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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  November 29, 2015 1:00am-3:01am PST

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we have now stopped it. i don't know how terrorism can be stopped, but history's rhythm be stopped, but history's rhythm is on our side. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com . paris launches massive security operation as more than 100 world lead aers rife for a crucial summit on climate change. plus, pope francis about to arrive in the central african republic. what he's hoping to accomplish in the war torn country. russia's slaps tough sanctions on turkey over the downing of a fighter jet. welcome to our viewers in the u.s. and around the world. i'm lynda kinkade. this is "cnn newsroom." world leaders will begin to arrive in paris today ahead of the conference.
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protests have erupted around the world to demand action on climate change ahead of the international summit which begins on monday. ♪ in indonesia protesters gathered urging the government to reduce a pen an si on fossil fuel. protests have been seen in australia, new zealand, switzerland and the philippines. 24 greenpeace activists have been placed under how arrest suspectsed of demonstrations. there will be security for the event. joining me now is cnn correspondent phil black live from paris. phil, we've seen so main demonstrations people calling for action on climate change. in paris, security concerns. demonstrations there were canceled. >> reporter: that's right,
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lynda. organizers have been planning a huge march here, hundreds of thousands of people it was hoped would take part joining those people around the world in a popular demonstration, if you like, demanding a strong, ambitious result from the climate negotiations taking place here over the next two weeks. it's not to be. paris is making -- insisting the talks go ahead, guaranteed the massive -- the tens of thousands of other people that will be attending the official part of this event. there's still been a cost, that festival type aspect to it. the area where people themselves can get involved in pressure leaders, negotiators to come out with a good result. that's been scaled back if not wiped out entirely. the march can't go ahead. activists are planning other smaller, more nuanced events around paris today.
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we're seeing lots of shoes laid out at a location close to the march or where the march was to be. that's obviously still an attempt to demonstrate. numbers support, securing a strong climate field here. there's talk of a large human chain later today as well today. these are much smaller than the hundreds of thousands of people expected for the march today. the hope is that they have is that the emotional reaction to the attacks here in paris will be one that still encourages world leaders, their negotiators and representatives to work harder at coming up with a strong agreement at the end of the two weeks of talks. that, many say, will be the ultimate act of defiance to those who took so many lives here in paris two weeks ago. >> this event would have been a security headache even before the paris terror attacks happened. give us a sense of the security situation. >> reporter: well, it's incredibly visible. it is everywhere really.
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you mentioned 120,000 police. the military police, other security forces. that's nationally. that's how many people, as well as soldiers as well. that's how many have been mobilized to protect france at the moment. they're around the site of the conference itself. big security perimeter there. a lot of streets will be locked off as more leaders arrive and the talks get under way officially tomorrow. 3,000 security forces or around that number alone protecting that site. a massive operation. when you get a sense of those resources required to hold something like this, protect so many world leaders and visitors and so forth, you have to understand, the environmental activists themselves can understand why perhaps a huge march involving hundreds of thousands of people are something the police security forces and the government wouldn't have been able to deal with today. >> huge effort by a lot of people involved. phil black in paris. we'll check in with you later. thank you very much for joining
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us. scientists running for months all the way from norway to paris. it's all to raise awareness for how climate change has affected the arctic. take a look. >> irwin knudson is a climate scientist from norway. he's been running for nearly four months. >> they call this journey call to paris. it started in the arctic. i caught up with him thousands of kilometers later here in northern france. >> yes, today, we're going to do about 32 kilometers. that's quite an average day for us. >> he only carries one extra pair of clothes and already on
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his fourth pair of shoes. >> all i have in this bag is everything i have. >> today is almost eight hours on the road. through villages and across farms. his destination, a u.n. climate summit called cop 21. >> i had to bike to keep up. >> running and biking across half the globe, it's really to connect stories from people around the world. for me, the distance -- the world has gotten smaller rather than larger over this journey as i'm seeing it's possible, actually, to move just by running from pretty much polar regions into paris. >> he's running the farthest of the group. he's been 2100 kilometers on the road, running almost a marathon a day. started in arctic norway. some days have been beautiful, other days like this, snowy and rainy in france. he's on the way to the cop 21 climate talks to bring stories of the people he's met along the road.
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>> in the arctic things start changing rapidly. it's warming more than twice as fast as the global average. this is all having huge consequences for example, for polar bears, but also for people living in the reson. in paris, i hope we can continue on this path and take another step in a big and important step in the rye direction. >> the recent terror attacks in paris haven't stopped him. if anything, he's more determined to arrive with a message of hope. john sutter, cnn, france. in a few minutes, i'll ask an expert about the climate issues to be discussed at that paris summit. stick around for that one. the pope has left uganda and expected to arrive in the central african republic very shortly. he hopes tensions between muslims and christians have -- this is the first time the pope visited an active war zone
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drawing concern from his security personnel. pope francis hopes he can still make a difference. sectarian violence in the country led to security concerns ahead of the last leg of france's travels through africa. as i mentioned. vatican analyst john allen weighed in on what the pope hopes to accomplish during his time in the central african republic. >> reporter: what difference can he make? that obviously remains to be seen. but this is a country, as you say that has been locked in a bloody civil war for a couple of years. it's a place where it breaks christian muslim and 80% of the population is christian. i think pope francis believes, if he hits the ground and calls on the organized christian, if not to lay down their arms, at least to observe a cease-fire to allow peaceful election toss unfold, he could make a real difference. we'll see if that happens.
