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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  November 28, 2015 1:00am-3:01am PST

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three dead in colorado after a standoff at a woman's health center. we'll bring you the developments in the latest mass shooting in the u.s. paris counts down to a global climate change summit. security concerns threaten to overshadow the big event. and pope francis celebrates mass in uganda where the pursuit of peace and fight against poverty are top of the agenda. welcome to our viewers in the u.s. and around the around. i'm mindy kinkaid, and this is "cnn newsroom." we begin in the u.s. state
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of colorado where a 59-year-old man is accused of shooting and killing three people including a police officer during an attack at a woman's health clinic. the gunman gave himself up on friday after nearly six hours of gun battles with officers at the planned parenthood center. police say nine other people who were wound read in good condition now. one survivor describes his encounter with the gunman. >> i saw a man crawling to the front door. i saw the glass shatter when he crawled into the entryway. i saw this other fellow come behind him and shoot down and up and walk into the entryway. i kind of lost it there. i tried to get out of my car and run. i thought about that and said, no, i got back in the car, started it, put it in reverse, started backing out.
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he was in front of me and aiming at me. i just hit the gas. he started shooting. i was looking at his face. i think i had five to ten seconds to look at him, to try to remember who he was and why he doofsing that or whatever. then the shots came through the glass. i started bleeding. as i was looking at him, i saw blood. i didn't know if it was coming from my neck or lip or what. >> that victim was not shot but suffered cuts from his shattered windshield. the attack started friday local time. police told people in the area to stay inside as they dealt with the situation. kyung lah has more on how this unfolded. >> reporter: the first calls came in at 11:38 local time. reports of a man with a gun from inside the planned parenthood building in colorado springs. police quickly arrive on scene and are soon fired upon from inside the building.
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at least four officers are wounded. >> we saw officers fly into the parking lot with their lights on and everything. then we saw them pass our shop and go over behind the chase bank which is next door. then there were officers everywhere in the whole perimeter. then we saw one of the officers that was behind the chase bank -- we heard several gunshots and saw one of the officers go down behind his car. then the other officer helped him to safety. and then -- >> denise? you saw the officer go down? you saw an officer get shot? >> yes, yes, it was terrifying. >> reporter: the area which is heavily populated with shops and traffic quickly shuts down. business owners and customer told to shelter in place. >> we were told to go back to our cars. that's when a bullet cracked over my head and hit the stop sign on my left side. and i just kind of flipped a switch and tried to do crowd control and get people back to
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their cars as fast as i could. >> reporter: at this point police do not know if this is a single shooter or if more are involved. law enforcement set up a perimeter around the building. the fbi, atf, and bomb squads also on the scene. those who are able to escape the planned parenthood building are quickly taken to safety. the gunman remains inside. hours after the first call came in, the gunman is still firing on officers. police are unsure how many civilians are wounded and how many remain inside the building. it has become a potential hostage situation. >> we have not transported everyone to the hospital at this point. we're still working through the situation. >> reporter: police are tracking the gunman's every move inside the building. they're not only concerned that there may be hostages but also because of the possibility of explosive devices the gunman may have brought with him into the building before he began his assault. >> he is behind the counter with an ak looking at the ceiling.
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white male, trench coat, looks like maybe a beard. he's looking around, but he's still sitting. he's got the gun at a low, ready position. >> which way is he walking? >> toward the lobby. >> reporter: finally, just before 5:00 p.m. local time, the suspect is cornered and surrenders to police. his ties to planned parenthood and his motives still unclear. >> come out with hands up. >> we've got to take him out if he has any ieds of suspicion on him. >> are we in the way of the snipers? >> we have one suspect detained right now. >> good job. >> reporter: cnn, los angeles. joining subcommittee steve moore, a form -- joining me is steve moore, a former supervisor agent for the fbi. coming to us via skype from los angeles. thank you very much for joining us. there's three people dead. nine people wounded, and a 59-year-old man in custody.
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what do you make of this attack? >> well, it appears to have all the earmarks of a domestic terrorism attack. you have a potential political target, an abortion clinic -- it looks like a duck and walks like a duck, it's going to be a dick. this sure appears to be domestic terrorism. >> abortion, as you mentioned, is among the services at this planned parenthood clinic. it's an issue that has made the organization a target in the past. what do you make of the kind of people who carry out these attacks at facilities like this? >> the people who do this are similar to isis people. they take their violent tendencies and use a religion to justify it, specifically a religion that actually prohibits this kind of violence. these people are terrorists hiding behind a religion. >> do we need to see more security at these types of clinics given the number of
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attacks? >> i think they should probably consider that. you have literally almost a split in the united states among those who believe abortion is okay and those who believe it's taking a life. so you're going to have a lot of people on either side of this issue. then you've had these videos recently of planned parenthood allegedly selling body parts of aborted children. this is going to inflame the emotions of anybody on the side who believes that abortion is wrong. >> according to police reports, the suspect was carrying an ak-47, a military satisfassault. if t might surprise international viewers that in the u.s., you can buy an ak-47 on line with no background check in areas. do you think it's too easy for people in the u.s. to get their hands on weapons? >> i can tell you, i can't do
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that even being ex-fbi because i live in california. it's probably something where, again, we have to look at the type of people buying it. the whole gun issue, the guns are a pandora's box to open. we're not going to be able to get it in the box back. i think we need to look at mental health issues as much as we need to look at the availability of weapons. the abortion clinic attacks that i worked were all bombings. so i mean, if you don't use a gun, you can certainly use ammonium nitrate which is available at home depot. >> we know the death penalty does exist in colorado even though there hasn't been an execution for a while. is it likely do you think that this shooter might face the death penalty? >> i think it's very possible that he may face the death penalty. i think the big decision right
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now is going to be his motivation. if it turns out that it's a domestic terrorist act, then what's going to happen is the u.s. justice department is going to want to prosecute this as a domestic terrorist incident. then it -- the rules on -- the rules on the death penalty change just a little bit. if you remember after the oklahoma city bombing, there was a death penalty issued and executed. >> okay. we'll have to leave it there for now, as much as we'd like to continue the conversation. steve moore, special agent for the fbi. thank you very much for joining us. >> thank you. turkey's president is warning russia don't play with fire. he's responding to moscow apparently detaining a group of turkish businessmen on visa irregularities. russia threatened economic punishment after the turkish military shot down one of its warplanes. former cnn moscow bureau chief
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jill dougherty, now a researcher with the international center for defense and security, has more on the diplomatic fallout. >> reporter: russia is planning even more retaliation against the turkish government for the shootdown of its plane. prime minister medvedev had ordered the government to put together a list of possible actions. and now they have that list complete. they will formally present it saturday. the government already had c cut back on imports of food from turkey. it had ended at least temporarily visa-free travel by turks to russia. and also it urged russian tourists not to travel to turkey. now the defense ministry, meanwhile, has released its version of how that shootdown of the russian plan happened. they call it an ambush by the turks, and they also say that they informed the united states as the head of the u.s.-led coalition that their forces were
