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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  January 14, 2016 10:00pm-1:01am PST

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guess. thanks tonight if to everyone. we'll see you. thanks for watching right now, cn in the news room. >> this is ynn news room. republican presidential candidates replace shots during their latest debate. but some of the sharpest blows were for hill clinton. the white house insists iran's release of u.s. sailors is a sign of progress. and the oscars once again drawing fire for the nominees' lack of diversity. hello, everybody. great to have you with us. we wl welcome our viewers in the united states and all around the world. "news room l.a." starts right now.
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the top candidates met face to face in south carolina, talking taxes, syrian refugees and trade with china. there was a lot of sniping especially between donald trump and ted cruz. all the candidates took shots at president barack obama and democratic front-runner hillary clinton. >> i would go first of all one step furtherner this description of hillary cloin ton. she wouldn't be a disaster. hillary clinton is disqualified from president of the united states. >> she's under investigation by the fbi. >> you can not give hillary clinton a third term of barack obama's leader shirp. i cannot do that if i'm the nominee. she won't get within ten miles of the white house. >> joining me now with more on the debate is cnn's senior flil analyst. this debate started with ten minutes of hillary hating, the
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president was called on twice. it seemed to be an angry debate. david, is that how it felt to you actually on the ground there at the debate. >> that's not what this debate was about. this debate was clearly about sort of two different races going on inside the republican party right now. primarily, 18 days to iowa, this was about donald trump versus ted cruz. they've been exchanging comments back and forth on the campaign trail of late. and on the debate stage, they delivered on the promise that these are the two leaders in the race right now fighting for those conservative votes in iowa. and they went to full battle mode tonight on the debate stage. a. >> the birtherish shaw came up quickly in this debate.
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this is something working quite well for donald trump in the last couple of weeks also. but it seems in this debate at least, the senator from texas was ready. let's listen to some of the exchange. >> back in september, donald trump said he had his lawyers look at this from every which way and there was nothing to this birther issue. now since september, the constitution hasn't changed. but the poll numbers have. >> this was interesting because trump actually said well, yeah, the polls have changed and that's why i'm doing it. is this the end of the biter issue for ted cruz? was that enough to put this away? or will trump keep this going all the way to iowa. >> i think trump keeps it going. cruz is dealing with it as a legal issue. there really is a political argument trump is trying to make here, which is he is reminding republican voters, 93% of whom in 2012 were white that ted cruz
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does not share their background. i kind of think the main debate is really the opposite. the dog that didn't bark i thought was the biggest sound all night. we are less than three weeks from the iowa caucus, less than four weeks of a new hampshire primary, and the other candidates failed to make a systematic and sustained case against the front-runner donald trump. in fact, i would argue, i thought this debate, they seemed less confident, not more that they know arguments that will work against him for the republican base. i think that's a striking development as we get closer. ted cruz and marco rubio and chris christie fighting amongst themselves is one thing. but there's one grie leading all of them. i think he came out largely unskaited. >> most of the polls are saying -- look at the drudge report, most people thought trump won. but i thought that ted cruz was actually taking jabs at donald trump. the problem is if you jab away at donald trump he's going to clock you. that seems to be what happened when ted cruz was asked about the whole new york values. he was asked what he meant when
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he said trump has new york values. and then trump nailed him. >> everyone understands the values in new york are pro abortion, pro gay marriage. >> new york is a great place, it has wonderful people, lovely people. when the world trade center came down, i saw something that no place on perth could have handled more beautifully, more humanely than new york. >> let's go back to david in south carolina. the other big take akwawatakeaw trump/cruz detente is well and truly over. yes? >> as dana bash had earlier, the bromance is over. that exchange encapsulated two main things. ted cruz was speaking to his base in iowa when he made sort of the attack on the liberal pro
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choice, pro gay marriage, new york crowd. that's something that his base in iowa is happy to hear ted cruz make those comments. but donald trump came back and delivered what i think is maybe one of the most sort of authentic moments with eewe've seen from donald trump this entire campaign. really speaking from a gut level of being a new yorker, defending new york, invoking 9/11 in a really authentic way. and ron's point about earlier is really key to underscore here. donald trump, in the past he would hang back in debates. he was in full command of this stage. he entered as the dominant force in this race. there's nothing that happened on the stage that upended him from being the dominant force coming out of this debate. there's very little time now between now and the caucuses. there's only one debate left. and i just don't see anything rigt right now dislodging between now and when the voting begins donald trump from being the dominant force in this race. >> that was a very powerful --
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>> it was one of the moments of the night. >> but it was set up to be so powerful because ted cruz, as they say in baseball here in the u.s., you've got to throw the pitch with conviction. he did not throw the pitch with conviction. he basically said new york was pro choice and pro gay charj. he didn't say donald trump had those positions in the past. he basically -- i think it was a half hearted kind of swing and then donald trump showed what a full kind of punch is. and the rest of the night, to see these candidates going after each other, it seems to imply they believe there's still a ceiling for trump and if they can just get to him one-on-one they'll be fine. i think the evidence is more they're going to have to take him down if he's going to go down. >> unlikely crust is going to use that line again. >> unfortunately, governor christie endorsed many of the
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ideas that barack obama supports. common core, gun control, the appointment of sotomayor or the do nation he made to planned parenthood. our next president and the republican nominee cannot be someone who supports these positions. >> i would like to disrupt the debate on the floor of this senate to answer the questions you asked. the question was about entitlements. no, you already had your chance, marco and you blew it. >> there were a couple of different exchanges there. he gave some of the passions and feelings between these two guys. these guys are fighting it out essentially for third place right now. >> they're fighting it out to be the leader of the center right that may or may not ever consolidate. it's a fight going on largely in new hampshire where you have christie, rubio, even kasich and to some extent jeb bush all clumped together. that a, gives donald trump a very strong chance of winning the state, but b makes it unclear whether anyone will
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emerge from that with the momentum to consolidate that block of the party, which after all, has picked the last two nominees. and yet mitt romney and john mccain finds itself without a horse three weeks before iowa. >> we talked about someone going out to donald trump. jeb bush tried. he's also chasing the establishment vote, the third ticket. he seemed to be taking it to trump on policy issues. in particular, one instance was on trump's temporary muslim travel ban. let's go to that exchange. >> is there anything you've heard that makes you want to rethink this position? >> no. >> i hope you reconsider this, because this policy is a policy that makes it impossible to build the coalition necessary to take out isis. the kurds are our strongest as lies. they're muslim. you're not even going to allow them to come to our country. >> i want security for this country, okay?
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i want security. >> that that room, there's cheers. lukewarm reception to what jeb bush had to say, a loud roar for what donald trump had to say. that kind of says it all, doesn't it? >> yeah. that's right there at the success of the trump candidacy so far. just completely ignore the argument that jeb bush is making there and just get back to a basic truism, obviously, that everybody would like security. and donald trump just takes that, cuts everything else away and says this is what it's all about, folks. and people are responding to that. jeb bush has been taking it to donald trump on the campaign trail quite a bit. in paid advertising from his super pac in his own campaign and is now doing it on the debate stage as well. it's not necessarily sort of elevating jeb bush in this race, but it does seem to be now the path he is committed to. >> okay, there was another sort of skirmish, if you like,
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between the other sort of lesser candidates, the lore ranking candidates. this oning was actually between marco rubio and ted cruz. and these guys have been going at each other. they got similar sort of resume, if you like. but this time in this debate, it seems rubio really unloaded opinion he went out to cruz on his voting record in the senate. >> you used to support a 500% increase in guest workers. you used to support legalizing people who were here illegally. now you stay you're sbens against it. you used to say you were in favor of birth-right citizenship. now you say you're against it. by the way, it's not just on immigration, you used to support tpa. i show you flip your vote on crop insurance because they told you it would help you in iowa. and we saw you flip your vote on ethanol in iowa for the same
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reason. that's political calculation. when i'm president, i will work consistently every single day to keep this country safe, not call edward snowden as you did, a great public servant. he's a traitor. if i'm president and we get our hands on him, he's standing trial for treason. >> one more point. one more point. every single time that there's been a defense bill in the senate, three people team up to vote against it -- bernie sander, rand paul and ted cruz. >> i appreciate your dumping your research folder on the stage. >> no, it's your record. at least half of the things marco said are flat-out false. they're absolutely false. so let's start with immigration. let's start with immigration and have a little bit of clarity. marco stood with chuck schumer and barack obama on amnesty. i stood with jeff sessions and steve king. marco stood today, stand on this stage, marco supports
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legalization and citizenship for 12 million illegals. i opposed and opposed legalization and citizenship. and by the way, the attack he keeps throwing out on the military budget, marco knows full well i voted for his amendment to increase spending to $976 billion. what he said in the last debate, it's simply not true. and as president i will rebuild the military and keep this country safe. '. >> that seemed like a big hit. i felt it came a bit late. if you're going to go big, go early. >> i think it was the biggest single hit that's been delivered on ted cruz in any debate. especially for someone who presents himself as a conviction conservative. i think if you're donald trump watching the candidates who are two and three in the polls behind you tearing each other apart, as someone tweeted, you're probably eating popcorn and enjoying watching that. and one other point, the engagement around immigration and basically accusing each other, debating who can move
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furthest to the right often immigration is how the trumpian gravitational field has pulled republicans towards a message that's a huge roll of the dice in the general election in a rapidly diversifying america. and how far they've come after the 2012 election. don't lose sight of what was said in the primaries. they have now camped out a position that could be problematic.. >> mitt romney learned that lesson four years ago. >> rubio seems to be campaigning on the electability argsment. >> the challenge for marco rubio. you said the exchange with cruz and crist tree. he has to sart of fight this two-front war right now. he's fighting those guys you talked about in new hampshire, the more establishment lane. but there's still this very heated cruz-rubio thing going
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on. that's a tricky proposition for a candidate to be in right now, to be having to sort of fight in both directions and that is a big challenge for marco rubio. >> david, thank you. very quickly, in terms of substance, did we learn anything? was this essentially just candidates going after each other and trying to, like, who's the toughest guy here? who can hate hillary the most? >> there wasn't a huge amount of substance. you have to preview some of the general election arguments. it's kind of odd when only one party is on the stage. but the trump doubling down on kind of the protectionist, mercantilist approach on china was striking. but other than that, there was -- i think there was less, you know, less of a poclicy debate than you might have expected and more about going ach each other's record. >> we'll get to the china stuff after the break. we appreciate you being with us. we'll take a short break here. when we come back, we'll continue to break down the republican debate. we'll have a panel of experting
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weighing in on how they saw all this play out for the candidates. plus, the u.s. offering an explanation as to why ten american sailors unexpectedly entered iranian waters earlier this week. we'll have that later in the hour. our cosmetics line was a hit. the orders were rushing in. i could feel our deadlines racing towards us. we didn't need a loan. we needed short-term funding fast. building 18 homes in 4 ½ months? that was a leap. but i knew i could rely on american express to help me buy those building materials. amex helped me buy the inventory i needed. our amex helped us fill the orders. just like that. another step on the journey. will you be ready when growth presents itself? realize your buying power at open.com itswhen you're engineeredct to literally to drive circles around the competition.
