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tv   AC360 Democratic Presidential Town Hall  CNN  February 5, 2016 7:00pm-9:01pm PST

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. thanks for watching. "cnn tonight" with don lemon starts now. four days till the new hampshire primary and the republicans are blanketing that state tonight. >> i've learned so much campaign hearing in new hampshire. >> i'm sure glad we're up here for a new hampshire primary and woe got some snow and some good new hampshire weather.
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>> the good people of new hampshire don't want snow and i don't want. ♪ >> we are going to make america great again! >> donald trump? south carolina tonight, not new hampshire, because snow. tell what to john kasich, though. >> i'm going to whitewash him. >> hillary clinton and bernie sanders battling it out in the granite state. >> we are talking about ending a corrupt campaign finance system. >> new hampshire has never quit on me and i'm not going to quit on pup. >> it may be friday but there's a lot going on tonight. i think that was a snowball fight or scuffle but whatever, it's all interesting.
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sanders with a 30-point lead. what's happening on the ground there today? >> it's hard to believe that that margin will hold. no one believes that margin. even we don't really believe it. we know he has a big lead. polling in new hampshire is so tricky because of those independent voters who can decide if they're going to vote republican or democrat. i've met many of those voters here over the last several days on the ground here, who are still trying to decide between bernie sanders and john kasich. there's no doubt senator sanders has a commanding lead, if it's 10 points or more going into that primary next week but, boy, the action on the ground here, secretary chilinton continued h action, urging senator sanders to show where she's been compromised on wall street.
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he's not really responded. his supporters believe any wall street donations are bad mee. he said a few minutes ago tonight, he's the only candidate without a super pac. you can hear senator clinton just wrapping up a speech tonight. she's trying to fight to win new hampshire, even though she knows she's somewhat behind. >> it's really coming down to the wire for both democrats and republicans. donald trump wasn't in new hampshire because of the weather. he said he was in south carolina. what do people there think about that? >> he's been the punch line of so many political jokes today. it was snowing here today. i have my snow shoes on but it was not a snowy. maybe four inches on the ground or is he. he said he was not able to get out of laguardia, but it founpo it the fact that he campaigns in a different way. he did not spend the night at a
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holiday inn or marriott courtyard, he flew back home to new york. it's just one of those things that make you not connect quite as closely with the voters here. i'll be interested to see if someone brings it up tomorrow night at the debate if someone dings him for not being up to the snow. >> does one day make a difference? you said you're going to see if they bring it up in the debate. does one day make that big a difference? >> i'm not sure that one day of campaigning makes a difference butch it's the news must cycle. in the closing day of the campaign, you have to own every news cycle. and today the news is donald
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trump couldn't make it here because of the snow. it's just the fact that he knows he has to perform well here. this is a headline where he was really not expecting. is it going to change everything, i don't think it will but if anyone is on the fence, it gives them a reason to decide against. >> and a lot of people are still unde sadcided according to the there is. joining me now is hugh hewitt, our regular friday night date pip think i'm paying for this one. you paid for the last one, hugh. >> okay, don. >> we've been talking about donald trump missing new
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hampshire because of his plane or the snow incident. is this one day going to affect him like skipping the debate did? is this going to haunt him? >> i don't think so. i think donald will win new hampshire fairly handily. hi had a great car ride with two students from st. anshelm. they said thousands of kids turned out to cheer marco. the battle is really oaf third place. anecdotal evidence, john kasich will get that fabulous willie
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wonk wonka to join the others in south carolina. >> these millennials have no idea. they're too young for that. >> they all know what the golden ticket is. they remade that me 18 times. johnny depp was in that. >> how significant are the polls in new hampshire? >> i never bought into the establishment/nonestablishment. i vote for the person who understands me better than anybody else theory of politics. and donald trump understands lot of americans better than anybody else in politics. he gives voice to their frustration, at a collapsing
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middle class and a fecklessness abroad. marco rubio gives aspirational americans hope. i'm from ohio. i've never governor kasich a long time, he is every man. he's everybody's buddy. can you go to a bar with john kasich, can you go to a steak house with john kasich. >> he had snowball fights today with his team and his staff. you're not giving any credit to rubio. why not is. >> oh, i'm giving him a lot. >> you don't think he can surface trump though? >> no. >> the dark horse or the person who could possibly pass donald trump, people are saying he could be the sleeper in all of this. >> he's going to be a solid second place, going into south carolina very strong. he got endorsed by bobby jindal.
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he picked up tim scott. he's got cory gardner, a terrific guy running around all over the place for him. he's got a lot of money and momentum. i don't think he's beaten donald trump in new hampshire. donald connects with yankees. >> you're sounding like a southerner now. that's what we called them in louisiana, people who grew up here in the north, yankees. >> i had dinner with donna brazile tonight. i didn't know you were southern. >> she's my louisiana home girl. i have to ask you about these robo calls. >> we don't need muslims beep need smart, well-educated white people. >> i am a farmer and white
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nationalist. the call is not authorized by donald trump. trump's campaign disavowing them saying mr. trump has disavowed all super packs offering their support meech can't control the people who do this but is it going to hurt him? we're hearing voters in new hampshire are really turned off by this kind of thing. >> they should be. white supremacists are despicable. >> will it hurt him? >> no, they will know it's a dirty trick. new hampshirites, if anything, they are fair play people. ted cruz did not do a dirty trick on ben carson but some people think he did and that's hurting him a little built. >> why do you say that? >> because ben carson did not fully absolve ted cruz. and as a result, even though i think it was an honest mistake made by steve king and the consequence of that, just one of
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those things about the acceleration of modern politics, not intentional, it is perceived by dr. carson and his supporters as an underhanded tactic. >> do you think that's hurting him if new hampshire, people are thinking he's playing dirty? >> i do. new hampshire is a clean state. i went to school in massachusetts, it's got this reputation, yankee play by yankee rule. the jaw is square, the line is straight, the rules are undrawn, there are no dirty tricks. dirty tricks in south carolina, that's part of the landscape down there. with you um here noosht way. >> i want to ask you about jeb bush. he'll pulling out all the stops. i want you to listen to what barbara bush said about trump. >> he doesn't give many answers to how he would solve problems. he makes faces and says crazy
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things but i don't want to think of him. i'm sick of him. >> barbara bush, they're pulling out all the stops to try to save a struggling campaign. i don't know if it going to work. >> do you have that picture of mrs. bushand her wa-- bush and walker out in the snow? she's so cute. here's the picture by the way. >> i reservice the right to refine it on sue and monday. stuff changes up here in a hurry. that debate tomorrow night, big
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stuff. >> we had the picture up while you were talking. it made you look better, hugh hewitt. the mommy offensive. remember that. >> when we come back, thele trump and cruz campaigns go head to head but is marco rubio stealing their thunder? good, clean food pairs well with anything. the clean pairings menu. 500 calories or less. at panera. food as it should be.