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going to be operating in a specific area. now, meanwhile, the turks are looking to try to calm the situation. president erdwan wants to meet with putin at a climate conference. the kremlin is saying no meeting has been discussed, and no meeting is planned. finally, an interesting comment by a senior aide to president putin. he gave the highlights of the meeting that president putin had with french president hollande and said that there is a recognition that eventually there will have to be a ground operation in order to squeeze the terrorists. but he said there is also an understanding that only the syrians can do that. just in, two peacekeepers and a spokesman were killed in a
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mission in mali. an unidentified group launched a mortar attack early in the morning. no one has claimed responsibility at this stage. we will of course continue to bring you the latest on that as soon as we learn more. pope francis celebrated mass at a shrine dedicated to ugandan martyrs near kampala, uganda. ♪ he paid homage to christians executed more than 100 years ago for refusing to denounce their faith. it's estimated that hundreds of thousands of people attended the mass. cnn's delia gallagher is in cam pallal with more on the pope -- kampala with more on the pope's activities and joins us by phone. the mass wrapped up a short time ago. give us a sense of what it was like. >> reporter: a couple hundred thousand people were there in the shrine area so they could see what was going on at the
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mass. outside the gate, it was lined with people on dirt roads, waiting to get a glimpse of the pope. many told us they had stayed overnight. they had walked fa from far away, to have a chance to see pope francis. when we came in from kenya, the airport here is 40 kilometers outside of the main city, kampala. the street going from the airport to kampala was jam-packed. i mean for kilometers and kilometers. obviously a very big event for the people of ugrand arch the shrine -- uganda. the shrine is the focus of his visit because it's the scene of a massacre of 45 christians back in the late 1800s. so they are kind of heroes for the people of uganda. and the people of uganda come from all around to go on pilgrimage every year. a very symbolic moment for the
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country. >> absolutely. a huge turnout. there the pope also covered some important issues. we know he visited a slum and has spoken out against corruption. what did he have to say? >> reporter: yes, he certainly has a political message. he's got a political message and a religious message here. on his political message on corruption in particular, we heard him in kenya and here after he met political leaders after he landed. and he told them that they need to work with integrity and transparen transparency, the same message he gave in kenya. on corruption, it's interesting that in the event after he met with politicians, the people, he also talked about corruption. of course, there's two levels. there's a political side, but there's also a cultural acceptance of corruption. he told the people, you know, corruption is like sugar. it tastes good, but ultimately it's bad for you. i know what i'm talking about because we have corruption also
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at the vatican. it's interesting to see pope francis in these situations when he's with politicians. he gives one type of speech. when he's with the people, he gives another type of speech. same message, different language. he's the people's pope. he knows how to have the credibility to talk to them in simple terms about something so important like corruption. in this country like in many african countries, they suffer from the fact that a large amount of their wealth -- and they are very wealthy in natural resources -- is held in the hands of a few people. society suffers from it. that's been a big message point for pope francis. >> it was interesting, he spoke of that sugar analogy given that it's a commodity that is often stolen and smuggled in the region. the other thing he also spoke about -- anti-homosexual law. obviously that's a major issue there. will the pope be preaching more tolerance? >> reporter: on that topic, i think he probably won't touch on
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it here. that's my sense. i think here you've got a religious focus. however, we've spoken to bishops about it. we've certainly spoken to the people of uganda about it. and what's interesting, of course, is the vatican's position is that the whole story for those who don't know is that there was an anti-gay bill being proposed here by the president, supported by the president, and western government threatened to cut off funding if the bill went ahead. and there are many aspects to this issue. in general terms, the vatican would obviously be against any discrimination against gay people. at the same time, they're also again threatening to cut off funding. they think that affects the poor the most. when you talk to people here in uganda about that issue and similarly in kenya, it's about a mentality and culturally don't
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accept homosexuality. some of them point, for example, the president of kenya who when obama came over in july said we can't impose a law upon people who don't accept it. there are a couple of aspects. one is legislation. the other is mentality. in any case, pope francis probably won't be talking that issue today in uganda. >> we appreciate the update and hope to talk to you soon. thank you very much. >> reporter: thank you. now, it was, of course, high security there in kampala for the pope's visit. security will be especially important in paris for the upcoming climate change conference which gets underway soon. it comes, of course, after those horrific terror attacks in paris. we will tell you what the country is doing to keep hundreds of world leaders safe.
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welcome back. thousands of demonstrators in brisbane, australia, attended a climate change rally on saturday. you see thousands of them marching for action. the protest is one of a number of demonstrations planned around
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the world this weekend ahead of the u.n. climate talks in paris. 150 heads of state will attend the cop-21 summit and security deployed as a precaution. cnn's jim bittermann has more. >> reporter: a wind turbine has sprouted in the middle of the avenue russia. there are solar panels, and the city is awash this displays and innovations. gerard who has single-handedly ridden boats across the atlantic and pacific oceans, set up what is said to be the largest solar-powered ocean-going vessel. >> the key to the climate is mostly in the ocean. i'm pleased to bring here in paris the city. >> reporter: for those drawn to paris the coming two weeks, this
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is make or break time for climate change. later will be too late, say the signs atop the french foreign ministry as the foreign minister himself knows trying to get the nations of the world to agree on anything is a tall order. never perhaps any did where have there been negotiations quite like these. starting monday, 195 countries will gather at a purpose-built conference center at the airport north of paris to try to find grammy on worldwide limitations on green-- agreement on worldwide limitations on greenhouse gases. the conference was nearly overshadowed by the vicious terrorist attacks two weeks ago that at first seemed might endanger the meetings here. some thought the climate talks should be called off. >> translator: i'm not convinced about the necessity at this moment to organize this event. i think we have other priorities today even if the environment is very important. >> reporter: for most, those worldwide issues trump even terrorism concerns. in a way, the paris conference is just too big to call off.
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everyone from the pope on down has emphasized how important it is for the planet to concentrate on the climate issue. president hollande said a few days ago that the best response to the terrorist attacks is to carry on with the climate summit. protecting the nearly 150 heads of state and 40,000 delegates where expected will be a challenge for french security forces. 2,800 police and army will patrol the site itself. 8,000 more will reinforce french borders. in all, 120,000 security personnel will be mobilized across the country. the leaders will only attend the first two days of the conference. but miles of roads will have to be closed off to get them to and from the conference site. something that is expected to throw normally impossible french traffic into chaos. with popular demonstrations and serious negotiations, the climate conference will go on. something the world's leaders feel cannot be postponed any
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longer. jim bittermann, cnn, paris. joining me is founder of avaz, an advocacy group that encourages global action on climate change. thank you very much for joining us. now two years ago, your organization asked members to contribute to a 30-month campaign to bring the world to a climate deal at this paris summit. what did that campaign involve, and what are you hoping will be achieved? >> reporter: 18 month ago, people were miserable about the issue. there didn't seem to be any political momentum whatsoever on it. and the outlook was bleak. a year ago, we saw the largest mobilization in history on climate change. hundreds of thousands in the streets across the planet. it changed the music. we've seen the best year of progress ever on climate change. much higher commitments from each nation state and unpress denlted commitments from the -- unprecedented commitments from the broad range of issues.
