:00 pm
10:01 pm
this is cnn breaking news. hello and welcome to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. i'm rosemary church. >> and i'm errol barnett. thanks for joining us for special coverage of the terror attacks in france. and in mali. first, we want to get you new information that the major developments in the paris terrorist attacks investigation. brussels is on lockdown at this hour. the belgian prime minister says the sphere of attack in several places at once, and the terror alert is at the highest possible level. >> separately, turkey arrested this belgian citizen of moroccan descent. he's believed to have scouted sites for the paris attacks. >> and we're learning more about the raid outside of paris on wednesday. sources say investigators isolated the dna of a suicide bomber. it's believed that french police didn't know that attacker. >> and there's an international
10:02 pm
manhunt for this suspected attacker, salah abdeslam. he was last seen driving towards belgium. let's get an update on the situation. let's go to paris with max foster who is live there. talk to us about the latest information on the investigation and of course, this manhunt. >> reporter: salah abdeslam, where is he? that's the first question. why did he leave paris? was he manning to be part of the attacks in paris? has he got a suicide vest with him? or was he heading towards brussels to carry out an attack? so many questions around that, and how did he slip under the wire from being involved in the attacks in some way? certainly in terms of driving, other attackers involved in that. how did he get under the wire, out of the city and we believe towards brussels. in brussels, there is this very heightened state of alert. last night, all the restaurants and bars closed early, because
10:03 pm
people were warned to stay well away from areas where there are crowds. a horrible situation there, but the main terror alert has been risen there because of a separate terror instance, not necessarily linked to what happened in paris, but multiple attacks possibly planned across brussels. a frightening situation. and a very small district of that city has been described as a hot bed for terrorists. we know some of the paris attackers had lived there. it's been the focus of this investigation. we can go there now to cnn's drew griffin. he's in brussels. any sign that the heightened level of alert may be reduced in the near future? >> reporter: we won't know that until the people who manage the threat levels here in belgium will meet sometime this afternoon. i believe it's 1:00 the meeting is set for with an announcement around 3:00. they're going to determine if the metro is going to open or stay closed. of course, that will be a very,
10:04 pm
very important part of the day here on monday, when work resumes. this shutdown took place late friday night into saturday morning, while it's disrupted the weekend. if this continues into monday, it will disrupt the actual business of brussels. the streets are quiet right now, but saturday night, what would be a party night, a cafe night, a heavy bar night, was just very, very quiet here. as police continue to search out this threat, which you mentioned is somewhat separate than the search they had been doing all week long, which is for the eighth paris attacker. this new threat described to us vaguely by the prime minister and by the interior minister only as a possible paris style attack involving weapons and explosives at many different locations. that is the reason. they stopped concerts. they asked people not to gather
10:05 pm
in crowds. they asked the restaurants to shut down. and that is why brussels remains virtually under some sort of a lockdown situation this morning. max? >> what do we know of salah abdeslam? is he in brussels? is that the working assumption? there's a suggestion also that he has a suicide vest with him. >> reporter: yeah, that suggestion seems to have come from an attorney of one of the men who drove or reportedly drove salah abdeslam back from paris to belgium on saturday. now, that person is in custody, remains in custody. but according to his attorney who was speaking to a french newspaper, her client said that salah abdeslam appeared agitated and appeared to be wearing some sort of vest. it's very vague, but police have told me that they are looking for a vest, an explosive vest.
10:06 pm
they haven't found it yet. and raid after raid, night after night, they have searched, max, every known possible location, either through relatives, friends, or acquaintances that they know of for salah abdeslam. they just have not found him yet. so as that search continues, this new threat has emerged and things seem to be getting more and more tense in brussels rather than any kind of threat situation subsiding. >> well, the ringleader of that attack, of course, died here in a shootout, just on the outskirts of paris. we're learning more about the raid in saint-denis, that neighborhood just outside of paris. that raid was on saturday. here's martin savidge with the latest on what we know.
10:07 pm
>> reporter: the latest from french investigators is that they say they have isolated the dna of a third person who was killed inside of that apartment that was raided by police last wednesday in saint-denis. where they stop short is to say who that dna belongs to, because apparently authorities do not know at this time. it raises even perhaps more questions. another person that was perhaps part of this plot. there is reports that there is a surveillance video that showed not just two attackers but a third person inside a vehicle. but where is that person now? well, maybe the dna that's been isolated is that person. right now, authorities haven't made that link, but it's certainly something that comes to mind. speaking about that raid, new photographs that have come to us through i-tv show just how violent that raid was. and the man who led that raid for french authorities said they had gone in with surprise on their side. but when they blew the door to
10:08 pm
enter the apartment, they found that the door didn't give and the people inside, which had reinforced it, which able to get their weapons and explosives and there began the long and violent attack as these photos attest. back to you. >> the picture of what happened back nine days ago here in paris is starting to come together. it's not necessarily a reassuring picture, particularly with what's going on over there in brussels. everyone concerned about follow up attacks, and they're just not comfortable yet. >> and understand my so. our max foster live there from paris, just after 7:00 in the morning. we'll go back to you, max, in about 20 minutes from now. the president of mali visited the hotel where attackers killed 19 people on friday. >> six nationals from russia, three from china, two from
10:09 pm
belgium, and one each from israel and the u.s. were among the dead. cnn's david mckenzie brings us the latest on the information. >> reporter: the guests are gone. the cracked glass and bullet holes remain. now now details emerging of a devastating attack at a popular western hotel. they started at 7:00 in the morning here at the radisson hotel. now foreign investigators are here trying to piece through exactly what happened. what we're learning is new information. they didn't in fact come inside a diplomatic vehicle. the u.n. is now saying they snuck behind on foot, and then moved rapidly into the hotel to start shooting. the guards were unprepared. their weapons unloaded. everyone was running scared, he says. they were shooting at anyone that moved. he says he then looked terror in the eye.
10:10 pm
the gunman had a cap, blue shirt and jeans. he pointed the gun at me, stared, and then i ran. but many hid, doing everything they could to survive. did you barricade the doors? >> yeah, we barricaded the doors. we put a lot of heavy stuff so that nobody can enter. >> reporter: did you hear the noises getting closer? >> yeah, we hear a lot of gun noise firing around the door. and they were trying to knock the door and enter in the door. but thanks to god we were evacuated at that time. >> reporter: the quick action by malian and foreign forces saved many but the threat still remains. david mckenzie, cnn, mali. a tense morning in brussels as authorities warn of more than one possible attack. we'll bring you the latest from the belgian capital after this short break. stay with cnn. ♪
10:11 pm
the way i see it, you have two choices; the easy way or the hard way. you could choose a card that limits where you earn bonus cash back. or, you could make things easier on yourself. that's right, the quicksilver card from capital one. with quicksilver you earn unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere. so, let's try this again. what's in your wallet? the uncertainties i don't wantof hep c.with or wonder... ...whether i should seek treatment. i am ready. because today there's harvoni. a revolutionary treatment for the most common type of chronic hepatitis c. harvoni is proven to cure up to 99% of patients... ...who've had no prior treatment. it's the one and only cure that's... ...one pill, once a day for 12 weeks. certain patients... ...can be cured with just 8 weeks of harvoni.
10:12 pm
with harvoni, there's no interferon and there are no complex regimens. tell your doctor if you have other liver or kidney problems, or other medical conditions. and about all the medicines you take including herbal supplements. harvoni should not be taken with any medicines containing amiodarone, rifampin, or st. john's wort. it also should not be taken with any other medicine that contains sovaldi. side effects may include tiredness and headache. i am ready to put hep c behind me. i am ready to be cured. are you ready? ask your hep c specialist if harvoni is right for you. i think when people hear about i think it's important for, everyone to know that there is so much more to memory support than the stigmas you hearabout. that these residents still have lives and their lives still matter and that they are still living their lives. that they're not locked away and that they still have a lot to live for, you know, that they have people that care about them and they have people that love them and i love them, so their lives still matter. that is what i do this for.
10:13 pm
this bale of hay cannot be controlled. when a wildfire raged through elkhorn ranch, the sudden loss of pasture became a serious problem for a family business. faced with horses that needed feeding and a texas drought that sent hay prices soaring, the owners had to act fast. thankfully, mary miller banks with chase for business. and with greater financial clarity and a relationship built for the unexpected, she could control her cash flow, and keep the ranch running. chase for business. so you can own it.
10:14 pm
you can't work from home when you're sick. you need real relief. alka-seltzer plus day cold & flu has three cold symptom fighters to relieve your tough symptoms. (truck horn) alka-seltzer plus. i want to get you back to our top story this hour. brussels in lockdown after authorities raised the terror alert level to its highest
10:15 pm
ranking. belgian's prime minister says there are indications several people are planning possible attacks in multiple locations. >> subway service is suspended and citizens have been told to stay away from large gatherings such as concerts, sports events, airports, and train stations. >> this comes a week after the deadly paris attacks. for a look at the steps authorities are taking to try to avert another tragedy, we bring in steve moore, a former special agent with the fbi. thanks for your time. as i just mentioned, brussels is essentially shut down this weekend. do you think this could be the new european normal because of the climate we're in? >> i hope it's not. this is extraordinary seeing a city essentially shut down. you can't live that way. you have to have normal life. you have to have sports,
10:16 pm
transportation. i think what should concern people is that first of all, this is a very, very specific threat or you wouldn't have this type of reaction. but we want to avoid a situation where one terrorist attack gives the terrorist free mileage. it's like the bully in 2 schoolyard who beats up the kid at the beginning of the year and gets his lunch money the rest of the year without touching him. that's what we have to avoid. we have to look at actionable intelligence and act that way, and not panic when we have partial information. >> as a member of the public, you just have to have faith and believe that your public officials are doing the right thing. we've just seen in france, they agreed to extend the state of emergency by a number of months. but you do have the fear -- officials want to be rather safe than sorry, but is there not a risk of politicians abusing the emergency practice? how do you determine an imminent threat and how can the general
10:17 pm
public know if it's legit. you just have to trust your leaders. >> at a certain point you do. the public isn't going to say, i think i would take that one a little more seriously than you are. the people in the intelligence community are getting threats like this every day. they may not say it, but they are. after 9/11, we got threats every day. you come to a point where you start to recognize when something is vague, when something is nonactionable. when something -- it doesn't give you enough information to even do anything if you wanted to, you have to be able to go on living life and dismiss things that are not credible or specific. >> on that note, we had two air france flighting heading out of u.s. locations, diverted this past week, after apparently bomb threats were made over the phone. that it seems turned out to be a
10:18 pm
hoax. but should we expect more of that? >> we should expect more of those phone calls, because apparently it worked. i was very disappointed when i saw that -- i couldn't believe that the airliners landed simply because of a nonspecific threat from a phone call. i thought we had gotten past that after the 9/11 attacks. there was nothing in those phone calls that i know of that was specific enough to land those airplanes. i wasn't a pilot of the airplane. i don't want to second guess that. but if it was the decision of the airliner or the decision of the government, then i think it's an indication that they were acting out of fear because of the earlier attacks. you have to amy a happy median where you're safe but you don't
10:19 pm
lose all your free throw ddom. >> you hope that we're getting back to some sense of normalcy, while still being vigilant. great to here from steve moore, former agent with the fbi, speaking to us from l.a., approaching 10:20. steve, thanks a lot. back in the united states, republican presidential hopeful donald trump continues to create controversy with his remarks about american muslims. trump had spent the past couple of days backing off his response to a reporter's question that a database would be a good idea. >> but at an event in birmingham, alabama on saturday, the billionaire said surveillance of certain mosques would be okay. >> so here's the story, just to set it clear. i want surveillance of these people. i want surveillance, if we have to, and i don't care. i want -- are you ready for this, folks? are you ready? oh, they're going to make such a big deal.
10:20 pm
oh, he said something so politically incorrect that's why we're going to hell because we're so politically incorrect. such a big deal. such a big deal. i want surveillance of certain mosques, okay? if that's okay. i want surveillance. and you know what? we've had it before, and we'll have it again. >> trump's comments about muslims come as the presidential candidates square off over whether the united states should accept syrian refugees while isis still poses a threat. >> very simply, we can't take them, folks. >> reporter: it's a debate in the republican party, how to handle the resettlement of syrian refugees in the wake of the paris attacks. donald trump drawing a hard line, refusing to take any option off the table to protect the u.s., including closing some mosques in the u.s., issuing
10:21 pm
muslims special i.d. cards listing their religion and potentially creating a database to track all muslims living in the u.s. [ inaudible ] >> there should be a lot of systems beyond databases. we should have a lot of systems. today, you can do it. but right now, we have to have a border. we have to have strength, we have to have a wall, and we cannot let what's happening to this country happen. >> reporter: the gop front-runner today tweeting he didn't suggest a database, but still not dismissing the idea as some of trump's rivals have done. >> we don't need division in america. we need to be united. >> you talk about closing mosques, you talk about registering people, that's just wrong. >> reporter: even ted krouz, in a rare break with trump -- >> the first amendment protects religious liberty and i've spent
10:22 pm
decades defending that. >> reporter: ben carson saying it sets a dangerous precedent to single out a group of people, instead calling for a database of everybody that enters the u.s. >> i want everybody to have a database. i want us to know about anybody that comes into this country. >> reporter: that after he raised eyebrows comparing refugees to rabid dogs. >> if there's a rabid dog running around in your neighborhood, you're not going to assume something good about that dog. doesn't mean you hate all dogs. >> reporter: cruz has proposed to let syrian christians into the country but not muslims. >> we would need to vet anyone coming in, but there's no indication of muslim s pretendig to be christians. >> reporter: a new poll from "the washington post" and abc news shows that a majority, 54%
10:23 pm
of voters believe that the u.s. should not be taking in syrian refugees and only 13% are very confident that the u.s. will be able to identify terrorists among the refugees. >> now back to our focus on the fight against terrorism. every day, isis urges young men and women to leave everything behind and join a terror group. they run a powerful and effective propaganda machine through social media. >> our poppy harlow talked to someone about isis recruitment techniques and how they can be combatted. take a listen. >> this is a problem for especially parents whose kids are maybe in the experimental phase, trying to figure out what their purpose is in life. it could be because of their friends that they become
10:24 pm
interested in islam. but what kind of islam? that's really the question. nonmuslim parents, they might just see this as a phase, they want to be respectful. at the same time, it's a real concern for them. even in my time, when i was -- from '95 to 2001 when i was involved in these extremist groups, we did the same thing. we looked for converts who were alienated from their parents, who may have been kicked out of their homes, and looking for new peer groups. for a lot of these young people, they just don't fit with their parents, with older people in the community. it could be imams who are 20 years older than them, don't know the popular culture in which they live. so these are things which the youth are very confused and will latch on to whoever gives that sense of meaning and belonging. >> reporter: what drew you in, and what do you think parentks do to counter this?
10:25 pm
>> i was drawn into it bid an acute identity crisis. i wasn't deprived. i wasn't picked on or bullied. i wasn't the victim of racism. for me, i was being told that i wasn't a good enough muslim. and i interpreted that in my mind as, okay, i need to be religious, quote unquote. for a lot of muslims today, they're pressured into thinking that they have to keep a full beard, they have to wear robes, effectively dressing like the prophet, peace be upon him, and what happens is it makes them alienated. because once you start dressing like that, it's still string for people to see that kind of dress, it enforces -- reinforces that sense of isolation and alienation. so what i would tell parents is, find the right islam. it's not difficult to find. you will find many muslim scholars who condemn isis and
10:26 pm
these extremist interpretations. islam teaches justice. it's about being just. there are versus in the koran that says just because of your dislike of a people, don't be unjust to them. so the idea is to be just to people. you'll find many scholars like this online and in the real world. >> incredible insight there as to why young people are attracted to isis. you're watching cnn's special coverage of the paris terrorist attacks. still to come, new details about a suicide bomber in a raid outside of paris. plus, brussels fears an attack in several places at once. more after this. other wireless carriers make families share data. some way to say happy holidays. switch to t-mobile now and get 4 lines with up to 6gb each, and no sharing. just $30 bucks a line. that's 6gb each plus unlimited streaming with binge on.
10:27 pm
stream netflix, hbo now, hulu, and many more without using data. get 6gb each just $30 bucks a line, plus free video streaming. ditch your data worries with t-mobile. have you ever thought, "i could never do that"? have you ever thought... you just didn't have anything left in the tank? well - you do. because the courage is already inside. the possibility of a flare swas almost always on my mind. thinking about what to avoid, where to go... and how to deal with my uc. to me, that was normal.
10:28 pm
until i talked to my doctor. she told me that humira helps people like me get uc under control and keep it under control when certain medications haven't worked well enough. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers, including lymphoma, have happened; as have blood, liver, and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure. before treatment, get tested for tb. tell your doctor if you've been to areas where certain fungal infections are common, and if you've had tb, hepatitis b, are prone to infections, or have flu-like symptoms or sores. don't start humira if you have an infection. raise your expectations. ask your gastroenterologist about humira. with humira, control is possible.
10:29 pm
( ♪ ) uniqlo's revolutionary thin fabric converts body moisture into heat and retains it. ( ♪ ) heattech. super thin, super warm. ( ♪ )
10:30 pm
welcome back to our special coverage of the terror attacks in france and the widening impact now across europe. at this moment, brussels is on lockdown. the belgian prime minister says there's fear of an attack in "several places at once." >> and there's an international manhunt for this suspected attacker, salah abdeslam. he was last seen driving toward belgium after friday's paris attacks. >> new details emerge about the raid outside of paris on wednesday. investigators have isolated the dna of a suicide bomber, but authorities say french police didn't know that attacker. >> turkey arrested this belgian citizen of moroccan descent. he's believed to have scouted
10:31 pm
sites for the paris attacks. >> max foster joins us again with more. max? >> the situation in brussels is very concerning, of course. we understand the authorities will reconsider that terror alert, the highest possible in brussels. there's no signs that it is going to be reduced. they have got very precise intelligence on possible multiple terror attacks against that city. so a great deal of concern there. separately, salah abdeslam, the man on the run, suspicion being that he's also in brussels. here in paris, people just trying to move on, trying to recover. the attacks brought one frenchman back to his homeland, as our martin savidge reports. >> reporter: to measure the mood in paris a week after the attacks, i could have gone anywhere in the city.