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>> you've been getting good reviews. do you know why this is better than the past? i'm leading. i think i've done well in all the debates. other wise i wouldn't be reading but a lot of people are saying this is my best debate. >> this is a very animated republican debate. john thomas is a republican strategist. we heard from donald trump. the instant polling, a lot of people say he walked away with it. do you think he did and why? >> i don't think he did. everyone was attacking everybody else and donald remained the least attacked of bunch. >> he seemed a lot more animated
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than he did in previous debates. >> he did. he does have a draw a contrast between himself and ted cruz in iowa. donald trump got attacked the least. >> he was floating above it. >> you would not have thought watching this debate this was the guy leading in the national polls, leading in new hampshire, right on the brink of possible winning iowa and new hampshire with no one has done since gerald ford in 1976. yet there was no sense of urgency or confidence, i think, in the way the other candidates approached him. >> we were talking about donald trump. and one area i thought really brought him to light, he was really animated when he was talking about china. and he was talking about trade. and he was talking about the 45% tariff on chinese goods. this is what he had to say. >> if they don't start treating us fairly and stop devaluing and
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let their currency rise so our companies can compete and we don't lose all of these millions of jobs, i will certainly start taxing goods that come in from china. >> this could be devastating fur our economy. we need someone with a steady hand being president of the united states. >> we don't need a weak person being president of the united states, okay? that's what we would get if it were jeb. i tell you what, we don't that. >> drazer classic trump tactics. he just hit jeb bush straight back. >> i thought he was hitting on the populist things that he hits on. the china trade, muslim travel ban and 9/11. >> you sigh how demographic change ultimately produces policy change. you have a jep ration of white working class voters realigning in the republican parties. and what that's done is provide an audiendd argument for an aud
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and trump is making a consistent coherent argument towards a predominantly blue collar wing of the republican party that rejects all of those ideas, also throws in ideas like the muslim ban. praise of police tonight, policing. also another kind of note. he was to us canned, i thought, like a laser on his constituency. this is a constituency that really didn't exist to this extent 20, 25 years ago in the republican party. >> he was focused on the trump supporters who were watching but it seemed to be a different mood inside that hall. mj, did it feel like the crowd wasn't really quite with trump. it seemed like he was getting booed a lot more than he has in the past. >> that is right, he did get some boos. i want to say up with of the most powerful moments from the
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debate. i saw on twitter, democrats, republicans, both saying this was a good moment for trump. when he responded to the new york values from cruz, h espoke pretty passionately and personally about one halving the world trade towers coming down. and talking about the resiliency of the people of new york and new york city. that was a good moment for him. yes, i think at any debate trump is going to get boos and people who disagree with him. i do think there were some strong moments for trump in tonight's debate. >> absolutely. who haven't we talked about in this debate? ben carson. the neurosurgeon. he got a couple of good laughs. this was one of them. >> well, i'm very happy to get a question this early on. i was going to ask you to wake me up when the time came. >> it's a funny line.
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it's really hard to believe that this guy was leading the polls in november. so what's happened here? >> well, a bunch has happened. the idea that, you know, terrorism is the number one issue. and that hasn't been his number one issue. he suspended his campaign to go to uh israel to bone up on the issues. an the electorate wants somebody who's as angry as they are. i think that's always the disconnect. early on, the evangelicals did like ben carson a lot, but he never exude odd the enthusiasm that he's going to go to d.c. and shake it up. he peaked too early. >> it seemed like a strange strategy about kasich to talk about the amount of time he's spent b on congressional committees in an election cycle where everyone hates washington. here's a guy on paper looks great but just hasn't performed.
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>> i think that's a great point. his core message tonight was kind of striking. we have to work together to solve problems. which again is kind of, in fact, is the reality in a closely divided country, but is not really the tenor and current of this republican primary. still potentially a vice president, i suppose, for the right republican nominee. but after this campaign. look, and as we say that, he's still in the mix in new hampshire. and that's part of the problem that the center right has that none of these four candidates trying to compete all kind of cannibalizing each other in a place that anoints the favorite from that wing of the party. >> i think kasich looks at this as saying he's got a narrow lane to own. that bipartisan, that fiscal watch. if he can own it better than anybody else and be consistent, maybe there's a path to new hampshire. >> mv, back to you. this all seemed like hard nosed politics tonight. it was a rough and tumble here. and in some ways it seemed that these candidates are vying to
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see who can hate hillary clon more. . >> it doesn't do them a lot. iowa is still a couple of weeks away, right? i think it's always a political move for these candidates to show their audience we are capable of taking on hillary clinton come next november. -mile-an-hour t however, iowa still hasn't happened. they're laser focused on winning iowa and new hampshire and taking it one day at a time. i think hillary clinton as good of an opponent as she would make for these candidates, i think it's sort of a mixed bag how much these candidates would want to focus on her at this point in the cycle. >> we make the point that iowa is 17, 18 days away. i'm wondering if that's one of
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the reasons why there seems to be a lot more passion and anger in this debate. nothing really happened tonight. >> i was struck that there was more urgency in the second tier candidates going after each other than in their attempt to make the case against the guy who's leading them all and is positioned to potentially put them in a very difficult position in a matter of weeks if doesn't make a move against him. >> the choice, if you don't like trump, because the establishment is saying at some point trump is going to implode. i want to be their guy. >> is there still a kreeling? >> ron's point is that's not nearly the argument anymore. essentially, someone is going to have to take him down. >> nikki haley made the case pretty pointedly, except for jeb
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bush, you didn't hear anyone pick up on those arguments. if you want to say that donald trump isn't a real conservative, don't blame it on the city of new york. put the label on donald trump himself, which he did not do. >> john, thank you for coming in. mj in north charleston, thank you dpr being with us. it was a very interesting debate. and we're going to be talking about this for a while. thank you, both. u.s. democratic candidate hillary clinton appeared on the jimmy fallon show on thursday. it was recorded before the republican debate. >> you have to watch the debates, right? >> owell, usually i'm not home when the debates are going on. i have err things that i'm out doing. i do try to catch up on them. >> what was it like? >> i love to be able to fast forward. >> that's always nice. that's always fun. is it hillary clinton with a bowl of popcorn and just sitting back with a glass of wine. whatting them going, oh, this is no -- oh, that's wrong. do you watch with bill?
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does bill watch as wells? >> sometimes. yeah. >> does he get into it? does he pause it and say that's not how you do it. >> well, secretary clinton clearly watched the debates. she was tweeting about it at one point. she broke this. here's the truth. you can't make america greater by insulting, shaming and demonizing the people of america. and bernie sanders also weighed in as well. i have a message for donald trump. no, we're not going to hate latinos or muslims, we are going to stand together. a short break here on cnn. when we come back, thursday's deadly terror attack in indonesia. new information on the accused militant in charge.
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>> welcome back, everybody. it's about 10:34 on the west coast. the u.s. republican presidential hopefuls are promising to rebuild the country's military. roll back government regulations and repeal obamacare. the litest debate comes less than three weeks before the nation's first caucuses in iowa february 1. the u.s. navy is now debriefing ten american sailors released from iranian custody. the they say the sailors appear to be officially okay but they're tired and upset about what they say happened when their boats drifted not far from farsi island. indonesian play blasts killed two people and wounded 24 hours. officials believe the indonesian militants behind the attack
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instructed members of his terror cells from syria. >> let's get more on this now. steve moore is with me right now. now, steve, indonesia has been hit by a number of terrorist attacks over the years. the biggest was the bali fwoming in 2002. there was also an attack in 2003. the marriott hotel hit by a suicide bomber. >> that was my case. >> you took the lead for the fbi investigation. the others were linked to al qaeda? >> yes. >> this one was linked to ice miss . >> that's the sea change. indonesia and philippines. i think what's happening is isis is taking their membership away into this new group. and he is really changing it, because what's going to happen and what the future is going to
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be the new attack is going to be the new 9/11. you do 20 or 30 of these attacks and it has the same effect. >> they're a home grown islamic terrorist group? >> yes, they are. they work mainly in indonesia and in the southern philippines. this new group works through indonesia and up the malai peninsula. it's actually west of where the other one was. >> how much of these guys actually loyal to isis. and how much is it that these guys are just hitching their wagon to whichever islamic group is the one that seems to be strongest at the time? >> i think that's good insight. everybody that you're seeing are bandwagoners. they're going with the team that's winning. and so al qaeda is headaching a deep hit. and isis is picking up all the people they thought are d
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disenfranchise popped. >> they hit a star bucks. it was an upscale area, shopping malls, luxury hotel, u.n., embassies. we're looking at restaurants, cafes, these are soft targets. again, we get to that question, what can you do to protect those areas? 4. >> they're all over the place. you've been there. that is what stopped this so lick kwi. they're find they can hit western targets.
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>> if you haven't had the intelligence beforehand, that's where you're in trouble. >> with this leardless resistance, it is going to be almost impossible to stop all of the attacks because these people decide on their own, the only person they talk about is themselves. >> you're going to have a real quick window where you can get it. >> it's not like the israelis where you go to 70 back ground checks and security checks before you enter a building. >> the u.s. is offering an explanation why sailors entered iranian waters earlier this week. [richard] would you like more money with your refund? how about a thousand dollars more?
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>> another u.s. secretary of defense said a navigational error caused ten sailors to entered iranian waters this week. they were within three miles of the farsi island. now they appear to be fine physically, but they're tired and upset. here's jim sciutto. >> the two boats drifted near an island where an iranian naval bases are located. when revolutionary guards guns drawn boarded the boat. they missed a call. a gps discovered they were inside iranian waters. one navy helicopter spotting the
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boats moored on shore, leading them to con cluz the nine men and one woman were in iranian skus di. >> it was a misunderstanding. >> what happened next is sparking even more outrage, both inside and outside the military. iran broadcast and rebroadcast images of the captured sailors on their knees across the world. >> they now are taking our american servicemen and putting them on their knee, taking off their shoes and having them hold their hands over their heads. that's not the way the united states of america would have been treated under any other president that i know of. >> administration officials continue to insist the standoff could have been much worse. without the diplomatic channels resulting from nuclear negotiations with iran. >> the video on the face of it is difficult to watch. there's no question about that. and nobody likes to see our 1 s sailors in that position, but we got our sailors back in 24 hours.