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we're heading into paris with a lot of political momentum. the job is to make sure the summit delivers. >> you founded this online activism group that specializes in e-mail mobilizations and petitions. what do you say to critics who claim your group doesn't engage with people on the issue because it's easy to click on and sign a protest, feel good about it for a moment, and then forget about it? >> i think it's silly, the criticism. the internet empowers all kinds of action, including offline. we spearheaded the movement on climate change last year and are doing it again. we're seeing early marches from australia and new zealand. the largest marches in australia and new zealand's history. we think we'll beat last year's record. our community of 42 million people has mobilized. there are hundreds of thousands for this. i think this is just -- today is a great day to ask the question. you can see what's going on around the world in the streets as a result of this activism. >> you mentioned some of the things you've achieved. where do you think your group
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has made the biggest difference? >> oh, i think on climate change, one thing that recently lapped is there's a goal -- that happened is there's a goal we need out of this paris conference. the world commits the only solution to climate change, to transition our economies to 100% clean energy. when we first started pushing that goal, it was said to be pie in the sky. there was no way. we pushed merkel, the chairman of the g-7 talks, recently. she stepped up. obama joined her and other leaders committed as the world's richest polluting countries to decarbonize the global economy. that was a real eye-opener for a lot of people that, wow, there is a potential for profound tectonic movement on this issue. it's being pushed by people. there are no spectators. like if you're at home watching now, what happens in the next two weeks depends on all of us. we've got to get on the phones to our governments. we've got to be on the internet. we've got to be in the streets. what people do will determine
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whether this conference is a success or not. >> of course. many believe that no matter what comes out of the paris conference it won't keep the temperature from rising two degrees by 2100. at the end of the conference, what do you think realistically would be a successful outcome? >> i think paris needs to deliver a goal, a price tag, and a mechanism. the goal is 100% clean energy worldwide. the price tag is when the fact that you can't ask poor countries who haven't contributed to the problem nearly as much and need development to pay for this transition. so the price hike that's been agreed is $100 billion a year from rich polluters to the poor countries. we have to recognize that, you're right, we'ron track with the current pledges we have. we're on track for three degrees warming. we've got to get it dowto down. we need a mechanism that will ratchet up ambition over time. those are the three things that will ensure success. >> thank you very much for joining us.
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>> thank you very much. now ahead, we'll explain the extra challenges officers face as they try to bring a deadly standoff to an end in the u.s. state of colorado. still to come, stay with us. i have asthma... ...one of many pieces in my life. so when my asthma symptoms kept coming back on my long-term control medicine, i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment. once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms. breo is for adults with asthma not well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. breo won't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden breathing problems. breo opens up airways to help improve breathing for a full 24 hours. breo contains a type of medicine that increases the risk of death from asthma problems and may increase the risk of hospitalization in children and adolescents. breo is not for people whose asthma is well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. once your asthma is well controlled, your doctor will decide if you can stop breo and prescribe a different asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid.
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welcome back. hello, i'm mindy kinkaid. here's an update of the top stories this hour. a u.s. law enforcement official tells cnn a 59-year-old man is the shooter who killed three people at a woman's health clinic. officers and the gunman exchanged fire for six hours friday in colorado. the six-year police veteran is among the dead. investigators have not yet
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released a motive. turkey's president is warning that russia is playing with fire with its threats of economic sanctions. russia reportedly detained a group of turkish businessmen over visa irregularities. this after turkey shot down a russian warplane. an incident which left two russians dead. in nigeria, a suicide bomber attacked a shiite moslem procession killing at least 21 people on friday. the march is an annual ritual for the religious minority in northern nigeria. nobody has claimed responsibility, but the terrorist group boko haram has carried out similar attacks in the region. people in new zealand gathered saturday to mourn one of the nation's greatest rugby players. the former all black player died suddenly earlier this month. a traditional ceremony called the day of the family was held on friday. returning to our top story now. the mass shooting in colorado that left three people dead and
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nine wounded. police say the gunman exchanged gunfire for nearly six hours before surrendering. tom foreman has a closer look at the colorado springs area to see what police were dealing with. >> reporter: one of the big questions about this is how did the situation here in the middle of colorado go on for so long, why was it so difficult for police to pin it down. part of the problem was the potential threat to so many people around. in the beginning, police closed down this road because it was not clear exactly where the shooting was coming from or where it was aimed. if you add up all the houses out in this main grid here of the roads that close in around it, you're getting 750, 800 different homes. you have a lot of businesses up in here. you have businesses down in here. an awful lot of people in the area potentially affected. when there is this confusion, it was partially spurred by the fact that it appears that the shooter, the suspected shooter in all this, was over in this
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area, authorities say. but his shots were reaching out into other areas. so much so that there were people in the shopping center down here who were told they could not come outside. they had to stay inside and lock the doors. this is a bank down in this area here. more businesses over in here. all of that had to be protected by police until they figured out exactly what was happening. and then even when they narrowed it down to saying it really was about the planned parenthood building right over here, they still had a large building next to it that had medical offices in it. they also had this building up here which takes care of senior citizens. there were dozens of people in the general vicinity that had to be protected, not merely from this long gun, the rifle that the suspect has or police say he had, but also these devices that they're talking about. possible propane tank. obviously they're talking about the idea that they might have exploded at some point. all of that is what made this go on and on and on. yes, it looked like it was just
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one incident in one building when you get to the end of that time. before then, an awful lot of people potentially affected. >> our thanks to tom foreman for that report. what's not clear is why the gunman went on this rampage. earlier cnn's reporter spoke with natalie allen about the investigation. you would think at the beginning of this that this would end -- wouldn't end in a shoot-out and they would have to neutralize the target, being the subject himself. whatever may have come over him, he made the right decision to get up -- to give up. what's important here, the information that's going to be ascertained from him as to, one, why did you do this, two, who else may have been involved in helping this planning and staging this unfortunate incident, and also it gives us a lot of history to his mind, where he's from, what's his thoughts expect ideologies may be whether it's around this
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clinic, whether it's around some other issue such as mental illness, whatever the case he may be struggling with. this is certainly going to be a long investigation that's going to cover a great deal of territory in and around that building in and of itself. certainly they're going to question the subject. hopefully he's able to give some idea as to why and how he planned this. and that would give us further insight, too, into other things that may come out of this investigation. i think it's also important to note, as well, once search warrants are given to officers to go into his vehicle and residences that he may own will be revealing, as well, too, in terms of his planning of this operation. still to come, the sister of one of the paris attackers speaks exclusively to cnn. you'll hear why she says she can't believe what he did.
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now for the latest on the terror investigations in europe. belgian authority have arrested and charged one person with links to terrorist activities. two others have been placed in detention. in brussels, the city's threat level was lowered to serious, the second highest ranking after it was in lockdown last weekend. the small town outside the belgian capital was once called the city of jihadis after dozen of its citizens left for syria. since taking office, the mayor has taken extraordinary steps to change the city's reputation including a de-radicalization officer for the town. we have this report. >> reporter: the fastest growing town in belgium is small, population 42,000. when it started feeding fighters to syria, things spiralled quickly. then stopped suddenly. >> the exodus started in 2012. >> reporter: in the two years, from 2012 to 2014 had 28 people
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leave to go syria. where are they now? >> some of them are still there. some of them are killed. >> reporter: the mayor took office in 2013 in the middle of the crisis. at the time, he says it was called the city of jihadis. >> young boys telling me, my dream is to be killed. >> reporter: today the mayor is cautiously declaring at least a measure of victory for his de-radicalization intervention efforts. >> radicalism, you win it or lose it on the corners of the street. >> reporter: counteracting messages from recruiters has taken the work of a coalition, the police, family, a lot of community members, and outreach workers. >> we try to send social workers toward the houses, engaging into the families. and providing help. >> reporter: the proof of success, they say, is that no one has made it to syria since may of 2014.