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donald trump is topping the latest cnn poll in new hampshire. look at marco rubio in second place. ted cruz ties for third. jeff dewitt is a trump supporter. arizona much warmer than new hampshire. senator smith, i'm going to start with you. it's from nate silvers, a fivethirtyeight blog. it says "cruz may have less of a bounce after iowa because republican party elites just
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don't like him very much and didn't want him to get one. did marco rubio really win even though he came in third? >> in the media he did. on the ground where we are, every day meeting voters, 200, 300, 1,300 at one stop every single day and i might also say that, you know, this is really about when you look at the establishment and where rubio is getting all these endorsements and media flurry, i've never seen so much attention for a guy who finished third. the votes aren't even counted yet here. i might also say since my colleague on to the is for donald trump, it's fine to see 90-year-old barbara bush using a walker and donald trump can't make it up here. everybody else is up here but
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not him. >> well, it's not as if mr. trump isn't coampaigning. he's using the opportunity to be in south carolina and meeting voters. nobody has spoken to more voters in new hampshire than i think mr. trump has because, as you pointed out, other candidate, get 100, 200 people at their events and nobody can pull in 5,000 and 10,000 like mr. trump does. we have a movement. >> let be honest. so up see barbara bush. she's 90 years old. she's got a jeb sticker on her walker. and she can make it there. i mean, you have to admit it does not look good. come on, be honest. >> what a contrast. what a contrast. it's amazing. >> i think she's probably a thousand times tougher than any other bush. she's a great lady and everybody
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loves her. i love her. and, you know, she's a tough cookie. mr. trump comes from a snowy area, too. there's nothing like that. we were using the opportunity to get -- don't forget, the entire race isn't going to be won or lost right here in new hampshire. he's coming back tomorrow. we're going to talk to more new hampshire voters than anybody, than any candidate but right now the chance to go and have a south carolina event is just too good to pass up. >> go ahead and then i want to move on. >> the tradition up here, though, is face to face, meeting vote voters. you can say one event 5,000. but in a week we meet more than 5,000 in all the stops on this bus tour. >> a poll shows cruz and kasich are tied for third place. 14% of new hampshire voters have already ruled out ted cruz
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whereas only 2% of voters have ruled out kasich. it doesn't seem like cruz has a lot of room to grow here. >> we don't know any of that. that's just polling stuff. some people haven't even made up their minds yet. i mean, come on. the conservatives in this state are going to unite. what we've been saying out there, don, is if you voted for all or even one of these people, ronald reagan, ron paul, bob smith, gordon humphrey, mel thompson, you're going to like ted cruz. ted cruz is that kind of conservative. and, finally, ronald reagan changed not only america, he changed the world when new hampshire voters said you know what, we don't believe the polls, we want a conservative and ronald reagan would be here and changed the world. >> that was a different time, though. to be honest with you, a lot of people you mentioned, some people are like who are those
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guys? but that was a different time. >> so what? i was going to disagree with the senator on one thing when he said the people haven't made up their mind. the beg to differ. the people have made up their mind and they want somebody with mr. trump's strength, courage, honesty and -- >> trump is leading the latest poll but more than a third of voters, 36% say they have ruled trump out. only 45% of voters have decided who they want to work for? should trump be worried about marco rubio or kasich? it doesn't mean he has much room to grow either. >> trump was leading in the polls in iowa, too. he didn't win. so what? >> we're lead big double digits. >> we'll see what it is on election day. >> in this and many polls around the country. we're pretty much done even looking at any other candidates.
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we're just going and taking our message to the american people that mr. trump is the only one who has created tens of thousands of jobs, signed the front of paychecks, knows how to build companies, knows how to build an economy and he's going to bring jobs back to america. >> the people in new hampshire, if you take them for granted and you're looking at polls, watch out, i can tell you that. but, look, the conservatives in this state are united. we know what's at stake here. if you want to make deals or if you want to be part of the establishment and live on endorsement and all that kind of stu stuff, that's business as usual. if that's what you want, can you have donald trump, you can have marco rubio. marco rubio ran as young senate candidate with the tea party support, promptly went to washington, d.c. and immediately led the effort, not just supported, led the effort for amnesty with a gang of eight
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bill. that is being dishonest with the voters and people are sick of it and it's not going to happen up here. >> well, it looks like he's paying off because he's moving up in the polls. >> we'll see. we'll see what the poll is on election day. >> jeff, donald trump posted this video message. >> the great slogan of new hampshire, "live free or die" means so much to so many people. all over the world they use thaethat expression, it means liberty, it means free enterprise it, means borders, strong, strong military where nobody is going to mess with us, it means take caring of our vets. what a great slogan. congratulations, new hampshire. wonderful job. >> does this video make up for him not being this with just a couple days before the primary?
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>> he was up there. >> this is for jeff. >> he was right there. he's coming right back. the snowstorm hit obviously. over the thing is it's tough to have an event of his size. what obviously a great message. that just shows what mr. trump is all about. live free or die, great slogan, new hampshire is going to turn out. i don't see any way that this movement is not going to continue and grow and everybody's looking for something different. everybody's looking for something outside of the establishment, someone from the business world that knows how to get things done. mr. trump is a worker and he gets things done. he's going to bring common day solutions and that's why they're turning out in the thousands for every event we have. >> no one could turn out today because he wasn't there. thank you, appreciate it.