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and nobody got hurt. >> the deal will take effect including ending economic sanctions on iran, freeing up tens of billions of dollars in iranian assets now frozen overseas. the taking of the u.s. sailors is the latest in a series of provocations by teheran. in december, finding a barrage of rockets near an american aircraft carrier in the persian gulf. in october, testing a ballistic missile in violation, say u.s. official, of a u.n. resolution banning such tests. in addition, iran continues to hold four american citizens on what the u.s. considers baseless or trumped up charges. >> and u.s. officials believe iran also knows the whereabouts of former fbi agent robert levinson who went missing in iran in 2007. it's a charge they've repeatedly denied. >> i think the administration is willing to stomach just about anything to make sure this deal goes ahead. >> the geneva convention prevents countries from parading
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members of foreign military. but they say the geneva conventions do not apply here because the u.s. and iran are not at war. short break here. when we come back, #why is oscar so white is trending for the second conservative year. our cosmetics line was a hit. the orders were rushing in. i could feel our deadlines racing towards us. we didn't need a loan. we needed short-term funding fast. building 18 homes in 4 ½ months? that was a leap. but i knew i could rely on american express to help me buy those building materials. amex helped me buy the inventory i needed. our amex helped us fill the orders. just like that. another step on the journey. will you be ready when growth presents itself? realize your buying power at open.com
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♪ hello from the outside at least i can say that i tried ♪ >> that's adele singing her trip hello before a trip around london. adele proved she doesn't just stick to the old ballads. they sang to the spice girls and nikki manage. ♪ tell me what you want you i really-really want ♪ ♪ tell me what you want
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what you really really want [ rapping ] just kill another career it's a mild day ♪ ♪ this is what you live for >> they're enjoying themselves. he has picked up a couple of other notable celebrities, including stevie wonder and rod stewart. rod stewart would have been interesting. >> this may finally be the year for actor leonardo dicaprio. the nominations are in and he's nominated for his lead role in "the revenant." >> they took my boy from me. >> a number of nominations, 12
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in total. and this is the fifth acting oscar nomination for dicaprio. >> i am the one who runs from both the lefing and the dead. >> oh deals are "the martian" and matt damon is nominated for best actor. also best equipment "root" "brooklyn" "the big short" and "spotlight." many are blasting the oscars after no ethnic minorities were nominated for the second consecutive year. and the hashtag oscarsowhite is trending. sylvester stallone was nominated
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for best supporting actor to. and the cast "straight out of compt compton" for which two of the white co-writers were actually nominated. oh, the irony. we have a senior reporter with the hollywood reporter. thanks for being with us. what's actually going on here? this is the second year it's happened. it's not a case that the academy doesn't b have options out there. there's a lot of good talent. so exactly what's happening for minorities as far as diversity. >> it basically shows you that progress is going to be really slow. i think people were really surprised this year that we again saw 20 all-white nominees, partly because of the fwak lash the year before when "selma" failed to be nominated. this year you think there's not just one movie, there's five viable contenders. it does show it's going to take a while for the academy membership to sort of diversify and change, as well as you just need to keep putting more movies
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out there in the pipeline. hollywood studios, last year they had "selma" can they keep increasing that number? >> the other argument is there's just not enough lead roles or may nor roles for minorities as well and that's a problem, right? >> i remember when vile la davis said in her emmy speech. the only separating women of color from anyone else is opportunity. that goes across the board. >> as we mention, this has been trend on the twitterverse. oscarsowhite. whoa, the attendance list sure is high class. oh, never mind. it's just the oscar nominations. best picture may go to straight out of martha's vineyard. >> zing. >> that's a good zing. clearly people are on to this. does that mean the academy actually listens to this kind of criticism? >> the academy actually is listening.
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>> but not doing anything about it. >> the leadership is listening. the voting members, the about 6200 voting members. and in november, she announced this initiative called a 20/20 where in five years they want to really look at diversifying the membership. they're slowing doing that. they're inviting more diverse people. but it's going to be a population for that population to change. >> what about people who say listen, if they're any good, they would be nominated, this is sour grapes. this isn't about a color thing, this is about a talent thing. as you say, 7,000 people vote, it can't be a conspiracy. >> it's not a deliberate conspiracy. but the problem is when you look at the fact that the academy membership is 94% white, it's unconscious bias. >> 94% white, old male, yeah?
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>> yes. >> old, white and male. so that reflects their tastes. it's natural. if you ask a different constituency, it's not going to resonate with them as much. >> it's interesting this issue comes up for hollywood. the liberal elite, the left coast. you know, this is the organization which is meant to be progressive, break down stereotypes. this is what movies are often made to do, challenge the way we think. in some way, does that mean the whole progressive liberal image of hollywood to some extent, you know is, a little bit bogus if you like? >> there is a disconnect. i think it's totally fair to point that out. i would say that hollywood, the academy represents a very elite small percentage of that. if you look at what's out there on television now, much, much more diverse than this film landscape. even movie, all the movies still dpis. it's just the fact that when you get to the really, really top tier elite, yeah, we're not putting our money where our mouth is. >> this is going to be a
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generation issue. as the academy changes and the views change and people wake up, how long do people actually have to wait for these changes to occur. that's the question. >> you've been watching cnn news room live from los angeles. please stay with us. the news continues with george howe at the cnn center in atlanta after a short break.
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the clash of the favorites. donald trump and ted cruz take on the birther battle as republicans running for president face off in thursday's debate. terror in indonesia. isis claims responsibility for the fatal attack thursday in downtown jakarta. we take you live to the scene this hour for the very latest. and goodbye to an act great, alan rickman, the movie villain that people love to hate dies at 69. from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, welcome to our viewer here is in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell. "cnn newsroom" starts right now.
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and a very good day to you. we start this hour with the latest on the republican debate that was held in the state of south carolina and where people expected sparks to fly between the rivals that were on stage, they were not disappointed. candidates went after each other, then they went after hillary clinton, insisting that she would only continue the policies of the current president, barack obama. this was one of the last chances for the candidates to make their closing arguments, so to speak, before voting starts in just a few short weeks in iowa, then in new hampshire and the state of south carolina. the chances for any candidate to make a big move or to take an opponent down a peg are dwindling. and that made this latest debate a prime opportunity. here is a look at some of the key moments. >> you were born in canada to an american mother so you were are considered an american citizen. but that fellow next to you and others have said being born in
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canada means you are not natural born and that has raised questions about your eligibility. do you want to try to close this topic once and for all tonight? >> well, neil, i'm glad we are focussing on the important topics of the evening. [ applause ] you know, back in september, my friend donald said that he had had his lawyers look at this from every which way, and there was no issue there. there was nothing to this birther issue. now, since september, the constitution hasn't changed. [ laughter ] but the poll numbers have. >> there are other attorneys that feel, and very, very fine constitutional attorneys that feel that because he was not born on the land, he cannot run for office. here is the problem. we're running. we're running. he does great.
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i win. i choose him as my vice presidential candidate, and the democrats sue because we can't take him along for the ride. i don't like that, okay. the fact is and if for some reason he beats the rest of the field, he beats the rest of the field -- [ booing ] see, they don't like that. they don't like that. no, they don't like that he beats the rest of the field because they want me. [ laughter ] but if for some reason, neil, he beats the rest of the field, i already know that democrats are going to be bringing a suit. you have a big lawsuit over your head while you're running. and if you become the nominee, who the hell knows if you can even serve in office. so you should go out, get a declaratory judgment, let the courts decide. >> i hate to interrupt this episode of "court tv", but the real -- [ applause ] >> well, i am very happy to get a question this early on. i was going to ask you to wake
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me up when the time came. >> senator cruz, "the new york times" is reporting that you failed to properly disclose a million dollars in loans from goldman sachs and citibank. during your senate race, your campaign says it was inadvertent. a million dollars is inadvertent? >> well, maria, thanks for passing on that hit piece on the front page of the "new york times." you know, the nice thing about the mainstream media, they don't hide their views. the "new york times" a few weeks back had a columnist who wrote a column who said "anybody but cruz." that same columnist wrote a column comparing me to an evil demonic spirit from the movie "it follows" that jumps apparently from body to body, possessing people. so, you know, "the new york times" and i don't exactly have the warmest of relationships. now, in terms of their really stunning hit piece, what they
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mentioned is when i was running for senate, unlike hillary clinton, i don't have masses of money in the bank, hundreds of millions of dollars. when i was running for senate, just about every lobbyist, just about all of the establishment opposed me in the senate race in texas. and my opponent in that race was worth over $200 million. he put a $25 million check from his own pocket to fund that campaign. and my wife heidi and i, we ended up investing everything we owned. we took a loan against our assets to invest it in that campaign to defend ourselves against those attacks. and the entire "new york times" attack is that i disclosed that loan on one filing with the united states senate that was a public filing. but it was not on a second filing with the fec. both of those filings were public. and yes, i made a paperwork error disclosing it on one piece of paper instead of the other. but if that's the best hit "the
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new york times" has got, they better go back to the well. >> unfortunately, governor christie has endorsed many of the ideas that barack obama supports, whether it's common core or gun control or the appointment of sonia sotomayor or the donation he made to planned parenthood. our next president and our republican nominee cannot be someone who supports those positions. >> governor? >> you know, i -- i stood on the stage and watched marco and rather indignantly look at governor bush and say someone told you that because we're running for the same office, that criticizing me will get you to that office. it appears that the same someone has been whispering in old marco's ear too. >> a lot to talk about here. we get more on the debate now from our chief political correspondent, dana bash, who was there in north charleston and has this wrap of key moments. >> it is official. the bromance between ted cruz and donald trump is over. the two went at it. it became clear watching them in
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the debate that they are -- it's a two-man race, at least for the top right now. especially when it comes to iowa. and on the issue of whether or not ted cruz is eligible to be president, one that donald trump brings up over and over and over again, at the end of the debate, by the end, it seemed that trump kind of bested cruz on the whole issue that cruz tried to hit him with, which is the new york issue, saying that he has a new york attitude. cruz has asked what that meant. he didn't really answer. but trump came back at him big-time, talking about the 9/11 new york that he knew, the post- 9/11 new york, the way new yorkers came together. that's something that mr. trump talked to me about after the debate. >> let's talk about new york value. >> okay. >> do you think ted cruz explained what new york values were when he was asked about it? >>, no i don't think he did. and i think he insulted a tremendous number of people. and you can't insult new yorkers in front of me. you know, with what we all put
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up with, with the world trade center and that whole thing and the death and travesty of the world trade center. and then to come back like we came back, i just don't think he should be hitting on new yorkers. and i think he realizes he made a mistake. >> now trump left here and went straight to iowa. he is going to do some stop there's in the morning. that is a place where trump really wants to win to try to stop ted cruz's momentum. the two of them are neck and neck in polls there. the question is going to be whether or not trump can get the voters out who might not have ever caucused before. it is not something that is an easy thing to do. you don't just go and check the box in a ballot box. you have to go. you have to stand there for hours. so the trump campaign insists that they are going to get new caucusgoers. they're going to get people out to the caucuses who had never been there before. but the bottom line is donald trump has to make sure that that happens and has an organization that hasn't been seen when it comes to the republicans in iowa.
