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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  February 7, 2016 1:00am-3:01am PST

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where is my cocktail? we are following the breaking news this hour. north korea launching a rocket toward space just hours ago. welcome to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. according to the u.s. military, there are two objects in orbit around the earth. one may be the satellite. the other could be the final stage of a rocket launched a little more than eight hours ago by north korea. in pyongyang, state media cheered that launch despite widespread condemnation around the world. the u.s., south korea, and japan say the satellite launch of a long-range missile test. comes one month after north
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korea claimed it tested a hydrogen bomb. cnn is covering the story from all angles around the world with reporters in stations. alexandra field with reaction in beijing this hour. first, paula hancocks joins us from seoul, south korea. good to have you with us. people are talking about the latest move by the north. what has been the general reaction among people in south kore korea? >> george, i have one piece of information to update you with. first of all, we just heard that the defense minister here in south korea has been briefing parliament. he has said that it appears the satellite has entered orbit. so the satellite appears to have entered orbit. south korea effectively confirming what north korea has said earlier today, that they have successfully launched that satellite into orbit. and certainly this is the news that we have been waiting for. so north korea is very pleased,
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as you see, from the photos that have been run on state-run media. and kim jong-un, the leader, looking pleased. the rockets also being launched into orbit. and we understand from the south korean point of view that reaction on the streets is fairly muted. it is lunar new year here. not many people around. it's really a mixed feeling, though. there's certainly no panic on the streets of seoul. there never is when these kind of events happen. people here have been dealing with this for decades now. the two countries are still technically at war. it is not a surprise to many. of course, for those officials who have to deal with this, it is more of a concern. president park said she believes it is a threat to world peace. we've heard similar from leaders and institutions around the world. we expect more to be coming in the coming hours. george? >> paula, one other question. sow south korea now saying that
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it will push for more realistic measures with the u.s. to strengthen national security measures. >> one thing has emerged is the u.s. and south korea have announced that they will be publicly discussing a missile defense system which has been controversial in this region over recent months, maybe even a couple of years. china is dead set against it, effectively because it believes it would affect its own radar systems and would be allowing the u.s. to spy on them which the u.s. has said is not the case. this missile defense system would just be trained on any missiles, potentially coming from north korea. this is something being openly discussed. this could be a game changer
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when it comes to missile defense on the peninsula. it will be interesting to see china's reaction in the coming days. george? >> paula hancocks live in seoul. now to alexandra field in beijing. this launch floss in the face of chinese efforts to deescalate tensions, especially after north korea claims to have tested an h bomb a month ago. though it is important to point out that world powers including the u.s. have not yet confirmed that to be the case. >> reporter: yeah, the timing is everything. it should rankle those in beijing. their public statement was that they regret that north korea would insist on using ballistic missile technology for its launch which flies in the face of u.n. sanctions. at the same time publicly, officials in beijing are calling for restraint and calm from all parties. they're urging negotiation, consultation, and further discussions. this gets to the question of sanctions.
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the u.s. secretary of state john kerry in beijing just last week, urging the chinese government to exercise more of its leverage in the region here. we know that china is the biggest trading parliament partner of north korea. the world view is that china is in a position to put a tighter choke hold on the economy. the chinese have resisted out of concerns of top-long a regime next door and the -- toppling a regime next door and the questions at china's doorstep. what happens now? the chinese have been clear in sanction -- in saying that sanctions should not be imposed for the sang of sanctions. they're saying the continuation of provocations is to get the attention of the u.s. and the u.s. should be talking to north korea. we go back to where we started in saying that the timing is everything. this launch certainly has to irk official in beijing because it comes on the eve of the lunar new year, the biggest holiday in
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china. it also comes a week after the chinese dispatched a senior official to pyongyang to urge restraint, and it comes only a month after the reported test of an h bomb that went through without anyone giving warning to beijing which was a bit of a surprise and certainly speaks to the somewhat cooling relationship between the two historical allies. >> at this point, do you get a sense that china is calling on nations like the united states to engage more in discussions, negotiations? is that what the chinese are asking for in their reaction to what happened? >> reporter: yeah, that's exactly what they're asking for. they're being clear saying first everyone needs to be calm. second, there needs to be restraint. lays out clearly in this brief statement that dialogue and consultation are essential. while you have the u.s. looking at china and saying, china, you are the ones who have the power here, you have the leverage to choke off the economy, it is the
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chinese who are certainly quite trepidacious given the problems on china's door step, and they're saying clearly to the u.s. something they've said before, that there needs to be dialogue. that north korea is being clear with these provocations, that they are interested in talking to the u.s. the chinese saying there needs to be a diplomatic procedure. a diplomatic route for moving forward, george. >> alexandra field live in beijing. thank you so much for your reporting. we'll stay in touch with you. reaction from around the world has been sharp. south korea's president park is pledging to protect her citizens saying the following, "we don't know when north korea is going to do another provocative action, so our government needs come up with a plan to protect the safety of the people." from the u.s. secretary of state john kerry, said the following, "the united states strongly condemns today's missile launch by the dprk. a flagrant violation of u.n.