10:32 pm
i went to the american kitchen, partly for its name. mostly for its view. it stairs directly down the vote to two other restaurants, now charred, bullet riddled memorials. terrible night. what others misto be for fireworks she knew was not. >> i said no, it's shoot. and you have to go inside. at this moment, i felt like -- i don't know, an animal. like you just think with the fear and you just want to escape. >> reporter: she now has trouble sleeping, and even when awake haunted by something else she saw. >> the terrorist car was just past -- >> reporter: just came by more? >> yes, came by here twice, and
10:33 pm
it could have been us. it could have been me. it could have been my friend. i don't know. >> reporter: i share a table with olivia atare. he's french, but recently proudly became an american. >> i was in new york on 9/11, so i experienced that. i live in brooklyn. >> reporter: after paris' 11/13, he had to come back to the city. in defiance to the terrorists, he sits outside in the dark, drinking a bottle of wine and eating a cheese burger, taking a stand. >> i'm american and french and this is my life. and there is no way somebody is going to change that. >> reporter: thank you. very good to talk to you. minutes later, the lights of the american kitchen go out and in the gloom, they gather in the doorway, silently looking down the street. it is the moment exactly one week later.
10:34 pm
and you see in all their faces, like it or not, they are forever changed. martin savidge, cnn, paris. >> we heard many incredible stories of many trying to help the wounded. when the cafe was bombed, a nurse tried to save a man who was lying amongst the overturned tables and chairs. but he soon discovered he was trying to resuscitate the suicide bomber. here's the uncredible story. >> translator: i go to this man that i could see out of the corner of my eye. i take him out of this tangle of chairs and tables and put him on the floor. he had nothing special, he was just unconscious. but i noticed there was an enormous hole on his side. but there again, i don't think at all it's a suicide bomber. at that point, for me, it's a client like others who suffered from a gas blast and who must
10:35 pm
have hurt himself in something. but his wound was huge. i put him on the ground and i start performing cpr. the other guy who was with me takes over for me, and at that point we had just unbuttoned the jacket, we kept his t-shirt on. it was not really thick. when i was performing cpr, i didn't feel anything. at some point, the other guy tells me maybe we should remove the t-shirt. i tell him yes, you are right. then i ripped the t-shirt and when i did, i saw some wires. i looked up at these heating lamps and noticed there was nothing wrong with them. they are made of a material that becomes distorted quite easily. there was nothing wrong with the three of them. on the ground there was blood and i noticed the first bolts on the ground. then i understood immediately. i told myself it's an explosion that made the wound. it's a suicide bomber. and i knew it was him. at that moment when i realized what he was, the emergency services arrived.
10:36 pm
>> no one was killed in the cafe except the bomber. reports say he's believed to have been involved in the attack on the theater, as well. since all that happened, so much for people to take in, taking what efforts they can to keep normalcy, trying to carry on in an act of defiance, trying to carry on a normal way of life. i spoke to some musicians yesterday who always play on this particular street, and they decided to continue doing that. not just for themselves but for the people that walk past them every day.
10:37 pm
♪ every saturday, they play. there was no exception the day after the attacks. they picked up their instruments and played in the usual way. though they admit they were scared. >> it was good for us to do our thing and to say that people were happy to see that life was going on and music was going on. >> something has changed. >> reporter: can you articulate that? >> yeah, something has changed but i think we're going to be stronger. i think we realize we need to fight for what we believe in, and it's not given to us. we must realize our freedom is something we have to fight for. >> reporter: you're going to keep playing? >> yeah, we are. >> it's not like a war where you see the other guys coming. they're already here, but you never know where or when they're going to strike. you just have to keep on living. >> reporter: a band in one street and a stitch in the tapestry of life in paris. without their music, life just wouldn't be what it was.
10:38 pm
they're doing their bit amid a new reality. the reality really expressed with the pictures of the soldiers walking through past the musicians and through a cafe. it's something that people are already used to. so a sacrifice for french people to have to accept that in their ordinary lives, but something they're willing to do because of those shocking events. >> max, as one of those band mates told you, the focus is just to live on. i'm curious, we saw the street sweeper behind you, cleaning up. it's been a week of people handing out flowers and setting up that memorial. are there plans to clean it up after all the rain and perhaps do that as a sign of moving on? >> it's interesting, because it's got this particular place in society. this is where people come over
10:39 pm
the course of the day, you see lots of people walking around very slowly. but the cleaners are trying to get rid of all the litter or leaves that gathers in there, but carefully leaving all the memories people have left this. people who knew people involved in the attacks come here. they come to this memorial, and i think it's going to have to be something they'll consider long-term. but that is the sense of change that you feel here, this resignation that they have to carry on, but there's a new reality, and it's not just because of these attacks but because there was another attack earlier in the year, "charlie hebdo," as well. so less anger now, more resignation to how french culture is going to have to change. they have to think more about security, and in times of
tv-commercial
10:40 pm
austeri austerity, they have to accept they have to spend money on security, as well. >> max, thanks for that. we will see you and touch base again next hour. thank you very much. you are watching special coverage of the terror attacks in paris. still to come -- >> do you feel hate? >> no. that's what they want. they want us to fear. they want us to hate. >> a couple describes the mayhem inside the bataclan theater and how they survived that attack. we're back in a moment. did you know that good nutrition is critical for brain health? brain food, hmmm. ensure has b vitamins that help support brain health - now that's smart nutrition. ensure's complete balanced nutrition has 26 vitamins and minerals and 9 grams of protein. ensure. take life in.
10:41 pm
10:42 pm
come happy birthday. i just had a heart attack... and now i have a choice. for her. for them. and him. a choice to take brilinta. a prescription for people who've been hospitalized for a heart attack. i take brilinta with a baby aspirin ...no more than 100 mg. as it affects how well it works. it's such an important thing to do to help protect against another heart attack.
10:43 pm
brilinta worked better than plavix. and even reduced the chances of dying from another one. don't stop taking brilinta without talking to doctor. since stopping it too soon increases your risk of clots in your stent, heart attack, stroke, and even death. brilinta may cause bruising or bleeding more easily or serious, sometimes fatal bleeding. don't take brilinta if you have bleeding, like stomach ulcers. a history of bleeding in the brain, or severe liver problems. tell your doctor about bleeding, new or unexpected shortness of breath, any planned surgery and all medicines you take. i will take brilinta today. tomorrow. and every day for as long as my doctor tells me. don't miss a day of brilinta. the deadliest attack last friday took place at the bataclan theater where 89 people were killed.
10:44 pm
>> a capetown university college graduate spoke with cnn's anderson cooper about their ordeal. >> when did you realize something was happening? >> we heard sounds. we thought they were fireworks. >> you thought it was part of the concert? >> part of the concert. quickly, we realized it was something serious. >> did you know it was shots? >> it was quickly i realized it was shots. you could smell the gun powder. you could hear the terror of people screaming. you knew it was gunfire. >> was it constant? >> constant, nonstop. [ speaking french ]
10:45 pm
>> did you see them?
10:46 pm
>> did you hear them talking to each other? did you hear them say anything is >> i heard sounds, but i don't know if they were in french. i didn't understand what they were saying. they were very calm. >> they were calm? >> they were calm. >> everybody tries to imagine what they would do in a situation like this. were you thinking of different things in your mind? what was going through your mind? >> complete shock. i think that's the first thing. i couldn't believe it. i couldn't believe this was happening. >> it didn't seem real? >> didn't seem real. felt like a nightmare.
10:47 pm
it felt like the worst, horrible -- i just -- i remember the stories and you just -- you don't move. you pretend that you've already been shot. you pretend you're dead. that's what i did. >> did you worry they would see you breathing? >> yeah, i was so worried. the fact that i didn't cry is shocking, given how scared i was. it was so hard not to move, not to flinch, not to do anything that would alert them to the fact that i was still alive. and as much as the terror and the anguish was in that room, there was a lot of love. there was a lot of positivity in such a tragic, tragic place. >> how do you mean? >> you just felt it. everyone was there, they were
10:48 pm
innocent lives. they were there for the exact same reasons. we were at a concert. minutes before the attack, everyone was dancing and smiling and people were happy. when the gunman came in, it all changed. but the people didn't. people who followed their family and friends, that's what you do when you're so close to death. and it's all you want to be is with your family and friends. you want to tell them you love them. sorry, and you -- you don't want them to think of the pain you're going through. you don't. and this the the only thing i did is i said out loud, i love you. i didn't say their names, i just pictured their names and i said,
10:49 pm
i love you. i whispered. >> you whispered that out loud? >> it was important. it was important if i was going to live, if the next bullet was for me, that i left saying "i love you." so i said it to every single person i've ever loved. and in that way, it felt okay to die, because i had love in my heart and it reflected a great life. >> you wanted to die with love in your heart? >> yeah. i didn't want them to have their -- have their horrible actions determine the end of my life. i didn't want them to win. i wanted the people i loved to win, to know that they blessed me with an incredible life.
10:50 pm
>> an extraordinary story. just the way she approached the situation and the way she's moving forward. >> even with that, it's hard to imagine what it would have been like to have been there and for the rest of their lives, all them that survived will have to wrestle with that reality that it could have been them. >> you are watching cnn's special coverage. still to come, remembering the victims. touching moments from people around the world, showing they will not forget what happened. my constipation and belly pain... ...feel like a raging storm. i've tried laxatives... ... but my symptoms keep returning. my constipation... ...feels like a heavy weight... ...that keeps coming back. linzess can help. once-daily linzess treats adults with ibs with constipation or chronic constipation. linzess helps you proactively manage your symptoms. it may help you have more frequent
10:51 pm
and complete bowel movements that are... ... easier to pass and may relieve your belly pain. do not give linzess to children under 6, and it should not be given to children 6 to 17. it may harm them. don't take linzess if you have a bowel blockage. get immediate help if you... ... develop unusual or... severe stomach pain... ...especially with bloody or black stools. the most common side effect... ... is diarrhea, sometimes severe. if it's severe, stop taking linzess and ... ...call your doctor right away. other side effects include, gas, stomach-area pain... ...and swelling. bottom line, ask your doctor about linzess today.
10:52 pm
the uncertainties i don't wantof hep c.with or wonder... ...whether i should seek treatment. i am ready. because today there's harvoni. a revolutionary treatment for the most common type of chronic hepatitis c. harvoni is proven to cure up to 99% of patients... ...who've had no prior treatment. it's the one and only cure that's... ...one pill, once a day for 12 weeks. certain patients... ...can be cured with just 8 weeks of harvoni. with harvoni, there's no interferon and there are no complex regimens. tell your doctor if you have other liver or kidney problems, or other medical conditions. and about all the medicines you take including herbal supplements. harvoni should not be taken with any medicines containing amiodarone, rifampin, or st. john's wort. it also should not be taken with any other medicine that contains sovaldi. side effects may include tiredness and headache. i am ready to put hep c behind me. i am ready to be cured.
10:53 pm
are you ready? ask your hep c specialist if harvoni is right for you.
10:54 pm
welcome back, everyone. people around the world are showing their solidarity with the french people in moving displays. >> many are leaving messages to honor the victims of the attacks, as we wrap up our coverage this hour, we take a look at some of those poignant moments. ♪
10:55 pm
>> translator: it's an act of war committed by a terrorist army, daesh. an army of jihadists against france. ♪ >> we're reminded in this time of tragedy, that the bonds of liberty and egalite are not only values that the french people care so deeply about, but they are values that we share. ♪ >> translator: we stand with
10:56 pm
you, united. >> and then suddenly in a flash, there was chaos. friday was a night of shock. saturday was a day of mourning. but on sunday, we felt determined today to come out to take our lives back. >> the headline of it is, i will not succumb to hate. friday night, you stole an exceptional life, the love of my life. the mother of my son. but i will not succumb to hate. >> we stand free. gentlemen. you look well. what's new, flo? well, a name your price tool went missing last week. name your what, now? it gives you coverage options based on your budget. i just hope whoever stole it knows that it only works at progressive.com. so, you can't use it to just buy stuff? no. i'm sorry, gustav.
10:57 pm
we have to go back to the pet store. [ gustav squawks ] he's gonna meet us there. the name your price tool. still only at progressive.com. ok, wehere's dad. mom. the twins. aunt alice... you didn't tell me aunt alice was coming. of course. don't forget grandpa. can the test drive be over now? maybe just head back to the dealership? don't you want to meet my family? yep, totally. it's practically yours, but we still need your signature. the sign then drive event. zero due at signing, zero down, zero deposit, and zero first months payment on a new jetta and other select volkswagen models. the possibility of a flare swas almost always on my mind. thinking about what to avoid, where to go... and how to deal with my uc. to me, that was normal. until i talked to my doctor. she told me that humira helps people like me
10:58 pm
get uc under control and keep it under control when certain medications haven't worked well enough. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers, including lymphoma, have happened; as have blood, liver, and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure. before treatment, get tested for tb. tell your doctor if you've been to areas where certain fungal infections are common, and if you've had tb, hepatitis b, are prone to infections, or have flu-like symptoms or sores. don't start humira if you have an infection. raise your expectations. ask your gastroenterologist about humira. with humira, control is possible.
10:59 pm
11:00 pm
welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. i'm rosemary church. >> and i'm errol barnett. thanks for joining us for special coverage of the terror attacks in france and in mali. >> and we start in brussels. the belgian capital is on lockdown right now. the prime minister says there's fear of an attack in "several places at once." and the terror alert is at its
11:01 pm
highest level there. >> separately, turkey arrested this belgian citizen of moroccan descent. he's believed to have scouted sites for the paris attacks. two other syrian men were also arrested. >> we want to go now to our max foster, who is live in paris with the latest on that manhunt and indeed on the investigation. max, of course, everyone talking now about the lockdown in brussels. >> absolutely. it doesn't appear to be linked to salah abdeslam, who may or may not be in brussels right now. it does seem to be a separate threat authorities have got about multiple attacks across brussels. certainly the search for salah abdeslam is very much in people's minds here in france. he was the eighth attacker as far as we know, and he could possibly have a suicide vest. he was seen leaving france
11:02 pm
heading towards belgian. also, a lot of questions about what actually happened. was he meant to set off a suicide vest in an additional attack here in paris or was he planning to go to brussels? so many questions that authorities are considering, as well right now. but i'm going to go to brussels right now, because there's a small district there described as a hotbed for drifts and there's been a big focus on the investigation. drew griffin is there in brussels right now. so in terms of the latest level of alert, still at its highest. and the investigation is ongoing there. >> reporter: yes. and it must be said, max, that it's unprecedented that it's at this level, he feel four, for an entire region of brussels. that has never been done since they began issuing these threat levels in 2006. as you said, this is separate and above the threat that
11:03 pm
they're looking in terms of salah abdeslam, the eighth and missing paris attacker. police have been making raids ever since the paris attack in and around brussels specifically. you mentioned molenbeek, which is a district attached to brussels. perhaps it is through those raids they've gathered intelligence that has warned them about a separate possible attack, an attack described by the prime minister as being that with multiple guns and explosives at multiple locations, very similar to the attacks that took place in paris. that is what led to this basic shutdown of public activity within brussels, which remains today the biggest inconvenience is the shutting down of the metro. this city has terrible traffic to begin with. shutting down the metro on the
11:04 pm
weekend has been a major inconvenience. they will gather later todd and decide whether or not this shutdown will continue into the business week. i just want to point out, max, you mentioned this district of molenbeek. at least a half dozen terror attacks in recent years have connections to molenbeek. of the 130 foreign fighters from belgium who have gone to syria and come back after their fight, 85 of them are believed to be in just this one mostly migrant community attached to brussels. so they have a very big intelligence and security threat on their hands. they're trying to weed through it, but it's been playing catchup basically all week, as they try to protect the public while continuing with their investigations. max? >> drew, thank you very much.
11:05 pm
now, the band playing here in paris on the night of the attacks is speaking out about the chaos that they saw in an emotional interview. eagles of death front man jessie hughes says he watched fans try to save each other, refusing to leave others behind. >> several people hid in our dressing room, and the killers were able to get in and kid every one of them except for a kid who was hiding under my leather jacket. >> killers got in your dressi i room? >> yeah, people were playing dead. the reason so many people were killed is so many people wouldn't leave their friends and put themselves in front of people. >> amazing to hear the words. we'll hear more from jessie hughes later on in the week.
11:06 pm
he's from eagles of death playing at the bataclan concert hall. more details of the arrests made in turkey in relation to the paris attacks. ahmed is believed to have been in contact with the attackers and sources say he traveled from amsterdam to turkey the day after the massacre. an official says at that time, no country had alerted turkey about him, so he was allowed to enter and turkish authorities later found him at a hotel in italia. two other men who traveled from syria to meet him are also under arrest. but it highlights the concerns about intelligence sharing and whether or not that needs to be updated in some way in the future to avoid these attacks and the responses to them. we're getting closer to a view of the destruction after a raid outside paris on wednesday connected with the attacks. i-tv news has exclusive photos of the destroyed apartment in
11:07 pm
the saint-denis neighborhood. here's our martin savidge with more on those pictures. >> reporter: the latest from french investigators is they say they have isolated the dna of a third person who was killed inside of that apartment that was raided by police last wednesday in saint-denis. where they stop short is to say who that dna belongs to. apparently authorities do not know at this time. it raises even perhaps more questions. another person that was perhaps part of this plot. there is reports that there is a surveillance video that showed not just two attackers but a third person inside a vehicle. but where is that person now? well, maybe the dna that's been isolated is that person. right now, authorities haven't made that link, but it's certain hi something that comes to mind. speaking about that raid, new photographs that have come to us through i-tv show just how
11:08 pm
violent that raid was. and the man who led that raid for french authorities said they had gone in with surprise on their side. but when they blew the door to enter the apartment, they found that the door didn't give and the people inside, which had reinforced it, which able to get their weapons and explosives and there began the long and violent attack as these photos attest. back to you. >> well, here in paris, it's an extraordinary sort of situation, sort of nine days on from those attacks. just walking around seeing how the city is trying to recover from this and respond really. you have obviously been here throughout. at this point in the proceedings, if i can call it that, how would you describe the atmosphere here? >> the atmosphere is very heavy. like i was walking yesterday in
11:09 pm
this area, and usually at this time of the year, we're heading towards christmas, some people are coming, they're going shopping. all the people that are there are shopping because they need something, not because they're going to think about christmas. >> reporter: the christmas lights are up, aren't they? >> they are, but they're not christmas shopping. i heard some people saying, i didn't leave my apartment since the terror attacks. so it's really a situation where people are pulling together. they're going about their neighbors, they're trying to bring some warmth in that. i live in the northwest suburbs of paris. it's also a tight community, and people are talking to each other. they need to talk, they need to gather. it's really a feeling that's unknown, because we all usually see that parisian and french are very individualistic people.