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>> dana bash reporting there for us. now throughout this debate, we heard the candidates make plenty of negative claims about their opponents' records, as well as the record of president obama. cnn's tom foreman looks at some of those claims and how they compare with the facts. >> the candidates gave us plenty to keep our fact checkers busy. so let's start off with marco rubio going after chris christie for not being conservative enough. >> unfortunately, governor christie has endorsed many of the ideas that barack obama son, whether it's common core or gun control or the appointment of sonia sotomayor or the donation he made to planned parenthood. >> that's four fast claims there. christie says on the first three, he has really evolved to a different position. but the bottom line is yeah, he has supported them over time. so that's true. that's true. that's true. in terms of what rubio said about him. on planned parenthood, rubio's claim is based on a 20-year-old newspaper article in which christie says he was misquoted.
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he never gave money to planned parenthood. we don't have any financial records to prove it one way or the other. we can only say that is complicated. let's move on to ted cruz who has some things to say about the economy under barack obama. >> the millionaires and billionaires are doing great under obama. but we have the lowest percentage of americans working today of any year since 1977. >> that's a big claim. but let's take a look at the numbers and see if it's true. in 1977, the percentage of americans working was 58.7%. in 2011, it was at 58.2%. and right now it is at 59.5%. just do the math, and you can see that ted cruz's claim here is false. and jeb bush jumped in on the iran nuke deal. listen. >> as it relates to iran, we need to confront their ambitions across the board. we should reimpose sanction. they have already violated sanctions after this agreement was signed by testing medium
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range missiles. >> this gets really complicated when you start looking at all the language and the timing and the sanctions and what they can and what they can't do. the bottom line is iran tested some missiles last fall. they shouldn't have done it. so bush's claim is true. you can find out a whole lot more about how we reached these conclusions and about many of the things that were said during this debate by going to cnn.com/realitycheck. >> tom foreman, thank you so much. and we will have much more on this debate. still ahead here on "cnn newsroom," including the criticism from ted cruz of donald trump's new york values. plus, we take you live to jakarta. one day after a terror attack that killed two people and wounded dozens of others. you'll hear why indonesians say they won't cower to fear. stay with us. this is "cnn newsroom." i'm the. i'm there for ray. ted loved baseball. dr. phil likes to watch football. renne, who wants sloppy joe on the menu every day.
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welcome back to "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell. one day after a deadly attack in indonesia, and the investigation there continues. in an online statement, isis has
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claimed responsibility for that violence on thursday. attackers armed with grenades anson handguns killed two people. they wounded 24 others. investigators believe the person who ordered the attack is an indonesian man living inside syria. indonesia's president says the country cannot live in defeat and fear. it's a sentiment that was echoed by many at a memorial for the victims. listen. >> this accident can happen in life. so we just careful every time. >> are you afraid that there could be more violence? >> no, we're not afraid anymore. >> let's go live to jakarta right now. our simon mohsen joins us there this hour. simon, very good to have you. the government has singled out one particular suspect. what more can you tell us about him? >> yes, george, this is baru
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imman, a man known to authorities. linked always with extremist organizations. previously a nonviolent extremist organization. but it was in 2010 when he was believed to be hiding and went to prison for hiding, ammunition that belonged to terrorist attackers that carried out an attack on police in java that he was arrested and sent to jail. it's after 2013 after his release. he is believed to have slipped through the net somehow and travelled to syria from where he is believed to have been trying to recruit, send money here to indonesia, recruit local people to carry out attacks. it is believed he is one of the many men here now trying to vie for position to head what he will eventually want to call isis in indonesia. george? >> saima, you also got a chance to talk to people, to get their sense, their reaction a day
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after this attack. what more are you hearing? >> yeah, that attack, george, resonating right across indonesia, particularly here in the capital jakarta. i'm actually at the grand mosque indonesia of course, the world's largest muslim population. thousands of people had come here earlier to listen to the friday sermon. the imam making some very strong statements today, clarifying his position and what he believes muslims' position should be, saying terrorism is a crime against humanity. but according to him throughout islamic history, any islamic war was always defensive, not offensive. of course, denouncing and referring to isis' so-called jihad. people here too coming today saying that this should not be in their name. take a listen, george. >> translator: what happened yesterday, they are not muslims. they are infidels. i condemn them.
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i demand the government solve this problem. as a muslim, i reject this terrorism in the name of islam. >> translator: islam has become a scapegoat. people believe islam is identical to violence. every time violence happens people think it's related to islam, but it's not. >> no, no, i'm not terrorist. and muslim in indonesia not terrorists. but i want to say to it the world that muslim islam not terrorists. not to muslim. >> and that was a statement we heard repeated again and again as i spoke to people as they arrived and left here, george. incredibly important statements, of course for both the imam to make and the people here to make after what is now the first attack on indonesian soil claimed by isis. george? >> cnn correspondent saima mohsin live for us in jakarta. thank you so much for your reporting there. it was only a matter of weeks ago that australia's attorney
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general declared indonesia an aspirational distant caliphate for isis. on the surface, that may carry some weight, especially after the jakarta attack. but just dig a little deeper, and it appears the world's most populist muslim company is actually not a lucrative hunting ground for isis recruiters. there are fewer than 700 indonesia fighters in iraq and syria right now. this according to the government security advisers group. its studies show tunisia has by far the most foreign fighters per million muslim citizens. in belgium, there are 40 per million. in iraq and syria and in indonesia, just one per million. with those figure, this idea of a distant caliphate doesn't appear to add up. cnn heard from kerstin on this issue earlier. he is the author of "islam in indonesia" and he gave us his assessment on whether isis is
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creating a foothold in indonesia. listen. >> we have seen in the last ten years various instances far apart indeed of internationalized forms of islamic violence. on the other hand, i do think there is still a very robust counter narrative which prevails among indonesia's muslim population, so the realistic chances of establishing a distant caliphate in indonesia are very slim. but of course isis has a great interest in projecting this image and creating the impression that its tentacles are now reaching far into asia. but as your report showed already, there is really very small numbers of activists who are willing to take these extreme steps. and they disappear in this sea of muslims who embrace a much
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more pluralist islam. it is indeed the biggest nation state in the world. but it is also ethnically very diverse and the spectrum of religious experience is even among muslims is quite unique. so the formulas that work in the middle east are greeted with a great deal of suspicion in indonesia where they have very little appetite for this, indeed this arabization of indonesian islam. >> indonesia's president says his nation will not be defeated by these acts of terror. on to paris now, where prosecutors there have a positive id on the suicide bomber who blew up an apartment just as anti-terror police closed in. the blast happened last november 18th just as law enforcement was raiding the apartment in the saint-denis region. the bomber was a 25-year-old, a belgian moroccan, the suspected
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ringleader of attacks and his cousin were also killed in that raid. there is also a new "charlie hebdo" cartoon out that has critics saying that it pushes its provocative brand too far, and it has many people questioning whether those who supported the satirical magazine after last year's attacks would feel the same way about that publication now. cnn's atika shubert has this report. >> reporter: french satirical magazine "charlie hebdo" has done it again with another cartoon sparking outrage. this time it features an image of alain cordie, the 3-year-old who drowned trying to reach europe. his death last year became a symbol of the plight of millions of refugees. but the headline in the cartoon asks "what would little aylan have become?" and the answer is a sex offender in germany. now that last line clearly is in reference to that new year's eve
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sex assault here in cologne. the police have described the perpetrators as being a mob of north african or arab men. well, critics have condemned the cartoon as being both offensive to the memory of aylan cordie, but also being racist in depicting all refugees as sex offenders. others have defended the magazine saying that perhaps it was intending to attack those worldwide stereotypes of refugees. now the family of aylan cordie has seen the cartoon, and it told cbc, canadian broadcasting that the cartoon was, quote, disgusting. "charlie hebdo" has had no comment on this particular cartoon. however, it has long maintained that there are no taboos and no boundaries when it comes to satirizing politics and religion. take a listen, though, to what some people on the streets of paris had to say in reaction. >> no, i can't understand why they are saying that.
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it's just a cliche on immigrants. it's weird. >> they've been able to foresee what i had in mind as usual, which is really good. okay, aylan, all right. that's the side they always use to shock people. >> "charlie hebdo" has been really, really satirical. and i think that was kind of their way of communication sometimes. it's a little bit funny. >> of course, the magazine has risked death for publishing many of its provocative cartoons last year. many of its animators and journalists were brutally murdered by islamic extremists, the reason the attackers gave was because the magazine published a provocative cartoon of the prophet muhammad. now in the aftermath of the attacks, there was a rallying cry, i am charley in defense of the magazine. but this time with ch cover,
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there are not as many coming to its defense. atika shubert, cnn, berlin. stock markets in asia are taking another hit. the main shanghai index is in bear market territory, more than 20% below the high it reached in late december. the shanghai composite is now closed. the hang seng, though, trading down. as you see all of these major indices trading down at the moment. you're watching "cnn newsroom." and still to come, a police department under fire. chicago releases yet another video showing the shooting of an unarmed teen. we'll have that story, plus actor alan rickman has died of cancer. he is remembered for his portrayal of such characters as snape in the "harry potter" films. well take a look at his career and life. live from atlanta and around the globe this hour, you are watching cnn worldwide. was engineered...
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a warm welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. you're watching cnn newsroom. good to have you with us. i'm george howell. the headlines we're following for you this hour. isis claims responsibility for the terrorist attacks thursday in jakarta in indonesia. police say the blast there killed two people, an indonesian and a foreigner. 24 others were wounded. officials believe that the indonesian militant behind the attacks instructed members of his terror cells from inside syria. in japan, a bus taking tourists to a ski resort rolled off a mountain roadway. the accident killed 14 people. the bus was carrying 41 people when it crashed from nagano prefecture earlier on friday. the cause of that crash is still
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under investigation. donald trump, he is raising more questions about whether his republican rival ted cruz is even eligible to be president. the two clashed over the issue during the debate on thursday night in the state of south carolina. mr. cruz says even though he was born in canada, he is a natural born u.s. citizen because his mother is american. but it is a question mark that mr. trump hopes to leave over ted cruz's head. earlier i spoke to ben ferguson about this birther question just a short time ago. and here is what he had to say. >> donald trump has realized that if he can just throw doubt out there, it pulls down ted cruz in the polls. and many people go well, i don't want to waste my vote if this guy can't even be president, regardless of what the facts actually are. legal scholars have made it very clear. donald trump is not correct on this issue. and donald trump keeps trying to say look, i'm not the one saying this, but democrats are the ones doing it. and if you can't put this to bed
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100% sure and the democrats sue you, do you really want that to be your nominee? it's a very crafty play. i also think it's the lowest form of politics. but it's a very crafty play. i do think donald trump is going to keep using this to somehow try to go after some of the supporters of ted cruz. it has worked in the polls in iowa. it has brought him down five or six points. i think it's also going to work in iowa. and at some point the question is going to be does ted cruz have to throw a harder punch at donald trump than he did even tonight in the debate? he certainly fought back with him, but i don't think you saw him go for full-on blows. right now donald trump is going to wear this one out. >> he is definitely a talker, and we'll of course have more on that entire interview that i had with ben ferguson next hour here on "cnn newsroom." and another contentious issue. ted cruz really criticized donald trump for what he calls his new york values. the debate moderators asked cruz exactly what he meant. listen.