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security council resolutions related to the dprk use of ballistic missile technology." from russia, the foreign minister saying in part, "pyongyang didn't listen to the calls from the international community once again, demonstrating defiant disregard for international law." i'd also like to read a statement from france saying that this is a senseless provocation and flagrant violation of the resolutions from the security council. reaction coming from around the world. north korea says the rocket launch was personally ordered and directed by its leader, kim jong-un. daniel pinkston is a professor at the international relations at troy university in the united states. earlier he told my colleague, natalie allen, why this rocket launch is so disturbing to washington and to its north korean neighbors. >> this is part of the north korean regime's identity. they place a lot of importance on the newark program and delivery systems, missiles, and
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space launch vehicles. so they continue to do this. they will continue to do it. and so we should expect to see more in the future. it's moving toward more dangerous region. for weather broadcasting, scientific technology, they have a legitimate interest. they can use the same technology to develop intercontinental ballistic missiles. wedded with nuclear warheads, they could strike the united states potentially. that is worrisome. it makes it more difficult or complicated for the united states to actual fill its mutual security treaty obligations with the republic of korea and with other allies in the region. so the deterrent's response, military posture, assets that have to be to be deployed and so forth, there have been discussions about that and other things. that's going to be on the horizon. we're going to have to manage this emerging threat. as north korea enhances its
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capabilities, they will continue to use it for coercive purposes, to try to achieve their political objectives. >> again, that was daniel pinkston of troy university. he also said he doesn't think china will support stronger sanctions against north korea. christopher hill is a former u.s. ambassador to south korea. he spoke earlier with my colleague, jonathan mann. mr. hill says he thinks the rocket launch may well be part of pyongyang's effort to develop its nuclear weapons technology. listen. >> despite all the talk about whether it's a north korean provocation, et cetera, what i think it is is the military testing program. they've been testing nuclear weapons, and testing the delivery system. i think we need to understand this in that context. i don't think it's an effort to somehow humiliate china or somehow behave in -- in some different way. i think it is an internal testing program.
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and what it speaks to the fact that north korea simply doesn't care what we think. >> how dangerous is north korea's rocket technology now? >> reporter: there is no question that they have made progress on their nuclear explosions, on these nuclear devices. you know, at first they had a fizzle. fizzled out, didn't work. they've continued to work on it. they've had four tests. it's not a hydrogen program. but you don't have to be a hydrogen program to be extremely threatening. the issue, of course, is whether you could take a nuclear device and turn it into a weapon that can fit on the nose cone of a missile. and clearly that is the second part of what they're trying to do. so in answer to your question, i think it's a serious problem. and i think what the u.s. needs do is rethink so-called strategic patience. and i think the chinese need to
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rethink their own soft policy. more importantly than that, i think the u.s. and the chinese need to stop pointing fingers and start sitting down and figuring out what are we going to do about this. >> obviously there are countries that look nervously at north korea having this kind of technology. but there are suggestions that another reason for concern is that the technology isn't going to stay in north korea. it is going to be seoul. that north korea is the center for proliferation, a dangerous technology. how great is that concern? >> reporter: we have seen a capacity among north koreans to sell just about anything. i think proliferation is a real concern. i cannot say that we have seen connections between north korea and international terrorism. but why not if the price is right? so we have a country that has no interest in working with other countries, that has no interest in its standing in the world except to become a nuclear
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state. i think we need to get serious about this. and by serious i mean -- i mean we need to look at traditional diplomatic channels, not communications with the chinese through press conferences, but rather sitting down with the chinese and figuring out what we can do to retard the program and what we can do to make northeast asia a safer place. >> so let's get deeper to what kind of threat this rocket launch and north korea's ambitions may pose. melissa happenum is a -- hanum is a research associate at the james martin center and joins us from monterey, california. good to have you with us. we've heard reaction from around the world about the rocket launch. i want to talk about the internal motivations. what do you believe the reasons are for north korea's actions and the nation's aims? >> sure. so -- [ inaudible ] >> i think this rocket test is a
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message to -- [ inaudible ] >> we lost your audio. go ahead and continue. >> sure. north korea's a signal to its domestic audience today -- [ inaudible ] >> we're going to have to come back to you. you're having audio issues. we appreciate you being with us and want to hear your take and insight. thank you. news of the missile test came as u.s. republican presidential candidates debated in new hampshire. we will hear their reaction to the launch and the latest on the aftermath of that debate. you're watching "cnn newsroom."