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i think this is another indication of how committed francis is to be a peace pope. >> ahead, we'll bring you the pope's arrival in the central african republic live as it happens. in tokyo, a lawyer was killed on saturday. he was shot when gunfire broke out between security forces and the pkk militants during a news afternoons. two turkish police officers were also killed and another wounded. meanwhile, russia is hitting tokyo with economic sanctions. it's a reaction to the downing of one of its warplanes by turkish forces last week. among the penalties, imported into russia, moscow curtailed visa-free travel between the two countries. russian travel agents will no longer sell packages for trips into turkey. cnn's ian lee joins us now from istanbul. before we get to that, you have
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more information on the downing of that russian jet. >> reporter: that's right, lynda. we're hearing now that the body of the pilot of that plane has been delivered to turkey, that it was late last night the body was handed over to the turks. they were there were men of the orthodox religion that took the body and prepared it. it will be handed over to the russians. this has been a very sensitive point as well as getting that body back to the russians. this is something that the russians wanted to have done swiftly. now we're seeing that the body, in fact, has been handed over. >> very tough situation. of course, the fallout tonight continues. russia is certainly happeneds down a lot of sanctions to turkey. >> reporter: that's right. this isn't going to be a forgive
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and forget moment for putin. we have seen a number of economic sanctions. you mentioned tourism. that really is a big one. they bring roughly $4 billion worth of tourism to turkey every year. you have that visa-free travel being thrown out as well. that's going to make it a lot more difficult for businessmen from both countries going back and forth. we've heard from moscow and ankrah that you shouldn't go to the other country unless it's absolutely necessary. there's other measures that russia could take still. haven't seen any movement toward the gas. turkey gets 60% of its gas from russia. we're watching this nuclear power plant, that multibillion dollar project. the one that russia is building for turkey. there's a lot that could happen. it all hinges, what we're hearing, on an apology. putin demands an apology from
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president erdogan. the other wants something neither is willing to give. >> what are the chances they will meet at the summit? >> things really slim at this -- seems really slim at this point, lynda. again, going back to that apology, putin will not meet until an apology. the day of the incident, in fact, erdogan tried to call putin to talk to him about it. putin didn't answer. there is another opportunity, though. on december 15th that erdogan is scheduled to go to moscow to meet with putin. this is something planned for a while. we do not know if that trip has been canceled or not. but still, really does seem like right now it hinges on that apology. >> looking at the killing of in kurdish lawyer in turkey, does that look like an accidental
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delt, that he was caught in a crossfire or do some believe he was assassinated? >> reporter: there's really dramatic video surrounding the killing of the lawyer in southeastern turkey. but the one piece of video that is missing is the actual moment where he shot -- who shot him. this has really raised a lot of questions. we heard from the turkish prime minister saying it could be one of two options. eerpt a, he was assassinated or b, he was an innocent bystander caught up in crossfire. if you look at this video, you can see there's a gunfight before he was shot and killed. the bar association which he was the head of has said this is an assassination. we need to also remember that his last month was on cnn futur and he was talking about the pkk, the kurdish pkk.
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which is a terrorist organization by turkey. he said they are not a terrorist organization and there should be political dialog between them and the turkish government. well, right after that he was arrested, interrogated, he was released. but he had received a lot of death threats following that. so these are all things that investigators are going to have to look into. but this is a polarized climate. you have the pro-kurdish, the major pro-kurdish party doubtful that a thorough investigation will bring life to this. lynda? >> ian lee, a lot to cover there from turkey. thank you so much for staying across it all for us. we'll talk to you soon. still to come, world leaders are set to meet at the cop 21 climate conference in paris. we'll talk to an expert about the issues on the table. plus, an update on ben carson's -- what he thinks about
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well, in paris, nearly 150 heads of state will start arriving in a few hours for the cop21 summit. they will try to agree to a plan to stop the global warming. the summit is also a security headache for france. tens of thousands of officers have been deployed across paris. border patrol has been stepped up. protesters are demanding strong environmental commitments. these images come to us from new zealand, switzerland, the philippines and australia. we're joined from paris by a senior pal si adviser of greenpeace international. thank you for joining us. there is a draft pope sal that was hashed out between the delegates ahead of this summit. just explain for us what is on the table. >> i think there are three main themes for this we need to think about. there's the destination. where are we going and what are
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we trying to achieve? from our perspective, it's important where we're going is towards a completely clean energy future. that's one critical part. a sicced part is watch the map or the process we're going to use to get there. it's really important that we don't see this as just ending in paris. the offers on the table now, once they're important and not enough to keep us below 2 degrees or 1.5 degrees temperaturewise. it's really important that countries are able to come back on a five-year cycle and improve their levels of ambition. the third thing is all about the resources that we're going to need to get us there. this is going to be a universal agreement and universal participation is that we have to have access to resources. so that countries, poorer countries facing development challenges are able to meet those with the solidarity of other countries around them. so those are the kind of three key themes, destination, map and resources. >> very clear explanation. now, there was some research by
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the group found -- that were polled favored a strong deal on global climate. that was back in 2009. do you think support is waning? >> no, i don't, actually. i think it's very complicated question. people inevitably respond to these kinds of polls with the issues that are utmost in their mind at that moment. this is the world we live in. economic challenges and huge security threats. it's kind of inevitable that people respond to those immediate issues. you need to look around you and see there are hundreds of thousands of people demanding climate action during the course of this. we've never seen so many people directly involved from all wakes of life and political backgrounds and country coming up with a solution. no, i don't know that -- i feel hugely heartened by the level of support i've seen for strong action.
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>> of course, there does seem to be a sense among rich and poor countries that there -- to stabilize fragile growth in some regions. thousand do you take the concerns on board when rallying support for action on climate change? >> i think it's really important to understand that this transition to obtain an energy system is something that needs to happen in a way that actually supports sustainable kind of economic growth and that supports the opportunities of people to get out of policy into decent lives. one fts things we've seen is that the kind of infrastructure, the kind of energy to be put in place is hugely economically beneficial for people for all kinds of reasons. not only because it brings the difficulties of water pollution that we've seen in countries like china which have been a huge burden on their population and huge burden actually on their economy. so that opportunities to transition to clean energy are one that is are also
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opportunities to build a more sustainable economy. but the reasons why i'm talking actually so much about resources is because in order to be able to make use of the opportunities and to capture them, there has to be a sense of solidarity and able to get access to the investment, to the infrastructure and to the support for adaptation that allows countries to get on a more sustainable development path for their citizens. >> okay. ruth davis joining us from paris. senior policy adviser at greenpeace international. you'll have a busy two weeks ahead there. thanks so much for joining us. >> thank you. you can get complete coverage of the cop21 conference on official section of our website. from the field, from the community standing up to coal mining efforts to why that -- footprint than you think. cnn.com/2 degrees. midwestern united states is dealing with the aftermath of a dangerous winter storm.
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meteorologist karen maginnis is at the world weather center. karen, what's this like? >> it has been very dangerous along the interstate, secondary roads across the south central united states. this has been a lingering storm from texas to nebraska, kansas, missouri and into iowa. the weather pattern is fairly stuck and the ground is saturated ahead of this weather system. that has prevent aid secondary volume of problems where there were high water rescues thanks to the abundance of wet weather across northeastern texas. these are our weather advisories, winter storm advisories, warnings and watches and we're looking at several inches of ice and already in wichita, omaha, oklahoma city ice has been devastating and has knocked the power out to thousands of people over the last several days. take a look at what it did look
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like in and around oklahoma city. everything covered in layers of ice. now, as pretty as this may look, it does produce a very heavy toll on the power lines, telephone lines, also on trees and limbs. they come crashing down. we've seen numerous reports of that happening. but look at the roadways. they've been clogged as well. there have been spinouts, tractor-trailers that have jack-knifed. very dangerous driving conditions across the south central u.s. and we're looking at already nine fatalities associated in the last several days because of the continuing situation. there could be more. across sections of europe, back-to-back storm system impacting united kingdom into the region through the bin lux and into stand scandinavia. in the south, temperatures will be warming up. wif this long stretch of moisture on back-to-back storm
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systems just kind of aimed at ireland, northern ireland and scotland and into wales. the wind will be very gusty here over the next 24 to 48 hours as we watch that steady stream of moisture. the winds could gust as high as 100 kilometers per hour or about 60 miles per hour. lynda, back to you. >> thanks, karen. incredible pictures out of oklahoma city. i was feeling cold looking at that. >> exactly. >> thanks, karen. there's another weather disaster hitting china's capital. this is man made though. beijing residents have been advised to stay indoors as smog has reached a high level. the thick smog reduced visibility to a few hundred meters. some 20 million people live in beijing. still to come, pope francis continues his trip to africa. we'll bring you the latest from
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the central african republic just ahead. stay with us.