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nearby in brussels, raids to root out anyone with ties to the terrorist cell that perpetrated the paris attack continue making it clear there's a second front in the bigger battle across belgium. a country that is proportionately the largest supplier of foreign fighters to syria. what to do about those who come back? >> in my opinion, someone who has left belgium to go over there to fight in syria, he can stay there. >> reporter: seven of the 28 who traveled from the town to syria eventually returned to the town, he says. most were sent to prison, but the mayor says those who weren't are carefully and constantly monitored by police and the community. >> most of the people who came back, i don't think they are risky. >> reporter: he insists everyone must watch to keep anyone from falling through the cracks. now, we're learning more about one of the men behind the
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paris terror attacks. he was among three attackers at the bataclan concert hall. he then blew himself up. now his sister is speaking out exclusively to cnn. hala gorani spoke with her in french. the woman asked us ton show her face or -- us not to show her face or use her real voice. translator: he was one of the terrorists responsible for the worst attack in france in half a century. [ screams ] >> translator: one of three shooters at the bataclan concert hall on november 13th. his name revealed days later. sammy amimor. for the first time on international television, his sister is speaking out. at what point did you learn that your younger brother was one of the attackers? >> translator: at first, i was shocked. i was screaming in despair and sadness. when i gathered my thoughts, i thought this information was wrong. that there was a mistake.
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that it was impossible. >> reporter: a man who grew up to be a mass murderer, but whose life, according to his sister, started very differently. she shared personal pictures of her brother with us. the sami you knew, you're saying, was a nice guy. >> translator: exactly. he was a nice person, a sensitive person. a bit shy. somebody you can rely on. a generous person. someone nice who loved to laugh and joke. >> reporter: then that man disappeared, she said, literally, traveling to sear to join isis. his father reportedly went after his son to try to convince him to come home to no avail. his family actually stayed in touch with him while he was in syria. the last message from him was sent in august of this year. in your last contact with him, was it just an ordinary conversation? >> translator: yes. >> reporter: with absolutely no
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sign that anything like this could happen? >> translator: no. no sign. totally normal conversation. i asked how he was. he told me, listen, i am very well. i have a lot of thing to deal with at the moment, but i will call very soon. send kisses to everyone and to my cat. >> reporter: how do you reconcile your brother who says kiss the parents, kiss the cat, i'll call you soon? the little boy you grew up with with the man who so coldly murdered dozens of helpless people in a concert hall? >> translator: to me, there's no link. it's almost like it's not him. there's no chance. i know it's real, but -- >> reporter: so what happened to a man who worked as a bus driver, led a seemingly normal life in the northern paris
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suburb, that turned him into a mass killer and suicide bomber? >> translator: it started with the internet. he visited websites that were sort of controversial. then it continued with videos. then it stayed that way. beyond the world of the internet, there was also the real world. people came to talk to him. >> reporter: where? >> translator: in the area. here below the house. they came to talk to him more and more and told him he should attend the sermon of the mosque more regularly. that he should be more devoted to his practice of islam. they led him toward mosques that were more radical. >> reporter: these are some of the pictures of the victims. some of the 89 people ruthlessly killed that night. does his family feel any responsibility for his actions? >> translator: of course, there's part of us that says maybe it's our fault. maybe we could have done something different. maybe, just maybe.
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>> reporter: if you had an opportunity to speak to one of the family of the victims, what would you say to them? >> translator: sorry for your loss. we're sorry because we didn't want all of this. we understand the pain they feel, and we know that nothing will bring their families back, whatever we may say. we just hope that they can mourn their dead. >> reporter: hala gorani, cnn, paris. still to come on "cnn newsroom," miss canada can't get into china for this year's miss world competition. why the beauty queen says the country is punishing her. that story just ahead.
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welcome back. the miss world competition is underway in china. one contestant is missing from the event. miss world canada, anastasia lin, says she's been barred from entering china because of her outspoken views on human rights issues there. we have the details. >> reporter: meet anastasia lin, the beauty queen banned from
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mainland china. >> i was declared persona non-grata which means i'm not welcome to the country anymore. i'm not welcome to the place where i was born. >> reporter: lin n was born in china and moved to toronto as a teenager. now 25, she was crowned miss canada in may. she was stopped at the airport in hong kong friday, denied permission to board a connecting flight to a resort in mainland china where the miss world pageant finals are already underway. speaking to reporters, she accused chinese authorities of punishing her for speaking out against human rights abuses in her native country. >> i ask the chinese government why is it afraid to let in a beauty queen. ask them why, what kind of precedent this would set for future international events that it wants to host. ask them whether they would also bar olympic athletes from participating in the winter
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olympic games just because they have different views that the communist party don't agree with. >> reporter: she is also a believer in falun gong, a spiritual group banned in china that beijing describes as a cult. in an interview with cnn, lin says her father, who still lives in china, has also been harassed by security officials. the beauty queen says she's not giving up her fight. >> i think someone's got to speak out. this can't continue forever. foreign journalists, academics, they're stifled because the chinese communist party tried to use visa as leverage to silence them. i want to do my best to put a stop in this unhealthy trend. >> reporter: chinese officials aren't commenting. while miss world organizers tell reuters they had no information as to why a visa was not granted to lin but said she may be offered a place in the 2016 contest. paula newton, cnn. finally this hour, if you're in the u.s. and you didn't spend
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the friday after thanksgiving shopping until you dropped, you definitely were not alone. black friday is becoming a bit of a bleak friday for many big brands. alison kosik explains the reasons for the downturn. >> reporter: believe it or not, black friday isn't the powerhouse it used to be. in recent years, sales have been slipping. but it is still king. last year, in term of sales, black friday was the second biggest shopping day of the year behind super saturday, the saturday before christmas. but there's a lot that's stealing black friday's thunder. it's really become black friday november where stores offer deep discounts throughout the entire month leading up to turkey day. you look at yesterday alone, on thanksgiving, cybersales are expected to have reached $1.7 billion. kind of makes you wonder which is better for a bargain -- black friday or cyber monday. it really depends on what you're buying. if you're looking for clothing, shoes, or beauty items, cyber monday wins. if it's electronics that you're
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after like a laptop, you'll score a better bargain on black friday. when you shop on line where prices often change faster than in stores, if you're worried about missing out on the best deals, here's a little tip for -- there's an app for that. it's called paribus. you sign up and connect your inbook to the service and shop on line as you normally would. then when prices drop or you miss a coupon, it will get your money back for you. yep, it's just one more way to get all the benefits of black friday minus the crazy crowds. >> that does it for this edition of "cnn newsroom." i'll be back with another edition in a few minutes. first, you heard alison kosik talk about the crazy crowds on black friday. here's just a taste of those that were not so festive. [ yelling ] >> get off of me! life.eces in my so when my asthma symptoms kept coming back
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a gunman opens fire at a woman's clinic in colorado. police still searching for a motive in the attack. tensions remain high between russia and turkey after a russian jet is downed over syria. we'll look at what may be moscow's next move. and belgium on alert after police arrest and charge a suspect with terrorism. welcome to our viewers in the u.s. and around the world, i'm mindy kinkade, and this is "cnn newsroom." we begin with the latest on the deadly shooting at a woman's clinic in the u.s. police have not yet said why a
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gunman opened fire at a colorado planned parenthood killing three people. the gunman gave himself up to police friday after the standoff. he held officers off for nearly six hours. a police officer is among the dead. nine other people were wounded. five of them are police officers. all are said to be in a good condition at this stage. the attacks started friday local time. police telling people to stay inside as they dealt with the situation. kyung lah with more on how this unfolded. >> reporter: the first calls came in at 11:38 local time. reports of a man with a gun from inside the planned parenthood building in colorado springs. police quickly arrive on scene and are soon fired upon from inside the building. at least four officers are wounded. >> we saw officers fly into the parking lot with their lights on and everything. then we saw them pass our shop
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and go over behind the chase bank which is next door. then there were officers everywhere in the whole perimeter. then we saw one of the officers that was behind the chase bank -- we heard several gunshots and saw one of the officers go down behind his car. then the other officer helped him to safety. and then -- >> denise? you saw the officer go down? you saw an officer get shot? >> yes, yes, it was terrifying. >> reporter: the area which is heavily populated with shops and traffic quickly shuts down. business owners and customer told to shelter in place. >> we were told to go back to our cars. that's when a bullet cracked over my head and hit the stop sign on my left side. and i just kind of flipped a switch and tried to do crowd control and get people back to their cars as fast as i could. >> reporter: at this point police do not know if this is a single shooter or if more are
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involved. law enforcement set up a perimeter around the building. the fbi, atf, and bomb squads also on the scene. those who are able to escape the planned parenthood building are quickly taken to safety. the gunman remains inside. hours after the first call came in, the gunman is still firing on officers. police are unsure how many civilians are wounded and how many remain inside the building. it has become a potential hostage situation. >> we have not transported everyone to the hospital at this point. we're still working through the situation. >> reporter: police are tracking the gunman's every move inside the building. they're not only concerned that there may be hostages but also because of the possibility of explosive devices the gunman may have brought with him into the building before he began his assault. >> he is behind the counter with an ak looking at the ceiling. white male, trench coat, looks like maybe a beard. he's looking around, but he's still sitting. he's got the gun at a low, ready position. >> which way is he walking?