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when we come right back, is donald trump changing his ground game and will it work this time? i think it landed last tuesday. one second it's there. then, woosh, it's gone. i swear i saw it swallow seven people. seven. i just wish one of those people could have been mrs. johnson. [dog bark] trust me, we're dealing with a higher intelligence here. ♪ the all-new audi q7 is here. ♪
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donald trump may be playing risky politics. he is leading in new hampshire but didn't come pain theampaign. i want to bring in bob beckel, rebecca bird and and haley, it's good to have all of you. coming out of iowa, have we seen a changed donald trump do you think? does he have a new brand? >> i wouldn't say a new brand. i think he's trying to fill in some. voids that he saw maybe happen in iowa, for instance, a lock of a graound game. maybe adding a little more soft
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ek rhetoric. he only lost iowa. reagan lost iowa in 1980. bill clinton lost iowa in 1992. by the way, he also lost new hampshire. this is one state that only has delegates in is not the end for donald trump. he needs keep doing what made america fall in love with him and that's being donald trump. >> rebecca, how important is tomorrow night's debate for all the candidates? >> it's huge for all the candidates but it's definitely huge for donald trump because he missed the last one. all of the candidates, jeb bush, john kasich, chris christie, even ted cruz and donald trump will be after him pop rubio will
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have toe see if he can defend himself in that setting, especially for those guys making what could be their last stand in new hampshire. jeb bush, john kasich, chris christie really need to do well in the state. >> here as what they found. 24% of those had said that they would support donald trump before the caucus, they stayed home on caucus night compared to 13% for cruz voters and rubio voters. that's a big chunk, isn't it? >> yeah, it is. trump lost five points from the poll the day before the iowa caucuses. that is what i call a free media bump he gets. trump better be careful. he was a little humble when it
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came to cruz that night and they he accused him of cheating. 5 -- new hampshire is a classic state where it breaks very late and the last four days, i said last night in new hampshire it was a longest four days you're going to get in presidential politics. >> carly fiorina won't up on the stage for the debate. she didn't meet any of the parameters. should they have let her on that stage anyway as many of her rivals -- at least rivals are saying. >> no doubt about it. i'm really disappointing for the rnc for intervening. i notknow they say they don't
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intervene with the networks. hillary clinton made a point last night when bernie sanders called her establishme menmen me said i'm not establishment, i'm a female. >> should they put her up there just because she's a woman? >> not just because she's a woman. we're down to seven people, republican vote vrs chosen. all seven should be on the stage regardless of gender, even if it was a money that was excluted. >> bob, i have to ask you, this trump committed to this fox news debate. megyn kelly will be there. do you see we'll see a softer sider donald trump?
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>> no. he's got one gear, this guy. i'll tell you something between last night's debate betweenhillary clinton and bernie sanders. the problem with the republican debate so far, it's been so crowded nobody's been able to lay a hand on trump or trump lay as hand on them and comes back the next day and says something different. >> you save trump learned from his ground game mistakes in iowa. how is that? >> we're seeing him adjust his schedule to smaller events, get morg more votes from people. in iowa he was criticized for swooping in, doing big rallies, not campaigning in the traditional iowa way. that's also very important in new hampshire, it's a state
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where traditionally a ground game matters. weechbd sti and we still don't know much about donald trump's ground game. what i've heard from many republican strategists is he probably doesn't have much of that but at least he needs o go through the motions of trying to meet people in new hampshire and it looks like he's trying to do that. >> that doesn't convert into a ground game. going to smaller events. the people i've talked to in new hampshire and i've done six presidential campaigns don't see much of a trump ground game. look what happened in iowa. it fell off. he's defending on young people. so is bernie sanders. he's forgetting that southern new hampshire is an exodus place for massachusetts republicans who are more moderate, who left there because of the taxes and i don't think they're trump support percent. >> if you look at the polling, most of the trump supporters identify as moderate. >> i want to get the mommy fo
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offensive in. listen to what mrs. bush said today about her son and how he would make a great president. >> he has the best record, he's wise, he's decent, he knows american values. he knows the values of people in new hampshire. they care about their country. i love my country, i adore my child. every mother in new hampshire knows why i'm here period. they know. >> reporter: is he your favorite son? >> today. >> i mean, come on, how could you not love that? a guy who loves his mom? how much dou you think that barbara bush on her walker in the snow helped out jeb bush nod. >> i think it helps a lot. you've seen barbara bush come out, you've seen george w. bush come out, these are figures that are really popular among
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republicans. barbara bush just listed he has this, he has that when he doesn't have. he's not an outsider. that's why jeb bush doesn't have a chance in this election. republicans want an outsider. that's why donald trump and ted cruz are playing so well. >> hillary clinton was behind, that one issue about doing la laundry and, boom, it flipped over. >> don't underestimate the power of the mom. everyone stay with me. when we come right back, the big at this vision may be mainstream versus wall street but who is best positioned to take advantage of that? and paired with even more lobster? you get hungry. and you count the seconds until red lobster's lobsterfest is back with the largest variety of lobster dishes of the year. like new dueling lobster tails with one tail stuffed with crab, and the other with langostino lobster mac-and-cheese,
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we're talk about unfavorability ratings. bob, let's take a look at the favorabilities ratings for
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donald trump, hillary clinton and this is a new quinn pooh ak poll. trump 59% unfavorable, clinton 56%. can candidates win with those kind of -- >> probably vote for somebody from canada. hillary clinton has been under attack for years and years. i'm not surprised that her negative is up. that's trust. trump's problem is that he's trump and people just don't buy into his barnum and bailey act except for that percentage of the republican base where he's popular. >> what if both candidates have high unfavorables? >> they're come down after the conventions. they always do. they'll show them in their best light, they'll have a lot of people out there talking about them. that's the problem with any polls this far out, particularly any national poll nos now, they
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meaningless. i also will tell you this. i think trump is going to fall off in his numbers in new hampshire. let me put my neck out on the line. i think it's possible that rubio will upset him. >> i'm quiet because i have that feeling that it's a definite possibility that can happen. rebecca? >> we've seen deficits larger than the margin between trum and rubio right now. it's a very tumultuous state when it comes to the final day. it's completely possible that marco rubio could overtake trump. this goes back to the ground game, the organization. marco rubio has run a traditional campaign. donald trump has not. he only a few weeks ago accessed the voter access file. marco rubio is doing the
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traditional things and has momentum on his side. it an 11 point difference and 55% of the people sap they haven't made up their mind. what do you think, kayleigh? >> donald trump has been off in the polls but his lead in new hampshire has been a commanding one, far greater than his lead if iowa. i would argue new hampshire is undoubtedly donald trump's kind of state. independents are actually april loud to vote for republicans in the election. >> is 11 commanding do you think? >> i think 11 is commanding, especially after losing iowa. some points were peeled off, shaved off of his lead. coming out of iowa to still have a an 1 1-point lead is a
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commanding lead. >> i've seen a presidential candidate after winning 50% vote, we were 28 points up with about five days out and gary hart beat us by 15 points. i'll very leery about it. it's a late-breaking state. it just is. and independents particularly are going to take a hard look at this. this will probably be the most important republican vote they had. >> the independents could go for sanders. >> true. >> thank you very much. have a great weekend. when we come right back, one thing people are talking about tonight that isn't politics.