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back to our top story. north korea's rocket launch and the threat to nations.
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senior research associate at james martin center for nonproliferation studies joins us on the line from california. good to have you back with us by phone. i wanted to ask you again the same question -- what do you believe the north is trying to accomplish by this move? is it to threaten other nations or something more? >> on the surface, it's a space launch. i think it's important to them to demonstrate their capability as a space bearing nation. this was a space launch vehicle and intended to put satellite into orbit. and they are tracking objects in orbit. the underbelly is that the technology that's used in a space launch vehicle is dual use and can be used for an icbm program. even though this is heralded as a peaceful scientific innovation, unfortunately for the rest of us this can also be interpreted as a military
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activity. >> one more question and briefly. so the idea of new sanctions, more sanctions against north korea given what happened here, will that really matter? >> it's tough. the low hanging fruit have already been cut. the obvious group to turn to is the chinese. the chinese hands are tied at this point. even though they trade in heavy fuel oil and food and other goods with north korea, they are concerned about what severe sanctions would do to the north korean economy and political stability. to them, the only thing worse than having a nuclear capable north korea is to have a collapsed north korea. >> senior research associate at the james martin center for nonproliferation studies. thank you for being on the line with us. >> thanks for having me.
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now to the race for the white house. with just two days left now until the new hampshire primary, the republican candidate wes we head to head in the final debate saturday. ted cruz used the north korean missile launch to slam the obama administration arguing the recent deal with iran would lead to a similar outcome with tehran. donald trump says china should handle north korea in this situation. chris christie lashed out at marco rubio criticizing his level of experience and poor attendance record in the u.s. senate. from the rocket launch in north korea to so-called memorized speeches, here are some of the highlights from the republican debate. ♪ >> i'm curious why you didn't
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call ahead of time before sending out the messages. >> monday about 6:30 p.m., cnn reported that ben was not going from iowa to new hampshire or south carolina, he was taking a break. cnn reported. they didn't correct the story until 9:15 that night. >> the timeline indicates that initial tweet from cnn was followed by another one within one minute. everybody can see what happened, and you can make year own judgment. >> thank you. >> when you're president of the united states, governor of a state, the memorized 30-second speech where you talk about how great america is end doesn't solve one problem for one person. >> this notion that barack obama doesn't know what he's doing is not true -- >> there it is. there it is. the memorized 25-second speech. >> that's the -- >> it was reported just moments ago that the north koreans testlauntest test launched an intercontinental ballistic missile. >> china says they don't have
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that control over north korea. they have tremendous control. i deal with them. >> we're going to build a wall, triple the border control. >> i will simply say i have somebody in mind to build it. >> the property from -- >> a lot of times -- let me talk. quiet. [ booing ] >> in that reports, you noticed that ted cruz mentioned the cnn reporting. important to point out that cnn stands by its reporting. according to the l.a. cnn/wmur poll, donald trump is coming out on top of his republican rivals in new hampshire holding an 11-point lead ahead of marco rubio after tuesday's primary. on the democratic side, bernie sanders leads hillary clinton by a 2-1 margin. to find out more about the 2016 race for the white house including the latest poll numbers and debate performances, find it on our website, cnn.com/politics. so there is snow headed for the u.s. northeast. will it be enough to affect voting in new hampshire for
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these primaries? derek van dam joins us to talk about. derek, so people are used to the weather there. more snow coming? >> that's right. the winter weather is our story across the united states. our viewers are going to want to stick around for the next couple of minutes. i've got great footage of an event that happened in wisconsin. more in a second. to answer your question, we've got the primaries taking place in new hampshire this tuesday. we have the potential for yet another east coast snowstorm, believe it or not. remember, it was only two weeks ago where we set some snowfall records along the east coast. let's try and time this out and determine if this will impact the new hampshire primaries coming up on tuesday. here it is, tuesday morning. there foes the storm system across nova scotia and extreme northeastern united states. look at the back side of the system. the pink line, by the way, the freezing line. anything above that or north of that would fall in the form of snow. it does appear that we could receive a few inches of snowfall into new hampshire, and with