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>> toward the lobby. >> reporter: finally, just before 5:00 p.m. local time, the suspect is cornered and surrenders to police. his ties to planned parenthood and his motives still unclear. >> come out with hands up. >> we've got to take him out if he has any ieds of suspicion on him. >> are we in the way of the snipers? >> we have one suspect detained right now. >> good job. >> reporter: cnn, los angeles. now to give you background on planned parenthood, the nonprofit organization is the largest provider of reproductive health services in the united stat states. it provides sex education, contraception, breast and cervical cancer screenings as well as hiv screenings and abortions. it operates about 700 clinics across the u.s., and it's estimated that 2.7 million patients visit the facility each
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year. most of them from low-income families. planned parenthood says just 3% of the services it provides are abortions, and 80% of clients receive services to prevent unintended pregnancy. the clinic in colorado springs is surrounded by businesses and homes making the situation even more challenging for the officers who were trying to defuse the situation. tom foreman gives a closer look at what the police were dealing with. >> reporter: one of the big questions about this is how did the situation here in the middle of colorado go on for so long, why was it so difficult for police to pin it down. part of the problem was the potential threat to so many people around. in the beginning, police closed down this road because it was not clear exactly where the shooting was coming from or where it was aimed. if you add up all the houses out in this main grid here of the roads that close in around it, you're getting 750, 800 different homes. you have a lot of businesses up
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in here. you have businesses down in here. an awful lot of people in the area potentially affected. when there is this confusion, it was partially spurred by the fact that it appears that the shooter, the suspected shooter in all this, was over in this area, authorities say. but his shots were reaching out into other areas. so much so that there were people in the shopping center down here who were told they could not come outside. they had to stay inside and lock the doors. this is a bank down in this area here. more businesses over in here. all of that had to be protected by police until they figured out exactly what was happening. and then even when they narrowed it down to saying it really was about the planned parenthood building right over here, they still had a large building next to it that had medical offices in it. they also had this building up here which takes care of senior citizens. there were dozens of people in the general vicinity that had to be protected, not merely from
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this long gun, the rifle that the suspect has or police say he had, but also these devices that they're talking about. possible propane tank. obviously they're talking about the idea that they might have exploded at some point. all of that is what made this go on and on and on. yes, it looked like it was just one incident in one building when you get to the end of that time. before then, an awful lot of people potentially affected. >> our thanks to tom foreman for that report. earlier i spoke to a special agent for the fbi. he gave his thuts what may have -- thoughts on what may have motivated the gunman. >> it appears to have all the earmarks a domestic terrorism attack. you have a potential political target. you have the abortion clinic, and you have a person -- it's almost, you know, if it looks like a duck and walks like a duck, it's going to be a duck. this sure appears to be domestic terrorism.
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>> abortion, as you mentioned, is among the services at this planned parenthood clinic. it's an issue that has made the organization a target in the past. what do you make of the kind of people who carry out these attacks at facilities like this? >> the people who do this are similar to isis people. they take their violent tendencies and use a religion to justify it, specifically a religion that actually prohibits this kind of violence. these people are terrorists hiding behind a religion. >> do we need to see more security at these types of clinics given the number of attacks? >> i think they should probably consider that. you have literally almost a split in the united states among those who believe abortion is okay and those who believe it's taking a life. so you're going to have a lot of people on either side of this issue. then you've had these videos recently of planned parenthood allegedly selling body parts of aborted children.
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this is going to inflame the emotions of anybody on the side who believes that abortion is wrong. >> according to police reports, the suspect was carrying an ak-47, a military assault rifle. it might surprise some of our international viewers that in the u.s., you can buy an ak-47 on line with no background check in areas. do you think it's too easy for people in the u.s. to get their hands on weapons? >> i can tell you, i can't do that even being ex-fbi because i live in california. it's probably something where, again, we have to look at the type of people buying it. the whole gun issue, the guns are a pandora's box to open. we're not going to be able to get it in the box back. i think we need to look at mental health issues as much as we need to look at the availability of weapons. the abortion clinic attacks that i worked were all bombings. so i mean, if you don't use a
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gun, you can certainly use ammonium nitrate which is available at home depot. turkey's president is warning not to play with fire. a reaction to reports that russia detained a group of turkish businessmen over visa irregularities. the countries are at odds after turkey shot down a russian warplane which left two people dead. russian president putin has threatened economic retaliation. mr. erduwan has asked to meet with mr. putin next week when they attend the global climate conference in paris. so far, no signs if that will happen. the u.s. is concerned about its air strikes in syria because of russian missiles being installed at an airbase this. barbara starr explains. >> reporter: this is what worries u.s. pilots right now. the russian s-400 anti-air
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missile system being unloaded in syria. russian president putin says this massive weapon system will protect his pilots and aircraft in the wake of turkey shooting down a russian jet. >> translator: we need to have security for our air force. that is why we have set up the modern system, s-400. this is one of the most effective and efficient systems in the world. >> reporter: the s-400 will give russia the capability to control hundreds of miles of turkish and syrian airspace. the pentagon does not believe the system is fully operational yet but is watching developments by the hour. a u.s. military official tells cnn. if the russians activate it, u.s. warplanes may have to start flying with specialized electronic jamming aircraft to protect themselves or even forego some air strikes.