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hello. i'm lynda kinkade. here's an update of the top stories. russia is imposing economic sanctions on turkey for the shooting down of one of its fighter jets. the measures block the import of certain goods into turkey, from turkey into russia. moscow curtailed visa-free travel between the two countries. polls are open in the -- free election in almost 27 years. voters will elect a new president after the former president was overthrown a year
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ago. he was trying to change the constitution so he could retain power. the pope is said to arrive in the central african republic any moment now. he left uganda on sunday to bring peace between christians and muslims. this is the first time the pope every visited an active war zone. traveling with the pope is cnn vatican correspondent delia gallagher. apparently they have just landed in the country. delia, the pope's trip to the central african republic is the biggest security challenge for vatican. how have they prepared for this? >> reporter: woer here at the airport. there are u.n. security about some 10 to 13,000 u.n. security here in the central african republic. there are also french troops and also the vatican security. so certainly in terms of security, this is the leg of the trip that people were concerned about. this is a country which has been
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suffering in the last two years severe fighting between christian and news lum militia groups. it is a country rich in natural resources and so on. there is a power struggle. it has a long history of civil war and a long history of coups and military regimes. it is unstable. the vatican has decided their security team came several days ago, asking the popes spoke man every day on this african trip if this is different. here we are. certainly for the people of this -- it's going to be an important trip. i think it's important for the pope. the archbishop of the cap -- said the pope in choosing to come here has chosen the weakest and the poorest. i think that's the message the pope is hoping to give.
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on monday he's going to visit a mosque in one zone of muslim area and then he's also going to open the holy doors of the catholic city. that is a symbolic gesture. it is a main door of their cathedral which is connected to the pope's special jubilee here for reconciliation and peace. so those are the two things that we'll be looking for when the pope comes down. he's just meeting with the transitional president of the republic. we are being pushed over to get into the convoy and get ready for the pope. i will let you go, lynda. we'll be back next hour with more. >> delia, gallagher, we appreciate that. thanks for joining us. u.s. presidential candidate ben carson is calling the syrian refugee crisis a great human tragedy. it came after visiting with refugees in jordan on saturday. carson admits it's a situation that needs to be fixed but
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doesn't believe the u.s. is the country to do it. cnn correspondent lieberman joins us with the latest on carson's surprise trip. this is a secretive visit. what is ben carson hoping to achieve? >> reporter: it could be that he's trying to boost his foreign policy and national security credentials, not only because those are two of his weak areas but that's what the republican presidential candidates are putting their efforts toward. he wants to make that more important for him and make him seem stronger. whether the u.s. should take in syrian refugees has been a big part of that debate. most if not all of the candidates don't want the u.s. to take in refugees. this is carson on the ground here visiting two of the refugee camps here in jordan. he's there to learn about the crisis for himself and make his
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own decisions. he plans in the next few days and the coming days he said in a statement to put out his own foreign policies. a problem he blames in part on the obama and clinton administrations. this is carson not only coming here to be seen as someone who knows more about the refugee crisis but somebody whose credentials are stronger and we'll see what the plan is in coming days, lynda. >> oren, in the past, he's made controversial comments about refugees. in particular, he compared some syrian refugees to rabid dogs. has he had a change of heart? >> reporter: well, based on his statement that he put out yesterday, certainly seems like it. he says it's a human tragedy. it seems like a carefully worded statement. he said the u.s. taking in 25,000 syrian refugees isn't enough. but instead of coming out and blatantly saying yes, the u.s. should take in more refugees. he's saying the u.s. should help countries like jordan that are taking in the syrian refugees.
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we'll see what the plan is. but it seems like he's stepping back from those comments and trying to make up for the comments where he compared some syrian refugees to rabid dogs and coming up with his own plan on foreign policy. he wants them to see foreign policy not as weak points but strong points. >> he kind of wants countries in the region to do more to support the refugees. oren lieberman, thanks for joining us. we appreciate it. police in kenya have thwarted a terror plot. authorities say both men admitted they were working for iran. as we report, this is the not the first time tehran has been accused of plotting terrorism in kenya. >> security officials here told cnn that the two men, both kenyan nationals were plan ago tax on soft targets. such as western hotels frequented by tourists, businessmen and others. 69-year-old saah deek low and a
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25-year-old have confessed. police say to working for iran force. the special forces of the islamic revolutionary guard corps that works overseas. the pair were reported spying for iran and planning terror attacks and recruiting other terror operatives. kenya's chief of police told reporters that the men had both traveled to iran under false pretenses to be trained in spy craft and military tactics. and that they had recently trained in karbala, iraq. kenyan officials say this man was their iranian contact. he's believed to have traveled the continent. police have coordinated with other intelligence service this is africa as to his movement. counter terror police here are still hunting for other young
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men thought to have been recruited by the spy ring. the last attempted attack by iran's force in kenya police say was back in 2012. that was when two iranian nationals were arrested with 15 kgs of rdx explosives in the coastal resort town of mombassa. both have been sentenced to life in prison. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu says he believes they were targeting israeli interests here in kenya. so far no reaction from tehran on these allegations. robin kreel, cnn, nairobi, kenya. the comments here reportedly made to investigators may reveal a possible motive for an attack. that story just ahead.
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welcome back now to the latest in the shooting at a planned parenthood women's health clinic in the u.s. a law enforcement official tells cnn the suspected gunman mentioned baby parts to investigators. he also reportedly expressed anti-abortion and anti-government views in police interviews following his arrest. planned parenthood faced backlash earlier this year after an anti-abortion group released videos alleging that the organization was selling fetal organs. critics diskreted the videos calling them heavily edit and misleading. planned parenthood released a statement concerning the suspect. the organization says eyewitn s eyewitnesses confirm he was motivated by opposition to safe and legal abortions they said this is an appalling lack of -- terrorizing skilled and dedicated health care officials. loretta lynch called it a crime
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against women. >> we spoke with a woman held hostage inside the clinic. she said she was there for an ultrasound when the gunman opened fire. >> when you saw the gunman outside, what did he look like? >> like he had no remorse and this is just a game to him. i ran down the hall. i tried to open one door. it was locked. i opened another door and there was two people there. one was a nurse. and one was an actual patient. when i heard around two of the second gunshots, you could clearly tell it was in the building. it is near. it was close. one of the ladies beside me started screaming. i had to tell her to remain calm, everything is fine. the gunshots were there, as clear as day. you could hear it. we had a bullet go through our wall, came through one and went through the other. you could see the gunpowder and smell it. it was just frightening at that point. we all just wanted to get out.