11:10 pm
they had -- they think about their country, but usually they live their life, and this time around, it's like the flag is becoming of value again. the national anthem has been heard like -- it's something unseen. >> people are signing up for the military, as well. but "charlie hebdo" plays into this, doesn't it? there's been two attacks now, so the anger that you had after "charlie hebdo" now feels a bit more like resignation, the fact that they have to get used to this new reality, armed police walking through cafes. >> absolutely. the security aspect of this, the french know that they're going to have to get used to a high level of security in their daily life. it's something they're not used to. something they usually don't like very much. american people are much more inclined to have heavy security
11:11 pm
around. that doesn't bother them. as long as the law is respected. in france, it's always been back and forth. we have a very strange relation with our army. a lot of people like the army, but a lot of people don't like the army. so it's the french way. so the french way will have to change. >> that's is cultural shift here, isn't it? also giving up some free throw domes, as well. >> yes, more security, giving up freedoms to be protected. but the feeling right now for a number of french people is the french people don't feel they have enough security. you were mentioning "charlie hebdo." "charlie hebdo" was a big wakeup call for our society. but what did he target? journalists like you and me. jewish people, communities, specific targets, which have been targeted in the past. this time around, slaughtering people with an ak on a friday
11:12 pm
night, everybody can get injured. you know what? it's the feeling in paris that we know somebody who was there or we know somebody that knows somebody who was there. everybody feels that they were touched in the heart, touched in the flesh. sometimes we hear a friend of a friend. it's us as a collective, as a community, and that is new for french people. >> regis, thank you very much for joining us as paris tries to come to terms with what happened nine days ago. for now, it's all about security and accepting that somes and police are part of everyday lives here now and they're going to be armed. >> that is the new reality. max foster there, it is 12 minutes past 8:00 in the morning. we'll return to you, marks, in about 20 minutes from now. still co-tom, nto come, how
11:13 pm
carried out an attack in mali. >> and another attack in israel underlines the tension between israelis and palestinians. we'll bring you the latest after this short break. stay with us. i am the ghost of cookies' past oh, so gross... well you didn't use pam! so, it looks like you're stuck, with me... that's really a good one... thank you. i'm here all week, folks. no wait, i'm here forever.
11:14 pm
hahaha... bargain brand cooking spray can leave annoying residue. but pam leaves up to 99% less residue. pam helps you keep it off.
11:15 pm
plan well and enjoy life... ♪ or, as we say at unitedhealthcare insurance company, go long. of course, how you plan is up to you. take healthcare. make sure you're covered for more than what just medicare pays... consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company... the only medicare supplement plans that carry the aarp name, and the ones that millions of people trust year after year. it's about having the coverage you need... plan well. enjoy life. go long. i was on the bus and i couldn't stop streaming. i don't even want to think about the overages.
11:16 pm
it's okay. t-mobile now has binge on, so you can stream all the movies, tv and sports you want without using your data. it's like...free. so it's okay that i binged an entire season during my kid's piano recital? i've done that. yeah. i'm binging right now. you know, i think we've made a real breakthrough here today. what? aw, he dies in this episode. introducing binge on. with t-mobile, stream video free without using data from netflix, hbonow, hulu and many more.
11:17 pm
u.s. president barack obama continues on his tour of asia. he's currently in kuala lumpur. >> that's right. he in malaysia gave an emotional news conference, referencing refugees and how the united states would be welcoming, he kind of humanized who refugees are and emphasized american leadership is about caring about those who have been forgotten or experienced extreme circumstances. we're joined now with more on this, joined from kuala lumpur. we did just get a heads up that the u.s. president could be making remarks at any moment. we'll break to that when it takes place. but tell us about what he's expected to say today in the wake of the refugee comments yesterday. >> reporter: yes, errol. we're expecting president obama
11:18 pm
to hold that press conference here in kuala lumpur to wrap up really his trip here for asean. and as you rightly mentioned, talking about the transpacific partnership, the u.s.-asean deals that have been discussed here. there has been a heavy emphasis, not only on refugees, but also how to take on isis, spectacularly in the wake of those two horrendous attacks. beirut, paris, and mali. it's been a delicate balance for the president while he's been here, while trying to address his asia policy, but also to address this concern back home, of course. he's going to look at the domestic pressures of whether or not he really is addressing the isis threat head-on and strongly enough.
11:19 pm
and he wants to show that he is a president that wants to have an aggressive and does have an aggressive strategy towards isis while balancing the fact that america needs to remain open, as he said in his own words, while i remain president, we need to keep america open and welcoming to people who want to come to the u.s. and find refuge and find a place to call home. yesterday, we saw a very impassioned president. we saw a very human side to him, as you point out, when he spent time with those children. this is a center for low income families and refugees, not from syria, but from myanmar, somalia, sudan, and what he said was, these children represent the opposite of terrorism, that america and the rest of the world should remain open to giving them a home, sharing their values so that they can create more good poeople around
11:20 pm
the world. a very frank and honest conversation after that. then he has to address the fact whether or not the united states and the white house is really dealing with isis head on as it should be. a lot of aggressive questioning of that over the past few weeks. particularly after the paris attacks, right in the heart of europe. what the white house team and senior officials are telling cnn is that, look at how the white house has been dealing with this. look at how the united states is addressing this terror from isis. well, we have reduced isis' power over the areas that they control. reduced their control by 20% to 25% over the last few weeks since the united states and the coalition's campaign. they've been pointing us towards their successes with strikes against the infamous
11:21 pm
executioner, jihadi john, managing to take him in a strike, as well. and the leader of isil, or as they termed it, the white house termed it, isis in libya, as well. believed to have been killed in an air strike. so the white house staying we need to be aggressive enough, and we need to pair that with a compassionate approach with refugees. the refugee crisis, of course, is the result of those fleeing the very terror that we have witnessed in paris and mali. >> as we wait for president obama to me again his press conference there in kuala lumpur, saima, let me ask you about the tpp. the u.s. president has been defending this deal that was signed with 11 nations there in the region. all the local governments still need to approve it. i just wonder what the prospects
11:22 pm
are for that? >> reporter: the president in his speech yesterday again, which started out being dominated by mali, did make a very strong promotion and positive approach to the tpp. he wants this deal to very much go through. he tried to say look, he understands there is good and bad with all kinds of trade. there are fears, and he addressed fears not just here, but also back home in the united states. he said yes, we understand when trade opens up, small businesses and jobs being lost to others and being exported. but there is a lot of good to come from that. so the president trying to make an appeal, if you wish, to not just world leaders, but businesses around the world, as well as to be supported with the
11:23 pm
tpp. he said this can only result in more business being done and a better prosperous future for all involved. it's still to be signed and the president very much wants this to go through. errol? >> as we stand by, u.s. president barack obama expected to make remarks there any moment. >> we have been told he'll be up very soon. we wanted to go to david mckenzie who is in mali where that attack took place on friday. david, we know that the u.s. president has condemned that attack, as he did the attack in paris. talk to us about what he said and whether he's likely to reference that on this day. >> reporter: he's most likely to reference the issues at play here. his trip to asia is all about the pivot to asia for the u.s. to push the policy of the u.s.
11:24 pm
and their interests in the asia pacific region. it's been dominated by the issue of terror, the aftermath of the terrorist attacks and now this hideous attack in west africa and mali. he did express condolences on the day of the attack and praised the malian forces who went in there to get people out. but we spoke to one survivor who described a terrifying ordeal. >> yeah, we barricaded the doors. we put a lot of heavy stuff so that nobody can enter. >> reporter: did you hear the noises getting closer? >> yeah, we hear a lot of gun noise firing around the door. and they were trying to knock the door and enter in the door. but thanks to god we were evacuated at that time.
11:25 pm
>> reporter: many malian forces were in that hotel in the aftermath of the attack. it happened exactly at this time on friday, that this unfolded here in mali. as i said, president obama saying that this is an issue that the world is dealing with right now. islamic terrorism. but here in mali, what we're hearing from people on the ground, this is also very much a localized issue, that the peace talks going on here in mali, which were trying to heal this fractured country that was split in two because of rebels and islamic jihadis, that is most likely the target of these terrorists who are trying to instill fear in those that want to push through this peace process. nevertheless, they attacked a key western asset here in mali, frequentedly americans, french and other foreign nationals. >> the concern going forward is the possibility of another attack just like that one. what is being said about how
11:26 pm
authorities are likely to deal with that going forward? >> i think it's important to stress this is not a local issue in terms of those who deal with attacks in this region. it's really pan regional. yesterday this s a suicide attacker, a female, who killed ten people in nearby cameroon. there's been a spate of terror attacks in nigeria, killing scores in just 24 hours. there's an issue of terror threats similar to isis in that it's terror groups trying to build caliphates as it were. in nigeria, it's boko haram. there's really a plethora of groups like this. while everyone knows about isis in the last week or so. this last threat has been dealt with by africans, very severely, as well as the rest of the
11:27 pm
world. >> our david mckenzie joining us there live from mali. we are watching these live pictures from kuala lumpur, malaysia, where the u.s. president barack obama is expected to speak at the asean summit there in kuala lumpur. we'll take that news conference as soon as it happens. but in the meantime, let's take a very short break right here. more "stay" per roll. more "sit" per roll.
11:28 pm
more "who's training who" per roll. bounty is two times more absorbent. so one roll of bounty can last longer than those bargain brands. so you get more "life" per roll. bounty. the long-lasting quicker picker upper. and try bounty napkins. (patrick 2) pretty great.ke to be the boss of you? (patrick 1) how about a 10% raise? (patrick 2) how about 20? (patrick 1) how about done? (patrick 2) that's the kind of control i like... ...and that's what they give me at national car rental. i can choose any car in the aisle i want- without having to ask anyone. who better to be the boss of you...
11:29 pm
(patrick 1)than me. i mean, you...us. (vo) go national. go like a pro.
11:30 pm
u.s. president barack obama will begin a press conference in kuala lumpur, malaysia shortly. he's expected to discuss terror and trade. as soon as that begins, we'll bring it to you live. >> we would like to welcome back
11:31 pm
our viewers in the united states around around the world. i'm rosemary church. >> and i'm errol barnett. thanks for joining our special coverage. >> in brussels, the capital is lock lockdown. there is fear of an attack in "several places at once." the terror alert is at its highest possible level. >> european authorities are hoping to find this suspected paris attacker, salah abdeslam. he was last seen in france driving towards belgium. at this stage, we want to get you back live to paris. >> and our max foster is standing by. so max, it is there early in the morning. it is about 8:30 in the morning to be precise. talk to us and bring us up to date on the situation in terms of this manhunt, the investigation and what is happening in brussels. >> the manhunt is ongoing. is he in brussels? many people think so, but the
11:32 pm
heightened state of the terror alert over in brussels is linked to a separate terror plot that they have some hard evidence on, which is why they raised it and why last night it was a ghost town. the restaurants and the bars closed early, because people were asked to not go to crowded areas. people are coming to terms with what happened here as that investigation goes on. and the british prime minister will be coming tomorrow to speak with president hollande about security and the reaction to isis. then hollande will go to washington to speak with president obama, then to moscow to speak with the russian president. the french's president's idea is to form a coalition against isis.
11:33 pm
so that's what we'll be looking out for probably from the president today, how he will respond to security in reaction to paris, and of course, the asian issues that he discusses, as well. in belgium, the prime minister saying authorities have reason to believe that attacks could happen in multiple locations. cnn senior international correspondent is there. >> reporter: reinforcements coming into brussels town center. police searching just a few roads up from where we are, we saw them using flashlights to look into all passing vehicles, including buses, taxis. they are clearly looking for someone. a few moments ago, sirens were just crossing behind us here. definitely you get the sense oh of a city on high alert. there is still some traffic, but given this is the european capital on a saturday night, not what you would expect. it is absolutely astonishing to
11:34 pm
see belgian soldiers surrounding hotels. they've asked people not to congregate in the center of town. this morning, we were in one of the main shopping districts where some of the few shops there that had opened were very quickly closed by police. you could see this very -- >> we break away from the story there to get you to u.s. president barack obama holding a press conference in kuala lumpur. let's listen. >> they have been a great success. earlier this week, as aheaded to this region, there was a headline in one of our publications back home that asked, obama's asian distraction? and the premise seemed to be that this region was somehow disconnected from pressing global events. i could not disagree more. this region is not a distraction from the world's central challenges but is critical to promoting security, prosperity
11:35 pm
and human dignity around the world. that's why i have devoted so much of my foreign policy with this region. i'm pleased on this trip we made progress across the board. with my fellow leaders from japan, australia, and the philippines, i reaffirmed our threaty alliances remain the foundation of regional security. at the u.s. asean and east asia summits, the key topic was the south china sea and many leaders spoke about the need to uphold international principles, including freedom of navigation and the peaceful resolution of disputes. and to make sure we keep deepening our partnership here, i invited all ten asean leaders to the united states next year. i'm pleased they accepted and i look forward to continuing our work. on the economic front, we worked with our apec partners to
11:36 pm
advance the economic order where all nations play by the same set of rules. based on my meeting with our transpacific partnership countries, i'm optimistic that we can increasingly focus on implementing this. apec joined the g-20, showing that we need to reach a climate change agreement in paris. of course, given the events of this week, much of my work here in asia focused on the threat of terrorism. today, families in too many nations are grieving the senseless loss of their loved ones in the attacks in france and in mali. as americans, we remember nohemi
11:37 pm
gonzalez, who was just 23 years old, a design major from california state university. she was in paris to pursue her dream of designing innovations that would improve the lives of people around the world. and we remember anita dakar of maryland. she's a veteran of the peace corps, a mother to her joining son, who devoted her life to helping the world's poor, including women and children in mali. they embodied the values of service and compassion that no terrorist can extinguish. their legacy will endure and the family and friends who carry on their work. they remind me of my daughters, or my mother who, on the one hand, had their whole life ahead of them. on the other hand had devoted
11:38 pm
their lives to helping other people. and it is worth us remembering when we lock at the statistics that there are beautiful, wonderful lives behind the death tolls that we see in these places. over the years, our friends here in asia have been victims of terrorism, and many of them are close counterterrorism partners with us. so my time here has also been an opportunity to work with many of our partners in the asia pacific that are members of our coalition against isil. australia, canada, japan, malaysia, new zealand, singapore, south korea, and taiwan, which brings me to the point i want to emphasize today. for more than a year, the united states has built and led a broad coalition against isil of some 65 nations. given the focus on america's
11:39 pm
leadership in this campaign, sometimes the contributions of our partners are overlooked. in fact, since the g-20, a number of our coalition members have stepped up with new commitments. so today i want to recognize how our allies and partners help advance every element of our strategy. nearly two dozen nations, among them turkey and our arab partners, contribute in some way to the military campaign, which has taken more than 8,000 strikes against isil so far. as i've said, we're ready to welcome or cooperate with other countries that are determined to truly fight isil, as well. 15 countries deployed forces to train and support forces in iraq. italy is coordinating the multinational effort to train iraqi police. on the political front, u.s.
11:40 pm
leadership brought all the key countries together to discuss a common understanding on the principles for ending the syrian civil war. on the humanitarian front, the united states is helping to lead the effort to mobilize more aid for the syrian people, including refugees. more than 40 countries have now passed or strengthened laws to prevent the flow of foreign terrorist fighters, and 34 nations, including the united states, have arrested foreign terrorist fighters. saudi arabia is helping to coordinate the crackdown on isil financing. the uaea is working to discredit isil's propaganda. by joining you are summit at the united nations, more than 100 nations, more than 20 multilateral institutions and 10 civil society groups, including many leaders from muslim
11:41 pm
communities around the world, have become part of a global movement against isil and its twisted ideology. all of which is to say that our coalition will not relent. we will not accept the idea that terrorist assaults on restaurants and theaters and hotels are the new normal, or that we are powerless to stop them. after all, that's precisely what terrorists like isil want. because ultimately that's the only way that they can win. it's the nature of terrorism. they can't beat us on the battlefield, so they try to terrorize us into being afraid and changing our patterns of behavior and panicking and retreating from the world. as president, i will not let that happen. in our diverse societies, everybody can do their part. and we will not give in to fear
11:42 pm
or start turning on each other or treating some people differently because of religion or race or background. that wouldn't just be a betrayal of our values but feed isil's propaganda. their assertion, which is absolutely false, that we must absolutely reject that we are somehow at war with an entire religion. the united states could never be at any war with any religion, because america is made up by multiple religions. so i want to be as clear as i can on this, prejudice and discrimination helps isil and undermines our national security. so even as we destroy isil on the battlefield and we will destroy them, we will take back land that they are currently in. we will cut off their financing. we will hunt down their leadership.
11:43 pm
we will dismantle their networks and their supply lines and we will ultimately destroy them. even as we are in the process of doing that, we want to make sure that we don't lose our own values and principles. and we can all do our part by upholding the values of tolerance and diversity and equality that help keep america strong. the united states will continue to lead this global coalition. we are intensifying our strategy on all fronts with local partners on the ground. we are going to keep on rolling back isil in iraq and in syria and take out more of their leaders and commanders so that they do not threaten us, and we will destroy this thrift organization and we'll keep working with our allies and partners for the opportunity and justice that helps defeat
11:44 pm
violent extremism. we'll keep standing up for the human rights and dignity of all people, because that is contrary to what these terrorists believe. that's part of how we defeat them. i'm confident we will succeed. the hateful vision of an organization like isil is no match for the strength of nations a and poem around the world who are united to live in peace and harmony with. that, i'll take a couple of questions. we'll start with angela of bloomberg. >> thank you, mr. president. you're scheduled to meet this week with president hollande in washington to talk about stepping up efforts against isil even further. given russia would be part of the coalition that france proposes, have you seen any signs of russia redirecting its military efforts in syria to
11:45 pm
focus on isil? are there any circumstances that you could see president assad remaining in power, even if only temporarily, if that's what it took to effectively had a broad alliance directed at isil? and finally, as you said, the u.s. won't work with russia if their goal is to keep assad in power. if that's the case, is destroying isil a realistic goalsome >> first of all, destroying isil is not only realistic, but we ale get it done with every aspect of american power and all the coalition partners we assembled. it's going to get done. it will be helpful if russia directs its focus on isil, and i do think that as a consequence of isil claiming responsibility for bringing down their plane, there is an increasing awareness
11:46 pm
on the part of president putin that ithey pose a greater threa to them than anything else in the region. the question is whether they can make the strategic adjustment that allows them to be effective partners with us and the other 65 countries that are part of the isil campaign. and we don't know that yet. so far over the last several weeks, when they started taking strikes in syria, their principal targets have been the moderate opposition that they felt threatened assad. their principal goal appeared to be, if you followed the strikes they took, to fortify the assad regime. that does not add to our efforts against isil. in some ways it strengthens it,
11:47 pm
because isil is also fighting many of those groups that the russians were hitting. when we were in turkey, i discussed with president putin his need to recognize that he nodes to go after the people who killed russian citizens. and those aren't the groups that they weren't currently hitting with strikes. so they're going to have to make an adjustment in terms of what they're prioritizing. more broad hi, i said this before, i said it to president putin five years ago, and i repeated it to him just a few days ago. the issue with assad is not simply the way that he's treated his people. it's not just a human rights issue. it's not just a question of supporting somebody who has been ruthlessly dropping bombs on his own civilian populations.