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u.s. officials tell cnn they need an agreement on how to proceed before the system is activated. >> i think there's a lot more talk going on at the tactical and operational level while the heads of state remain bellicose. but it is just upping the ante, and you never know when this might happen. >> reporter: putin remains furious, also saying the u.s. knew ahead of time the location of the russian jets but did nothing to stop the shootdown. two u.s. military officials tell cnn the u.s. did not know. and more complications for the obama administration. the french foreign minister saying in a radio interview, it may be time to work with rebel -- ♪ >> reporter: and president al assad's ground forces. >> translator: they should be of the free syrian army, sunni arab forces, and why not regime forces, too.
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>> reporter: no surprise, syria has already welcomed the french remarks, even though it's wholly unlikely rebel forces would join with assad. and it's about to get even more complicated for the obama administration. up to 50 special operations forces are scheduled to arrive in northern syria in the coming days. that is the first time they will be there. and defense secretary ash carter scheduled to testify before congress early next week where he's sure to get asked about all of this. barbara starr, cnn, the pentagon. are you watching "cnn newsroom." still to come, a small belgian town tries to shake its reputation as a breeding ground for jihadists. the steps officials are taking to keep their city safe. ♪ just look at those two. happy. in love. and saving so much money on their car insurance by switching to geico... well, just look at this setting.
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welcome back. we're following a developing story in west africa. two peacekeepers and one contractor have been killed at a u.s. base in northern mali. 20 other were wounded. a u.n. spokesman tells cnn an unidentified group fired mortars early in the morning. no one has claimed responsibility for the attack. now to the terror investigations across europe. in the belgium capital, security was tight at a popular christmas market on friday. the attraction in brussels opened as the city's terror threat was lowered to its second
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highest ranking. separately, belgian officials arrested and charged a person with terrorist attacks. but they haven't released any other details. a small town near brussels was once called the city of jihadis after dozens of its citizens left for syria. since taking office, the mayor has taken some extraordinary steps to change the city's reputation, including a de-radicalization officer for the town. >> reporter: the fastest growing town in belgium is small, population 42,000. when it started feeding fighters to syria, things spiralled quickly then stopped suddenly. >> the exodus started in 2012. >> reporter: in the two years, from 2012 to 2014 had 28 people leave to go syria. where are they now? >> some of them are still there. some of them are killed. >> reporter: the mayor took office in 2013 in the middle of
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the crisis. at the time, he says it was called the city of jihadis. >> young boys telling me, my dream is to be killed. >> reporter: today the mayor is cautiously declaring at least a measure of victory for his de-radicalization intervention efforts. >> radicalism, you win it or lose it on the corners of the street. >> reporter: counteracting messages from recruiters has taken the work of a coalition, the police, family, a lot of community members, and outreach workers. >> we try to send social workers toward the houses, engaging into the families. and providing help. >> reporter: the proof of success, they say, is that no one has made it to syria since may of 2014. nearby in brussels, raids to root out anyone with ties to the terrorist cell that perpetrated the paris attack continue making it clear there's a second front in the bigger battle across
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belgium. a country that is proportionately the largest supplier of foreign fighters to syria. what to do about those who come back? >> in my opinion, someone who has left belgium to go over there to fight in syria, he can stay there. >> reporter: seven of the 28 who traveled from the town to syria eventually returned to the town, he says. most were sent to prison, but the mayor says those who weren't are carefully and constantly monitored by police and the community. >> most of the people who came back, i don't think they are risky. >> reporter: he insists everyone must watch to keep anyone from we're learning more about one of the men behind the paris terror attacks. he was among three attackers at the bataclan concert hall. now his sister is speaking out exclusively to cnn. hala gorani spoke with her in french.
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the woman asked us not to show her face or use her real voice. >> reporter: he was one of the terrorist responsible for the worst attack in france in half a century. [ screams ] >> reporter: one of three shooters at the bataclan concert hall on november 13th. his name revealed days later. sami amimor. for the first time on international television, his sister is speaking out. at what point did you learn that your younger brother was one of the attackers? >> translator: at first, i was shocked. i was screaming in despair and sadness. when i gathered my thoughts, i thought this information was wrong. that there was a mistake. that it was impossible. >> reporter: a man who grew up to be a mass murderer, but whose life, according to his sister, started very differently. she shared personal pictures of her brother with us.
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the sami you knew, you're saying, was a nice guy. >> translator: exactly. he was a nice person, a sensitive person. a bit shy. somebody you can rely on. a generous person. someone nice who loved to laugh and joke. >> reporter: then that man disappeared, she said, literally, traveling to sear to join isis. his father reportedly went after his son to try to convince him to come home to no avail. his family actually stayed in touch with him while he was in syria. the last message from him was sent in august of this year. in your last contact with him, was it just an ordinary conversation? >> translator: yes. >> reporter: with absolutely no sign that anything like this could happen? >> translator: no. no sign. totally normal conversation. i asked how he was. he told me, listen, i am very well. i have a lot of thing to deal
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with at the moment, but i will call very soon. send kisses to everyone and to my cat. >> reporter: how do you reconcile your brother who says kiss the parents, kiss the cat, i'll call you soon? the little boy you grew up with with the man who so coldly murdered dozens of helpless people in a concert hall? >> translator: to me, there's no link. it's almost like it's not him. there's no chance. i know it's real, but -- >> reporter: so what happened to a man who worked as a bus driver, led a seemingly normal life in the northern paris suburb, that turned him into a mass killer and suicide bomber? >> translator: it started with the internet. he visited websites that were sort of controversial. then it continued with videos. then it stayed that way.
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beyond the world of the internet, there was also the real world. people came to talk to him. >> reporter: where? >> translator: in the area. here below the house. they came to talk to him more and more and told him he should attend the sermon of the mosque more regularly. that he should be more devoted to his practice of islam. they led him toward mosques that were more radical. >> reporter: these are some of the pictures of the victims. some of the 89 people ruthlessly killed that night. does his family feel any responsibility for his actions? >> translator: of course, there's part of us that says maybe it's our fault. maybe we could have done something different. maybe, just maybe. >> reporter: if you had an opportunity to speak to one of the family of the victims, what would you say to them? >> translator: sorry for your loss.
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we're sorry because we didn't want all of this. we understand the pain they feel, and we know that nothing will bring their families back, whatever we may say. we just hope that they can mourn their dead. >> reporter: hala gorani, cnn, paris. france is honoring the 130 victims of the paris terror attacks. president hollande led a solemn ceremony on friday. hada granny with more on -- haal gorani with more from paris. >> reporter: on a freezing morning, france paused to remember its victims again. ♪ >> reporter: two weeks after the atrocity, in the great courtyard -- [ speaking in french ] >> reporter: the names of the victims were read aloud. one by one along with their ages. a somber president hollande sat alongside survivors and loved ones of those who were killed.
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>> translator: friday the 13th of november, this day that we will never forget. france was struck shamefully. a horde of killers murdered 130 of our people and wounded hundreds of others. today, the entire nation is making an effort to live and is crying for the victims. >> reporter: the victims, said the president, were of all ages, but mostly under 35. they are being called the bataclan generation. hollande also remembered the foreigners who died in the attacks from 17 different countries. >> translator: parents who will never see their children again. children who will grow up without their parents. couples broken apart by the loss of a loved one. 17 countries share their grief with us today. these women, these men on that friday the 13th of november were in paris. >> reporter: poetry aside, the french president had harsh words for the terrorists.