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. have we told you the new hampshire primary is tuesday in first there's another event -- super bowl 50! >> san francisco, one of the greatest cities in the world and ho
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home of the 2016 super bowl -- sort of. this is the closest i'll ever come to going to the super bowl. weird thing is, this seat cost $250. the field is that way. security won't let me get closer. as you can see weeks have some people even monitoring this situation. apparently they called in black guy in parking lot. i'm don lemon. they won't believe i'm don lemon. i wasn't alone in the struggle. just walking up and down, see what was happening. >> i got close and i saw guys with guns. >> maybe this guy can help. he's on his 11th super bowl. >> listen, you got credentials that will get you in, right? >> this is as close as my credentials will let me get. i made this at home, sir. i made this at home. >> so this is a big scam. >> yeah. >> i tried. time to check out super bowl city. nowhere near the stadium. see, the super bowl is happening
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here but all the stuff is happening way up there, an hour away on a good day. >> isn't it weird that the super bowl isn't there? >> it's a little surreal. that's kind of the merchandising of san francisco. >> outside in the streets of season frsan francisco, it is neither. >> the san francisco that's been sanitized, a san francisco that's been cleaned up and a san francisco that's being presented to the world that is devoid of all the homeless people that they rustled up here. they said it's going to bring in millions of dollars for the city. how does that trickle down. >> reporter: several reports estimate san francisco will spend about $5 million on super bowl security and infrastructure. as the city cleaned up, some people got cleaned out. >> the reason we're in san francisco is because it's a melting pot. why do they have to come to our
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city to get the money? why do you need to come through here? go home. you're getting all that money. >> reporter: season fran is oan one of the wealthiest cities in the country. hopefully we can figure this out so we can make a better world for the little babies like this. >> aw! he scared that baby. w.kamau bell, the such bowl is the highest -- >> it's not in san francisco. it's in santa clara. but the traffic is here, the pushing out the homeless people here, the messing up reveryone'
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day is here, the lack of the $5 million that doesn't go to anyone in the city is here and none of our teams are in the super bowl. why should we be excited about that? >> i'm just concerned that you told the police that you were don lemon. not cool. that is not cool. >> that's been my go to for years. now i have a job at cnn. for years. it's gotten me out of a lot of scraps, don. you got to know. >> i got to like that. >> you may have heard there's another huge event taking place across the country. i'm not sure if we told you about the focus on iowa and new hampshire. how much are people there paying attention to what's happening back east with this presidential race? >> i live in berkeley. i'm in the middle of the white progressive civil warle between the bernie people and the hillary clinton people. that's what's happening right now. >> so no ben carson?
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>>. [ laughter ] >> even ben carson is forgetting he's running for president right now. >> bernie sanders is criticized for not reaching out enough to minorities. what do you think about that? >> you know, i think he's a big time dreamer. he's got all the big time plans but whenever you say black people, he gets a little nervous. >> he did march with dr. king. >> that was a long time ago, all right? there's been a lot of black things that have happened since the march of dr. king. i'm not mad at bernie sanders for marching with dr. king. i didn't do it, i wasn't really available but there's been a lot of black things since then. we went through the 90s since then. >> it's going to be very interesting to watch "saturday night live". he's going to be on with larry david. are you looking forward to that?
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>> yeah, you are knknow, i just he's funny. i just hope since i'm a comedian, i'm just hoping that it works. you don't want to go on "saturday night live "and bomb. >> i think of this should switch places. thank w. kamau bell. we'll be right back, everyone. hy and a passion to build something better. and what an amazing time it's been, decade after decade of innovation, inspiration and wonder. so, we say thank you america for a century of trust, for the privilege of flying higher and higher, together. ♪ i thione second it's there.day. then, woosh, it's gone. i swear i saw it swallow seven people.
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that's it for us tonight. have a great weekend. i'll is you back here on monday. from new hampshire. have a great weekend. on this episode of "death row stories" exkugss around the country go horribly wrong. >> it was clear something was not write. >> he looked like he was trying to get off the gurney. >> you could see a spasm go through his body. >> but when secrets emerge -- >> you have people carrying cash through the night across state lines. >> the question is asked does it matter how we put people to death? >> these are evil doers, animals. we want justice. >> who cares if he feels pain. >> you are not allowed to
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experiment on people in killing them. >> we make these god-like decisions without god-like skills. >> there's a body in the water. >> he was butchered and murdered. >> many people pro cham theclai innocence. >> he's remorseless. >> he flashed before my eyes. >> from the beginning of recorded history, civilization has sought justice through the ultimate punishment -- death. and as societies have evolved, so, too, have their methods of execution.