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another system developing in its wake. that means we could pile up even upward of a half a foot in locations. this is depending on which computer model you actually tend to trust this time of year. this is the north american model. this has been a little less consistent than the european model in which i'll show you in one second. that nam, north american model, had half a foot to eight inches of snow spot capital of new hampshire, concord. look at the difference between the european, only showing one to two inches. nonetheless, there could be snowfall that could impact the voters heading to the polls on primary day there on tuesday. one thing's for sure -- it will be extremely cold over the upper great lakes and the new england coast for the middle of this workweek. you'll see these temperatures drop off significantly into monday and tuesday. here's the seven-day forecast for concord. we should be 33 this time of year. we're warm up nicely today, but look at the sharp cooldown into
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the rest of the week. i promised you video. and i want to show you this. if you can see what's happening in lake geneva, wisconsin. george, check this out. can you imagine parking your car on what you thought was a safe surface and all of a sudden coming back and seeing that it has fallen into ice. that's what happened at the winter fest in lake geneva, wisconsin. this is the u.s. snow-sculpting competition. and while fortunately no one was in those vehicles when they fell through the ice, it shows you just how dangerous it can be. you never know how thick ice can be this time of year. >> they call it winter fest? >> they call it winter fest. >> it lives up to its name. >> sure does. >> thank you very much. >> sure. you're watching "cnn newsroom." still ahead, north korea launches what it claims to be a satellite sparking a global outcry. ahead, we're live in seoul, south korea, with reaction and the very latest there. plus, we'll show you the moment a powerful earthquake hit taiwan.
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we'll tell you about a little boy who was rescued from the rubble. live from atlanta and broadcasting around the globe this hour, you're watching cnn worldwide.
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a warm welcome back to our viewers in the united states and around the world. you're watching newsro"cnn news" i'm george howell. this morning, north korea claims it successfully launched a satellite into orbit. it's believed to be cover for a long-range missile test. the launch comes a month after north korea claimed it tested a hydrogen bomb successfully. the world powers have not yet confirmed that to be the case.
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more than 70 people remain unaccounted for in taiwan after a 6.4-magnitude earthquake. looking at live images this hour near the epicenter of the earthquake. rescuers are desperately searching for survivors there. on saturday, a 7-year-old boy was pulled from a mountain of wreckage. at least 20 people have died from that earthquake. an elderly australian woman has been freed after she and her doctor, her husband were kidnapped by an al qaeda-linked group last month. the militants claimed responsibility for the abduction friday and said they would release jocelyn elliott because they do not target women in times of war. authorities are trying to get dr. elliott released. returning to our top story, this rocket launch in north korea and the fallout across the world. paula hancocks joins us from seoul. good to have you with us again. what is the latest you're hearing out of south korea?
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>> reporter: well, we're hearing from the south korean defense minister who's briefing parliament or has been briefing parliament that he believes that the satellite appears to have entered orbit. so really confirming what north korea said earlier on today, that they believe it was a successful satellite launch. it appears, according to the defense minister, at least that it may have been successful. he says whether or not it is functioning as it should is something that will take a lot more time to work out. this isn't the first time that north korea has done this. of course, the question is, why does it feel the need to carry out the satellite launches. august, 1998, mission failed. april, 2009, a provocative act, says the u.s. april, 2012, the rocket broke up one minute into flight. and december, 2012, four attempts by north korea to launch a satellite into space.