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>> i think most people know exactly what new york values are. >> i am from new york. i don't. >> you're from new york, so you might not. but i promise you in the state of south carolina, they do. and listen, there are many, many wonderful, wonderful workingmen and women in the state of new york. but everyone understands that the values in new york city are socially liberal, are pro-abortion, are pro gay marriage, focused around money and the media. and i would note indeed the reason i said that is i was asked, my friend donald has taken to his events playing bruce springsteen's "born in the usa." and i was asked what i thought of that. i said well, if he wanted to play a song, maybe he could play "new york, new york." and the concept of new york values is not that complicated to figure out. not too many years ago, donald did a long interview with tim russert.
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and in that interview, he explained his views on a whole host of issues that were very, very different from the views he is describing now. and his explanation was look, i'm from new york. that's what we believe in new york. those aren't iowa values, but this is what we believe in new york. so that was his explanation. and i guess i can frame it another way. not a lot of conservatives come out of manhattan. i'm just saying. >> because he insulted a lot of people, i've had more calls on that statement that ted made, that new york is a great place. it's got great people. it's got loving people, wonderful people. when the world trade center came down, i saw something that no place on earth could have handled more beautifully, more humanely than new york. you had -- [ applause ]
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-- you had two 110-story buildings come crashing down. say them come down. thousands of people killed. and the cleanup started the next day. and it was the most horrific cleanup probably in the history of doing this and in construction. i was down there. and i've never seen anything like it. and the people in new york fought and fought and fought. and we saw more death an even the smell of death. nobody understood it. and it was with us for months, the smell, the air. and we rebuilt downtown manhattan. and everybody in the world watched. and everybody in the world loved new york and loved new yorkers. and i have to tell you, that was a very insulting statement that ted made. >> earlier cnn political commentator anna navarro explained why cruz should have attacked earlier, to attack trump on his conservative credentials. listen. >> he is a little late to the
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party. for months when trump started surging, we've all been saying, many of news the party have been saying he is not a true conservative. he is not a true republican. look at where he has been on guns. look at where he has been on gay rights. look at where he has been on reproductive rights. look at his entire life. he is not a republican. where was ted cruz, the vanguard or the conservative movement, he was suck up to donald trump, who he thought was not going to withstand the rigors of the race and he could inherit those followers. well, it's a little too late now to be turning it around. >> cnn political commentator anna navarro speaking earlier. and you can bet there are many more twist and turns yet to come in this race ahead of the iowa caucuses. that again are set for february 1st. now on to chicago. three years after police there killed an unarmed african american teenager, a judge has now released the video showing what happened. cnn's rosa flores shows you that video and explains why it's just coming out now.
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>> reporter: it's yet another deadly shooting caught on camera. an unarmed black teen shot and killed by a chicago police officer. the video is released today after a judge's order to show the final moments of cedrick chatman's life three years ago. at 1:46 p.m., surveillance cameras capture chatman, a carjacking suspect, getting out of a car and running away from police. that's chatman running between two parked cars and on to the sidewalk. a police officer close behind. two seconds later, a second police officer, kevin fry, is seen in the middle of the street with his weapon drawn. chatman disappears out of frame, still running away from police when fry opens fire. officers say chatman was pointing a dark object at them and shot in self-defense. the object turned out to be a black iphone box.
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the camera pans over and shows chatman lying on the street. and then about a minute later, a police officer is seen with a foot on the wounded teen's body. >> you have a 17-year-old kid that is shot and killed, bleeding in the street, the city of chicago, handcuffed, facedown on the ground. and for him to essentially step on him, on top of it, it's totally unreasonable. >> reporter: unreasonable and disturbing according to the judge that ordered the video to be released. the judge also called the city irresponsible for what he called an age of enligegghteenlightenm. the judge is referring to the city's motion to drop its opposition for the release of the video made late wednesday afternoon after a three-year fight. the city's explanation, transparency in the public's interest. >> i would say it's more of a political move than anything. >> reporter: attorneys for the officers sent cnn a statement saying they had reason to
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believe that the suspect was armed. the police officers have not faced criminal charges, but instead chatman's two accomplices, who were ten blocks away, were charged with the teen's murder. they later pleaded guilty to lesser crimes. the police officers kept their jobs, but are facing a wrongful death suit from chatman's family. rosa flores, cnn, chicago can. >> a french school teacher is under investigation after two students died in an avalanche on an alpine ski trip. the warning signs authorities say he missed, straight ahead.
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the french school teacher who led ten of his students into a deadly avalanche in the alps is now facing a manslaughter investigation. these still images that we have to show you show the scene
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moments after that avalanche hit. investigators say the teacher took the students on to a closed ski slope, despite posted signs, a safety net, and a high avalanche danger. two students, a 16-year-old girl and a 14-year-old boy were killed, along with a ukrainian skier who was also on the slopes. christina mcfarland is the host of cnn's alpine edge, and has been in the alps now for weeks. earlier she told what's the teacher and students did wasn't that unusual. >> people ski a lot in europe throughout the season. and the areas are not always marked by a sign. but if they are considered to be dangerous, they are roped off. it's certainly not forbidden. but what happened here is that beyond the facts that the section in question was closed, the school group appeared to have missed a lot of the warning signs on that day. the avalanche level at that time was 3 out of 5. that means as little as one person on that day could have
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triggered an avalanche. and there have been i believe 30 centimeters of fresh snow that had fallen the day before. now after mild conditions in the alps, which is what we have seen in the early stages of the season, this is exceptionally dangerous because the snowpack can slip. and it also sounds like it was unlikely that the school group were actually wearing the right equipment, which would be a probe, a shovel and avalanche transceiver. these are standard pieces of equipment for anyone venturing off piste. now they were attempting the descent on a black run which is france's highest difficulty rating. a very steep slope. unfortunately, it's really a recipe for disaster in these type of conditions. >> now the regional prosecutor says the students had asked their teacher to take them to the slopes, and he says the first teacher that they asked refused. but then another teacher agreed to lead them. let's get more on the conditions surrounding this tragic
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incident. our meteorologist derek van dam is at the weather center to explain more about it. derek, good to have you. >> yeah, george, it was a combination of lethal elements that ultimately led to this disaster. extremely steep mountainous terrain over this pacific mountain range in the alps. they have pictures, mountain pictures. anywhere between 50 to 60 degrees. on top of that, there was a layer of fresh fallen snow that had fallen on top of an already icy packed surface. this is thanks to the above average temperatures that eastern and central jury pool have experienced over the month of december. any time you add fresh fallen snow, that destabilizes the snowpack and ultimately creates this layering effect that gravity will ultimately win and create that disastrous avalanche that took place, unfortunately, earlier this week there is still the threat of avalanches across the french and swiss alps. another 15 to 30 centimeters of snowfall anticipated over the
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next three days. so be on the lookout for that if you are indeed a skier or snowboarder traveling to that region. now i'm going to take you to another part of the world that is often synonymous with warmer climates. this would be the third hurricane ever recorded in the month of january. and it's got its eyes set on the azores islands, just west of portugal. currently at 80 miles per hour. this brings it at the strongest january formed hurricane ever recorded. and records go back since the 1800s, believe it or not. some of our current winds indicating that gusts already for the southern islands between 60 to 80 kilometers per hour. this particular hurricane first started to develop across the relatively warmer waters of the bahamas. and then it moved in to the cooler waters of the eastern atlantic. but there was enough temperature difference between the upper-levels of the atmosphere and the sea surface temperatures that it created this instability. thunderstorms formed. and that circulation developed
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as well, creating this very unusual january hurricane. i'm going to leave you with this, george. this is the latest time lapse coming out of port delgado. this is the capital of the azores islands. you can see some of the rain shafts starting to move on through as people hunker down in preparation for a very unusual hurricane. and by the way, george, it's unusual because it only happens every 15 to 20 years that a hurricane makes landfall in the azores. but to have it happen in the month of january is truly remarkable. >> i was going to ask you, derek, it is january? we're talking about a hurricane? >> it's not something we typically see. again, only the third time that this has happened. >> derek, thank you so much. >> thanks, george. in the country of guatemala, former comedian jimmy morales has been sworn in as the new president there. he was elected after a huge corruption scandal forced the resignation of otto perez
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morena. >> the new guatemalan president used to be a comedian who has been repeatedly criticized for his offcolor jokes, some deeply offensive to the indigenous population. but the 46-year-old was also considered the ultimate outsider, one of the outsiders that gave him an edge in the october presidential election in a country riddled with corruption. morales was sworn in friday evening in guatemala city before several latin american presidents, and u.s. vice president joe biden. >> translator: i've said this before, making use of and paraphrasing our national anthem, woe to he who with blind ambition tries to steal the people's money because we will be drastic and severe. >> guatemala, a country of 15 million, is reeling from a corruption scandal that last year prompted the resignation of its president, vice president, and more than a dozen cabinet members, ministers, and government officials.