11:48 pm
as a practical matter, it is not conceivable that mr. assad can regain legitimacy in a country in which a large majority of that country despises him. and will not stop fighting so long as he's in power, which means the civil war perpetuates itself. so the goal in vienna is to see if all the countries around the table, whether we can arrive at a political transition process that recognizes the need for a new government. and can quell the fighting, bring about a cease-fire. and get us all to refocus our
11:49 pm
attention on this barbaric organization that's killing so many people. russia has not officially committed to a transition of assad moving out, but they did agree to the political transition process. i think we'll find out over the next several weeks whether or not we can bring about that change of perspective with the russians. keep in mind that we all have an interest in maintaining a syrian state, because we don't want complete chaos. there are problems that we've seen in for example lebanon, when the machinery of state breaks down. so there's going to be a need for the international community and the united nations to work to maintain a syrian state and be able to move forward with the political transition that's orderly. and that's going to be difficult. but that's what we have to focus on.
11:50 pm
in terms of the position of the united states and the other 65 members of the coalition, my view on assad is it will not work to keep him in power. we can't stop the fighting. even if i were to cynically say that my priority is isil and not removing assad, regardless of the terrible things that he's done to his people, the united states could not stop the fighting in syria by those who are opposed to assad's rule. and so this is a practical issue, not just a matter of conscience. and i think that there are a large number of members of this coalition, including president hollande, who agree with me on that. michael sheer.
11:51 pm
>> thank you, mr. president. on a different topic, when you go to paris next week for the climate talks, could you talk a little how those terror attacks might affect the talks and can you talk a little about concerns the united states might not have the ability to convince poor countries that the nations will help them pay for what they need to do to achieve the climate talks, given the republican opposition back home. and on one separate matter, would you comment on the investigations that we reported about this morning into whether or not intelligence officials are altering the assessments of the isil campaign to make them seem more rosy? >> i'll take the last question first. one of the things i insisted on the day i walked into the oval office was that i don't want
11:52 pm
intelligence shaded by politics. i don't want it shaded by the desire to tell a feel-good storey. we can't make good policy unless we have good, accurate, clear-eyed intelligence. i believe that the department of defense and all those who head up our intelligence agencies understand that, and that i have made it repeatedly clear to all my top national security advisers that i never want them to hold back. even if the intelligence or their opinions about the intelligence, their analysis, their interpretations of the data contradict current policy. so that's a message that we've been adamant about from the
11:53 pm
start. i don't know what we'll discover with respect to what is going on in centcom. that's something best left to the i.g. i have communicated with the chairman and the joint chiefs, as well as secretary carter, that i expect we get to the bottom of whether or not what you join has been happening. there are always going to be some disputes with respect how to interpret facts on the ground. i get intelligence briefings every single day, and there are times where they're making their best judgments. they'll say with moderate confidence or low confidence or high confidence, this is what we think is happening. there may be times where there are disputes internally among various intelligence agencies about that. but i don't know the details oh of this. what i do know is my
11:54 pm
expectation, which is the highest fidelity to facts, data, the truth. and if there are disagreements in terms of how folks are interpreting the facts, then that should be reflected in the reports that we receive. that some folks think this is going on, and that's part of what i weigh in terms of making decisions. one last thing i'll say, as a consumer of this intelligence, it's not as if i've been receiving wonderfully rosing glowing portraits of what's been happening in iraq and syria over the last year and a half. so to the extent that it's been shaded, again, i don't know the details of what the i.g. may discover, but it feels to me like at my level we've had a pretty clear-eyed, sober assessment of where we've made
11:55 pm
real progress and where we have not. on paris, a lot of the discussion out here, both at the g20, apec and finally here at asean has been that we've got to get a strong paris deal. i'm optimistic that we can. 160 countries have now put forward their national targets for how they can reduce emissions. >> all right. listening there to u.s. president barack obama. he is in kuala lumpur, malaysia, where the focus is very much on attacking isis. he said, we will destroy them. we will cut off their financing. we will hunt down their leadership. and we will cut off their supply lines. he says they are realistic goals and they will be pursued with a coalition. >> and he made a point to support the coalition and mention how supportive it has
11:56 pm
been in defeating isis. we'll get an update on the other end of this break. for the both of us, we leave you for now and will see you back here tomorrow. do stay with cnn. automated voice: to file a claim, please state your name. carnie wilson. thank you. can you hold on? ♪ hold on for one more day really? hey, i know there's pain. why do you lock yourself up in these chains?
11:57 pm
♪ this would be so easy if you had progressive. our mobile app would let you file a claim and help you find one of our service centers where we manage the entire repair process. things will go your way if you hold on. [ sighs ] someday somebody's gonna make you wanna turn around and say goodbye. ♪ say goodbye no, you just made it weird. human maintenance guy would acti got to hang a picture.am. it may not seem like much, but to that resident it was the best thing in the world. it's amazing to me because it takes me seconds. but yet, when i go into the apartment, i'm there for half an hour. it is not just hanging a picture, it is conversing, it is being a friend. there aren't old people there. there are actually young people with old clothing on.
11:58 pm
real milk vs. almond milk ingredient spelling bee lecithin lecithin. l-e-s (buzzer sound) your word is milk. m-i-l-k milk wins. ingredients you can spell.
11:59 pm
it's gotten squarer. over the years. brighter. bigger. it's gotten thinner. even curvier. but what's next? for all binge watchers. movie geeks. sports freaks. x1 from xfinity will change the way you experience tv.
12:00 am
this is cnn, breaking news. welcome back to our viewers in the united states and armtd the world. i'm george howell. >> and i'm lynda kinkade. u.s. president obama spoke just moments ago at the asia pacific summit about the threat of isis and other terror groups. take a listen. >> the united states could never be at any war with any religion, because america is made up by multiple religions. so i want to be as clear as i can on this, prejudice and discrimination helps isil and undermines our national security. so even as we destroy isil on
12:01 am
the battlefield and we will destroy them, we will take back land that they are currently in. we will cut off their financing. we will hunt down their leadership. we will dismantle their networks and their supply lines and we will ultimately destroy them. even as we are in the process of doing that, we want to make sure that we don't lose our own values and principles. >> let's bring in saima who joins us from kuala lumpur. the president really took the time to lay out what each and every country is doing to fight isis, didn't he? >> reporter: yeah, he did. we saw very unequivocal and confident president there speaking about how he and the other countries that are united
12:02 am
in this coalition with the united states are tackling isis. he's come under a lot of pressure in recent weeks from his domestic audience in particular, and the opposition saying he's simply not doing enough. that is why we are hearing president obama using this platform at the asean summit here in kuala lumpur, to address those concerns by u.s. citizens and criticism by his detractors by saying that 65 nations alongside the united states that have formed this coalition have been tackling isis for over a year now. white house administration officials are telling cnn, hook, we have managed to take out jihadi john, we've managed to take on the isil leader in libya, as well, through our air strikes. and president obama expanding on that, making a point that there have been more than 8,000 strikes against isil so far.
12:03 am
and he has 15 countries as well training iraqi forces to take them on, on the ground, as well. he mentioned as we heard in that clip there, we heard him say several times over the last few weeks to try and differentiate between isis and islam, saying that the united states and these coalition partners are not in any kind of way in any kind of war against islam. he really wants to -- we've seen him say this repeated hi, try and make that difference, known by everyone who is listening. of course, he said in the end we heard that we need to maintain our values. he said our values is what isis is seeking to destroy. they can't beat us on the battleground, so they seek to terrorize us and how that
12:04 am
terrorism is about striking fear in the hearts of the people that they target, whether that is, as we saw in the paris attacks, mali or beirut. so people stop going out and living their lives as they have been doing. that is what the president is trying to say, that isis is trying to do. and in not letting them do that, in continuing with our lives, our daily lives is the way we do normally is the best way to battle them. he also pointed out that leaders of the muslim communities around the world are now starting to step up and coming together to counter the terrorist and extremist message of groups like isis and their counterparts around the world. that, of course, it has been a huge criticism of muslim countries and communities around the world, but they're simply not doing enough to counter this extremist and terrorist message and president obama, of course, trying to promote and support anyone who does do that.
12:05 am
he also went on in the questioning afterwards to talk about russia's part in this campaign. of course, russias a been carrying out an arms campaign in syria. however, that's not supporting the coalition. that is, of course, targeting the moderate opposition, which in effect fortifies president assad's position in syria. as to whether russia will start to pivot towards supporting the coalition forces rather than carrying out its own independent bombing campaign and air strikes, and president obama said that, of course discussions are always open, trying to get president putin -- >> saima, i'll just interrupt you. we're going to return to president obama. >> with respect to rules of engagement, we are in a constant conversation about how do we
12:06 am
apply force most effectively to go after key isil targets, key isil leaders, strategic positions, their infrastructure and supply lines, while minimizing civilian casualties. we do so for two reasons. one, because it's the right thing to do. there are people who are caught up in mosul right now, for example, who despise isiisil, a to the extent that we can avoid them being killed by those of us who are trying to defeat isil, that's a legitimate concern in any military campaign. because if we're not careful about it, and this brings us to the practical element of it, you can alienate the very populations that you need to win over because ultimately, those
12:07 am
are the folks that are going to have to drive isil out, stomp it out all the way. the good news is, the u.s. military has become very good at this. i think that there have been some circumstances where the military proceeds in steps and are continually re-evaluating this is a situation where we can in fact take the strike without a lot of civilian casualties. so a good example, with the recent trucks that were struck, there may be ways in which warnings could be given to the drivers. many of whom may not work for isil. they may just be forced into it. so they better abandon those trucks, because we're shooting them down. so that's been ongoing throughout the process.
12:08 am
with respect to immigration reform. i can't comment on the ins and outs of the legal case. i've said before and i'll say again, i am confident that the rules and executive action that i put forward are squarely within the category of prosecutorial discretion that historically has been under a president's power. you've got lower courts who have disagreed. but we think that past precedent is on our side. substantively, i've got 11 million people in our country, many of whom are working, paying taxes. our neighbors, co-workers, friends who have lived here,
12:09 am
lived in the united states for a long time. we're not going to deport them, despite what some political leaders may say. it would be contrary to who we are, it would be too costly. it is too impractical. what we want to do is allow them to get out of the shadows and to get right with the law, pay a fine, go to the back of the line. but hopefully over time be contributors to society. of course, none of this would be necessary if we just passed the legislation that was passed in the senate, with a bipartisan majority. i continue to believe that the ultimate solution is going to be one that comes from congress. although during this political season, it may be difficult for republican leaders in either the
12:10 am
house and the senate to resuscitate that legislation. my hope is that after the election, they will. and in the interim, i'm going to do everything i can to sense my apply our immigration laws in a way that is reflective of the fact that we're a nation of laws and immigrants. and just very briefly with respect to sex trafficking, this is a critical problem. we take it very seriously. we have entire divisions in our law enforcement agencies that are dedicated to this. i have elevated this within the white house so that we have people focusing specifically on ending trafficking. and in our international discussions, most specifically out here in southeast asia, we are working very closely to promote mechanisms that will end trafficking. in fact, tpp, one of the central mechanisms to ensure high labor
12:11 am
standards and human rights and human dignity, are requirements among the members who are signatories to have in place real serious, enforceable ways to prevent the kind of human trafficking that causes such hardship and brutality for so many people. those of you with me when i visited the refugee center yesterday will recall the lovely young 16-year-old who was sitting next to me. she's somebody that had been a victim of trafficking. and it reminds you of the terrible toll that is often placed on children. people who are the most vulnerable. people who are least able to protect themselves. every country has an obligation to put an end to it.
12:12 am
>> thank you, mr. president. you said moments ago that americans should not give in to fear when it comes to terrorist attacks, but you also said the person who may have been the person behind thinking about the attacks and anybody can get their hands on some conventional weapons could blow themselves up. abc news came out with a poll saying 83% of the public believes a terrorist attack against the u.s. with mass casualties is likely to happen in the near future, and 40% say it's very likely. does that, in your mind, given the fact that you think the public should not be so fearful mean the terrorists are winning and do you believe this is sort of the new normal and american also have to live with this kind of fear? >> david, i think that the american people are right to be
12:13 am
concerned and to expect that we, in the government and in law enforcement, are doing everything we can to disrupt terrorist attacks, to intercept intelligence that may lead us to individuals who are willing to carry out these attacks. that we make sure these terrorists are not gaining the kinds of weaponry to cause mass attacks. this is a serious problem. you know, as somebody who more often than i would like, have met with or comforted families, victims of terrorism. you know, the losses are real and devastating. so this is a serious problem, and we have to work collectively
12:14 am
across the board, as we've been doing since i became president and since, you know, previous administrations identified the kinds of organized terrorist activity like al qaeda that we've seen. we've got to do everything that we can to stop it. but there's a difference between being vigilant and being concerned and taking this seriously and taking precautions and in some cases, changing our security arrangements, as we've done in aviation. there's a difference between smart applications of law enforcement and military and intelligence, and succumbing to the kind of fear that leads us to abandon our values, to abandon how we live.
12:15 am
to abandon or change how we treat each other. the good news is, americans have been resilient. they've been tested. we had a mass casualty attack on 9/11. and as i said before, i was proud of the fact that the fundamental nature of america and how we treated each other did not change. i think we made some bad decisions subsequent to that attack, in part based on fear. that's why we have to be cautious about it. we have to think things through. but overall, the american people went about their lives. times square is filled with people, rightly so. after the boston bombing attack, folks went right back to the ballpark and sang "take me out
12:16 am
to the ball game." that's what they needed to do. and so the message i have is that those of us who are charged with protecting the american people are going to do everything we can to destroy this particular network. once this network is destroyed, and it will be, there may be others that pop up in different parts of the world. and so we're going to have to continue to take seriously how we maintain the infrastructure that we built to prevent this. but it doesn't have to change the fundamental trajectory of the american people. and that we should feel confident about. and the media needs to help in this. i just want to say, during the course of this week, a very
12:17 am
difficult week, it is understandable that this has been a primary focus. but one of the things that has to happen is how we report on this as to maintaining perspective and not empower in any way these terrorist organizations or elevate them in ways that make it easier for them to recruit or make them stronger. they're a bunch of killers, with good social media. and they are dangerous and they've caused great hardship to people. but the overwhelming majority of people who go about their business every day, to the americans building things and
12:18 am
making things and teaching and saving lives as firefighters and police officers, they're stronger. our way of life is stronger. we have more to offer. we represent 99.9% of humanity. and that's why we should be confident that we're winning. >> mr. president, you threatened to voto the bill the house passed that would tighten screening procedures for syrian refugees but left the door open to legislation more constructive in the white house's view. what specific changes to the program would you support and do you think democrats calling for a halt to your program are betraying your country's values as you suggested of some republicans? and one last thing, separately, not a four-part question. >> just a two-parter. >> you met friday with prime
12:19 am
minister najib, who is facing allegations of human rights violations and you said you would raise those issues with him when you spoke privately. what was your message to him about the scandal and the issue of jailing his political opponents? >> okay. with respect to the refugee program, paris just happened a week ago. news moves so fast these days that sometimes we just lose track. it's been so recent, and so pervasive in the news and people have been so concerned, given how similar paris is to many american cities, that i get why legislation in the house moved forward quickly. my hope though, is, now that we
12:20 am
have some time to catch our breath and take a look at this carefully, that people understand that refugees who end up in the united states are the most vetted, scrutinized, thoroughly investigated individuals that ever arrive on american shores. that the process that's been constructed over the course of several administrations, on a bipartisan basis, is extraordinarily thorough. and currently takes between 18 to 24 months for somebody to be approved. and so although on its face, the house legislation simply says we can just certify and this is not
12:21 am
along the lines of some of the more radical proposals we were hearing earlier in the week from some presidential candidates, the fact is, if it gums up the works so much that effective will you you don't end up seeing any refugees admitted. if you layer it with more and more bureaucracy, that it doesn't actually make us safer, because it doesn't do a better job of screening, but simply makes it almost impossible to process individuals who are coming in, then you're effectively ending the refugee program for people who desperately need it. when i referred to a betrayal of our values, i was being very specific about the commentary that we might let christians in but not muslims. that we somehow were so fearful
12:22 am
that a 4-year-old orphan might not be let in. those of you who joined me to the refugee center yesterday and you saw those kids, that's who we're talking about. if you are a parent and you saw those kids, and you thought about what they had gone through, the notion that we couldn't find a home for them anywhere in the united states of america, that's contrary to our values. and the good news is, the overwhelming majority of people who know that we are screening and all the precautions that are already taken, if they saw those kids, they would say yeah, we need to do right by those children. with respect to prime minister najib, i don't comment on investigations happening back in
12:23 am
the united states. >> you've been watching the u.s. president barack obama live in kuala lumpur, speaking at the asia pacific summit. terrorism has been a top topic there. we heard the u.s. president talk about everything from the debate in the united states over syrian refugees, we heard him talk about possibly broadening the u.s. coalition in the fight against isis. the question, though, what to be done with the syrian president bashar al assad. and the president spoking quite frankly about ice calling them "killers with good social media." >> that's right. he tried to call on people to maintain some perspective when it comes to all of this. he said the paris attacks happened just a week ago. this should. be backlash that effects the syrian refugees. he said if you saw a 4-year-old orphan --
12:24 am
>> and that has been an intense debate here in the united states between democrats and republicans. some states, many southern states at this point, and throughout the country, but many states saying they would not accept syrian refugees. but some cities within those states are saying that they would. so a debate even within the states. >> and he also went through and listed what members of the coalition are doing to degrade and destroy isis. he went through quite a list of, you know, what role italy is playing and the uk and malaysia. >> let's go now live to david mckenzie, who joins us to talk more about what we just heard from the u.s. president. david, what did you take away from what we just heard? >> reporter: certainly the issue of terrorism around the world, particularly in europe and in africa has tdominated the
12:25 am
president's trip through asia and to show the u.s.' commitment to trade relationships. but it seems like the issue and the fallout of refugees is dominating the worldwide conversation. now, that conversation moved of course from europe here to africa with these hideous attacks here in mali, that were at a very well known western hotel here in the capital. we are now learning new details of that attack. >> reporter: the guests are gone. the cracked glass and bullet holes remain. now now details emerging of a devastating attack. they started at 7:00 in the morning here at the radisson hotel. now foreign investigators are here trying to piece through exactly what happened. what we're learning is new information. they didn't in fact come inside a diplomatic vehicle. the u.n. is now saying they snuck behind on foot, and then moved rapidly into the hotel to
12:26 am
start shooting. the guards were unprepared. their weapons unloaded. everyone was running scared, he says. they were shooting at anyone that moved. he says he then looked terror in the eye. the gunman had a cap, blue shirt and jeans. he pointed the gun at me, stared, and then i ran. but many hid, doing everything they could to survive. did you barricade the doors? >> yeah, we barricaded the doors. we put a lot of heavy stuff so that nobody can enter. >> reporter: did you hear the noises getting closer? >> yeah, we hear a lot of gun noise firing around the door. and they were trying to knock the door and enter in the door. but thanks to god we were evacuated at that time.