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in ancient rome, prisoners were fed to the lions. in greece the condemned were sealed inside a bronze bull, which when set on fire would pour smoke from the nostrils while the person inside roasted to death. in england prisoners were drawn and quartered with horses pulling people apart limb by limb. france famously used the guillotine responding to the chant "off with their heads." for a long time the method of choice in america was hanging. >> in the united states, the first recorded execution was in 1608 in jamestown, virginia. over the years hangings became a great social event, a great source of entertainment. people brought picnic, teachers would bring the students, parents would bring the kids. there was a choir, a band. >> executions were public because they were considered a
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ritual whose goal was to deter the populous. >> but our history of executions also included a dark side -- botched executions that quickly turned horrifying for the masses. >> it turns out it's very difficult to properly hang somebody. if the drop was too long, the person's head would fall off. so somebody invented a machine where the rope would go up to a pulley and a boulder was dropped. they called it jerk to jesus or launch to eternity. there was a man named eddie ives. eddie weighed only 80 pounds. the weight drops and each roger goodell ka zoom and twirld around the horizontal beam and came crashing down to the ground. they had to hang him twice. there was a lot of concern about botched hangings. that's why the electric chair was brought in. >> by the late 180 s, electricity was transforming america. in order to demonstrate the
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incredible power of this new phenomen phenomenon, thomas jefferson filmed the execution of an elepha elephant. >> one of our first appliances was the electric chair but the electric chair has its own problems. >> a lot of reasonable people do believe he was innocent. there were 8 inch flames that f erupted from the skull cap so he basically burned to death. a man named pedro medina was executed. >> flame ef rupted all across his head. >> the warden from the florida state prison said the flames, the smoke, and putrid order and death by inferno flagsticplague still. >> in 1977, lethal injection was
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invented in oklahoma as a more humane way to execute prisoners. >> historically executions were very ugly. hangings, eloectrocutions so on of the goals of the state now is that it looks calm and peaceful. >> to a great degree, the lethal injection regime has more to did with the witnesses that it has to did with the condemned. >> the challenge with lethal injection was finding executioners with the medical skills do the job. >> today in the united states it violates ethical codes for physicians to be involved. so much usually the people who are involved in the executions are not physicians and they're not properly trained to do an i.v. insertion, much less an execution. >> over the years the issue of medical training led to numerous
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mistakes but a water shed moment came in 2009 with the case of romel broom in ohio. >> just 17 steps from the room where he'd be put to death, romel broom, convicted of raping and murdering a 25-year-old girl 20 years ago, he laid on his side, flexed his muscles, broom never made it out of the preparation chamber. >> there were 20 different needle insertions into mr. broom. in all parts of his body, back of his hand in, his arm, in his ankle. mr. broom was actually trying to help them find the vein. >> after two hours, the director of rehabilitation and direction made an unprecedented request and asked the governor to grant a temporary reprieve. >> rommel broom became the only person to walk away from a lethal injection alive. >> each does not have an execution date.
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his attorneys are arguing you can't try and kill someone twice. >> but corrections officials in ohio were undeterred. they devised a enough way to kill him called plan b. most executions used one drug to put the inmate to sleep, a second drug to paralyze the inmate and finally, a third drug to stop the heart. plan b proposed using a drug injected into the muscles to put the prisoner to sleep and this invention would open a proverbial pandora's box of botched executions, starting with ohio inmate dennis mcguire. >> he was a human guinea pig for the state of ohio to experiment on. and it did, in a horrific way. like new dueling lobster tails with one tail stuffed with crab,
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starts with an alfredo sauce withmade-from-scratch.oli because the most comforting thing about comfort food, is who you're sharing it with. marie callender's. after the failed lethal injection of romel broom, the state of ohio proposed a new method of execution using a drug. the medical community had immediate concerns. >> traditionally the first drug was used to induce unconsciousness. this drug does not do that. if the inmate is not unconscious and the inmate receives a second drug that paralyzes the muscles, that is a horrible, horrible situation, where you are awake but you cannot move, you cannot breathe. you have this sensation of
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suffocating essentially, and you can't communicate to anybody that this is happening. >> ohio original liiginally pro using it as a becomie iuiue iuip plan but soon it became their only plan. >> the suppliers, most of them in europe where they don't have the death penalty, said we will not sell you drugs to kill people. our drugs are not intended to kill people. >> in january 2014, ohio announced they would try their plan b drug on inmate dennis mcguire, convicted of the rape and murder of a housewife named joy stewart. >> he slashed her throat, severed her jugular, she was seven months pregnant. >> the baby suffocated as well. >> if you're going to have the death penalty, this guy is the
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poster child for it for what he did. >> tim young represented mcguire in his final appeals. >> when we went to court with mr. mcguire, we ordered that the drug was like live to leave him in severe pain, almost torture, as if he were drowning or unable to breathe and choking and gasping for air. >> but arguing the danger of the drugs presented an unnerving catch 22. >> the burden of proof is so high to show it's going to go bad, it actually has to go bad. >> the judge said this was an experiment but the inmate was not entitled to a pain free execution. >> the court has ruled they believe the execution would be humane. if i believed that it would not be, we would not be proceeding. >> dennis mcguire was led into the execution chamber on january 16, 2014. >> dennis mcguire had a very brief but emotional final
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stateme statement. he said he was sorry for what he had done. he al popologized to the family had a son and daughter there and how he loved them. then the drugs were flowing and typically five, six minutes, maybe ten minutes, and it would be all over. and a few minutes here, began gasping, wheezing and coughing, sucking in breath. for 13 minutes his body was struggling not to die. it was obvious that he was trying to get air into his lungs and the drugs were preventing it. and 13 minutes doesn't sound like very long, but if you're watching somebody do that with his family there, it's an eternity. it just went on and on and on and on and i'll be candid. as a human being, i was at this point going, please, just let him die, let it stop. >> finally at 10:53 a.m., dennis mcguire was declared dead.
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>> yesterday i watched the state of ohio kill my dad. i witnessed his execution along with my wife and my sister. after watching my dad's execution, i know what cruel and unusual punishment is. >> anger bubbled up quickly. this was so foreseeable and so obvious. >> the agony and terror of watching my dad suffocate to death lasted more than 19 minut minutes. >> i saw him just gasping for air. his head kept coming up and his mouth was wide open and he was making all kinds of horrible noises. >> we just don't need to do this. there's nothing in the name of the people that justifies this horrible painful process before dying. >> europe's drug ban soon left other states facing their own
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drug shortages and despite dennis mcguire's botched execution, lessons from the drug had yet to be learned. >> after the mcguire execution, i thought will would be no state that would consider using the drug, that they would be moving on and i have since been disabused of that motion. >> mcguire was predictable. it was foreseeable. how do you ever go forward after that moment? that's just beyond horrifying to me. mother, we are settlers. we settle for cable. and the simpler things in life. like our drab clothing. that's right, daughter. and homemade haircuts. exactly, boy. besides, if it weren't for wires, how would cousin tobias get his privacy? hey - shut the blanket! i need my privacy! (vo) don't be a settler. get a $100 visa prepaid card when you switch to directv.