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former president oto perez molina is in jail awaiting trial. perez won with more than 67% of the vote. among the main challenges for new president is combatting poverty. in a country where over half are below the poverty line, according to the world bank. the president asked all guatemalans to make a commitment and work for a better guatemala. morales will serve as president until 2020. reelection is not allowed in guatemala. actor alan rickman lost his battle with cancer. he is best known for his portrayal of villains, but we will tell you what he said about the roles that he chose to play. stay with us. sfx: rocket
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sfx: rocket blasting off sfx: (countdown) 3, 2, 1 rocket
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british actor alan rickman is being remembered by fans and colleagues as a generous and funny man, but also as a magnificent actor. rickman lost his battle with cancer on thursday. he was 69 years old. he was known for his roles playing villains, but there was much more to the actor who
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conquered theater, films, and television. our erin mcloughlin takes a look at his long career. >> reporter: the moment he appeared on screen, it was all there, the flare, the charisma, and the voice. >> turn to page 394. >> reporter: unmistakably alan rickman. arguably most famous for his portrayal of one of the most iconic characters in the "harry potter" franchise, professor severus snape. >> mr. potter. >> throughout the series it was unclear whether the professor was good or evil. rickman was the only actor who knew how to play the devious character whose story was revealed to the rest of the world in the final film. >> before i started, i rang and i said you have to tell me something. and she told me one tiny piece of information, which i swore i would never share with anybody here. >> reporter: a native londoner, his breakout film role was in
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"die-hard" as hans gruber. >> ha, ha, ha. >> reporter: rickman won a golden globe, an emmy and a screen actor's guild award for his much acclaimed portrayal of rasputin. >> you can see the face of god. >> reporter: performance as the sheriff of nottingham in "robin hood prince of thieves" won him a bafta. >> and call off christmas. >> what's that? >> reporter: his devilish charm also extended to films like "love actually". >> you won't regret it. >> 'tis but the work of a moment. >> he didn't want to be remembered only as a villain, was absolutely superb, he could be someone you really would love to kill, but equally he would be someone you would be absolutely delighted if he took a shine to you. >> reporter: choosing his roles, he told cnn -- >> i don't ever judge characters that i'm playing because then you would be lost. >> reporter: now the world has
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lost one of the most versatile and recognizable actors of the screen and stage. alan rickman was 69. >> that wraps this hour of "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. i'll be back after the break with more news from around the world. you're watching cnn, the world's news leader. our cosmetics line was a hit. the orders were rushing in. i could feel our deadlines racing towards us. we didn't need a loan. we needed short-term funding fast. building 18 homes in 4 ½ months? that was a leap. but i knew i could rely on american express to help me buy those building materials. amex helped me buy the inventory i needed. our amex helped us fill the orders. just like that. another step on the journey. will you be ready when growth presents itself? realize your buying power at open.com
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♪ light piano today i saw a giant. it had no arms, but it welcomed me. (crow cawing) it had no heart, but it was alive. (train wheels on tracks) it had no mouth, but it spoke to me. it said, "rocky mountaineer: all aboard amazing".
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the republican race for the white house, the gloves come off. hear what candidates had to say in their first debate of 2016, including this. >> because he was not born on the land, he cannot run for office. >> donald trump hammers ted cruz on whether he can even be president because he was born in canada. and later, isis now claiming responsibility for the terror attack in indonesia's capital. from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, welcome to our viewer here is in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell. "cnn newsroom" starts right now.
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and we begin this hour with debates that wrapped up just a few hours ago in north charleston, south carolina. that's the republican candidates that are running for president. and they got into their last chance really to make the case to voters to be commander in chief just weeks before the iowa caucuses. their latest debate featured fireworks between the two front-runners, donald trump and ted cruz. it started early when mr. trump insisting there are still questions about whether ted cruz is even eligible to be president since he was born in canada. >> this isn't me saying it. i dent care. i think i'm going to win fair and square. and i don't have to win this way. thank you. numerous from harvard say there is a serious question as to whether or not ted can do this, okay? there are other attorneys that feel, and very, very fine constitutional attorneys that feel that because he was not
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born on the land, he cannot run for office. >> well, listen, i've spent my entire life defending the constitution before the u.s. supreme court. and i'll tell you, i'm not going to be taking legal advice from donald trump. >> you don't have to. take it from lawrence. [ applause ] >> what i'll tell you also -- >> you can take it from your professor. take it from your own professor. >> i got to tell you one thing. >> the chances of any litigation proceeding and succeeding on this are zero. and mr. trump is very focused on larry tribe. let me tell you who larry tribe is? he is a left wing traditionalist who is al gore's lawyer in bush versus gore. he is a major hillary clinton supporter. and there is a reason why hillary supporters are echoing donald's attacks on me. >> trump and cruz got into it again over cruz's recent assertion that donald trump embodies, quote, new york values. cruz explained what he meant.
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>> everyone understands that the values in new york city are socially liberal. they're pro-abortion, or pro gay marriage, focused around money and the media. >> new york is a great place. it's got great people. it's got loving people, wonderful people. when the world trade center came down, i saw something that no place on earth could have hadn'tled more beautifully, more humanely than new york. >> and there was another key moment as ted cruz and marco rubio sparred on the issue of immigration. it started with a discussion on whether to allow syrian refugees into the united states. >> you don't get to say we need to secure the borders and at the same time try to give barack obama more authority to allow middle eastern refugees coming in when the head of the fbi tells us they cannot vet them to determine if they are isis terrorists. >> maria, let me clear something up here. this is an interesting point when you talk about immigration.
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ted cruz, you used to say you supported doubling the number of green cards. now you say you're against it. you used to support a 500% increase in the number of guest workers. now you say that you're against it. you also used to support legalizing people that were here illegally. now you say that you're against it. you used to say you were in favor of birthright citizenship. now you say you are against it. by the welcome back, it's not just on immigration. you used to support tpa. now you say you're against it. i saw you on the senate floor flip your vote on crop insurance because they told you it would help you in iowa. last week we all saw you flip your ethanol in iowa for the same reason. that is not political conservatism that is political calculation. >> joining us is conservative radio talk show host and cnn political commentator ben ferguson to talk about the republican debate. ben, good to have you with us. >> good to be with you. >> thank you, thank you. so let's talk about the front-runners, donald trump and ted cruz. and we saw that much anticipated showdown between these two.
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>> yeah. >> sparks flew over the birther debate. and the question that donald trump has raised over whether ted cruz is even eligible to be president since he was born in canada. is the birther debate put to bed now or will we hear more of it? >> you're going to hear more of it. the reason why is donald trump has realized if he can just throw doubt out, there it pulls down ted cruz in the polls. many people go i don't want to waste my vote if that guy can't even be president regardless of what the facts are. legal scholars have made it very clear. donald trump is not correct on this issue. and donald trump keeps trying to say look, i'm not the one saying this. but democrats are the ones doing it. and if you can't put this to bed 100% sure. and if you can't put this to bed 100% sure and the democrats sue you, do you really want that to be your nominee? it's a very crafty play. i also think it's the lowest form of politics. but it's a very crafty play. i do think donald trump is going to keep using this to somehow try to go after some of the supporters of ted cruz.
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it has worked in iowa in the polls there. it has brought him down five or six points. i think it's also going to work in iowa. and at some point the question is going to be does ted cruz have to throw a harder punch at donald trump than he did even tonight in the debate? he certainly fought back with him, but i don't think you saw him go for full-on blows. right now donald trump is going to wear this one out. >> donald trump, a master at branding. >> absolutely. >> that question over ted cruz's head. okay, the other issue that came up, gun control. it was front and center. chris christie took heat for his efforts as the governor of new jersey to strengthen gun reforms there. ted cruz saying she the strongest in protecting the second amendment. who do conservatives see as the strongest on gun rights? >> you know what? it's interesting. i talked to a lot of conservatives. they all know they're going to defend the second amendment. they're not really concerned with the infighting here on this one. i think ted cruz obviously this is going to play to his
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advantage, being from texas. he's got a strong record on this. i think what you see with chris christie, he is saying look, i've been strong on guns and vetoed many issues on guns in my state. when he said that tonight, i do hit the resonated with a lot of people who were watching and also those watching in the crowd. but overall i think pretty much everyone on the republican side of things, this is only going to be an asset for them if none of them enjoy real liability. and i think they all have a consensus on one core issue and that is the issue of mental health. they all seem to want to work on mental health issues. and i think that's where they're going to be able to use this on their campaigns. >> we saw marco rubio attacking ted cruz on being inconsistent on his votes in the senate, describing it as political calculation. this was really his last chance to top him in the polls and prove he is the better candidate. >> yeah. i don't think it worked tonight. and i think the way that you saw ted cruz fight back and n a very solid way with a lot of people applauding him when he was coming back after him.
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i think rubio, i said this tonight earlier. if there was a debate every single week, marco rubio would be in first or second place. he is probably i think the best debater consistently throughout this gop debate process. the issue is he's got some real liabilities. and one of the big ones is the gang of eight. and that seemed to really hurt him today. and one of the big issues where you saw ted cruz fight back against his this voting record critique that marco rubio was trying to bring on ted cruz, he said hey, you're the guy with the gang of eight. i was not part of that. you're the guy that worked on this issue saying you want the give every illegal immigrant in this country amnesty and citizenship. i'm against that. i think the counterattack may have done more damage than good for marco rubio. >> and what about the back and forth between marco rubio and chris christie? rubio calling christie too liberal. why not go after the front-runners? >> that is one of the ideas. i just don't understand here about all the candidates. i think they all should be ganging up on donald trump, just as a strategy.
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this isn't me saying i'm against donald trump. i'm just saying when you have a guy that is this solid and commanding in the lead, you need to go after him. and all of them need to go after him. the problem is if you go after him one-on-one, you end up losing because donald trump has a bigger microphone than anyone else. and he understands how to control that microphone in the media. and i think that's where these candidates have to kind of come together and say look, we may not be able to win the battle with him one-on-one. so let's all go after him. yet for some reason they didn't do that tonight. i don't think you help your campaign if you're rubio going after christie or christie going after rubio, or any of the cruz over rubio or ben carson over somebody or jeb bush over somebody. at some point these candidates are all going to lose out to donald trump if they don't start to wither away him as a candidate, chisel away at his lead. and right now if you're donald trump and you walk on the stage tonight, i think you still feel like you're in first place. you still feel like you're in command of this election, this gop election. and i think he is going to feel very good about tonight.
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>> okay. well, it comes down to the two front-runners. we saw the dust-up over cruz's comments about donald trump representing what he describes as, quote, new york values. >> yeah. >> is this a fair attack? >> i think it's a smart attack by ted cruz, because i think a lot of people associate new york politics with people like hillary clinton and others that are out there that have come from new york. and i think they understand that the media is an easy target right now. and people associate the media. cog out of new york. and the "new york times." i think this was politically a very smart cruz by ted cruz to say your brand of politics or conservatism is very different than mine or middle america. the other candidates if they want to go after ted cruz -- or excuse me, donald trump, they better go after him the same way. because otherwise they're all going to be in third, fourth, fifth or sixth place and donald trump is going to win this thing. >> from dallas, texas, ben ferguson joining us there.