12:27 am
>> reporter: the quick action by malian and foreign forces saved many but the threat still remains. after this attack, many people are asking why it happened, with some pointing to the paris attacks as a connection. what we're hearing on the ground, though, it's more likely a situation that these gunmen were trying to halt the peace process that is going on here in mali, that has been struggling through several years of attack and threats from jihadi groups to the northeast. >> david mckenzie in mali, thank you very much. we're going to quitake a quick break. we'll be right back.
12:28 am
12:29 am
12:30 am
12:31 am
welcome back to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell. >> and i'm lynda kinkade. we begin with u.s. president barack obama. he's been speaking to reporters at the asia pacific summit many malaysia. moments ago, he reiterated his commitment to defeat isis. he said "we will fight them and we will beat them." >> meanwhile in europe, brussels, it is on lockdown. the prime minister says there is fear of an attack in "several places at once." and the terror alert in the belgian capital is at the highest possible level. >> turkey arrested this belgian citizen of moroccan descent. he's believed to have scouted sites for the paris attacks.
12:32 am
two syrian men were also arrested in southern turkey. >> the concern among leaders is to prevent another paris-style attack. we go live now to max foster who is standing by for us. we heard the u.s. president, when asked about whether the french president, who is planning to visit washington, d.c., would be able to help broaden this coalition, to bring the united states closer to russia. but the question mr. obama said would be finding common ground on what happens next with syrian president bashar al assad. >> reporter: it will be very interesting. we've got david cameron coming to meet with president holland ahead of the meeting with president obama. president hollande very clear that he sees a ground coalition as a possibility. that means working with russia, but we were hearing that
12:33 am
president obama rather challenges that, because how do you work with russia when they have different strategies coming out of this? president obama reiterating he doesn't see president assad as part of syria's fucture. russia moving towards that direction, but not quite there yet. so lots to discuss around all of this. and in terms of the meeting this week, president hollande goes on to motor with the russian president, as well. you just returned from syria, haven't you? going ahead, going into that meeting with president obama, what is president hollande want out of it?
12:34 am
>> i think this ground coalition with isis. with the attack, the french position has shifted sharply. the question of bashar al assad is still up in the air, but what is the priority? i would say hollande and a number of french right now are thinking who is hitler today? who is the main problem the world has? and this is isis. there's no doubt about it. in 1941, when the idea was arming stalin in order to fight hitler, we tend to forget, but stalin had already killed 10 million ukrainians, slaughtered a number of opponents. even with that, we armed stalin to fight hitler. the situation is not comparable, but in a way, we have to unite. a lot of french people don't understand this sort of thing with the idea of why aren't the americans and russians working
12:35 am
together today? the americans could easily deal with iraq. the russians, the alliance that they have with syria, which is very, very -- goes back 40 years. the russian presence in syria has been this for a long time. and the french coming and helping, too. we should defeat isis. a lot of people are asking why has. this been done before? we hear a munition camp, a training camp was hit tonight. and a lot of people say why wasn't this done earlier? there's the situation of the oil. we know that isis gets the money from oil smuggling to turkey. now what is turkey doing to stop this outflow of oil and stop buying isis oil? these are simple questions that need answers. when you see president obama say we will ultimately defeat isis, like are we going to go back and
12:36 am
forth, why don't we all go together? >> now is the moment, is the sense you get from president obama. he's not shifting on this assad issue. so do you think president hollande can convince president putin to move towards the coalition view on assad, in which case they can form this ground coalition against isis? >> the russians don't let down their friends very easily. they stick to their alliances. not that the americans don't do it, but when you see what happened in vietnam in the past, sometimes they just move on. but the russians, they have very much -- they have interests over there. and what happened, the russians took mattered in their own hands. at first, it was seen as what are they doing? why are the russians moving
12:37 am
forward? now we're seeing a lot of people think the russians are taking matters in their own hands and going after isis. obama is saying of course, the russians have targeted different groups, moderate rebels or rebels that are not isis. which is true. i was in, as you said, in syria with the government troops about 15 days ago. we were in the area between homs. nusra is the al qaeda branch of syria. are these people -- they're on the american terror list. we cannot strike a deal with these people. you know, they're really seasoned fighters. we went to stop of the positions that have been targeted by the russian and taken over by the syrian army. what we found was, you know,
12:38 am
perfectly designed bunkers for snipers, trenches, all residential area with fortification, tunnels, every type of supply. this was a nusra headquarters and i witnessed that. so they're targeting these type of rebels. the question is, what do we call moderate rebels? nusra is much more holding the fight against president assad. when president obama says that the russians should redirect their strikes against isis, the air base south of aleppo had been sieged by isis for two years. now it's broken because of the russians. the russians are targeting isis also. >> regis, thank you very much indeed. brussels is still on high alert.
12:39 am
authorities believe attacks could happen in multiple locations. in the meantime, the city subway is closed and the prime minister says the main objective is to reduce the number of large event and free up police to secure that city. let's go to brussels, which is a bit of a ghost town. drew griffin is there. drew, bring us up to date on the current threat level there. >> the threat level is at four, the highest level. it was put there late friday night, into early saturday morning. as you said, it has turned this bustling city into a bit of a ghost town. many people are walking around, but shops are closed, many of the restaurants are closed. certainly the bars are closed, no concert. what you see along with the metro being shut is a heavy presence of soldiers, basically patrolling the street. you can see this large military vehicle just over my shoulder
12:40 am
here. we have military police armed right in front of our hotel. the assessment will be re-evaluated sometime this afternoon to determine whether or not this continues into the workweek. and what that means in terms of people in brussels actually going back to work. right now, we're told that in addition to the hunt for salah abdeslam, the eighth and missing paris attacker, that there is a separate threat. a threat of a similar paris-style attack, but by different people. and specifically, that attack was for several areas with guns, ammunition, and explosives. that is the most that the people of belgium have been told. we may get more information, max, later this afternoon after a meeting takes place between the prime minister and his security officials. max? >> thank you very much indeed, drew. the band playing here in paris
12:41 am
the night of the attacks is speaking out about the chaos they saw. jessie hughes says he watched fans try to save each other, refusing to leave others behind. >> several people hid in our dressing room, and the killers were able to get in and kid every one of them except for a kid who was hiding under my leather jacket. >> killers got in your dressing room? >> yeah, people were playing dead. they were so scared. the reason so many people were killed is so many people wouldn't leave their friends and put themselves in front of people. >> we do continue to follow the aftermath of these terror attacks for you. but we want to bring you some other news. so back to lynda and george in
12:42 am
atlanta. egyptians are heading to the polls right now for the down tri's second round of parliamentary elections. a live report from cairo coming up after a short break. want to survive a crazy busy day? sfx: cell phone chimes start with a positive attitude... and positively radiant skin. aveeno® positively radiant moisturizer... with active naturals® soy. aveeno® naturally beautiful results®. ...one of many pieces in my life. so when my asthma symptoms kept coming back on my long-term control medicine,
12:43 am
i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment. once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms. breo is for adults with asthma not well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. breo won't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden breathing problems. breo opens up airways to help improve breathing for a full 24 hours. breo contains a type of medicine that increases the risk of death from asthma problems and may increase the risk of hospitalization in children and adolescents. breo is not for people whose asthma is well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. once your asthma is well controlled, your doctor will decide if you can stop breo and prescribe a different asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. do not take breo more than prescribed. see your doctor if your asthma does not improve or gets worse. ask your doctor if 24-hour breo could be a missing piece for you. see if you're eligible for 12 months free at mybreo.com.
12:44 am
with a 100% electric nissan what will you do? how far will you go? how much will you see? electrify the world. now with a class-leading 107 miles on a charge, the nissan leaf is the best selling electric car in america.
12:45 am
polls are now open in egypt as voters cast their ballots in the country's elections. the president has hailed this election as a major step towards democracy. >> this will be the eighth time egyptians will vote in just four years. and there is concern that voter fatigue will keep participation low. >> let's go live to cairo. ian, from the outset, voter turnout is low. what is the mood among the people, is there any enthusiasm about this process? >> reporter: well, there is a lack of enthusiasm, george. if the first round of this election, we saw about a quarter
12:46 am
of eligible voters going out and vote. when you look at it, there really is three segments of society when it comes to this election fatigue. first off, the egyptians have been asked to go to the polls a number of times. a lot of team -- people said they don't believe this will bring about change. then you also have another section of people saying they just don't know who they're voting for. the candidates were given about two weeks to campaign, and one of the main criticisms is that they don't know their platforms. they don't know what they're in favor of, so they don't know who to vote for. then you have another section of the population. we've seen this throughout all the elections. these are the people just too poor to vote. they cannot take a day off and go to the polling stations and stand in line. so we've never really seen
12:47 am
really high numbers of voter turnout. this is one of the main reasons. so you do have a broad number of reasons why people are voting today and we're not expecting turnout to be much higher than the first round. >> ian, as it stands now, what is the expectation here, that when all is said and done, will the final results be more supportive or unsupportive of president sisi? >> reporter: it's a system here where you have candidates, individual candidates and parties running. and when you lock at the political parties, almost all of them support the president to some degree, in various degrees. some support him and will back him in every decision. others are a bit more critical.
12:48 am
but there are some individual candidates that have been critical of the president. but we're not expecting a parliament to come out with too much conflict with the president. we're expecting them to be able to work hand in hand. but this is an important moment for egypt to get egypt back to a fully functioning government. when you look at the constitution, this parliament is more powerful than the president. so we will see if -- what this parliament does moving forward. >> cnn's ian lee in ecairo egyp. >> stay with us here at cnn. we'll be right back.
12:49 am
right when you feel a cold sore, abreva can heal it in as few as two and a half days when used at the first sign. without it the virus spreads from cell to cell. only abreva penetrates deep and starts to work immediately to block the virus and protect healthy cells. you could heal your cold sore, fast, as fast as two and a half days when used at the first sign. learn how abreva starts to work immediately at abreva.com don't tough it out, knock it out, fast. with abreva.
12:50 am
12:51 am
12:52 am
welcome back. we have been getting more information about the raid that took place in the saint-denis neighborhood. >> the suspected ringleader of the paris attacks was killed. martin savidge give us us a look inside the apartment where the raid went down. >> reporter: the latest from french investigators is they say they have isolated the dna of a third person who was killed inside of that apartment that was raided by police last wednesday in saint-denis.
12:53 am
where they stop short is to say who that dna belongs to. because apparently authorities do not know at this time. it raises even perhaps more questions. another person that was perhaps part of this plot. there is reports that there is a surveillance video that showed not just two attackers but a third person inside a vehicle. but where is that person now? well, maybe the dna that's been isolated is that person. right now, authorities haven't made that link, but it's certain something that comes to mind. speaking about that raid, new photographs that have come to us through i-tv show just how violent that raid was. and the man who led that raid for french authorities said they had gone in with surprise on their side. but when they blew the door to enter the apartment, they found that the door didn't give and the people inside, which had
12:54 am
reinforced it, were able to get their weapons and explosives and there began the long and violent attack as these photos attest. back to you. >> as we learn more about the terrorists who carried out the attacks in paris, we are hearing from one mother who knows firsthandn't losing a child to radical islam. >> her son died fighting for isis in syria. earlier, boudreau spoke to poppy harlow. listen. >> a lot of it has to do with they're spending a lot of time and resources and focusing on our youth and developing a relationship. so they take the time to connect with them, surround them 24-7, building those relationships, manipulating their motivations, and guiding them in a different path and different direction, answering all those different questions. that's not something that we're doing. we're not intercepting or
12:55 am
guiding our youth, and we're not spending our resources on them. >> reporter: i think some people watching this might think, how can a parent not now, right? this child lives under your roof, et cetera. how can you not know? you've lived that firsthand, not knowing. actually feeling hopeful when your son found islam and started, you thought, turning his life around. what do you say to those people? >> the difficult part is not -- always easiest living at home. sometimes they are living somewhere else. as parents, we pay so much attention to our relationship, that it's so easy for us to miss all these other signs of them going astray or we just don't want to really believe them or we don't want to seem like we're panicking for nothing. and there's a stigma placed on parents, too. if we say we need help with our
12:56 am
youth and there's something going wrong, where do we go to get that outside point of view? so it's very challenging and difficult. this is a new type of movement that we're not really comprehending. it's being run through computers, social media, other venues that we didn't understand before. so there needs to be education and awareness there for the parents and the support for them to recognize what they're saying and where they can go for that help. >> that was cnn's poppy harlow. we thank you for watching. i'm george howell. >> and i'm lynda kinkade. stay with us here on cnn. announcer: if you'd give thanks for a better night's sleep...
12:57 am
12:58 am
12:59 am
[barks] sleep train has just the ticket. [train horn blares] during sleep train's "thanksgifting" sale save up to $300 on beautyrest, posturepedic, serta, even tempur-pedic! get up to three years interest-free financing! plus, choose a free gift with selected mattress sets! but hurry, sleep train's "thanksgifting" sale won't last! ♪ sleep train [train horn] ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪
1:00 am
in the united states and around the world. you are watching cnn's continuing coverage of the terror attacks in france and mali. i'm george howell. >> i'm linda kinkade. stay with us as we bring you the latest investigation and the fallout from the violence on two continents. a short time ago, president obama reiterated his country's commitment to defeat isis. he was speaking at the asia-pacific summit in malaysia. >> we will take back land that they are currently in. we will cut off their financing. we will hunt down their leadership. we will dismantle their networks and their supply lines and we will ultimately destroy them. >> mr. obama also urged russian
1:01 am
president putin to stop targeting the moderate opposition in syria and instead to focus efforts on isis. in brussels, the prime minister says they're still on lockdown. places at once.oyed several - the terror alert in the belgium capital is at its highest level there. >> turkey arrested this belgian citizen of moroccan descent. he's believed to have scouted sites where those terrible sites in paris. there's a lot happening. let's start in paris where cnn's max foster is covering developments across europe. max, the concern this day is brussels, concerned about another paris-style attack. in fact, that city like a ghost town today. people are just staying clear of public places. >> reporter: got some firm intelligence there about an imminent attack, ois they wouldn't have gone to that level. they've never been to that level
1:02 am
before. all those public spaces have been cleared effectively. last night was like a ghost town with cafes and restaurants closing early, people told to avoid crowded areas. the subways out of use and there's a meeting later, a review of that threat level. we're getting very little information. this is an ongoing concern. also dismantle -- the eighth attacker here in paris, could he be here in belgium? most people think he is. he could have a suicide vest on him as well. that's for the reason in the increase in the alert level in brussels. we're going to speak to drew griffin who is there. he has the latest on this. drew, what is the latest concern there and do you think the threat level will be raised today? >> reporter: it is very difficult to tell. there is going to be a meeting of all the prime ministers and his security team. that should take place in just a
1:03 am
few hours from now. they're going to reassess the situation. but as you said, max, this was a separate threat above and beyond the threat of this eighth paris attacker that they've been hunting. of course, the belgium counterintelligence police, forces have been out all week making raids, taking people into custody, questioning them. and perhaps along the way, they've gathered some new intelligence on this possible separate threat, which is what shut this city down. though not specific in its nature, the prime minister said it would be something similar or akin to what happened in paris last friday, which is why you see all the military on the street, the cafes are closed as you said. the metro is closed. they're going to reevaluate that situation. we have gotten no information overnight and certainly not this morning that would lead to anything to say that that threat is over. that they've made some sort of a
1:04 am
arrests and now we have that contained. all week, it's just been more and more raids, more and more searches and more and more speculation about the next threat that is coming here to brussels. of course, as you know, max, brussels, home to many, many men who have gone to syria, fought for isis and have come back. into 130 in all. 85 living in this enclave, this suburb of brussels called molenbeek. the security officials admit they do not have enough manpower to keep an eye on all of them. >> reporter: intelligence sharing, did belgium give france enough intelligence, has enough intelligence gone the other way. the issue obviously in europe is the freedom of people to move around the continent within that area.