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about 30, 45 minutes later, police officer contacted one of us and let us know that he's coming, they're coming to get us. he wanted to know what end we were at and he explained the procedures on how we would know it's him. then after that phone call, maybe 20, 15 minutes after that, you hear people walking in the hall. then you hear the procedure. we opened the door and there was a s.w.a.t. team. >> i know this is a sensitive topic with your boyfriend. you haven't heard from him. what do you think may have gone on or happened? >> i don't know. people were injured, i don't know if they've reached out to their families or he doesn't know my number.
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i'm just hoping everything is okay. >> because his number may have been stored in your phone. >> exactly. i have called his phone like we knew it was happening. i called him, texted him. there was no replay. his phone was active. at a certain point my sister called him too. after that, his phone has been dead ever since. >> we don't know yet if she has made contact with her boyfriend. police won't release the victims' identities until monday. to learn more about the police officer killed in an attack on friday. there was a vigil held for officer garrett swayze. here's more. >> officer garrett swayze has a loving father of two, a former championship ice skater and leader in his church. he was also a devoted police officer killed friday in the line of duty when a man opened fire at a planned parenthood clinic in colorado springs.
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>> the shooter is shooting at officers now. >> 44-year-old swayze was an officer for the university of colorado, colorado springs campus. he was on duty friday when he heard the call of shots fired and rushed to the scene. >> known him for about ten years. throughout that entire time watched him faithfully serve others and place others before himself in nearly every situation. >> a pastor with swayze at his church was there when swayze's wife had to tell their two young children what happened to their dad. >> the cries and the sobs of her children learning that their daddy was never returning is something that will be etched in my mind for the rest of my life. >> he was born in melrose, massachusetts, a graduate of melrose high school. the mayor there saying, as a class of 1989 graduate, i remember him to be a kind and caring young man with many friends dedicated to his skating career and excelling in all areas. a six-year veteran of the police
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force, law enforcement was his second career after retiring from figure skating. he competed in the 1995 national championships and won a junior national title in 1992 in orlando. garrett is -- or was the most selfless person i knew. always there as my confidant, my brother. he put up with me. >> his skating partner, christine fowler binder talked to his mother on the phone. >> she wanted me to say that remind everyone that garrett died in the line of duty, protecting everyone in our country and that there's no time that he ever would not have done that. >> in the early 1990s, he moved to colorado springs to train at the olympic training center. friends at the church where he led groups and played guitar say he defined himself through his faith. >> here's a man who stands on principal, loves christ and
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obviously he might not be in alignment with the abortion industry, but he'd be willing to go in and lay down his life for those people. >> sara began an, cnn, new york. you're watching "cnn newsroom." we'll be right back with a little more on the latest stories from around the wofrrld. stay with us.
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welcome back. a well-known american photographer has been capturing life in cuba for over 20 years. now he's getting to see the country change. patrick atman reports from havana. >> reporter: when i make a photograph, i'm not trying to knock someone over the head and tell them what they're supposed to think. i want to offer them a chance to feel what i felt. peter turley hunts for an iconic image to make in the broken down neighborhood of central havana. >> one of the world's best known photojournalists has turned his lens on cuba. >> what i think is a reality of our world today is with
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gleblization. one of the things about cuba, that's not the case. >> turnley sees senior citizens exercises in a vacant lot. he dances with his new friends. it's a spontaneous choice moment. the kind that keeps bringing turnley to the island. >> for me, this is a beautiful lesson of life and a way i would love to live my life. >> his life for decades was centered on capturing the image that made far-reaching conflicts understandable on a human level, from the fall of the soviet union to the gulf war to the end of apartheid in south africa. turnley was there. during a 1989 visit to havana, turnley caught the cuba bug. >> i had a sense that change was under foot. i've made 20 trips here in the
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last four years. for me, this has been the -- the scent of change has been present for quite a while. i'm grateful that i have a sense that my timing was right. and that i was a part of this moment of change. >> turnley released a new book of his photographs and in november inaugurated an exhibit of his work in havana's premiere art museum. it's the first of its kind for an american photographer. museum officials say since cuban revoluti revolution. >> because the essence of the human drama, she says, to daily life and with his photos, he makes a portrait landscape that's human, respectful and sensitive of the cuban reality. >> as the thaw in relations continues between cuba and the u.s., turnley says he will continue to capture the moments in history. >> it's one of the places i've been where every time a leave, i have a sense of being offered a beautiful lesson in life.
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i think what's transcendental about cuba in the midst of this moment of change is the spirit of the cuban people. i actually only hope that the change will be as kind to cuba as humans have been to me. patrick ottoman, cnn, havana. scientists believe they have a new clue to solve a mystery from 3,000 years ago. that's when queen never teed i vanished. the british archeologist says the remains could be behind the king of tutt tomb. there's a scanning that revealed an empty spot between the walls. they'll be analyzed by japanese experts. never needy means a beautiful woman has come. sunday marks the 14th anniversary of former beatle george harrison's death. he wrote one of the group's most
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memorable hits on the album abbey road. take a listen. >> here comes the sun ♪ ♪ here comes the sun ♪ it's all right ♪ >> who doesn't love that song? harrison frequently had to take the back seat in writing between mccartney and lennon. but his album, all things marked past, was the first original one by a former beatle 45 years ago. it was considered harrison's turn to speak and it became his most successful album. that does it for this edition of "cnn newsroom." i'm linynda kinkade. i'll be back after the break with another hour of news from around the world.
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the heat is on in paris as global leaders gather for consensus on climate change. french officials go to extreme length to guarantee safety. security concerns in the central african republic as pope francis touches down with a message for peace for a country divided. plus -- >> garrett is or was the most selfless person i knew. always there as my confidant, my brother. he put up with me. >> emotional tributes for the colorado police officer killed in the line of duty. in the u.s. and around the world, i'm linynda kinkade and
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this is "cnn newsroom." protesters have taken to e streets to ahead of the international summit that begins on monday. >> in indonesia, they urnld the government -- protests have been seen across australia, new zealand, switzerland add and the philippines. 24 greenpeace activists were placed under house arrest in paris. suspected of planning violent demonstrations. 120,000 police and soldiers will provide security for the event. joining me now is correspondent phil black live from paris. phil, we've seen so many demonstrations across the world.