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now i can download my dvr recordings and take them anywhere. ready or not, here i come! (whispers) now hide-and-seek time can also be catch-up-on-my-shows time. here i come! can't find you anywhere! don't settle for u-verse. x1 from xfinity will change the way you experience tv. after the botched execution of dennis mcguire, many thought
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that the controversial drug midazolam would no longer be used in executions. but less than six months later, arizona announced they would use midazolam on inmate joseph wood. wood was found guilt oo of murdering his ex-girl friend and her father in 1989. >> we were very aware about what happened with the execution of dennis mcguire, so we asked the department of correction for information about the source of the drugs and the qualifications of the executioners and wardens and the state of arizona told to us go pound sand. it would not disclose the source of the drugs and it said trust us, the people that are going to be doing this are qualified. >> why all the secrecy? i think the department of corrections would like to take care of this ugly little business in as efficient a way as possible. they have a job to did, they
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have executions to carry out. if people start raising questions about where the drugs come from, who the doctor is, then it slows down the process. >> jason wood was taken to the execution chamber on july 23, 2014. at 1:52 p.m. the state of arizona injected wood with 50 milligrams of midazolam, five times the amount used in ohio. >> mr. wood opened his mouth wide and took a very deep breath. suddenly his mouth popped open, like that. and everybody sort of jumped a little bit. hadn't seen that before. you could see a spasm go through his body. could you see it went all the way down to his stomach. gasping like a fish. it was extraordinarily loud. i started doing hash marks in my
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notebook each time that he would make that sucking sound. >> he was gulping, he was gasping, he was struggling to breathe. >> i eventually counted 240 hash marks. it went on and on and i wondered is someone going to stop this execution? there were two lawyers sitting next to me and i saw them get up and go out. >> one full hour into the execution, joseph wood was still alive. they called for the execution to be halted. >> we immediately filed a motion with the federal district court asking the federal judge to stop the execution. >> they got an assistant attorney general on the phone and he said he's unconscious, he's not feel niing any pain. the just said do you have an g set u on him? no, we don't. then you don't know.
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>> on the call, they admitted a second dose of midazolam had been given. >> what was not reported was 14 additional doses of the drug were administered while all this was going on. >> nearly all drugs have what we call a ceiling effect. even though joseph wood received 750 milligrams of midazolam, he was breathing and his heart was working for nearly two hours. >> eventually joseph wood's gasping slowed and it slowed and eventually it petered out and it was done and then finally it was over. >> after an hour and 57 minutes, joseph wood was finally declared dead, becoming one of the longest executions in u.s. history. to many this was a clear case of cruel and unusual punishment. >> joe wood is dead, but it took him two hours to die. i can't imagine this is what the
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criminal justice system had hoped for when they came up with this new drug protocol. >> there was someone from the attorney general as office who said it was very peaceful, he was just sleeping and snoring. no, this is not what it looks like. >> the victim's family had little sympathy for joseph wood. >> everybody here from what i heard said it was excruciating. you don't know what exkrurkating is. what's excruciating is seeing your dad and since ter lying there in a pool of blood. that's excruciating. this man deserved it. >> this man conducted a horrifying murder and you are guys are going, organization h, about the drug. why didn't we give him a bullet, why didn't we give him some drano. all of you guys who feel bad, to
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hell with you. >> we have a constitutional amendment that forbids cruel and unusual punishment. we're supposed to be above that. >> with botched executions now spreading, questions mounted about the fate of the 3,000 people remaining on death row. and with the moral implications falling on those normally hidden behind the curtain, the executioners themselves began to speak out. >> i just felt like the people have the right to know if something has been cloaked in secrecy for years and years and years. i just wanted people to understand that it's not that i couldn't handle it, it's that i couldn't handle what it turned me into. dependent study, tested wireless performance across the country. verizon, won big with one hundred fifty three state wins. a t and t got thirty-eight, sprint got two, and t mobile got, zero. verizon also won first in the us for data, call speed,
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when lethal injection became the standard method of capital punishment, there were unintended con questions. reverend carol pickett witnessed 95 executions at the death house in huntsville, texas. >> we've had guards who would strap people down and faint in the death house. we've had guards come back in to undo the straps and they freeze because they can't touch death.
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they come and go quite rapidly. every couple weeks another would change. they just couldn't do it. >> the life of an executioner is very much a hidden world, literally shrouded in secrecy. >> "there will be no stay." >> the executioner i spent the most time with joined the department of corrections and worked their way up from the correctional officer all the wave up to major, which is when they became executioners. it was the highest promotion. it just happened to include execution. >> among lts executioners patty found were craig baxley and terry bracey, who carried out executions at the broad river prison in south carolina. >> the inmate is less than just a few feet away. the duty that i had was to take the syringe, screw it in and then do the plunging.