1:05 am
but they're not sharing information properly. so there's that problem, that they can't respond quickly enough in these situations. >> reporter: that's absolutely right. when we look at the attackers that we know of who attacked in paris and how many of them came from the brussels area, we also know that brussels police had contact with several of them, both the abdeslam brothers were known to police. the abdeslam brother who blew himself up in paris reportedly was alerted to authorities back in february when turkish officials found him and sent him back here saying that he was trying to cross the border into syria. the counterintelligence people here did question both of the brothers back in february. that information apparently was not passed on to france. that we have another one known
1:06 am
and an investigation opened up. he traveled to syria and the belgian counterintelligence people had no idea he came back from syria. many, many holes have been exposed here in belgium. the prime minister is vowing to increase both the manpower and the money spent on counterintelligence and quite fra frankly, i think they realize they have to crackdown much further on the communities harboring and holding and welcoming back so many of these syrian fighters. max? >> reporter: drew in brussels, thank you. extraordinary to think that one neighborhood is the breeding ground of so many attacks it seems or embolden them. meanwhile, in france, the band playing the night of the attacks is speaking out about the chaos that they saw in an emotional interview. this eagles of death metal frontman, jesse hughes, says he watched fans trying to save each other, refusing to leave each
1:07 am
other behind. >> several people hid in our dressing room and the killers were able to get in and killed every one of them except for a kid hiding under my leather jacket. >> killers got in your dressing room? >> yes. people were playing dead and they were so scared. a great reason why so many were killed is because so many people wouldn't leave their friends. and so many people put themselves in front of people. >> reporter: we've heard many, many stories of people trying to help those wounded during the paris attacks. an off-duty nurse tried to save a man who was lying amongst the overturned tables and chairs at the cafe. he soon discovered he was trying to resuscitate the suicide bomber. here's that incredible story. >> translator: i go to this man that i can see out of the corner
1:08 am
of my eye. i take him out of this tangle of chairs and tables, and put him on the floor. he had nothing special, he was unconscious. i noticed that on the side of his body there was an enormous hole, a large hole on his side. but i don't think it's the suicide bomber. at that point, it's a client like others who suffered from a gas blast and hurt himself. but his wound was huge. i put him on the ground and i start performing cpr. the other guy who was with me takes over for me. at that point, we just unbuttoned the jacket, that's all. we kept his t-shirt on. it was not thick. when i was performing cpr, i did not feel anything. at some point the guy performing the resuscitation says maybe we should remove the t-shirt, it's better. i tell him you are right. when i ripped the t-shirt, i saw wires. i looked up again at the lamps, these heating lamps and i notice
1:09 am
there was nothing wrong with them. they're made of a material that becomes distorted easily. i saw there was nothing there, nothing wrong with the three of them. on the ground there was blood and i noticed the bullets on the ground and then i understood immediately. i told myself it's an explosion that made the room -- it's a suicide bomber and i knew it was him. at that precise moment when i realize what he was, the emergency services arrived. >> reporter: no one was killed at the cafe except the bonl bomber. paris and the rest of europe are still very much on edge. for more on the ongoing threat of isis here and the concern around it, i'm joined by the editor in chief of the paris magazine. i think it's incredible to think that it's been a week, it's passed so quickly.
1:10 am
parisians, have they managed to take stock and make sense of it yet? >> it's barely recovering. it feels like it happened last night. the mood, you know, the questions, the fear also because like when the assault happened on saint-denis with the early morning, i remember that day vividly because we were falling down on tv. we saw the army. it was new. you know, the army, there is a siege with the army in getting in. not only the police. with what happened in january with "charlie hebdo" attacks, only the special force of the police intervened, got in. this time we saw people with heavy weapons and military vehicles pouring in suddenly and all of a sudden we were listening to this live. you know, you look at the hour, you got to bring kids to school.
1:11 am
this sense of it's happening next door, shoppers were passing over my apartment. honestly, it reminded me of when i was covering iraq with chopper flying by. you felt really like war. except you're in a tiny community next door. you're about 15 kilometers from where i was, about 15 kilometers from where the raid was taking place. and you have to bring your kids to school. of course, the kids are going to wonder. they now, a lot of them have trouble going to bed at night. they have to come to how do we talk to them about it, how are we going to answer the questions. the teenagers are a bit lost. they go to concerts, places. they go to parties. last night i had to take one of the boys back from a party and this time, you know, there was no -- nothing like come and pick
1:12 am
me up half an hour after. i come and pick you up right on time. it's a situation where we're not used to that. france has not seen any conflict like that, any type of terror threat. you can remember maybe that in the '90s with the gia, the islamic group from algeria, that targeted many places in paris, the war brought some of terror in paris. so paris is not unknown to terror and people have that in the back of their mind. this time around, this targeted everybody. we're sitting at -- what more symbolic than -- >> a common threat now whereas "charlie hebdo" was targeted at a kosher supermarket. >> yes. these were people that unfortunately, are used to being targeted and people think they're going to go after these
1:13 am
guys. now, people that are sitting, having a drink, celebrating. there was a birthday party and one of the 11 people killed. this is really, really unusual. people have not recovered from that yet. >> reporter: no. takes a while, of course. regis, thank you very much. this country and this city tries to get back to normal. we'll bring you updates in brussels as well. for now, back to the studio. okay, max foster, thank you very much for that coverage in paris. we will talk to you very soon. now let's get more insight into that tense situation we heard about in brussels. joining me now from the belgian capital is rick, a professor of international relations at the university. thank you very much for being with us. brussels is essentially shut down. no underground transport, no football matches, the bars,
1:14 am
cinemas have been told to shut early. no doubt the intelligence must be pretty strong for authorities to go to these extremes. >> on the one hand, it seems to be specific but at the same time not specific enough to pinpoint the fugitives. it seems that there is more than one guy who has been looked after. it's specific that basically it's too early to tell how long this will last before that intelligence meets the investigators to the core of the threats. >> we're told it may last into the start of this working week. can they get used to this heavy security in brussels? could this be the new normal? >> i do hope it is not the new normal. i would say it's basically the second time in, i would say, ten
1:15 am
years that we have been living through this. the scope of this really is unprecedented. i mean, never it happened before that france is the most popular shopping street, shopping malls have been closed down. the whole subway is being closed down. so the scope of the consequences, really that's the first time. i cannot really imagine that this will become the new normal. >> we hope not. just talk about molenbeek, why that particular area is such a hotbed for radicalized extremists. >> well, it is a very complex issue and the portrayal of molenbeek as the hotbed really does disservice to people living there. basically molenbeek has been -- the industrial heart of brussels
1:16 am
and then factories closed down and the work the first -- you had successive waves of migration and no poor housing but cheap housing. poor education, poor job prospectus and for the last, i would say, 25 years and i'm living really close by in molenbeek in a neighboring municipality, you have a very strong feeling of abandonment by authorities. you have a very strong feeling of no perspective and what you hear the last couple of years among youngsters is the sentiment, whatever and ever we might make, whatever efforts we will make, we will never be accepted as belgians. so this kind of discrimination plays into the head of a number
1:17 am
of youngsters. you know, it is not really radicalization as we understand it. all those who have left from molenbeek, i would say some 100 left for syria and iraq in 2012. you know, their religious and political knowledge is so superficial. i would call it rather assault of new outlet for deviant behavior, like drug trafficking or street gangs or juvenile delinquency. now you have to this -- the kind of new life. it's so tempting for a number of youngsters facing this perception of no future. >> authorities certainly have a lot on their hands to deal with. particularly in that region. professor rick coolsaert. thank you for joining us. we appreciate it. >> you're welcome. this issue of rat calization
1:18 am
not only in belgium. i remember covering this story about a mother and father who were concerned, had no idea that their son was being recruited, was getting all of this information online. they didn't know it until it happened. it's something that really is happening in many parts of world. >> many parts of the world, particularly as he said disenfranchised youth. people that don't have prospect of getting a job or opportunities that seem to turn to that extremist sort of behavior. >> you're watching our special kofrmg here on cnn. still ahead, details about a suicide bomber killed in a raid outside of paris. new photos in the aftermath. >> learning more about how a deadly attack happened at a popular hotel in mali. stay with us. can a business have a mind? a subconscious. a knack for predicting the future. reflexes faster than the speed of thought.
1:19 am
can a business have a spirit? can a business have a soul? can a business be...alive? it begins from the the second we're born.er. because, healthier doesn't happen all by itself. it needs to be earned every day. using wellness to keep away illness. and believing a single life can be made better by millions of others. as a health services and innovation company optum powers modern healthcare by connecting every part of it. so while the world keeps searching for healthier we're here to make healthier happen. rightabreva can heal itold sore, in as few as two and a half days when used at the first sign. without it the virus spreads from cell to cell. only abreva penetrates deep
1:20 am
and starts to work immediately to block the virus and protect healthy cells. you could heal your cold sore, fast, as fast as two and a half days when used at the first sign. learn how abreva starts to work immediately at abreva.com don't tough it out, knock it out, fast. with abreva.
1:21 am
1:22 am
welcome back. one week after the terror attacks in paris, a popular hotel in mali, the death toll from that attack has risen to 22. that's according to the united nations. >> the malyian president visited the hotel on saturday where the
1:23 am
siege took place. six nationals from russia, three from china, two from belgium and one each from israel and the united states are among the dead. two islamist militant groups claimed responsibility for that attack. david mckenzie has the latest on the investigation. >> the guests are gone. the cracked glass and bullet holes remain. now new details emerging of a devastating attack on the popular westin hotel. >> the gunman started the attack at 7:00 in the morning at the radisson hotel. now foreign investigators are here trying to piece through exactly what happened. what we're learning is new information. they didn't in fact come inside a diplomatic vehicle. the u.n. is saying they snuck behind on foot and then moved rapidly through the hotel to start shooting. >> hotel concierge says the guards were unprepared, weapons unloaded. everyone was running scared, he
1:24 am
says. they were shooting at anyone that moved. he says he looked terror in the eye. the gunman had a cap, blue shirt and jeans, he says. he pointed the gun at me and stared and then i ran. but many hid, doing everything they could to survive. >> did you barricade the doors? >> yes. we put a lot of heavy stuff so nobody could enter. >> did you hear the noises getting closer? >> yeah, we hear a lot of guns around the door. they were trying to knock the door and enter in the door. but thanks to god we were evacuated at the time. >> the quick action by malian and foreign forces saved many. but the threat remains. david mckenzie, bamako.
1:25 am
at least a dozen were killed in cameroon. several bombers blew themselves up near the nigerian border. >> the terror group boko haram is the group. they struck before in january leaving more than 400 people in the town dead. polls are open in egypt has voters cast their ballots in the second parliamently elections. he's hailed the election a major step towards democracy. for the latest, we're joined by ian lee live from cairo. polls opened a little over an hour ago for the second phase of these elections. what's the feeling there among voters? >> reporter: there's a lot of voter apathy here in egypt. the first round, we saw it as well, we're roughly 26% of eligible voters went out and cast their ballots. what we're hearing from them is
1:26 am
a number of things. first off, they're saying that they don't believe this election will impact their life. this is what we're hearing from younger voters in particular. that they believe the country isn't moving forward in the way they'd like. the second thing we've been hearing from voters is that they didn't know who the candidates were. they were only given two weeks to campaign and the voters are saying they don't know the programs, they don't know what they want to achieve while they're in office. you also have people who frankly, can't go out and vote because they can't afford to take a day off from work. there are in this round 26 eligible voters that are expected -- expecting the numbers to be fairly similar to the first round. but there is a huge security operation going on as well to secure these polling stations. there's 160,000 soldiers mobilized around the country to protect them. we have sienna tax by isis
1:27 am
aligned militants against security forces here in egypt. the government wants to make sure this goes smoothly as it did in the first round. but this parliament is the last step in the transition to a full functioning government. they have a president, they have a constitution and now this is the last step in that roadmap. this parliament, while the candidates seem to be more or less in some sort of support of the president, it will have more power than the president. there have been talks that this parliament might try to vote away some of their powers to the president. but that is -- we'll have to wait and see if that's the case. how they work with the president. >> okay. ian lee in cairo. thank you very much for bringing us up to date with all of that. we'll talk to you soon again to see how the voting is going there. thank you very much. now to argentina when in less than two hours' time people
1:28 am
will head to the polls to choose their next president. surveys conducted before the vote show the mayor, mauricio mackry in the lead. he's in the running who has been endorsed by the current president. the winner will take office on december 10th for a four-year term. president obama focuses on the refugee crisis and isis. >> prejudice and discrimination helps isil and undermines our national security. >> ahead we'll have more on his comments at the asian pacific summit. plus, more about the raid that killed the suspect, the paris attacker ringleader. stay with us. i have asthma...
1:29 am
...one of many pieces in my life. so when my asthma symptoms kept coming back on my long-term control medicine, i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment. once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms. breo is for adults with asthma not well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. breo won't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden breathing problems. breo opens up airways to help improve breathing for a full 24 hours. breo contains a type of medicine that increases the risk of death from asthma problems and may increase the risk of hospitalization in children and adolescents. breo is not for people whose asthma is well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. once your asthma is well controlled, your doctor will decide if you
1:30 am
can stop breo and prescribe a different asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. do not take breo more than prescribed. see your doctor if your asthma does not improve or gets worse. ask your doctor if 24-hour breo could be a missing piece for you. see if you're eligible for 12 months free at mybreo.com.
1:31 am
1:32 am
welcome back to cnn's continuing coverage of the terror attacks in mali. i'm george howell. i'm lynda kinkade. >> attacks at a popular hotel in mali rises to 22. mali has declared a state of emergency. >> brussels is in lockdown after authorities there raised the city's terror alert to its highest level. belgium's prime minister says there are indications several people are planning attacks in multiple locations. citizens have been told to stay away from large gatherings such as concerts, sports events, airports and train stations. u.s. president barack obama is finishing bilateral meetings
1:33 am
during his visit to asia. he spoke earlier in malaysia at the summit where he focused on recent terror attacks vowing to defeat isis. people were killed by a landslide in myanmar. dozens of bodies were dug up beneath piles of rubble. they're searching for possible survivors. rescue operations are ongoing. let's return now to the terror threat in europe. max foster joins us live once again from paris. max, authorities fear paris-style attack in brussels. >> reporter: absolutely. the city still in lockdown. last night it was like a ghost town. the people were told to stay away from crowded areas. they weren't going to restaurants or bars like they would normally on a saturday night in a major european city. a very strange atmosphere there. it wasn't linked to the paris attacks as far as we understand, this heightened level of alert.
1:34 am
but there was a plan, an imminent plan for a paris-style attack, on multiple locations. separately, the man on the run, one of the paris attackers, the eighth man on the run is believed to be there. although they cannot locate him. he could possibly have a suicide vest with him. a great deal of concern over there in brussels. here in paris as well, very much still on edge. the investigation continues. a state of alert there effectively for the next three months because they're under emergency powers here as the police continue to investigate any sort of isis link they can find here. we're learning a bit more about the investigation and the actual attacks that happened in paris nine days ago. particularly on wednesday where you had that counterattack effectively where the ringleader was killed in saint-denis. we have new pictures coming from inside the flat.
1:35 am
here's martin savidge with the latest on that. >> they say they have isolated the dna of a third person killed inside of that apartment that was raided by police last wednesday in saint-denis. where they stopped short is to say who that dna belonged to. apparently authorities do not know at this particular time. it raises even perhaps more questions. another person perhaps that was part of this plot or in some way answer suspicions out there. there is reports that there is a surveillance video that showed in one of the attacks, not just two attackers but a third person possibly inside a vehicle. where is that person now? well, maybe the dna that's been isolated is that person. right now authorities haven't made that link but it's certainly something that comes to mind. speaking about that raid that took place, new photographs that have come to us through itv show how violent that raid was. and the man who led that raid
1:36 am
for french authorities said they had gone in with surprise on their side. but when they blew the door to enter the apartment, they found the door didn't give. as a result, the people inside, which apparently had reinforced it were able to get the weapons, get their explosives and there began a long and violent attack as these photos attest. back to you. >> reporter: people in france expecting -- after the paris attacks. they're vowing to destroy isis. the country is in the process of changing its constitution to extend the state of emergency, which gives those police the powers that they need to carry on these searches without going to court every time. i'm joined by an analyst from the university of paris. thanks for joining us. deep questions being asked in how to respond to these situations. but in terms of the emergency powers, are you comfortable with
1:37 am
that being used responsibly? >> there's some that stated the french population is in favor of not only the state of emergency but also about closing the borders for now. these are emergency measures and we definitely have to think about a long-term answer to terrorism, which is a method. but it's implemented by people and a lot of people who attacked us are actually french. we have to deal that and we have to take -- to think about what we can do to solve the trouble. the u.n. needs to pass a resolution, a french drafted resolution yesterday asking to implement all of the actions they can do against the safe-haven of isis. >> one of them is more intelligence sharing, right? >> it does not state anything. so it was unanimously accepted by the u.n. secretary consul,
1:38 am
but we don't know specifically what it's all about. >> the will is there. the issue is actually making it work. when you've got terrorists moving freely between countries, driving overboarders, but you don't have the policing working in a similarly freeway, the terrorists in this situation managed to stay a step ahead, haven't they, because the authorities haven't been sharing information in the most timely way possible? >> i think there's three steps. we have to think about the causes inside the french society, we have to improve the europe and the like you said schengen for instance. that we're planning the safe zone, the reform at the end and the global coordination, meaning intelligence, also the type of action we're taking in the middle east. because it grew just because of the international inaction in syria. so we definitely have to tackle these issues. >> off the back of that,
1:39 am
president hollande very much the focus on the international stage of this, because his country suffered this horrific attack, is going to -- president obama, they have to come up with a strategy because he's then going to go on to moscow to meet president putin. what is the likely international response? >> it's interesting to see that in diplomacy, the symbols and the -- are very important. i'm not surprised that our president is going to the u.s. first to meet president obama. meaning that we're close allies, i'm glad for that. but he also see after david cameron from the uk and -- >> that's tomorrow. >> and vladimir putin. it's a huge kind of cooperation we can have. if for instance, german is noninterventionist, that the solution is not about -- our military chief of staff actually said that as well. we can't beat isis, militarily without a political solution. we definitely have to find
1:40 am
something over there. we have to agree on solutions. >> the momentum behind it now, something is going to come out of this because people are frightend, with the russian plane as well. thank you very much. it's very difficult, of course, particularly when you have armed police and armed soldiers just walking around the city which people just aren't used to. but there's a sense of defiance that people will carry on and make it feel like a normal city and not be cow toed by the terrorism. every saturday, they play in plaza did he borj. there was no exception the day after the attacks. they picked up their instruments and played in the usual way, though they admit they were scared. >> it was good for us to do our thing and see that people were
1:41 am
happy to see that life was going on, music was going on. >> something that's changed. >> can you articulate that? >> i think something is changed but i think we're going to be stronger. we realize we need to fight for what we believe in. it's not something given to us. we must realize our freedom is something we have to fight for. >> you're going to keep playing? >> yeah, we are. >> like a war where you see the other guys coming, they're already here but you never know where or when they're going to strike. just have to keep on living, that's all. that's it. >> a band in one street and a stitch in the tapestry of life in paris. without their music, life just wouldn't be what it was. they're doing their bit amid a new reality.