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they're calling for action on climate change but where you are in paris, do the security concerns demonstrations were canceled. >> reporter: that's right, lynda. wants to be the king of demonstrations. this was to be the epicenter of that global popular movement that you've just been talking about with people around the people, especially here calling for a strong response, strong action over the coming two weeks during the climate talks. organizers had hoped for hundreds much thousands of people to take to the streets here but it was not to be. paris after those terrorist attacks has said we will continue with the business end of the climate talks. we'll host the talks, we'll step up the security necessary to protect 147 heads of state, as well as the tens of thousands of other people that are involved in the event itself. but there's been a cost to that. they've put restrictions on the numbers of people that can gather in public. so that's why no big dem
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station. that's why the people of paris aren't able to contribute in a festive type of way, put pressure on world leaders and take part in the way that they had hoped. now, world leaders, many activists hope that the event in paris, that the horrible terror event two weeks ago will lead t greater progress. securing a strong resolve at the end of it. a strong, ambitious climate deal. many believe that would be the ultimate way to refute those involved in the terrorist attacks here. >> as you mentioned, 147 heads of state. we know 40,000 people are expected to attend the event. this all comes after the paris attacks. the terror attacks. how are authorities dealing with security? >> reporter: with massive numbers mostly. it was supposed to be 1500
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people guarding the site of the talks itself. post the terrorist attacks, it's almost been doubled. it's basically doubled in size in terms of the number of police and security forces you'll see there. in addition to the enormous presence, security presence across the country. 120,000 police and other security forces have france on lockdown. this really is huge international event is taking place in a country that was already on security lockdown as an extraordinarily high state of readiness. >> okay. phil black, thanks for staying on top of that in paris for us. earlier i spoke with ruth davis, a senior adviser for greenpeace. she says the goals for the conference are very clear. >> i think there are three main themes to this that we need to think about. there's the destination. where we actually going and what are we trying to achieve? from our perspective in civil
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society, it's important where we're going is towards a completely clean energy future. that's one critical part of the conversation. a second part is what's the map or the process to get there? it's really important that we don't see this as just ending in paris because the offers we have on the table now, once they were important and not enough to keep us below 2 degrees or 1.5 degrees temperaturewise. it's important that countries are able to come back on a five-year cycle and improve levels of ambition. the third thing is all about the resources to get us there. this is going to be a universal agreement and universal participation means that we have to have universal access to resources. so that countries, poorer countries facing development challenges are able to meet those with the solidarity of other countries around them. >> a scientist has been running from norway to the climate summit in paris. he wants to raise awareness about global warming. you will hear from him and his story later this hour.
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well, pope francis has left uganda and landed in central african republic. he's there during a sum tumultuous time. there are tensions between the muslims and the christians there. now to turkey where a prominent pro-kurdish lawyer was killed on saturday. we want to warn you, the video you see, you may find disturbing. he was shot during gunfire during a news caverns. two turkish police officers were killed and another wounded. meantime, tensions arising between turkey and russia. russia imposed economic sanctions. the measures curtailed travel
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between the two countries and also block certain turkish i am properties into russia. cnn's ian lee is in istanbul. ian, you have more information about the downing of this jet. >> reporter: that's right. we're hearing that the body of the pilot, the one who was killed in syria has been handed over to turkish officials, men of religious men of the orthodox faith were there to receive the body, prepare the body and then eventually the turks are going to hand it over to the russians. this has been something the russians have been calling for, something they've been demanding late last night that body was handed over to the turks. >> and looking, of course, at the fallout from this, turkey's president will not apologize and incredibly he wants vladimir putin to apologize. that's not happening either. talk to us about the sanctions.
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>> reporter: yeah. the sanctions really, it seems at this point hinge on an apology, at least from erdogan, an apology to putin. again, as you said, erdogan wants an apology himself from putin. but the sanctions are very real. they hit the turkish economy in several ways. one, they take away this visa-free transit. so turkish businessmen, russian businessmen, it will make it more difficult for them to do business in each other's countries. starting at the beginning of the year, turks will not be able to get visas to work inside russia. probably one of the most damaging parts of the sanction is stopping sending tourists to turkey as russian tourists spend about $4 billion a year in tourism here in turkey. so that really has quite the impact. also, they're looking into possibly going after gas. that goes from russia to turkey.
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about 60% of their gas they get from russia. also, there's a multibillion dollar nuclear power plant that also is questionable. really, lynda, all of this, again just hinges on -- seems like an apology from erdogan. both men don't seem like they're willing to apologize. both men say they are in the right. >> okay. this will continue, no doubt, in istanbul. thank you very much. u.s. republican presidential candidate ben carson is calling the syrian refugee crisis a great human tragedy that comes after visiting with refugees in jordan on saturday. carson admits it's a situation that needs to be fixed but he doesn't believe the u.s. is the country to do it. cnn correspondent oren lieberman joins us with the latest from amman, jordan with the latest. it seems like this was a secretive trip. what was he hoping to achieve? >> reporter: it was very
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secretive. it came together quietly. we weren't allowed in the refugee camp while carson was there. this could be an attempt to boost his credentials to areas he's seen as being weak and at a time when the debate issues are foreign policy and national security, especially as the refugee crisis continues and the question remains, should the u.s. take in more or any syrian refugees. most, if not all of the republican presidential candidates including carson said no. he did say in a statement released after his visit to two camps in jordan that the u.s. taking in 25,000 refugees isn't enough. but he words his statement carefully. he doesn't say the u.s. should take in more syrian refugees. it seems he's saying the u.s. should help other countries such as jordan taking in those refugees. carson did also say that he'll release more of his plan and his plan for syrian refugees in the coming days. then he goes on to blame the refugee crisis, at least in part
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on the obama and clinton administrations. lynda. >> of course, oren, carson has made controversial comments in the past about the refugees. he compared them to rabid dogs. do you think he's had a change of heart? >> reporter: from the statement he released, it seems like this. that will depend upon what his plan is for the syrian crisis. it seems like it's had a real and profound effect on him as he visited the refugee camps in northern jordan. it will come down to what his plan is. he hasn't released too much about it. only saying the u.s. needs in some way to do more. this could very much be carson trying to backtrack or cover that comparison between some syrian refugees, calling them or comparing them to rabid dogs. it will depend what that plan is and how and when he laz it out. >> we look forward to seeing
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that in detail. oren lieberman, thank you very much for joining us. a story that brought attention to the migrant crisis. you may remember the little 2-year-old boy who drowned off the coast of -- in september along with his mother and brother. a photograph of his body washed ashore causing global outrage. the world came to know him as allen. his aunt says the pronunciation and spelling came from turkish officials. his real name is allen spelled differently. they will now be granted asylum. she spoke to cnn. >> so far what i know on the application, it's been approved and sent to ankara in turkey. it's been in the process. they did like the regular medical exam. both in the family in turkey and
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my brother in germany. they're going through the security check and all that. so far, i'm waiting for either an e-mail or a phone call to tell me on the date when they're arriving. i'm hoping before christmas. but i'm not sure at this moment. >> we've had a dramatic couple of weeks, three weeks when you count the bombings in lebanon and beirut, the most terrible in paris. some turn them against accepting refugees. they think it's a security risk. what would you tell people afraid to grant a asylum to thousands of refugees? >> first of all, i don't blame them. they have the right to concern about security. i always say take your time, make sure you do the security check and we don't want any
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tourists to come to any country owe terrorists to come to any country. please, open your heart and your arms and welcome those desperate. those refugees, they flee from the rubble, from isis, doesn't mean they are a terrorist. >> it is difficult for people to try and reconcile the fear, the terror that these refugees in are running from and then perhaps they feel risking the national security. i can't let you go without asking you how his father is right now. where is he? do you have any hopes he'll be able to come to canada? >> abdullah is -- he is in kurdistan. what he's doing, volunteer work and refugee camp to help refugee
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children with their needs. he's hoping to open the charity under his son's name also to help the refugees. but so far, he refuse -- he doesn't want to come to canada or anywhere. >> the aunt of the 2-year-old boy who drowned. still to come, new details about the details of a mass shooting at a colorado women's clinic. how the comments made to a suspect -- plus a woman held hostage at the clinic tells us what she did as the bullet ripped through the building. whie removes 5 times more stains than the red box.