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cnn political commentator. ben, thank you so much. >> thanks for having me. >> absolutely. >> throughout the debate, we heard candidates make plenty of negative claims about their opponent's records as well as the record of president obama. cnn's tom foreman looks at some of those claims and how they compare with the fax. >> the candidates gave us plenty to keep our fact checkers busy. so let's start off with marco rubio going after chris christie for not being conservative enough. >> unfortunately, governor christie has endorsed many of the ideas that barack obama son, supports, whether it's common core or gun control or the appointment of sonia sotomayor, or the donation he made to planned parenthood. >> that's four fast claims there. christie says on the first three, he has really evolved to a different position. but the bottom line is yeah, he has supported them over time. so that's true. that's true. that's true. in terms of what rubio said about him. on planned parenthood, rubio's claim is based on a 20-year-old newspaper article in which
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christie says he was misquoted. he never gave money to planned parenthood. we don't have any financial records to prove it one way or the other. we can only say that is complicated. let's move on to ted cruz who has some things to say about the economy under barack obama. >> the millionaires and billionaires are doing great under obama. but we have the lowest percentage of americans working today of any year since 1977. >> that's a big claim. but let's take a look at the numbers and see if it's true. in 1977, the percentage of americans working was 58.7%. in 2011, it was at 58.2%. and right now it is at 59.5%. just do the math, and you can see that ted cruz's claim here is false. and jeb bush jumped in on the iran nuke deal. listen. >> as it relates to iran, we need to confront their ambitions across the board. we should reimpose sanction. they have already violated sanctions after this agreement was signed by testing medium
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range missiles. >> this gets really complicated when you start looking at all the language and the timing and the sanctions and what they can and what they can't do. the bottom line is iran tested some missiles last fall. they shouldn't have done it. so bush's claim is true. you can find out a whole lot more about how we reached these conclusions and about many of the things that were said during this debate by going to cnn.com/realitycheck. >> tom foreman, thank you so much. cnn's gary tuchman went to a viewing party to watch this debate with a group of republican voters in charleston county there in the state of south carolina. here is a sample of what they had to say about it. >> normally they watch motion pictures in this movie theater. this is the cinema in charleston county, south carolina. a close drive to where the debate was held. and these behind me were 120 loyal republicans that came here
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on behalf of the charleston county republican committee. a lot of them have gone home because it's late. but these are the people who have stuck around. did you enjoy the debate? [ applause ] >> they enjoyed the debate. this is not a scientific sampling of voters. but it was a large number of voters in a very important political state. the south carolina republican primary is on february 20th. the democrats february 27th. was this good for the party, this debate do, you think? >> yeah. >> a straw poll was taken to see who these people thought won the debate. not who they like necessarily but who they thought won. in first place with 38% of your vote, donald trump. in second place, 36 vote, ted cruz. third place, 28 vote, marco rubio. tied for fourth with six votes each ben carson and jeb bush. two vote, john kasich and with no votes, even though he had a
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lot of applause lines in the debate. people weren't applauding for him is chris christie. he had no votes. but it was donald trump who was the win their time around. this guy right here. i'm going to lean over you if you don't mind. you think trump did better? we've been here for three debates now. you think he did better than last debate or about the same? >> i think trump has been very consistent lately. i think he has gotten better in the last two debates than earlier. i think he has a very strong performance tonight. and he has great presence on the stage and he is able to keep his they're 5 very focused. >> right over here we have new voters, seniors in high school. who do you think did best? >> i wasn't here for the whole thing. but i think marco rubio did very good. >> you weren't here for the whole thing. we'll let you say marco rubio. who did you think did best? >> i think cruz did a great job counterattacking a lot of the stuff that was said at him. >> and what about you? >> i agree. i think cruz did a very good job tonight. >> it's interesting. we were talking to these people. most people had opinions when they came. in they stuck with their candidates and had opinions about the candidates.
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but these two gentlemen right here, both school teachers, they came in undecided. you were undecided between who? >> kind of leaning toward rubio and cruz. >> and you? >> the same. i did like some of the undercard people who were not part of the main debate because i'm both a fiscal conservative and also a social conservative. >> so did this debate change your mind, either of you? have you come up with a candidate? >> i leaned more tonight towards rubio. but i could be happy with cruz. >> you? >> same way. i lean for rubio, for one reason. as i watched him in the debate and watched him on the screen, i was thinking i think he would appeal to the younger portion of the millennials that may think about voting republican this time because he is a young guy. he is very passionate. and i appreciate his passion tonight. >> thank you. this guy is the chairman of the gop here in charleston county. he is not allowed to say who he likes. so we're not going to interview him. but he sponsored this. and he provided pizza, popcorn, peanuts, and pop. that's what they call soda in
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the midwest. pop. they all had ps so i thought i would say pop. we've been here three times for debates. we'll probably be here more. this is a very important group of voter here is in the palmetto state of south carolina. >> now let's take a quick look at the democratic race for the white house. in that key state of iowa, and there the race is very tight between hillary clinton and bernie sanders. a new bloomberg-des moines register poll shows ms. clinton leading by just two points. just a month ago, she was leading bernie sanders by 9 points in that same poll. iowa's first in the nation caucus is less than three weeks away. you are watching "cnn newsroom." and still to come, one day after a terror attack that killed two people and wounded dozens of others, next week we take you live to jakarta where indonesians say they will not live in fear. stay with us.
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isis claims responsibility for the deadly bombing in downtown jakarta. the bombing that killed two people, an indonesian and a
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foreigner. two dozen worst wounded in that attack. police say the attackers used grenades and handguns. they also say the indonesian militant behind the attack is in syria right now, and instructed his cells back home to strike. an anti-terror source says they found a blog with isis teachings that is likely to belong to him. meanwhile, indonesians say they will not be afraid. listen. >> this accident can happen in a day, in night. so we just careful. every time. >> are you afraid that there could be more violence? >> no. not afraid anymore. >> not afraid, they say. let's go live to jakarta this hour. saima mohsin joins us with more on the investigation. saima, good to have you with us, and we do hear there in the background the call to player perhaps. if you could just talk to us about that particular suspect
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that the government has singled out. what more can you tell us? >> yeah, this is the prime suspect believed to have been the recruiter and financer behind this attack and one other that he tried to plan. the failed earlier last year, now george. his name is bahrun naim. he is around 32 years old, known to authorities here in indonesia. previously, a member of a nonviolent extremist organization, an organization like isis that wants an islamic caliphate, but not quite the version that isis wants it. it is nonviolent. it was in 2010 he came to be known amidst authorities when he was arrested and jailed for hiding ammunition that a terrorist group were using or had used in an attack on police in java. shortly after his release, george, he married for a second time. and it's with his second wife that he is believed to have fled
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to syria. he is now believed to be in raqqah from where he is orchestrating these attacks. he wants to be the leader of isis in indonesia there is no isis in indonesia. he wants to be the man to start it. and this of course is the first attack here on indonesian soil, claimed by isis. george? >> saima, this terrible attack, two people killed, dozens of people wounded. but, you know, we heard that sound bite before we came to your live report. the gentleman saying he is not afraid. talk us to about what you're hear there from people, reaction this day after the attack there. >> one of the reasons i'm here in the grand mosque today, george, is that thousands of people come here every week particularly for friday prayers. we wanted to speak to local people to know how they feel. of course when it's an take by a
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group that claims to carry out alikes to this in the name of islam, you want to hear how average muslims feel about it. in a very unusual and quite damning move, the imam here during the friday sermon which he gives every friday spoke to this attack, saying that terrorism is a crime against humanity. that this is nothing to do with islam. the people that carry out these attacks know nothing of islam. he said that throughout islamic history, the nature of jihad or holy wars has been defensive rather than offensive, which is what isis tries to do. he really tried to speak to the people here. and i expect the rest of the world saying that islam shouldn't be something to be scared of. and the people that came here today too spoke to me. they were willing to speak because they wanted to say that these attacks and these people do not represent them. let's have a listen, george. >> translator: what happened yesterday, they are not muslims. they are infidels.
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i condemn them. i demand the government solve this problem. as a muslim, i reject this terrorism in the name of islam. >> translator: islam has become a scapegoat. people believe islam is identical to violence. every time violence happen, people think it's related to islam, but it's not. >> no, no, no. not terrorists. and end this muslim in indonesia, not terrorists. but i want to say to it the world, muslim islam, not are not terrorists, not to muslim. >> is thome the largest -- indonesia, o, is home to the largest muslim population in the world. significant that this attack by a group that wants to be known as isis in indonesia has been carried out. but only 500 fighters from indonesia are believed to have gone to fight in iraq and syria. the fear is when they return, what do they do. george? >> cnn correspondent saima
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mohsin live for us in jakarta, indones indonesia. saima, thank you. in the aftermath, we spotted this man you see. a man with long hair and sunglasses. his sign showing the late beatle john lennon, and a very simple message there. rock 'n roll, yes. terrorism, no. we'll be right back after this.
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and a warm welcome back to our viewers here in the united
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states and around the world. you're watching "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell. returning now to our top story, the latest republican presidential debate that wrapped up in the state of south carolina, the leading candidates met on stage thursday night in north charleston, south carolina, where donald trump questioned ted cruz to find out whether he is even eligible to be president since he was born in canada. just listen to this exchange. >> the child of a u.s. citizen born abroad is a natural born citizen. if a soldier has a child abroad, that child is a natural born citizen. that's why john mccain, even though he was born in panama, was eligible to run for president. if an american missionary has a child abroad, that child is a natural born citizen. that's why george romney, mitt's dad was eligible to run for president, even though he was born in mexico. attend of the day, the legal issue is quite straight forward. but i would note that the birther theories that donald has been relying on, some of the more extreme ones insist that you must not only be born on
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u.s. soil, but have two parents born on u.s. soil under that theory. not only would i be disqualified, marco rubio would be disqualified, bobby jindal would be disqualified, and interestingly enough, donald j. trump would be disqualified. because, because donald's mother was born in scotland. she was naturalized. now donald -- >> but i was born here. >> on the issue of citizenship, donald. >> a big difference. >> on the issue of citizenship, donald, i'm not going to use your mother's birth against you. >> because it wouldn't work. >> you're an american as is everybody else on this stage. and i would suggest we focus on whose best prepared to be commander in chief. because that's the most important question facing the country.
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>> mr. trump, do you need to address that? >> let me just tell you something. and you know because you just saw the numbers yourself. nbc "wall street journal" journal just came out with a poll headlines trump way up. cruz going down. so don't -- see, you can't -- you can't -- they don't like "the wall street journal." they don't like nbc. but i like the poll. and frankly, it just came out. and in iowa now, as you know, ted, in the last three polls, i'm beating you. so you shouldn't misrepresent how well you're doing with the polls. you don't have to say that in fact, i was all for you until you started doing that, because that's a misrepresentation. number one. number two, this isn't me saying it. i don't care. i think i'm going to win fair and square to have to win this way. thank you. lawrence tribe and numerous from harvard, of harvard said that there is a serious question as to whether or not ted can do this. okay? there are other attorneys that
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feel, and very, very fine constitutional attorneys that feel that because he was not born on the land, he cannot run for office. here is the problem. we're running. we're running. he does great. i win. i choose him as my vice presidential candidate. and the democrats sue because we can't take him along for the ride. i don't like that, okay. the fact is and if for some reason he beats the rest of the field, he beats the rest of the field, see? they don't like that. [ booing ] no, they don't like that he beats the rest of the field because they want me. but, but if for some reason, neil, he beats the rest of the field, i already know the democrats are going to be bringing a suit. you have a big lawsuit over your head while you're running. and if you become the nominee, who the hell knows if you can even serve in office. >> ted cruz's former law professor is accusing him of
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constitutional hypocrisy when it comes to the birther issue. you heard trump mention lawrence tribe there. mr. tribe teaches constitutional law at harvard. tribe's former students include mr. cruz, president barack obama, and two supreme court justices. here is what he told our anderson cooper. >> cruz certainly needs to answer it. i agree with those of your guests who said he hasn't really put it to bed. if he did put it to bed, he is certainly sleeping alone. because real serious scholars think there is a serious question. it's just obvious. i think what is really interesting is that he is much more interested in kind of playing games, sticking daggers into people who are criticizing him, often untrue daggers. it turns out i'm not a hillary clinton supporter. i didn't endorse her in 2008. i didn't endorse her this year. but it makes, it makes a good talking point. but most of what he said is nonsense. all of these examples about
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rubio and jindal are simply distractions. he says the constitution, i think hasn't changed since september. of course not. but the question of how you interpret that document isn't a joke. it isn't funny. it matters a lot, regardless of whether he is or is not kicked off some ballot because of his birth outside the united states. i mean, his whole approach on issues where he likes the results of very rigid view of the constitutional is that it hasn't changed since 1788, not only in the last six months. it's a rigid document. it always mean what it meant before. well, in 1788, i assure you natural born citizens did not mean simply citizen from the time of birth. >> following the debate, cnn's dana bash asked donald trump to react to ted cruz's comments that trump embodies new york values.