1:42 am
>> reporter: paying tribute to the victims of the attacks over in paris or here in paris. take a look. manchester united standing united and singing the french national anthem while barcelona and real madrid observed a moment of silence before playing their el classico rivalry match. a continent united. lynda and george. >> continent and quite frankly, people around the world taking time to honor and remember the victims there in paris. max foster, thank you for your reporting there. you're watching cnn special coverage of the paris terror attacks. still to come, a look back at a devastating week in europe. plus reaction from the american president. >> we will cut out their
1:43 am
financing, we will hunt down their leadership. we will dismantle their networks and their supply lines and we will ultimately destroy them. >> strong words there from barack obama and his plan for the terrorist group isis. the live report on that coming up just ahead. stay with us. announcer: if you'd give thanks for a better night's sleep...
1:44 am
1:45 am
[barks] sleep train has just the ticket. [train horn blares] during sleep train's "thanksgifting" sale save up to $300 on beautyrest, posturepedic, serta, even tempur-pedic! get up to three years interest-free financing! plus, choose a free gift with selected mattress sets! but hurry, sleep train's "thanksgifting" sale won't last! ♪ sleep train [train horn] ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪
1:46 am
welcome back. u.s. president barack obama left asia, left malaysia, sorry, short time ago wrapping up a nine-day trip. >> he spoke at a summit of southeast asian nation and the focus was on isis and the recent terror attacks in paris. mr. obama vowed to destroy the terrorist group. let's bring in simon who joins us live from kuala lumpur. you got a chance to listen in
1:47 am
when president obama made those comments against isis and put terrorists front and center. >> reporter: absolutely. this was unequivocal. president obama addressing, perhaps criticism has come toward him. very emphatically and confidently laying out the successes so far against isis or isil as he calls them, of course, two different ways of naming them. he said that 65 nations alongside the united states have been fighting this campaign for over a year now with more than 8,000 strikes and the white house itself has also told cnn, look, we've managed to target jihadi john recently. we've targeted the isil leader of libya as well. but alongside dealing with isis, the president also saying that he's happy that muslim communities around the world are also doing their bit to step up
1:48 am
and stand up against isis and their interpretation and corruption of it. alongside that, the president also once again says there is a big difference between islam and isis. let's listen in. >> the united states could never be at war with any religion because america is made up of multiple religions. we're strengthened by people from every religion, including muslim americans. i want to be as clear as i can on this. prejudice and discrimination helps isil and undermines our national security. so even as we destroy isil on the battlefield and we will destroy them, we will take back land that they are currently in, we will cut off their financing, we will hunt down their leadership, we will dismantle their networks and their supply lines and we will ultimately
1:49 am
destroy them even as we are in the process of doing that, we want to make sure that we don't lose our own values and our own principles. >> reporter: the president there emphasizing the need for people to carry on their lives as normal because terrorism wants people to be afraid and not to go out. he also addressed the question about russia's involvement in syria. redirecting russia's efforts against what he said has so far been moderate opposition to president assad instead hoping that russia would change its mind and start targeting isis along the coalition partners saying president putin, he said he needs to go after the people who killed russian citizens, which is of course isis. lynda, george? >> a lot of moving parts from the president obama. thank you. you're watching special coverage
1:50 am
of the paris terror attacks. still to come -- >> remembering the victims. touching moments from people around the world showing they will not forget what happened. right when you feel a cold sore, abreva can heal it in as few as two and a half days when used at the first sign. without it the virus spreads from cell to cell. only abreva penetrates deep and starts to work immediately to block the virus and protect healthy cells. you could heal your cold sore, fast, as fast as two and a half days when used at the first sign. learn how abreva starts to work immediately at abreva.com don't tough it out, knock it out, fast. with abreva.
1:51 am
1:52 am
1:53 am
1:54 am
you've been watching "cnn newsroom." i'm lynda kinkade. >> i'm george howell. the rest of the world is watching in solidarity with the french people. >> we leave you with a look at some of the poignant moments we've seen over the last week and we'll be wrapped after the break. ♪ ♪ >> translator: it's an act of war committed by an army, daesh. ♪
1:55 am
>> we're reminded that the bonds of libertye, not only values that the french people care so deeply about, but values that we share. >> translator: we stand with you. united. >> and then suddenly in a flash there was chaos. friday was a night of shock, saturday was a day of mourning but on sunday we felt determined today to come out, to take our lives back.
1:56 am
>> the headline of it is i will not succumb to hate. friday night you stole an exceptional life, the love of my life, the mother of my son, but i will not succumb to hate. >> we stand free. we stand with the taste of life. we play games with my son. and then no, they don't win. ♪ ♪
1:57 am
1:58 am
1:59 am
2:00 am
you're watching cnn continuing coverage of the terror attacks in france and mali. welcome to our viewers in the u.s. and around the world. i'm lynda kinkade. >> i'm george howell. stay with us through the hour as we bring you the very latest developments in these two major stories that we're following. just a short time ago we heard from the president of the united states, barack obama, reiterating the u.s. commitment to defeat isis. he was speaking at the asia-pacific summit in malaysia. listen. >> we will take back land that they are currently in. we will cut off their financing. we will hunt down their leadership. we will dismantle their networks and their supply lines and we will ultimately destroy them.
2:01 am
>> mr. obama called isis a bunch of killers with good social media. he also mentioned the paris attacks urging people not to give in to fear. >> meanwhile in europe, brussels, looks like a ghost town. people in the belgium capital are waking up to a lockdown. the terror alert level is at the highest level there. officials fear an attack in multiple places at once. turkish authorities arrested this belgian citizen of moroccan descent. they believe he scouted -- he was arrested in southern turkey after traveling from amsterdam. officials say he wanted to cross into syria. we're joined live from paris. max, authorities are still looking for the eighth suspect who was involved in the paris attacks. >> reporter: yes. it's believed he's headed towards brussels. he could have a suicide vest as well. that's what the reports are suggesting. great deal of concern here how
2:02 am
he managed to get under the wire of all of the security officials that were around at the time here in paris. that terror alert level in brussels is separate. they have had separate confirmed -- the precise information as they're putting it about a possible pairiris-st attack on brussels. people weren't out and about as they normally would be on a saturday night because the restaurants, the bars all closed down early because of this concern about people gathering and causing congestion which would possibly be a target. so such concern there in brussels after what happened here in paris. we can go to drew griffin who is there. what do you know about the investigation and what caused this major alert there? >> reporter: we really don't have any information in detail.
2:03 am
we're hoping to get that after the 1:00 p.m. meeting, just a few hours from now that the prime minister will have with the interior minister and the officials here. as you said, it's been now going into the better part of two days since that serious and imminent threat shut down this city and max, this was separate than the search for abdeslam, the missing paris attacker. they have not explained what that threat is other than to say it was a paris-style attack that they were trying to thwart and to do that, they wanted to shut the city down and empty out of public spaces, keep people off the metro, all of that remains in place. ss you can see, people are trying to go about their lives. so many cafes are closed that it's difficult to call this anything approaching normal. we're waiting to see what the authorities release today in terms of what they can tell about the threat and whether or
2:04 am
not, max, whether or not it's indeed over. max? >> reporter: abdeslam is there somewhere. that's the thinking, isn't it? preet. pretty precisely in brussels as well. the threat isn't seen beyond the capital. >> reporter: that's right. but keep in mind that the search for salah abdeslam began last saturday afternoon when he was identified as the eighth missing attacker. the officials here that i've talked to say that this current threat that we're under in this city of brussels is separate from that. they have thought all along or there's a strong possibility that abdeslam is hiding somewhere in brussels. potentially now we know he may have had a suicide vest, although that is secondhand information that the police have gathered from an attorney from one of the men who brought him back from paris. so they have been working under the assumption that he is here. we're told that this current threat level was raised not because of that, max, but
2:05 am
because of some other intelligence gathered that pointed to a separate plot specifically here in brussels. max? >> reporter: we'll get more information and updates from the officials there. we're getting more information as well about the raid in saint-denis, the neighborhood outside paris where the ringleader of the paris attacks was killed. pretty startling images as well. here's martin savidge. >> the latest from french investigators is that they say they have isolated the dna of a third person who was killed inside of that apartment that was raided by police last wednesday insaint-denis. where they stopped short is who the dna belongs to. because apparently authorities do not know at this particular time and it raises perhaps more questions. another person perhaps who was part of this plot, or does it answer some suspicion out there. because there is reports that there is a surveillance video that showed one of the attacks,
2:06 am
not just two attackers but a third person possibly inside a vehicle. where is that person now? well, maybe the dna that's been isolated is that person. right now authorities haven't made that link. but it's certainly something that comes to mind. speaking about that raid that took place, new photographs that have come to us through itv show just how violent that raid was and the man who led that raid for french authorities said they had gone in with surprise on their side. but when they blew the door to enter the apartment, they found that the door didn't give. as a result of that, the people inside, which apparently had reinforced it, were able to get the weapons, get their explosives and there began a very long and very violent attack as these photos attest. back to you. >> reporter: martin savidge there. we've been monitoring this.
2:07 am
the missing attacker, paris attacker extraordinary to think he got out of paris. but he's on the run which is a frightening situation. can we safely assume he would have at least tried to get to brus snels. >> he tried to get to brussels, apparently there's high suspicion right now that he could be holed in molenbeek. that neighborhood nicknamed front of jihad in europe or gee had in the heart of europe. you got to realize what's going on with the communities in belgium, molenbeek, there's a lot of -- majority of arabic people there. they're living in some very tight communities. people are holding on each other, they don't trust the outside world. it's really some place where everyday life has been -- lot has happened, lot of petty crimes and things like this. he knows that he will have the best way to hide is over there.
2:08 am
his brother is still over there. he was questioned, mohammed abdeslam. now we know we've had several reports at least two people said to one of our reporters that he was in the neighborhood. he apparently skyped with some of his friend, apparently news was brought by sky. there's suspicion that he could be there. there's nowhere else he could be. >> one of the theories, he was meant to carry out attack in paris or didn't manage it or got scared. what are the theories about what happened? >> if we take the first communique by isis, there's a mention of the district of paris where nothing happened. he could have been planned of carrying an attack over there. whether he had time or something went wrong in the process or whether he fled. just didn't want to activate his suicide vest, which is a
2:09 am
possibility. now, that makes him either -- he's on the loose, he could be dangerous, could be still holding some weapons and still having a suicide vest. probably trying to make it back to syria. managed to get back to syria. let's remember that before the attack of -- on "charlie hebdo," the girlfriend managed to make it back to syria. she fled one day before and she made it back. now she's in syria. so there's this connection and probably they have accomplice on the way to help them move back into the country. >> the area of brussels that you've been talking about, just outside brussels, there's -- it's a low-income area. a lot of people outside belgium just find it extraordinary that consistently jihadis plan their attacks or emerge from that area. why aren't the authorities
2:10 am
better -- what's going on in that community? >> there's two problems. you're absolutely right to mention that there's a very known connection between jihad and belgium. remind the viewers that during the casablanca bombing in 2003. the connection was moroccan and belgium. the madrid attack was the same network, same connection in belgium. ever since we had -- he was from molenbeek. a number of attackers came from that area. what we can say the problem with brussels is a structural problem. it's a country where there hasn't been any government for instance for quite some time because of infighting between communities. you have some in the north, rich community, german community and the -- they've been at each other and the structure of the federal government of belgium makes it probably easier for
2:11 am
communities to escape scrutiny. their vision also is more -- in france there's a direct link between the citizens and the states. there's nothing in between. in belgium, there's definitely communities and that probably all this makes it harder probably for the belgium authorities to know what's going on within those communities. >> certainly not taking any chances in that area now. >> absolutely. >> gathering what information they can. lynda and george, it's still a situation which many find extraordinary. worried about where he is. whether or not he is got aggressive intentions as well. that's a priority right now. paris here, you can see it's sunday. people are out and about. they're trying to live their lives normally. but people aren't out shopping in the normal way. just for the basic goods when it should be christmas shopping
2:12 am
season. it isn't starting yet for obvious reasons. >> understandable difference and concern there in paris and in brussels. a city that really is on lockdown with, again, this eighth suspect still on the run. max foster, thank you for your reporting live in paris. now we move on to mali an the aftermath of the deadly terror attack that took place at a popular hotel on friday. we know that the death toll has ris tone 22. 22 people were killed according to the u.n. the siege happened in bamako. >> six nationals from russia, three from china, two from bell july and one each from israel and the u.s. are among the dead. cnn's david mckenzie has the latest now on the investigation. >> reporter: the guests are gone. the cracked glass and bullet holes remain. now new details emerging of the devastating attack on a popular westin hotel. >> the gunman started their attack at 7:00 in the morning at
2:13 am
the radisson hotel. now foreign investigators are here trying to piece through what happened. what we're learning is new information. they didn't in fact come inside a diplomatic vehicle. the u.n. is now saying they snuck behind on foot and 3406d rapidly into the hotel to start shooting. hotel concierge says the guards were unprepared, guns unloaded. everyone was running scared he says. they will shoot at anyone that moved. he says he then looked terror in the eye. the gunman had a cap, blue shirt and jeans, he says. he pointed the gun at me and stared and then i ran. many hid doing anything they could to survive. >> did you barricade the doors? >> yeah. we barricaded the doors, we put a lot of heavy stuff to the doors so that nobody can enter. >> did he hear the noises getting closer?
2:14 am
>> yeah, yeah. we hear a lot of guns around the door. they were trying to knock the door and enter in the door. but thanks to god we were evacuated at the time. >> the quick action by malian foreign forces saved many but the threat still remains. david mckenzie, bamako, mali. you're watching cnn special coverage of the terror attacks in paris. coming up, president obama focusing on the refugee crisis and on isis. >> prejudice and discrimination helps isil and undermines our national security. >> ahead we have more on his comments at a meeting in malaysia. first, the football world pays tribute to paris. we'll have much more on that. ok, we're here. here's dad. mom. the twins. aunt alice...
2:15 am
you didn't tell me aunt alice was coming. of course. don't forget grandpa. can the test drive be over now? maybe just head back to the dealership? don't you want to meet my family? yep, totally. it's practically yours, but we still need your signature. the sign then drive event. zero due at signing, zero down, zero deposit, and zero first months payment on a new jetta and other select volkswagen models. thso we got our new he washingzy machine but it took forever turns out it wasn't the machine, it was our detergent. so we switched to tide turbo clean. now we get way cleaner clothes way faster he turbo clean. 6x the cleaning power in ½ the time
2:16 am
♪ ♪ the beautiful sound of customers making the most of their united flight. power, wi-fi, and streaming entertainment. that's... seize the journey friendly. ♪ ...one of many pieces in my life. so when my asthma symptoms kept coming back on my long-term control medicine, i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment. once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms. breo is for adults with asthma not well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. breo won't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden breathing problems. breo opens up airways to help improve breathing for a full 24 hours. breo contains a type of medicine that increases the risk of death from asthma problems and may increase the risk of hospitalization in children and adolescents. breo is not for people whose asthma is well controlled on a
2:17 am
long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. once your asthma is well controlled, your doctor will decide if you can stop breo and prescribe a different asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. do not take breo more than prescribed. see your doctor if your asthma does not improve or gets worse. ask your doctor if 24-hour breo could be a missing piece for you. see if you're eligible for 12 months free at mybreo.com. > the soccer world paying tribute. >> players and fans showed respect by standing together for the french national anthem as we just heard there while displaying flags and signs to pray for paris. >> barcelona and real madrid observed a moment of silence
2:18 am
before playing their el classico rivalry match. security may become the new normal. -- france is hosting the 2016 tournament. a major event. >> despite the obvious fears about safety shall the tournament will go on as planned. we look at the preparations and the history of terror attacks at sporting events. >> last summer they were on top of the world. last friday, germany and france were under attack. a chilling sound of suicide bombers blowing themselves up outside the stand of france in paris. a coordinated strike that brought terror to the streets of the french capital. france and germany were playing in front of a packed stadium of 80,000 fans. they were all lucky to escape unharmed. but some of the players knew people who witnessed those who
2:19 am
were killed in the attacks elsewhere. with so much uncertainty, the teams stayed together in the stadium until the next morning. >> translator: football is a symbol of society. it represents many values. at times like this, it takes on an even greater importance. everyone has a responsibility to make sure those values are respected. >> targeting the stadium was significant. next summer france is due to host the european championships, a major tournament involving 24 teams from all over the continent. but now there are major concerns. paris has fallen victim to two separate terror atrocities in the space of 11 months. next year, they'll try to guarantee the safety of an event that will cover nine different cities across 31 days in june and july. >> i didn't think it was possible to guarantee anything. it is possible to identify the broad lines of threat development. but the threat is developing in such a complex manner at the
2:20 am
moment that the terrorists only has to succeed once. only has to succeed in one place and suddenly we have what appears to be a game changing activity. in my view, this is a development of an existing line rather than a game changer itself. >> the venues would be a prime target for any would-be terrorists. but in any of the cities hosting the games would be considered an attack on the tournament. supporters will be in the stadiums. 7 million expected to wacht games from within fan zones. the tournament organizers, uefa have said that the tournament will go on as planned. friday's attack wasn't the first time a sports event has been targeted. there was carnage at the boston marathon in 2013, three spectators were killed and hundreds injured. >> three people at the togo national football team were
2:21 am
killed. >> in pakistan in 2009, six squad were injured while six policemen and one driver died. but it was of the events at the olympic games in munich 1972 that cast the longest shadow. 11 members of the israeli team were massacred. athlete managed to evade the terrorists that night. he told me why sports events have always been a tempting target. >> they are looking for a stage where their awful actions should be visible and heard by everybody. at the olympic games, it was because they had the highest concentration of reporters and other media personnel. >> he says that anyone who was thinking of going to the tournament next year should carry on as planned. >> i advise them to go because by showing fear they are playing into the hands of the terrorists threat that disturbs our way of
2:22 am
life. >> for the french team hosting the tournament is a source of immense national pride and april chance to repeat the success of previous tournaments. the world cup in 1998. both times were played in paris. they were back in action at wembley stadium on tuesday night. there was a display of solidarity. this was the scene. heavily armed police officers on patrol. terrorists crosshairs, this may be the new normal for all major events. don rue dell, cnn. as we learn more about the terrorists who carried out these attacks in paris, we're hearing from a mother who knows firsthand what it means to lose a child to radicalism. her name is boudreaux. she says at first she felt hopeful when they are teenage son discovered islam after a
2:23 am
failed suicide attempt. >> she turned to despair when she found out he left canada to die fighting for isis. she's now made it her mission to keep other families from living that nightmare. cnn's drew griffin has her story. >> chris boudreaux may not look like it, but right now she's battling isis. >> these recruiters are really slick. they make you believe that it's something different than what it is. they kept stalking online and a couple times she'd ignore him and he'd blow up. >> a 23-year-old woman from the u.s. is being stalked. close to joining isis and traveling to syria. the woman's family contacted boudreaux and an intervention began. >> i was so proud of her. >> that's a success story so far. >> so far. >> in her calgary home, three separate families reach out to her, desperate for help.