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see if you're eligible for 12 months free at mybreo.com. now to the latest in the shooting at a planned parenthood women's clinic in the u.s. a law enforcement official tells cnn the suspected gunman mentioned baby parts to investigators. he also reportedly expressed anti-abortion and anti-government views in police interviews following his arrest. planned parenthood faced backlash earlier this year after an anti-abortion group released videos alleging that the organization was selling fetal organs. critics discredited the videos
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calling them heavily edited and misleading. we're also learning more about the policeman killed in the attack. people in colorado springs held a vigil for officer garrett swas swasey. >> officer garrett swasey was a loving father of two, former cam ship ice skater and leader in his church. he was also a devoted police officer killed friday in the line of duty when a man opened fire at a planned parenthood clinic in colorado springs. >> the shooter is -- keeping officers down. >> 44-year-old swasey was an officer for the university of colorado, colorado springs campus. he was on duty friday when he heard the call of shots fired and rushed to the scene. >> known him for about ten years. throughout that entire time, i watched him faithfully serve others and place others before himself in nearly every situation. >> a pastor with swasey at his
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church was there when swasey's wife had to tell their children what happened to their dad. >> the cries and sobs of the children learning of their daddy never returning is something that will be etched in my mind for the rest of my life. >> he is from massachusetts. the mayor there saying as a class of 1989 graduate i remember him to be a kind and caring young man with many friends dedicated to his skating career and excelling at all areas. a six-year veteran of the police force, law enforcement was his second career after retiring from figure skating. he competed in the 1995 national championship and won a junior national title in 1992 in orlando. garrett is -- or was the most selfless person i knew. always there as kind of my confidant, my brother. he put up with me. >> his skating partner, christine fowler binder talked to swasey's mother on the phone.
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>> she wanted me to say, remind everyone that garrett died in the line of duty protecting everyone in our country and that there's no time that he ever would not have done that. >> reporter: in the aefrl 1990s, swasey moved to colorado springs to train at the olympic training center. friends at the church where he led groups and played guitar say he defined himself through his faith. >> here's a man who stands on principal, loves christ and obviously he might not be in alignment with the abortion industry, but he'd be willing to go in and lay down his life for those people. >> sara began um, cnn, new york. cnn's dan simon spoke with a woman held hostage inside the clinic. she and her boyfriend were there for an ultrasound when the gunman opened fire. at the time of the interview, she had not heard from him. >> the last thing i recall, he
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was paying for the service. his card was declined. from there, he went outside. within 25 seconds, i heard gunshots. >> when you saw the gunman outside, what did he look like? >> like he had no remorse and this is just a game to him. >> do you needily recognize those -- immediately recognize those as gunshots? >> no, i didn't. it took someone to tell me to get down, that there was a gunshot. even then, i couldn't register because it felt like so surreal. at the point when i heard the gunshots, i was able to make out a picture of what was going on. i saw the gup man and saw him shooting. once i realized that this is really happening is when i fleed the scene and went in a back room. >> so you saw him outside? >> uh-huh. >> as you see him, you hear the
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gunshots and you realize what's going on. >> exactly. >> what are you thinking in your mind? >> where is my boyfriend? what's going on? this can't be happening. it felt like a dream. didn't feel real. >> then you go into a back room? >> yes. i ran down the hall. i tried to open one door, it was locked. i opened another door and there was two people there. one was a nurse and one was an actual patient. from there, they had no idea what was going on. so i immediately pushed them in the door. shut the door. i let them know that there was a gunman, armed. once they realized the gunshots is when we grabbed the table and placed it against the door. we don't have a lock on the door. time went by. i wasn't hearing much. around 2:00, i don't know, if it was before the armed car drove into planned parenthood or after. it was one of the two. right after that had happened, you hear gunshots.