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crump used the 9/11 attacks to counter cruz's jabs. >> no, i don't think he did. and i think he insulted a tremendous number of people. and you can't insult new yorkers in front of me. with what we all put up with, the with world trade center and the whole thing and to come back like we came back, i just don't think he should be hitting on new yorkers. i think he realizes he made a mistake. >> and speaking there of donald trump, he has a commanding lead in a new national poll. the nbc news/wall street journal poll shows him leading with 33% of national republican voters. ted cruz at 20%, marco rubio at 13, ben carson 12, chris christie and jeb bush were tied at 5%. on the democratic side of things, hillary clinton's lead over bernie sanders, it is shrinking. a new poll from "the new york
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times" and cbs news puts clinton at 7 points ahead of mr. sanders. but that lead was closer to 20% just last month. clinton told late night host jimmy fallon her big lead was at the start of the race, it was, quote, artificial. >> they just came out today with "the new york times" or someone came out with the national numbers that bernie and you are kind of close. >> oh, we're in a tight race. >> you had like a giant -- you had a 20-point lead at one point. >> but that's really artificial. all of those early sounds and polls. once you get into it, this is a democratic election for our nominee. and it gets really close, exciting. and it really depends on, you know, who makes the best case that you can be the nominee to beat whoever the republicans put up and try to get your folks who support you to come out. i find it exciting. >> the next democratic debate is on sunday hosted by nbc and the congressional black caucus institute.
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an off-season hurricane is churning right now in the atlantic. the first time we've seen a storm like this in the month of january in nearly 80 years. details on the hurricane's path and surprising strength as cnn newsroom continues.
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more trouble for chinese stocks. the shanghai composite is now officially in bear market territory. let's take a look at the numbers here. the shanghai exchange lost more than 3.5% today. it's off by more than 20% from its recent high in december. markets in japan, hong kong and australia were also down, as you see there. europe's financial markets are looking to recover from thursday's losses. we are about 30 minutes into the trading day. and right now you can see that the ftse is down. the dax is up. the cac 40 down and also
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zurich's smi is trading down at the moment. health officials in sierra leone are confirming a new death from ebola in that west african country. this news comes just hours after the world health organization declared the end of the outbreak in sierra leone, as well as in liberia i should say and in guinea. the organization did warn, though, of more flare-ups of the disease. this ebola epidemic started two years ago. it killed more than 11,000 people. now to the united states where a health crisis in flint, michigan is growing even more serious. governor rick snyder announced a recent spike in cases of legionnaires disease. in the two years since the city switched its water supply. soon after that switch, it was discovered that the drinking water there, that it was contaminated with lead. health officials say the increase cannot be directly linked to the water at this time. snyder, though, says he wants answers. >> i don't discourage the u.s.
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attorney from investigating. i think it's actually a good thing. it should be investigated. let's get the answers. with respect to the task force, they're going to come out with recommendations to say here are lessons learned with respect to flint. and hopefully here are recommendations that could apply statewide to make sure this doesn't happen again. because we never want to see -- this is something you wish that never happened. and let's not ever see it happen again in the state of michigan. >> authority says residents there should keep using filters and drinking bottled water. a school teacher is being investigated for involuntary manslaughter after an avalanche struck a group of students who were skiing in the french alps on wednesday. a french prosecutor says the group went to an area that had several signs indicating that it was closed off. that area had a high risk of avalanche. he says the group also went over a net meant to keep people out. two students and a ukrainian skier were killed.
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let's turn to derek van dam at the international weather center. talk more about the snow conditions there in the highest mountains that have been so dangerous this season. derek? >> george, it really was a combination of lethal elements that ultimately led to the avalanche disaster in france. first and foremost, this is extremely steep, mountainous terrain. some of these mountains actually range between 50 to 60 degrees slope. just show you how steep it actually is. on top of that, there was a fresh layer of new fallen snow on top of an already very icy packed layer of snow thatted will developed thanks to the unusually warm temperatures the alps have experienced throughout the month of december. so what we're seeing here with this new fallen snow on top of that icy packed layer is a layering effect that eventually destabilizes the snowpack and eventually gravity wins, creating an ultimately allowing for disasters like the avalanche
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that occurred in the middle of this week. unfortunately, there is the potential of more avalanches going forward because another 15 to 30 centimeters of snowfall is expected to cross the french and swiss alps going for academy award over the next three days. something you'll want the consider if you're traveling to this part of the world for a ski or snowboarding holiday. now i'm going to take you to another weather topic that is particularly synonymous with warmer climates. well, we have our first -- rather our strongest atlantic hurricane ever recorded in the month of january. welcome hurricane alex. this is the third hurricane ever recorded since records started keeping track back in the 1800s. 75 miles per hour sustained wind gusts. and it's currently impacting the azores islands just west of portugal. current winds across this area anywhere between 60 and 80 kilometers per hour, or roughly, 50 miles per hour. this storm actually developed in the relatively warmer waters of
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the bahamas. but once it reached the eastern atlantic, you would think that the colder temperatures would not allow for tropical development as it's done. so there is a large temperature difference wean the upper-levels of the atmosphere and the sea surface. so this created the instability necessary for thunderstorms to develop and eventually we saw that counterclockwise spin indicating our very unusually formed and unusually timed hurricane that developed. and by the way, as the storm system moves across the azores, it will move in a north to northwesterly directions, potentially impacting southern greenland, believe it or not, something that actually doesn't happen. and we'll end with this, george. a web cam coming out of port delgado. this is the capital of the azores. it's extremely rare to see a hurricane. this only happens about every 10 to 20 nears in the azores. it is remarkable to have a
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landfalling hurricane in this island nation during the month of january. back to you. >> hurricanes are no joke. let's wish them the very best as they get through the storm. but derek, it's so odd to be talking about a hurricane in january. >> you would think this is more october weather for sure. >> derek, thank you. you're watching "cnn newsroom." and still to come, the california lottery says it may have a hoax on its hands. the search continues for the country's newest millionaires.
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it is a mystery. we still don't know who the three winners are in wednesday's billion lottery jackpot. but the california store that sold that winning ticket is celebrating all day. and cnn's kyung lah is there. >> reporter: this is about as close as you can get to $1.5 billion. the very machine that printed out one of three winning powerball tickets. no one wanted to wait minutes after news of a winner, a crowd filled the chino hills 7-eleven. hoping to find out who won. serani the clerk who may have sold one of the three winning powerball tickets. >> i got money, yes, sir.
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>> i was watching tv. so my store was on the news. >> reporter: that's how store owner found out he would be getting a million buck forcelling one of the wing tickets in the biggest jackpot in u.s. history. not bad for a self-made businessman, an immigrant from india. >> this is a land of opportunities. so anybody, they want to make it, they can make it. >> reporter: it's a family-run business. are you going to get any of the cash that he is holding up over there? >> yes. yeah, he promised to share with us. yeah. a million dollars. >> reporter: i was talking to your brother-in-law. he says you're going to share the money with him? >> oh, no, not him. >> reporter: we think he is kidding. >> of course, of course. >> reporter: better to laugh than cry if you're not the mystery winner. did you buy your ticket here? >> no, i bought it up the street. i missed out. didn't win nothing. not even a handshake. >> reporter: maybe a handshake is all you can ask for. you shook his hand?
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>> yeah. >> reporter: why? because he seems to be on the news and maybe he is a lucky charm. >> reporter: do you though what time the winner bought the ticket? >> we actually do, kyung, but we cannot tell you. >> reporter: that's part of the winning process, matching the winning ticket to surveillance video. so you haven't peeked at who that person is? >> i'm not going to tell you, kyung! >> reporter: yeah, he knows. right along with the still unnamed luckiest three people in america. the california lottery says all day they've been chasing down fake reports from a nurse who was pranked to fake tickets that have been posted on twitter and facebook. the california lottery saying so far no winner has stepped forward. this year's academy award nominations, they are finally out. but critics noticed a frustrating trend. on the list for a second year in a row, none of the nominees in the act categories represent an
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ethnic minority. earlier cnn's don lemon spoke to april ring, the woman behind the twitter #oscar so white which has gone viral online. listen. >> we're talking about the major studios. when movies are green lit, weave got producers around the table, what decisions are being made and what questions are being asked. for example, birdman last year was a fantastic film starring michael keaton. but the question is did ken w t watanabe audition? we can always talk about denzel washington. so it needs to be a systemic change from the top down with respect to making sure that movies that include marginalized communities are being made, that they're being supported. >> some critics say the lack of diversity in the oscar nominations could be due to the voters themselves. a "los angeles times" study
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shows a majority of the members in the academy of motion pictures, arts and sciences are white males. powerhouse british singer adele took a spin around london while singing some of her tunes. listen to this. ♪ hello from the outside ♪ at least i can say that i've tried ♪ >> tv host james gordon picked up his friend for the latest carpool karaoke episode for his late, late show in the united states. gordon has picked up a number of other big names for his carpool karaoke, including stevie wonder and rod stewart. and from adele's "hello", we say goodbye. we thank you for watching this hour of "cnn newsroom." i'm george howl at the cnn center in atlanta. for viewers in the united states, "new day" is next. and for viewers around the world, newsroom continues. you're watching cnn, the world's news leader.
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republicans running for president going after each other on the debate stage. sharpening attacks throughout the night turned personal. breaking down the big moments. welcome to "early start." i'm christine romans. >> i'm alison kosik. it is january 15th. there were no more mr. nice guys in the debate in south carolina. nowhere near center stage. gone was the courtesy from earlier debates we have seen. instead with the first votes in iowa two weeks away, four of the candidates, don

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