2:24 am
>> they call, they find her for one reason. she has lived this nightmare. >> there's damian raiding the pantry and the fridge again. >> three years ago it was her son who became the target of a radical islamist recruiter. canadian authorities now believe damian and several other young muslims were recruited straight out of a downtown calgary mosque and literally led to the battlefield without their families suspecting a thing. her son would be dead in months, killed fighting for isis just outside aleppo, syria. >> how can somebody take such a bright mind and twist it and convince them that they are doing the right thing? they believe they're doing right. >> cnn's poppy harlow also spoke with the mother you just heard from. >> she talked about how isis
2:25 am
radicalizes the followers. >> they're spending time and resources and focusing on our youth and developing a relationship. they take the time to connect with them, surround them 24/7 building those relationships, manipulating their motivations and guiding them in a different path and different direction, answering all those difficult questions. that's not something that we're doing. we're not intercepting our youth. we're not mentoring our youth. we're not guiding our youth. we're not setting our resources on them. >> i think some people watching this might think, how can a parent not know, right? this child lives under your roof, et cetera. how can you not know. you've lived that firsthand. not knowing. actually feeling hopeful when your son found islam and started -- you saw it turning his life around. what do you say to those people? >> well, the difficult part is not always are these youth living at home at this point.
2:26 am
sometimes they are living somewhere else. as parents, we're still emotionally connected to our child. we pay so much attention to our relationship in that sense that parent/child relationship that it's easy for us to miss all these other signs or them going astray or we don't want to believe them or we don't want to seem like we're panicking for nothing. there's a stigma placed on parents too. if we do reach out for that help. if we do say we need help with our youth and we can see there's something going wrong. who do we turn to? where do we go to get that outside logistical view. it's very challenging and difficult. this is a new type of movement that we're not comprehending. it's being run through computers, social media various other venues that we didn't understand before. there needs to be education and awareness there for the parents and the support there for them. for them to recognize what they're seeing and where they can go for that help. >> again, that was cnn's poppy
2:27 am
harlow speaking with christhian boudreaux. a desperate -- how a waitress was desperate during the attack. (politely) wait, wait, wait! you can't put it in like that, you have to rinse it first. what's that, alfredo? no,that can go in. no it can't! what are you, nuts? that's baked-on alfredo. baked-on? it's never gonna work. dish issues? trust your dishwasher with cascade platinum. it powers... through... your toughest stuck-on food. better than finish. (to the hostess) see, told you it would work... (turns to girl 2) you guys heard me say that, right? cascade. the tougher tough-food cleaner. rightabreva can heal itold sore, in as few as two and a half days when used at the first sign. without it the virus spreads from cell to cell. only abreva penetrates deep and starts to work immediately to block the virus and protect healthy cells. you could heal your cold sore, fast,
2:28 am
as fast as two and a half days when used at the first sign. learn how abreva starts to work immediately at abreva.com don't tough it out, knock it out, fast. with abreva. at&t and directv are now one. which means you can watch in the house, in a treehouse, or even in miss pepperpie's house. pause in your pjs and hit play during a pb&j. nice! and enjoy some cartoons instead of listening to dad's car tunes. (dad) ♪meet you all the way! get the best of both worlds. directv at home and 2 wireless lines. from directv and at&t.
2:29 am
2:30 am
welcome back to continuing coverage of the terror attacks in france and mali. i'm george howell. hello. i'm lynda kinkade. here's a look at the headlines we're following this hour. >> at least 30 people died near a landslide in northern myanmar on saturday. search teams dug out dozens of bodies from the resulting piles of rubble while searching for possible survivors.
2:31 am
rescue efforts are still ongoing. the death toll from friday's attack at a popular hotel in mali has risen to 22. that's according to the u.n. six russians, two china niece, two bell jumps, one israeli and one american. in europe, brussels, it is on lockdown after authorities raised the city's terror alert level to the highest level possible. belgium's prime minister says there are indications several people are planning attacks in multiple locations. citizens have been told to stay away from large gatherings such as sporting events, airports and train stations. u.s. president barack obama is headed back to the u.s. after finishing up a nine-day trip to turkey and asia. he spoke earlier at the summit of southeast asian nations in malaysia where he focused on recent terror attacks. vowing to defeat isis. >> for more on all of this, we
2:32 am
turn to london and max foster. brussels, a paris-style attack there. >> reporter: actually, we have very little information about the situation in brussels. but we are expecting an update from the prime minister to find out what they've discovered in the searches through various addresses in brussels. still that heightened state of alert and people being told to avoid crowded spaces and very quiet evening last night. not the normal buzz you expect in brussels on a saturday night. certainly belgium is keen to find out if that's going to be lifted and whether or not that threat is still there. but a paris-style attack was planned for brussels according to the intelligence that they've been receiving there which is why they've gone to the extraordinary lengths. we believe the final attacker on the loose from the paris attacks is there as well. so that's an ongoing search. updates as we get them. you mentioned president obama
2:33 am
speaking about security and the battle against isis. that's going to be on the agenda here in paris as well tomorrow and into tuesday. because president hollande is going to washington to meet president obama. he then goes on to moscow too meet president putin and he wants to form a grand coalition against isis which takes you to the battle on the ground whether or not there can be some sort of agreement on the political future of syria against. it gets horribly kbli indicated from there. we have an expert to bring it together. what we've seen happen here in paris is going to be linked to what happens on the ground. >> it changes the equation for a lot of the leaders thinking about the fight against isis and how they want to do it. i think for president obama, firefighteit was an issue important to him. you have hollande going to washington and then to moscow. those are the two key players
2:34 am
that will have a massive say in what happens. >> what's the compromise? >> where is the compromise going to be, that's the big question. you heard president obama speak about that in malaysia. he said we want to get putin on board, to start combatting isis. right now the u.s. is saying that most of the targets russia is bombing are moderate rebels. the russians have bombed isis. it's going to take some sort of political compromise between all of these countries as to the future of bashar al assad, the future of syria. what syria is going to look like. who could possibly govern in syria for that whole compromise to actually come together for a united front against isis. you might be able to defeat them without there necessarily being a united front. the u.s. seems more willing to put assets up. david cameron is coming here tomorrow. possible that the brits will start rethinking their efforts in syria as well. then you have the russians who are for all the criticism
2:35 am
they've been getting, they have been flying -- there have been a lot directed at moderate level. but there have been some directed at isis as well. >> in terms of the immediate, we have a man on the run, brussels still in lockdown. for the people of brussels, the people of paris, it's confusing, bewildering. >> it's frightening. it certainly is quite a frightening situation for many people here in paris as well. they obviously had these various cells operating here. you had on the one hand the ones who did the paris attacks last friday and then another cell that was getting ready in saint-denis. we're asking could this happen again? how good is the intelligence that our intelligence services have? the saint-denis raid was certainly something that did show very fast intelligence work. where they act d really quickly on information they had just gotten. we've been talking about the fact that the saint-denis
2:36 am
apartment was only under surveillance for 24 hours. that's not a long time. normally think want to establish patterns of the people going in and out. they want to be sure that the guy they're targeting, abaaoud, is in it as well. they've done this very quickly. but you can feel it in paris. people are concerned about possible things happening again. >> fred, thank you. on saint-denis, getting more information about what unfolded within that apartment and extraordinary scene. we have pictures to show you. martin savidge has that report. >> to measure the mood in paris a week after the attacks that could have gone anywhere in the city, i went to the american kitchen mostly for its view. it stares directly down the street to two other restaurants now charred, bullet riddled memorials. >> really strongly when the people --
2:37 am
>> chloe was waitressing that terrible night when others mistook for fireworks she knew was not. >> i said no it's shoot. you have to go inside. at this moment i say -- i felt like -- i don't know anymore. you just think with the fear and you just want tos cape. >> she now has trouble sleeping 57bd even when awake is haunted by something else she saw, something else she knows. >> the terrorists who come who was just -- >> just came by here? >> just came by here twice and it could have been us. it could have been me or my friends. i don't know. >> reporter: share a table with olivier. he is french but recently proudly became an american. >> i was in new york on 9/11.
2:38 am
so i live in brooklyn. i experienced that as well. >> after paris' 11/13, he had to come back to the city. in defiance of the terrorists, he sits drinking a bottle of wine and eating a cheeseburger taking a stand. >> i'm an american and french. this is my life. there is no way somebody is going to change that. >> thank you. very good to talk to you. >> minutes later the lights of the american kitchen go out. in the gloom, they gather in the doorway, silently looking down the street. it is the moment exactly one week later. you see in all their faces, like it or not, they are forever changed. martin savidge, cnn, paris. >> just the beginning of a very long process. i mentioned the saint-denis apartment there, new images that came into us. they're actually from itv news.
2:39 am
we can show you inside the apartment where they had last wednesday the ringleader was killed in that apartment. of course, his relative as well. a female who we initially thought was a suicide bomber. turns out she wasn't. extraordinary scenes, amount of munitions used by the security forces in tackling that situation. but as fred was saying, it was a very fast, swift operation over a period of 24 hours. thankfully, no civilians suffered as a result of that. that was the impact on the apartment. the scale of the operation there. lynda and george, we continue to follow the diplomatic repercussions and what's going on over there in belgium, which is a very worried situation still today. >> indeed, max. >> that's right. still on lockdown. >> we continue to see the i am annals that you just shared with us. you got a sense of how intense
2:40 am
that gun battle was. max, thank you. >> for more on the ongoing threat of isis, we're joined by hasan ka san in london. he's an associate fellow at chatham house and co-author of "isis, inside the army of terror." thank you for being with us at this hour. the u.s. president warned against making this group seem more powerful, bigger than it really is, describing them simply as "killers with good koegs immedia social media." what do you make of the group? >> i think the group -- we should not underestimate the group that the organization has been in existence. even though it was under a different name for more than a decade. it's been fought against the americans and they survived. it was beaten at some point and then they came back with a vengeance later on. you know, i think there's a tendency to underestimate how
2:41 am
the group is resilient. how resilient the group is, especially given the recent -- i think that's a result of the recent setback, that the organization has been facing northeastern syria and iraq. but i think the group still has -- is entrenched in some areas and quietly in other areas. i think instead of expanding in strategic areas where it knows it will be facing the american firepower, it goes into more vulnerable areas, less strategic areas, like the inter lands of syria and rebel-held areas that isis knows the international community is not committed to their defense. >> let's talk about what's happening on the battlefield. from russia, from the united states, you have these attacks that are happening inside syria
2:42 am
and you hear from leaders that isis is losing ground there on the battlefield, that they're being pushed back. the question is, when we see things happen like what we saw in paris and you see the city of brussels now on lockdown, concerned about another attack, is isis growing in power or is it not? >> it's both. i mean, it has certainly lost some certificate torrey. recently, since march, it lost an important area for isis. a sunni dominated area. they lost it within a month. they also lost in northern syria. an important area on the borders with turkey. that was a gateway for jihadists coming from all over the world from turkey, syria and into iraq. but it also gained ramadi which is the group's most important
2:43 am
achievement since mosul last year. it's a city that had sunni forces up close to isis and isis has been trying to take the city since 2006 or when it was isi. but it's also, i mean, the recent that it has lost some areas but it's expanded a more -- a network to carry out attacks outside its territories. now, i think the recent attacks in paris, also the alleged role in bringing down the russian airliner in egypt, indicates that the group's international work is developed now. it's become better. alongside its work on the ground. i think the two are interconnect d. its success on the ground feeds
2:44 am
into its ideological appeal outside syria and iraq. the outside appeal also helps attract more foreign fighters into syria and iraq and help it on the ground militarily. >> it is a complicated situation. hasan hasan joining us live in london. thank you so much for your insights there. strong words from barack obama and his plans for the terrorist group isis. listen. >> we will cut out their financing. we will hunt down their leadership. we will dismantle their networks and their supply lines and we will ultimately destroy them. >> we'll have a live report coming up after the break. stay with us.
2:45 am
some cash back cards love to overcomplicate things. like limiting where you earn bonus cash back. why put up with that? but the quicksilver card from capital one likes to keep it simple. real simple. i'm talking easy like-a- walk-in-the-park, nothing-to-worry-about, man-that-feels-good simple. quicksilver earns you unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere. it's a simple question. what's in your wallet? you can't breathed. through your nose. suddenly, you're a mouthbreather. a mouthbreather!
2:46 am
how can anyone sleep like that? well, just put on a breathe right strip and pow! it instantly opens your nose up to 38% more than cold medicine alone. so you can breathe and sleep. shut your mouth and say goodnight mouthbreathers. breathe right you get used to sweaty odors you think it smells fine, but your passengers smell this... eliminate odors you've gone noseblind to for up to 30 days with the febreze car vent clip break out the febreze, and [inhale/exhale mnemonic] breathe happy.
2:47 am
2:48 am
u.s. president barack obama just left malaysia wrapping up a nine-day trip to turkey and asia. >> he spoke at a summit of southeastern asian nations. his focus was squarely on isis and the recent terror attacks. he vowed to destroy the group let's bring in our reporter. the president put terrorism front and center. he asked other countries to do more. >> reporter: he was absolutely unequivocal in this speech, lynda. laying out exactly what the united states and the coalition partners have been to defeat isis. he has faced a lot of criticism, particularly in the wake of the paris attacks. but simply not enough is being
2:49 am
done and he addressed that head on today. he said there's been more than 8,000 strikes against isis in their own territory with 65 coalition partners fighting an armed campaign for over a year now. he pointed out that 15 countries are training and supporting iraqi forces to try and battle isis as well in their territory. that's including malaysia. here in kuala lumpur of course. heading to join isis. and he says that countries are now uniting to fight isis. are they going far enough? that is the question a lot of others are posing. he says they are. the white house administration officials telling cnn, look, we've managed to target jihadi john, that infamous executioner in those hideous videos we've seen with the beheadings over the year. also, isis leader of libya has
2:50 am
been target d in air strikes too. 20 to 25% of isis' territory has now been regained by coalition forces, iraqi forces as well. and, of course, there is the question of russia. russia is not joining this coalition fight. they have their independent air strikes continuing in syria. president obama saying president putin now needs to address and target the people who are killing his citizens too. lynda? >> we hope they can work together on this. thank you very much for bringing us up to speed on all of that. still to come on cnn, an off-duty nurse who tried to save a life during the paris attacks discovered his patient was a suicide bomber. we'll share that incredible story with you just ahead. [inhales] grunts but your guests disagree... music starts febreze air effects doesn't just mask, it eliminates odors you've gone noseblind to [inhales] mmm break out the febreze,
2:51 am
[inhale + exhale mnemonic] and breathe happy. ...one of many pieces in my life. so when my asthma symptoms kept coming back on my long-term control medicine, i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment. once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms. breo is for adults with asthma not well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. breo won't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden breathing problems. breo opens up airways to help improve breathing for a full 24 hours. breo contains a type of medicine that increases the risk of death from asthma problems and may increase the risk of hospitalization in children and adolescents. breo is not for people whose asthma is well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. once your asthma is well controlled, your doctor will decide if you can stop breo and prescribe a
2:52 am
different asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. do not take breo more than prescribed. see your doctor if your asthma does not improve or gets worse. ask your doctor if 24-hour breo could be a missing piece for you. see if you're eligible for 12 months free at mybreo.com.
2:53 am
2:54 am
welcome back. we've heard many stories of people trying to help the wounded during the paris attack. when one of the cafes was bombed, an off-duty nurse tried to help a man who was lying underneath the chairs add tables. >> he soon discovered he was trying to resuscitate the suicide bomber. here's his story.
2:55 am
>> translator: i go to this man that i can see out of corner of my eye. i take him out of this table and chairs off the floor. he had nothing special, he was unconscio unconscious. i noticed there was a large hole on his side. i don't think at all it's the suicide bomber. at that point for me, it's a client like others who suffered from a gas blast and who must have hurt himself. but his wound was huge. i put him on the ground and i start performing cpr. the other guy who was with me takes over for me and at that point we had just unbuttoned the jacket at all. we kept his t-shirt on. it was not really thick. when i was performing cpr, i did not feel anything. at some point the guy performing the resuscitation with me tells me maybe we can remove the t-shirt it's better. i tell him yes, you are right. then i ripped his t-shirt.
2:56 am
then i saw wires. i looked up again at the lamps, hees heating lamps and i noticed there was nothing wrong with them. they're made of a material that becomes distorted quite easily. i saw there was nothing there, nothing wrong with the three of them. on the ground, there was blood and i noticed the first bullets on the ground, then i understand immediately. i told myself it's an explosion that -- it's a suicide bomber and i knew it was him. at that precise moment when i realized what he was, the emergency services arrived. >> no one was killed at that cafe except for the bomber. reports say that he is believed to have been involved in the attack at the nearby theater as well. for this nurse, you know, just to have to try to make any sense of that. he went in to help and then he realized that this might have been, was the bomber. >> absolutely horrific. now we know brussels is still on lockdown and the prime minister is expected to hold a press conference in about an hour from now. we'll bring that to you live.
2:57 am
>> thank you for being with us. i'm george howell. >> i'm lynda kinkade. new day is just ahead. stay with us. which means you can watch in the house, in a treehouse, or even in miss pepperpie's house. pause in your pjs and hit play during a pb&j. nice! and enjoy some cartoons instead of listening to dad's car tunes. (dad) ♪meet you all the way! get the best of both worlds. directv at home and 2 wireless lines. from directv and at&t. rightabreva can heal itold sore, in as few as two and a half days when used at the first sign. without it the virus spreads from cell to cell. only abreva penetrates deep and starts to work immediately to block the virus and protect healthy cells. you could heal your cold sore, fast, as fast as two and a half days when used at the first sign. learn how abreva starts to work immediately at abreva.com
2:58 am
don't tough it out, knock it out, fast. with abreva. ♪ ♪ the beautiful sound of customers making the most of their united flight. power, wi-fi, and streaming entertainment. that's... seize the journey friendly. ♪
2:59 am
3:00 am
♪ we will take back the land that they are currently in. we will cut off their finances and we will hunt down their leadership. we will dismantle their networks and their supply lines and we will ultimately destroy them. >> breaking this morning. president obama sending a strong message to the other world leaders that these terrorists, isis, will

160 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on