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the gunshots weren't like the ones i heard prior. because the ones i heard prior, they were clearly somewhere outside. it wasn't near. you could tell. it was not in the building. but when i heard around the second gunshots, you could clearly tell it was in the building. it was near. it was close. one of the ladies beside me started screaming. i had to tell her to remain calm, everything is fine. like i said, the gunshots were there, clear as day. we had a gun bullet go through our wall. it came through one and went through the other. you could see the gunpowder, smell it. it was just frightening at that point. we all just wanted to get out. about, i'd say, 30, 45 minutes later, a police officer had contacted one of us and he let us know that he's coming. they're coming to get us. he wanted to know what end of the planned parenthood we were at and explained the procedures
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on how we would know it's him. then after that phone call, maybe 20, 15 minutes after that you hear people walking in the hall. then you hear the procedure. we opened the door and there was a s.w.a.t. team. >> i know this is a sensitive topic with your boyfriend. you haven't heard from him? what do you think may have gone on or happened? >> trying to be positive. i don't know if the people injured have reached out to their families yet or if he just doesn't know my number. but i'm just hoping everything is okay. >> because his number may have been stored in the phone and not -- >> exactly. i've called his phone like when it was happening. i called him and texted him. his phone was active. at a certain point my sister
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called him. she heard someone pick up and hang up twice. after that, his phone has been dead ever since. >> we don't know yet if she has made contact with her boyfriend. police won't release the victims' identities until monday. still to come, the policies -- the trip to africa of the pope. what makes this the most dangerous part of the visit yet. that's coming up next. ♪
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hello. i'm lynda kinkade. here's an update on the stories we're following. russia imposed -- in a measure,
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moscow curtailed the import of certain turkish groups into russia. there are new travel restrictions between the two countries. the u.s. law enforcement official tells cnn the suspected gunman in a woman's clinic attack expressed anti-abortion and apt government views following his arrest. robert dear is in jail without bail. he will be in court on monday. in the pope in in the central african republic. he's there to spread messages of peace to a country fraught with sectarian violence and underline the importance of uplifting people from poverty in one of the world's poorest countries. president hollande expected to meet with ban ki-moon ahead of the cop21 summit. the meeting begins in paris on monday under heavy security after the terror attacks. the climate change summit will host 150 heads of state along with 40,000 visitors and
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delegates. 120,000 police officers and soldiers will provide the security. in paris, nearly 150 heads of state will start arriving in a few hours for the cop21 summit. they will try to agree on a plan to stop global warming. france has banned public demonstrations. activists in paris got around that ban and laid down shoes in a symbolic protest. they are demanding strong environmental commitments and we have seen protests in other parts of the world. these images are from new zealand, switzerland, the philippines and australia. one climate scientist has been running for months ahead of the conference all the way from norway to paris. it's all to raise awareness for how climate change affected the arctic. cnn's john sutter biked
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alongside him for part of that journey. take a look. >> reporter: he's a climate scientist from norway. he's been running for nearly four months. they call this journey call to paris. it started in the arctic and i caught up with him thousands of kilometers later here in northern france. >> today we're going to do about 32 kilometers. that's quite an average day for us. >> he only carries one extra pair of clothes and already on his fourth pair of shoes. >> all i have in in bag is everything i have. >> reporter: today is almost eight hours on the road. through villages and across farms. his destination? a u.n. climate summit called cop21. i had to bike just to keep up. >> what we're trying to do with this journey, running and biking across half the globe is to connect the stories from people around the world. the distances, the world has
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gotten smaller rather than larger over this journey as i am seeing it's possible, actually, to move just by running from pretty much polar regions into paris. >> reporter: the farthest of the group, he's spent 2100 kilometers on the road. some days have been beautiful, other days like this, snowy and rainy here in france. he's on his way to the cop21 climate talks and bring with him the stories of those he's met along the road. >> things start changing rapidly in the arctic. it's going more than twice as fast. it's having huge consequences. for example for polar bears and also for people living in the region. i hope we can continue on this path and take another step in a big and important step in the right direction. >> the recent terror attacks in
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paris haven't stopped him. if anything, he's more determined to arrive with a message of hope. john sutter, cnn, france. and you'll get complete coverage of the cop21 summit on a special section of our website. also reports on the climate change debate from the field from the community that's standing up to coal mining efforts to why that steak you enjoy is a bigger carbon footprint than you might think. it's all at cnn.com/2 degrees. in the united states, across the central plains, ice storms continue and temperatures to remain below freezing. karen maginnis is standing by. it seems pretty cold, karen. >> it is. they have really been paralyzed because of the ice on the roads. and the trees. it's a relatively slow-moving system that we've been watching the last several days. this will go into sunday as a
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secondary area of pressure treks towards the north. this will be more involved with snowfall and gusty winds. further to the south, we have that dividing line between the warm moist air ahead of the system and that cold air that was diving in on the backside of this. but lots of folks traveling interstate 35, interstate 40, cutting across the south central united states. especially in oklahoma and in and around oklahoma city. take a look at the video that we have to show you. everything covered with ice. in some instances, as much as 2 inches of it. power outages all over. there are reports of as many as ten fatalities associated with fallen trees and traffic accidents across the region. it isn't just oklahoma but kansas, nebraska, portions of missouri and now beginning to snow across sections of the upper mississippi river valley. there you can see some spinouts
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thanks to the icy conditions and the black ice. ice which is very difficult to see with low visibility or low light. actually does not look like ice on the roadways. that ice is going to be spreading a little bit further to the north as i mentioned. really problematic, especially for people who had long weekends after the thanksgiving holiday. but it isn't just the snowfall and the ice. we're seeing just copious amounts of wet weather right around this ark-la-tex region. oklahoma, texas and into louisiana where substantial rainfall totals have saturated the ground and loosened trees. it's going to be another difficult 24 hours. here are the watches, warnings and advisories now from texas into colorado extending all the way up towards minnesota. as i mentioned, this is a very complex weather system that's really planted its roots across the south central u.s. across europe, we've got
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back-to-back storm systems that will usher in plenty of moisture from the united kingdom to the region. not just the wind and the rain but we could see damage and power outages with win gusts to 60 miles per hour. lynda, back to you. >> karen maginnis, thanks for bringing us up to speed with that. climb change protests around the only demonstrations. david cameron pushed his plan for the uk to join coalition air strikes on isis targets in syria. on saturday demonstrators gathered in london to protest the proposal. we were there. >> reporter: david cameron made is very clear when his government authorized air strikes last september, that he would seek parliamently approval
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before doing the same in syria. he said it was morally unacceptable to allow the u.s. and france to do the heavy lifting in syria. he insisted the uk would not send in ground troops but there were sunnis who would be supported by coalition air strikes. the people here, that is not a convincing case. >> i think there's evidence to suggest that what the bombing will actually help the situation. i think, if anything, it's probably more cause than -- i think -- to be honest. it's a perfect recruitment tool for them if we go ahead with it. >> i don't think it's a question of standing by our allies. it's a question of whether our allies are right or not. >> nothing seems -- consequences. >> reporter: you can expect there to be plenty of telephone calls this weekend as members of
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parliament call each other up trying to rally support for this vote. david cameron doesn't want to take it to the -- he can be sure that there will be a consensus behind it. but there is talk that this vote could happen as early as next week. diana mag nay, cnn, london. still to come, the latest on the pope's trip to the central african republic. plus, a photographer captured the cuba of yesterday and today. we'll show you everyday life in the island through the years. you have two choices; the easy way or the hard way. you could choose a card that limits where you earn bonus cash back. or, you could make things easier on yourself. that's right, the quicksilver card from capital one. with quicksilver you earn unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere. so, let's try this again. what's in your wallet?