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>> if the inmate does not die within a certain few minutes, then you have to actually do another set. it's not the fact that i couldn't do it, i did it. it the fact that it changes you psychologically and changes you into a different person. i was not trained to did it and it messed me up. >> taking that plunger and pushing it in sort of set me on a particular course i wasn't really paired for. i expected to be trained, i expected to be counselled. none of that took place. >> there's still those fundamental christian rules of thou shalt not killed and they're flapped their own head with this deep, dark seek contract of i'm not supposed to be killing people. >> i believe if you have taken some lives, you a serial killer, i do believe that. wuf but i also look at serial killer every day when i look in the
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mirror. i see a serial killer. at times it becomes unbearable. >> i haven't met anyone on an execution team that is not dealing with that. many have committed suicide. >> i got good professional help and medication and my wife and my children. >> these men that we've appointed to keep us safe say, you know, i'm the garbage man taking out your trash or what you're considering to be trash and it's ruining my life. >> the executioners who were in charge of the botched executions in ohio largely avoided
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scrutiny. with you that would change with nathan lochte. >> mr. lokt confessed to the police. he was convicted. on 19 counts, he received about 2,500 years plus the death penalty. >> facing their own shortage from the european drug ban, oak okay announced they would use midazolam on lockett and inmate charles warner to be executed the same night. >> both of these crimes, charles warners were horrific. charles warners raped and murdered a baby. the question was whether the process was handled constitutionally and properly. >> zuz anna gatoni represented them. >> a law was passed which made the source of drugs completely
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secret. but if my clients are not being rendered unconscious, that's cruel and unusual punishment. so i tried to show that this statute is unconstitutional because it prohibits mr. lockett and mr. warner, anyone from finding out where those drugs came from. >> in fact, she's discovered oklahoma had planned to execute lockett and warner with drugs purchased in a potentially illegal manner. >> correspondent from the attorney general's office admitted the drugs were coming from a compounded pharmacy, which is not regulated by the fda. >> compounding pharmacies are neighborhood pharmacies in some cases that tip clich don't do these things at all. they do small drugs, lotions and creamsnd other simple things. >> compounding pharmacies don't make intravenous compounds. that's not what they're for. >> nobody oversees what is in the compound or if the drug will
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do what it's supposed to do. >> if the state of oklahoma is buying drugs from a compounding pharmacy without a doctor/patient relationship, then that would mean that they're violating federal law, criminal law. >> in december of 2013, a court in missouri ordered the release of records detailing transactions with a compounding pharmacy in oklahoma. >> officials from the state of missouri department of corrections went to oklahoma to obtain drugs from a compounding pharmacy, apparently taking $1,0$ $11,000 in cash and buying it from a company in missouri that wasn't licensed. >> suddenly you have cash in the night across state lines so the public doesn't know how and where $11,000 in taxpayer money was spent? abide by the constitution in the
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full light of day in front of everybody like our justice system is supposed to. >> missouri officials were accused of buying drugs from a compounding pharmacy in tulsa, oklahoma. e-mail chains revealed secret agreements between the shop and prison officials in louisiana and georgia where the pharmacy was also unlicensed to do business. >> it's almost a cloak and dagger way of trying to get drugs to use for executions. i think the real reason for all the secrecy that's happening now in states that are at the end of their rope so to speak, they've tried everything. this is like their last ditch effort to proceed with executions. >> with less than 24 hours to go, the oklahoma supreme court agreed to hear susannah's argument and granted clayton lockett and charles warner a rare stay of execution. that decision would set off one of the biggest political fire
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storms in state history. >> these aryivee evil doers, yon call them animals if you may. we want justice. i am her ally. so i asked about adding once-daily namenda xr to her current treatment for moderate to severe alzheimer's. it works differently. when added to another alzheimer's treatment, it may improve overall function and cognition. and may slow the worsening of symptoms for a while. vo: namenda xr doesn't change how the disease progresses. it shouldn't be taken by anyone allergic to memantine, or who's had a bad reaction to namenda xr or its ingredients. before starting treatment, tell their doctor if they have, or ever had, a seizure disorder, difficulty passing urine, liver, kidney or bladder problems, and about medications they're taking. certain medications, changes in diet, or medical conditions may affect the amount of namenda xr in the body and may increase side effects. the most common side effects are headache, diarrhea, and dizziness. all my life, she's been there for me. now i am giving back.
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to learn more. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. but i've managed.e crohn's disease is tough, except that managing my symptoms was all i was doing. and when i finally told my doctor, he said humira is for adults like me who have tried other medications but still experience the symptoms of moderate to severe crohn's disease. and that in clinical studies, the majority of patients on humira saw significant symptom relief. and many achieved remission. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers, including lymphoma, have happened; as have blood, liver, and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure. before treatment, get tested for tb. tell your doctor if you've been to areas where certain fungal infections are common, and if you've had tb, hepatitis b, are prone to infections, or have flu-like symptoms or sores. don't start humira if you have an infection.
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granted clat clayeton lockett and charles warner a rare stay of execution in order to hear the argument against secrecy laws that allowed the state to mask their source of execution drugs. political reaction was swift and forceful. >> i believe the death penalty is an appropriate response and punishment to those who commit heinous crimes against their fellow men and women. >> the very next day governor falon issued an executive order which essential lily said she didn't believe that the oklahoma supreme court had jurisdiction to do what they did. she was trying to override, usurp, what the court had done. >> the governor said the supreme court had exceeded it's authority. i don't know that's everyone happened in oklahoma and no one really questioned whether she had the authority to do that or not. all the supreme court was really asking for was more time for the
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attorneys in the case to brief these issues. >> reaction also came from state representative and former police officer mike christian, who immediately introduced legislation to impeach the judges who voted in favor of lockett and warner. >> these are evil doers, animals. can you call them demons, if you may. and the people across this country, in particular oklahoma, we want justice. >> people in oklahoma strongly support the death penalty. an 18-year-old girl ends up being savagely duct taped, shot and buried alive and we're talking about mr. lockett and his rights. >> mike christian is a pro depth lawmaker as many are in oklahoma. christian and several others pro posed articles of impeachment. we had a major controversy on our hands between our branches of government. >> faced with impreechlt and a
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battle against the governor, the oklahoma supreme court now had second thoughts. >> the very next day the oklahoma supreme court dissolved their stay, said that the secrecy statute was constitutional and called our claim frivolous. >> in their ruling dissolving their own stay, they seemed kind of peeved that this process was rushed but the people are calling for their impeachment. is there i felt very disappointed in myself. i was reminded something my stepfather said to me when i was in law. he sais just remember, no matter when you do, no one will die. and in this instance, that wasn't true. >> at the oklahoma state penitentiary on april 29th,
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2014, clayton lockett was led to the execution chamber while charles warner waited in the wings. zeva brandsteter witnessed the lockett execution. >> it was my fourth execution to witness. it was scheduled for 6 p.m. eventually they rolled up the shades at 6:20 and he was asked if he had a statement and he said no. >> at 6:31 the doctor checked consciousness and the warden announced the inmate was still conscious. a few minutes later the doctor checked consciousness again and said the inmate is unconscious. >> a second drug was injected, intended to paralyze lockett. >> at 6:33, i noticed a reaction. there was a kicking of his leg. clayton lockett began to strain
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against the restraints. his body began to kind of buck. he was struggling and riting. he looked like he was trying to get um off the gurney to me. it was really very shocking. it was clear to me that clayton lockett was still conscious. it was clear to me that he was in pain. i heard him say, man, you know, like he was shocked at whatever it was that he was feeling. and he was lifting his head up and shoulders clear off the gurney, mumbling "something is wrong" and the warden said, ladies and gentlemen, we need to temporarily close the blinds. and they closed the blinds and shut off the mic. >> i sat next to the victim's family at the execution. no one knew if he had died or if he lived or what was happening. they were concerned about that. >> the attorneys who are witnessing this on behalf of clayton lockett said they're
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going to revive shouchim so the could kill him another day. >> the blinds were not reopened and at 6:56 p.m., his execution was immediately halted. >> we were taken back to the media center. there was no clear discussion of what happened. >> is lockett dead? >> we don't know. >> the first of two scheduled executions at the prison did not go as planned. >> clayton lockett was supposed to receive the death penalty for killing a woman 15 years ago, but tonight his punishment is being referred to as a botched execution. >> things obviously went horribly wrong with mr. lockett's execution. my assistant reached me and told me i needed to turn on a tv to see what was happening. the reports were that he was still alive. >> at 7:23 p.m., the man in
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charge of lockett's execution, department of corrections director robert patton, addressed the media. >> ladies and gentlemen, i'm going to make a short statement. ly not be take anything questions so please don't scream and holler at me. as those who were inside witnessed, the drugs were not having the effect, the doctor observed the line and determined that the line had blown. it was miey decision to stop th execution. at 7:06 hours approximately, inmate suffered what appears to be a massive heart attack and passed away. >> reporter: why did you decide to lower the curtain? >> so the physician to check the vein. >> reporter: what do you have mean line had blown? >> the vein blew. >> reporter: lockett's vein? >> yes. >> reporter: what does that mean? >> his vein exploded.