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>> translator: i promise you solemnly that france will carry everything out to destroy the army of fanatics who committed these crimes. despite the drama, despite the spilled blood, france keeps her principles of hope, tolerance intact. >> reporter: france and its vaubs might be in-- its values might be intact, but for the relatives, the grief is still raw. hala gorani, cnn, paris. ♪ still to come here on "cnn newsroom," hundreds of thousands of people gather in uganda to watch the pope celebrate mass. why he picked this location and who he honored in a live report just ahead. also, we shift gears to tell you about a ugandan man and his special four-wheeled creation.
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hello, here's an update of the top stories we're following this hour -- turkey's president is warning moscow ton play with fire. he reacted on friday to reports that russia detained a group of turkish businessmen over visa irregularities. the countries at odds after turkey shot down a russian warplane. russian president putin has threatened economic retaliation. u.s. republican presidential candidate ben carson arrived in jordan on friday for a two-day trip to meet with syrian refugee. his campaign says this is not a press event but a way to better understand the refugee crisis. carson has faced scrutiny over his understanding of foreign
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policy issues. two weeks after terrorists killed 130 people in paris, belgian authorities have made a new arrest in their investigation. the federal prosecutor's office in brussels isn't naming the person but says the suspect is charged with terrorist attacks and participating in the activities of a terrorist organization. investigators in the u.s. state of colorado are working to determine what led a gunman to open fire at a women's clinic. three people are dead at the end of a nearly six-hour siege at a planned parenthood clinic. one was a police officer. authorities have not identified the other two victims. nine people were wounded. one survivor describes his encounter with the gunman. >> i saw a man crown jewelling to the front door -- crawling to the front door. i saw the glass shatter. he crawed into the entryway. i saw another fellow come behind
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and shoot down and up and walk to the entryway. i just kind of lost it there. i tried to get out of my car and run. i thought about that and said no. i got back in the car, started it, put it in reverse. started backing out, then he was in front of me. he was aiming at me. i just hit the gas. he started shooting. i was looking at his face. i think his ten seconds, five to ten seconds to look at him, to try to remember who he was and why he was doing that or whatever. then the shots came through the glass. then i started bleeding. as i was looking at him, i saw blood. i didn't know if it was coming from my neck or lip or what. >> the survivors are said to be in good condition. the gunman surrendered after the standoff. a law enforcement source tells cnn he is a 59-year-old man. a while ago near
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kampala,gankampala, gra uganda, was paying homage to christians executed more than 100 years ago for refusing to denounce their faith. it's estimated that hundreds of thousands of people attended the mass. cnn's vatican correspondent, delia gallagher is on the line. she was at the mass earlier. explain what it was like. >> reporter: well, i think it's really been interesting to see how many people have come out and from how far here in kampala to meet pope francis. we talked to people who said they walked for miles. people have come from neighboring countries to get a glimpse of the pope. certainly you saw that last night when we came in from the airport, about 40 kilometers from the airport to the capital city here just lined with people, 10, 20 deep that had come to see the pope. of course, he's doing all of his events in the main city. 84% of uganda's population lives in the countryside. so for at least the people who are on the outskirts of this
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capital city, they were able to get a quick glimpse of the pope driving by in his four-door kia which is what he's chosen to go around in when he's not in his popemobile here in uganda. now the pope is resting. it's 1:30 in the afternoon. he's having a lunch break. his next event is a youth rally which is where i am now. at the air strip, an old military air strip that they use for outdoor events. holds about 100,000 people. people are still coming in because it's still about an hour and a half away. but it's obviously a major focus for the pope in any country he goes to to speak to the youth. particularly in africa because, of course, some of the problems that they deal with like corruption, like the radicalization of youth are generational things. so the pope tried to work on a political level with political leaders in those messages. but he also tries to work at the level of young people so that they don't fall into certainvises that will continue
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-- certain vices that will continue to damage their country. >> and explain the level of security needed for a visit like this. >> reporter: well, you know, coming into this trip, it was really overshadowed by the security. he's doing a three-country visit, kenya, uganda, and tomorrow is the central african republic which is what is considered the most dangerous leg of the trip because it's an unstable place that's had several years of civil war. there's not a lot of infrastructure there to guarantee the pope's safety. two things on, the plane coming from rome, the pope was asked and said, oh, the only thing i'm worried about are the mosquitoes. of course, his spokesman said, look, his security has gone and done extra sweeps, particularly in the central african republic. clearly they work with the military of kenya, of,gan grand of uganda.
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it is full of military, it is full of police in kenya and nairobi. they have the roads pretty much closed off. that doesn't necessarily mean a lot. it's not like when they close the roads in new york. people are wandering around, cars are still going through. i have to say that the security is very visible. and a lot of it depends on the pope's own vatican security. they're the ones who make the call in terms of whether or not the pope can go somewhere. so far we've been told last night by the vatican spokesman that we are going ahead tomorrow to the central african republic. >> okay. let's hope that goes well. delia gallagher, thank you very much for joining us. as we await the pope's next event, cnn's david mckenzie stopped in kampala where he met a man who built a pope mobile that he hopes will get pope francis' attention. take a look. >> reporter: when ugandan mechanic moses got word that pope francis was coming to town, there was only one thing to do. build the pontiff a popemobile
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for his trip to kampf had. -- to kampala. okay, it's a bit snug. so the pope, he says, is smaller than me, but also they can pull the doors off while he drives the popemobile through the crowds of kampala so he can wave. moses got parts locally and pulled images of the pope from the net. he says it will all appeal to the people's pope. "wherever the pope goes," he says, "he's not a lavish person. he prefers to be down earth and interacting with ordinary people." [ chanting ] >> reporter: pope francis raised eyebrows when he arrived in the u.s. recently in a fiat 500. and his official popemobile was pretty basic, too. moses believes his hand-built
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four-wheel drive has another edge over an imported popemobile. "i made a rugged popemobile," he says, "to suit the nature of our roads which are rough and full of potholes." moses hopes pope francis will take a ride in his popemobile, or at the least, he says, his home-grown holy vehicle deserves a papal blessing. david mckenzie, cnn, kampala, uganda. still to come, security will be especially high in paris this coming week for the climate change conference. we'll tell you how the country intends to keep hundreds of world leaders safe. stay with us. i have asthma... ...one of many pieces in my life. so when my asthma symptoms kept coming back on my long-term control medicine, i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment. once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms. breo is for adults with asthma not well controlled on a long- asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. breo won't replace a rescue inhaler
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thousands of demonstrators in brisbane,ous, have called for -- brisbane, australia, have called for a clean energy economy. the real was one of a number of protests planned across the world ahead of the u.n. climate talks in paris. demonstrators demanded climate justice in countries and take action to reduce vulnerable nations. some say the philippines have been hit by changing weather patterns including deadly typhoons that are worsened by climate change. 150 national leaders will attend the summit, and thousands of security personnel will be deployed throughout france as a precaution. cnn's jim bittermann has more. >> reporter: a wind turbine has sproult sprouted in the middle of the avenue. a globe appeared in the middle of the environmental ministry. paris seems as if it's being paved over with solar panels.