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welcome back. within the last hour, pope
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francis arrived in the central african republic and security personnel are expecting concerns about the state of the country and their ability to keep him safe. cnn's robin kriel reports on what makes this leg of his trip most dangerous. >> reporter: so far in africa. pope francis has taken modest transportation, mingling with the people on the ground and allowing spontaneity to intervene. but this laid-back, low-key approach that made him popular with africans so far is what makes his security nervous for his final stop. in the central african republic. it will be the pope's first visit to an active war zone. fighting between christian and muslim militias killed thousands and displaced close to a million people since violence erupted in 2013. the most recent spike in violence occurred just in september when more than 60 people died. french forces on the ground have
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said they cannot guarantee the pope's safety. while the u.n. is sending reinforcement peacekeepers from the ivory coast. on the ground in c.a.r., the pope will meet with muslim and christian leaders, some who have been displaced by violence. religious tolerance has been a key them of his six-day african tour. at a meeting with religious leaders in nairobi, he had this to say. >> translator: as we look to the future, let us pray all men and women will see themselves as brothers and sisters. united in and through our differences. let us pray for peace. >> reporter: the already rescheduled elections in the c.a.r. are planned for less than a month away. there's hope that these in addition to the pope's message of peace may at least bring the people there some hope. perhaps even reconciliation. robyn kriel, cnn, nairobi, kenya.
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vatican correspondent delia gallagher is traveling with the pope and joins us now on the phone. delia, as mentioned in robyn's report, security is a major concern. give us a sense of what you're seeing. >> well, i can tell you when we got to the airport, one of the things that happened besides security is they rush you. all of the journalists were taken off the plane quickly and rushed through the pope's welcoming ceremony and on to buses. unfortunately, escorted by a u.n. military. there were many u.n. armored cars along the way. that being said, it looks very much like a lot of scenes that we see when people come out to welcome the pope. everybody was gathered on the side of the road. the main road that leads down where the pope will be going. and they certainly -- thousands of people, they've all come out. the significance of this trip with us is that he's come at
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all. the few people that i was able to speak to at the airport were just thrilled because they said they were really concerned at having heard the rumors that the pope might not come because of security. it was so important that he did come. this really is one of the places that has been forgotten. that's one of the reasons why pope francis wanted to come here. the archbishop of the capital city said they couldn't believe it when they heard the pope had chosen them and their country. that they feel like they're the last people on earth. he has spoken to people in the muslim and christian communities and the armed men, he said, who were all ready to welcome the pope. in terms of the conflict here, we have a muslim and cristiano owe it's not necessarily a religious conflict. it's a conflict overpower and land and the resources because this is a country that's very rich in diamonds, gold, uranium and other minerals. this is a power struggle yet to be resolved.
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there is a transition government put in place as of last year by the u.n. exerting that peace. is expected to bring the country to elections just in december this year. so a few days away. we'll have to see how that goes. i think the pope coming here, he's going to visit a mosque, he's going to talk to political leaders and to religious leaders. one of the first things he's doing this afternoon is going to a refugee camp. as you also heard in that piece, there are some one million refugees, half have left and the other are displaced. they are here and in chaos because of this fighting. so i think the pope's message here is to draw attention to the rest of the world to this situation, one of the largest humanitarian crises and to give the people a sense that they have not been forgotten. lynda? >> let's hope he can help. in particular, delia gallagher on the phone with us traveling with the pope. thank you very much. as pope francis travels
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through central africa, another challenging issue for pope francis is the spread of hiv. the catholic teachings on birth control. john allen told us that he didn't expect the pontiff to lay down any new doctrines any time soon. >> reporter: if you're got a married couple where one partner is hiv positive and the other isn't, would the church be okay with them using condoms to prevent transmission of the disease? that's an issue upon which the teaching authority is not -- we have not gotten any indication from the pope this trip, which way he leans. in general, if you're asking, is there you have indication under pope francis, the church is going to revise its position on birth control. the answer there is no. i mean, he's made it clear that's not the case. he's a doctrineal revolutionary. >> that was senior vatican
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analyst john allen speak earlier on cnn. an american photographer in cuba has been capturing lives on the island for 20 years. you'll see some of his photographs and hear from him on how the communist nation is changing just ahead. stay with us right here on cnn. ...one of many pieces in my life. so when my asthma symptoms kept coming back on my long-term control medicine, i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment. once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms. breo is for adults with asthma not well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. breo won't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden breathing problems. breo opens up airways to help improve breathing for a full 24 hours. breo contains a type of medicine that increases the risk of death from asthma problems and may increase the risk of hospitalization in children and adolescents. breo is not for people whose asthma is well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. once your asthma is well controlled, your doctor will decide if you can stop breo and prescribe a different asthma control medicine,
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welcome back. a well-known american photographer has been capturing life in cuba for over to years. now he's getting to see the country change. here's our report from havana. >> reporter: when i make a photograph, i'm not trying to knock someone over the head and tell them what they're supposed to think. i want to offer them a chance to feel what i felt. >> reporter: peter turnley hunts for an iconic image to make in the broken down neighborhood in central havana. one of the world's best known living photojournalists, turnley as of late has turned his lens on cuba. >> one of the things that i think is a reality of our world today is with gleblization.
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things all look the same so often. one of the beautiful things about cuba, that's not the case. >> reporter: turnley happens upon cuban senior citizens exercising in a vacant lot and goes to work while dancing with his new friends. it's a spontaneous choice moment. the kind that keeps bringing turnley back to the island. >> for me, this is a beautiful lesson of life and the way i would love to live my life. >> reporter: his life for decades was centered on capturing the image that made far ranging conflicts understandable on a human level. from the fall of the soviet union to the gulf war, to the end of apartheid in south africa, turnley was there. during a 1989 visit to havana, turnley caught the cuba bug. >> i had a sense that change was under foot. i've made 20 trips here now in the last four years.
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so for me this has been -- this sense of change has been present for quite a while. i'm grateful that i have a sense that my timing was right and that i was a part of this moment of change. >> reporter: turnley released a new book of his cuba photographs and in november inaugurated his work in a premiere art museum in havana. the first of its kind for an american photographer officials say since the cuban revolution. >> he goes to the essence of the human drama she says. the daily life in cuba. with his photos, he makes a portrait, a landscape that's very human, respectful and sensitive of the cuban reality. as the thaw in relations continues between cuba and the u.s., turnley says he will continue to capture this moment. >> cuba is one of the places i've been where every time i leave, i have a sense being offered a lesson in life.
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what's transcendental in this moment of change is the spirit of the cuban people. i hope the change will be as kind to cuba as they have been to me. >> patrick altman, cnn, havana. that does it for krns newsronew "cnn newsroom." thanks for joining us. stay with us on cnn. ♪ ♪ the beautiful sound of customers
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♪ new details this morning out of colorado. here with the man accused of killing three at a planned parenthood clinic, what he told police moments after laying down his gun. there's new information emerging about a possible motive. plus a new look at the tamir rice shooting. we have enhanced moments leading up to the death of the 12-year-old boy. his campaign is struggling but, now chris christie gets a big boost for his white house run. will this endorsement keep his presidential dreams afloat? always good to see you. thank you for making time for us today. i'm christi paul. >> i'm victor blackwell. good to be with us. disturbing information about a possible motive in the attack on that planned parenthood clinic that killed three pe.

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