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>> they said "his vein slowed exploded," which i thought was strange. >> the truth would only be revealed after months of investigation. but down the hall, charles warner had eaten his last meal. he was told that his execution would proceed. 's right. i'm talking full time delivery of 7 grams of protein and 6 essential nutrients. ever see a peanut take a day off? i don't think so. harness the hardworking power of the peanut. a blade. many blades. tsharp blades.g. blades here, blades there. some more over there... whoa! that's not another blade. this is shielding. with lubrication here and here. the new gillette with proshield lubrication before and after the blades shields from irritation for a close, comfortable shave. the new proshield from gillette.
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after the botched execution of clayton lockett, charles warner, scheduled to die immediately after, was left in the dark. his family waited to attend the execution. >> the family was very, very deep in prayer. the mother of course was sobbing through her prayers. it was very sad. we waited for a long time. it became time for charles' execution and we were still sitting in that room and nobody was telling us anything. then another attorney came rushing into our room and said there was not going to be an execution for charles warner that night. the family was crying with joy. mrs. warner said, you know, those prayers were heard by a higher being. we were so relieved.
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>> but the mood soon turned sour as prison officials seemed confused about what exactly was going on. >> we were going to go home. we were led out to the parking lot and we started to get in the car. well, out of the building ran the warden yelling at us, get back into this building. you're breaking protocol. you have to get back into the building. >> prison officials now told warner's family the execution would proceed. >> i was horrified. we went back into the building and then we sat there for a while, not knowing if charles warner would be executed. i was angry and perplexed. it was too late to go file anything in the court be. we had no phone. finally at so many point we were told charles warner would not be executed and we were told to go home. it was an incredible roller
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coaster of emotions. >> investigations into the botched, kugs of clayton lockett revealed what happened behind the blinds. >> we learned that the doctor that was supposed to perform the exkukes had backed out and a doctor stepped in. the doctor made 12 attempts o insert an i.v. and it was not properly inserted. the drugs were not delivered into his vein. they went into the tissue. there was no backup drugs that night, there was no emergency plan if something went wrong. >> regarding the use of midazolam, the correction department said i looked online and i did find out midazolam would rend are a person unconscious so we thought it was okay. >> obviously they need someone
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who is better equipped at knowing if someone is rendered unconscious. >> after hitting an art riff causing lockett's blood to spray, the doctor who executed lockett said he hoped to, quote, get enough money out of this to go buy a new jacket. >> what happened in oklahoma is deeply troubling. >> clayton lockett's case would bring worldwide attention to america's botched executions and if he questions about the future of lethal injection. >> human rights outrage. >> after botching the delivery of a enough untested combination of drugs -- >> clayton lockett was said to be shaking uncontrollably 20 minutes after the first drug was administered. >> you've got amateur hour going on here, having someone poorly trained, brew up something in the back in the kitchen saying i never tried this before, let's see how it goes. >> and voices responded
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forcefully. >> why were we designing the most pleasant death possible for people who have imposed the most unpleasant death possible? >> i want them to sit back and think if that was your child, would you have sympathy? >> it took two hours for this man to die. this guy snored on his way to hell. >> it wasn't an execution. this man was killed by malpractice of a doctor, who was killed by intelligence of the states. >> the death penalty is a government program and the government takes a week to deliver a piece of mail. what gives us the idea that the government can make life-and-death decisions with life-and-death accuracy. >> lockett should be given the same mercy he gave his victim, stephanie, and that would be none. >> our constitutional rights are with us until we die. we shouldn't dismiss them because we think the person who is being executed isn't deserving. >> we are saying to the world
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this is done as a considered, thoughtful moment of punishment, not as some rageful, heinous act. if that's the punishment we're imposing, then we're him, we're the heinous murderer. >> time is running out for convicted killer charles warner, set to die at 6 p.m. in the state's first execution since last april. >> nine months after clayton lochte's execution, execution complete ld construction on a brand enough death chamber, which they were now ready to use on charles warner. >> a microphone will come on and the staff member will read the warrant exkukes to the offend erp and the offender will be allowed to make a last statement. . three-drug in the three-drug
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protocol, midazolam will be administered. >> meanwhile the mother of warner's victim, an 11-month-old baby made her feelings clear. >> if they want to honor me, they will give him life in prison without the possibility of parole. i don't see any justice in sentencing someone to die. to me the justice is in someone living with what they have done to you and your family, having to live with that the rest of their life knowing they'll never walk out those bars. i don't want that on my hands. it make me feel like i'm no different than him and i don't want to feel that way. >> the time for warner's execution came and went as oklahoma waited for word from the u.s. supreme court about whether they could use midazolam on warner.
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at 6:20 p.m., the decision came down. justice sonia sotomayer wrote the frugging frood and drug admn has not approved the use of midazolam. but her opinion was in the minority. >> ladies and gentlemen, the u.s. supreme court has dene -- denied the stay of execution. the process will begin shortly.
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they shot them like they were nothing and the crime is caught on tape. >> most significant piece of evidence i've ever seen in a case. >> but clear images of guilt. >> there's your guy. it's a slam dunk for the prosecution. >> only deepen the mystery. >> what they didn't have is any physical evidence. >> there's no doubt in my mind that he's innocent. >> there's a body in the water. he was butchered and murdered. >> many people proclaim their innocence. >> this man is

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