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there are solar panels, and the city is awash this displays and innovations. gerard who has single-handedly ridden boats across the atlantic and pacific oceans, set up what is said to be the largest solar-powered ocean-going vessel. for those drawn to paris over the coming two weeks, this is make or break time for cliencma change. as the foreign minister knows, trying to get the nations of the world to agree on anything is a tall order. and never before in france or perhaps anywhere have there been negotiations quite like these. starting monday, 195 countries will gather at a purpose-built conference center at the airport north of paris to try to find agreement on worldwide limitations on greenhouse gases. the complex negotiations were
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nearly overshadowed by the vicious terrorist attacks in paris two weeks ago which at first seemed as if they might endanger the meetings here. in fact, some people felt that the climate talks should be called off. >> translator: i'm not convinced about the necessity at this moment to organize this event. i think we have other priorities today, even if the environment is very important. >> reporter: for most, those worldwide issues trump even terrorist concerns. in a way, the paris conference is just too big to call off. everyone from the pope on down has family sized how important it is for the planet to concentrate on the climate issue. president hollande said just a few days ago that the best response to the terrorist attacks is to carry on with the climate summit. but protecting the nearly 150 heads of state and 40,000 delegates where expected will be a real challenge for french security forces. 2,800 police and army will patrol the site itself. 8,000 more will reinforce french
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borders. in all, 120,000 security personnel will be mobilized across the country. the leaders will only attend for the first two days of the conference. miles of roads will have to be closed off to get them to and from the conference site. something that is expected to throw normally impossible french traffic into chaos. with popular demonstrations and serious negotiations, the climate conference will go on. it's something the world's leaders feel simply condition be postponed any longer. jim bittermann, cnn, paris. texas is dealing with dangerous icy conditions in parts of the state. meteorologist karen maginnis is at the world weather center with the latest. how bad is it? >> it's fairly bad as folks are really asked to avoid all the highways and the secondary roads. they closed down a portion of the interstates running across the panhandle of texas into oklahoma. in kansas, ice has been a big
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problem. look at the folks that were struggling on the roadways here. they were putting sand and some salt down on those roadways. already five fay tats. it looks like -- five fatalities. it looks like the icy event will continue for the next 12 to 24 hours. an ice warning in effect. heavy rainfall from northeastern texas to the tennessee valley up toward the mid-atlantic region. two to four inches expected. and already the rainfall has turned deadly. and what has been the last several months, exceptional rainfall across this region. what we're seeing is kind of an interesting scenario with very mild air across the southeast. temperatures could be near record-setting levels going into saturday. ice on the back side of this. we saw pictures coming out of the deadly event in colorado. we're also looking at additional snowfall accumulation expected there. so kind of a wild chain of
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events weatherwise taking place. we will see the potential for still some traveler delays as we head to the central united states. and it looks like across adelaid, for the most part, the fires have diminished. they're still putting out hot spots where we saw about 85,000 hectares burned. some describe this as a fireball. more than 90 homes and businesses were destroyed. there were hundreds of firefighters that were battling these blazes all across the region right around adelaid. it is primarily in an agricultural and growing region. and there were thousands of animals that were also across the area that were killed. this just the beginning of fire season down under. back to you. >> tough conditions back there. karen maginnis, thank you very much. american skiing star lindsey
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vonn is renowned for smashing records on the slopes. she's also known for dating golfer tiger woods. what she says about that relationship next. ♪ ♪ the beautiful sound of customers making the most of their united flight. power, wi-fi, and streaming entertainment. that's... seize the journey friendly. ♪ ♪ just look at those two. happy. in love. and saving so much money on their car insurance by switching to geico... well, just look at this setting. do you have the ring? oh, helzberg diamonds. another beautiful setting.
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welcome back. people in auckland, new zealand, gathered on saturday to mourn one of the nation's greatest rugby players, jonah lomu. the former all black died earlier this month. he was just 40 years old. a traditional pacific islander ceremony called the day of the family was held. ♪ lomu's sons wore their father's number 11 jersey. tens of thousands are expected to attend the memorial service in auckland monday. she's the golden girl of american skiing. lindsey vonn broke the record in january for the most world cup race victories. she now has 67 wins under her belt. and she promises this isn't the end. we have more from the skiing superstar.
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♪ >> reporter: when it comes to pizza, lindsey vonn knows the best place in town. the local hero has been a regular here since her early skiing days. >> our family ate here three to of course times a week. the pizza was a main source of food for a while. >> reporter: you are probably the last girl of your generation standing in women's ski racing. how do you feel about that? >> it's kind of weird. it's really surreal. there's a couple girls left around my age. my generation is kind of gone now. the new generation is coming up. i feel like a veteran. i am mature, sure. >> reporter: her long history on the tour has brought with it a long list of injuries. and this year is no different. after fracturing her ankle in training this summer, lindsey of bo back in hospital again two weeks ago after trying to break up a
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fight between their two dogs. [ barking ] >> my dad actually had a talk with me and said, you know, i think you should look at retiring and being able to walk when you're 50. i'm like, i appreciate your love and support, dad, but it's not going to happen. >> reporter: six months ago, she ended her three-year relationship with golfer tiger woods. it was a high-pro-mile match that brought her very publicly into the spotlight. do you have any regrets about that period in your life now? >> no, definitely not. i loved him, and i still love him. i had an amazing three years with him. sometimes things just don't work out. unfortunately, it didn't work out for us. i don't have any regrets. yeah, i think we're both in a pretty good place. >> reporter: are you looking for a new relationship in your life? is that something you -- >> i don't know. >> reporter: want?
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>> i don't know. i don't know if i'm ready to be in another relationship. i kind of realized realistically i only have three good years of racing left. it's nice to be able to just focus on that and focus on my career. i don't know. you never know what's going to happen. >> reporter: her relationship with woods has meant more time on the red carpet in recent years. dressing up is not her favorite part of the job. she admits to being self-conscious when it comes to her body. >> probably the least confident person on the slopes that you'll find. especially this time of year. you know, i'm trying to bulk up kwib kwiblt. i definitely -- quite a bit. i definitely feel out of place on the red carpet. i don't know. >> reporter: in what way? >> i'm just bigger. i'm a big girl. amy schumer of like a little bit bigger and, like, we were comparing our butt sizes.
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and i think we were like three times the size of anyone at this fashion show we were at. it's not the norm, and i think it should be. maybe it will be eventually. right now's definitely not. >> reporter: what does the next three-year period hold for you? where do you want to be? >> i just want to keep winning races. that's really my own goal. long term, world championships and olympics. after that, i don't know what's going to happen. i don't know if i'll retire or keep going. >> reporter: it's that never-say-die attitude that makes lindsey so universally loved here. the hometown champion who will keep fighting until the end. christina macfarland, cnn, colorado. that does it for this edition of "cnn newsroom." i'm mindy kinkade. in the u.s., "new day." is ahead. for everyone else, "amanpour" starts in a moment. believe it.
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>> a guy got out and actually fell on the ground, where you could see all the gunshots and oh my god, it terrified me. >> this morning, we are learning more about the gunmen who killed three people, including a police officer at that planned parenthood clinic in colorado. investigators, of course, working to find a motive here. it is still covered in secrecy, presidential candidate ben carson visits a refugee camp in amman, jordan. we are taking you there live. and

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