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only this considered a success outside the country. north korean leader kim jong-un clearly delighted, claiming the satellite did reach orbit and is working. a space program north korea has pumped billions into over the years, but why? >> for weather forecasting, telecommunications broadcasting, science, agriculture mapping, all of those things. there is a legitimate interest. however, there's also -- there are also military applications. >> the rocket technology used is pretty much the same whether you put a satellite on top or a nuclear warhead which is why many believe it's a cover-up for a long-range ballistic missile test. the launches put militaries on alert. japan stationed patriots outside its defense ministry. navies rush to reach debris to assess the north's capabilities. governments line up to condemn pyongyang passing new sanctions and reminding them of previous u.n. security council
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resolutions that bar them from developing ballistic missile technologies. showing cnn its new satellite control center last year, scientists say that claims of missile tests are wrong. "my young scientist are working hard," the director says, "so they can develop a satellite. the u.s. and western forces are stabbing our scientists in the heart with these claims." a satellite launch coming weeks after a fourth nuclear test raises already heightened concerns. >> they need two pieces to their nuclear deterrent. they need the sort of weapon itself, and then they need the delivery system. they need a way to make people feel like we can hit you with this. >> reporter: new information now. we understand from the defense ministry that they may have retrieved part of the pairing of this rocket. the defense ministry official saying at 1:45 this afternoon, just southwest of the south coast of south korea, they collected what appears to be
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part of the pairing of the long-range missile. it will be interesting to see what they can learn from that. clearly the south koreans and japanese wanted to retrieve some of the rocket so they would be able to see what -- what north korea's capabilities are. >> a lot of people will be looking into what happened and try to understand the true nature of it. paula hancocks live from seoul. thank you very much for your reporting there. switching to michael fern, a journalist in tokyo. he joins us from outside japan's ministry of defense. good to have you with us this hour, as well. so look, we're hearing from japan's prime minister, abe. he is saying this is "totally unacceptable" and that the nation intends to take all possible measures to ensure the safety and peace of mind of the japanese people. what more can you tell us about the reaction from japan after this rocket launch? >> reporter: well, he had a meeting of the national security council in which he urged the government to look at extending
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unilateral sanctions against north korea to punish it for the missile test. and also japan is joining with south korea and the united states to push the u.n. security council to adopt tougher sanctions. asked for an emergency meeting. that's taking place on sunday or early monday morning, japan time. and japan, even if it doesn't get any joy through the security council is going to work with south korea, going work with the u.s., and try rope in the g7 to adopt some sanctions against businesses that work with north korea. according to the asian review, it says that any company that does business with north korea would be excluded from international financial markets. obvious there's been great public concern here in japan about this missile launch, with two of the pieces reportedly going over okinawa. one plunging into the sea.
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one continuing and eventually launching that satellite in space. but this is the view of some people that we spoke to. >> translator: we can't do anything about north korea. big power china is backing them, but they can't stop north korea either. we need coordinated sanctions again north korea. the problem is they can't do it. >> translator: if the situation continues like this, we should strengthen economic sanctions and beef up japan's defense capability. >> reporter: japan's defense spending is 1.5% higher this year than last year, with the defense budget topping five april yen for the first time ever. the executive director of the japan institute of international affairs told me that he doesn't think that this north korean missile test will have much of an impact on japanese defense
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spending. he says that the ballistic defense program is basically aimed at threats to japan, whereas this missile had a range that could target the united states. he also says that japan is adding another two aegis destroyers to its fleet. it's already got some spending in that can take account for the north korean missile tests. >> i want to push further on that. even before the rocket launch, there has been renewed talk in japan about increasing, strengthening defense and military positioning of that nation. so how does this play into that conversation? >> reporter: well, obviously japan's been working on -- there have been four missile tests since 1992. and japan has been working on strengthening its defenses. so it already has the seven patriot missiles that the
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defense systems that's deployed around japan. it already has a fleet of aegis destroyers which are equipped with sm-2 missiles which can take out any debris that falls from the fragmented rockets. japan is expanding its self-defense forces to have aqattic landing capabilities, to defend its remote islands. that's more because of the perceived threat, for example from china with the dispute over the islands. >> michael fern, thank you very much for your insight and reporting live for us in tokyo. in taiwan, more than 70 people remain unaccounted for after a 6.4-magnitude earthquake struck on saturday. you're looking at live images there in the city where the rescue efforts, the recovery
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efforts continue. you see so much rubble, so much debris left over from the very strong earthquake. emergency crews are digging through looking for survivors. i want to show video that shows the moment the earthquake hit. you see smoke rises, then chunks of cement come crashing down. at least 20 people have been killed including a baby girl just ten days old. we look at the people fortunate enough to survive the devastating earthquake. >> reporter: in taiwan's oldest city, a fragile life lingers behind the steel pars of a collapsed highrise apartment complex. this is the destruction left in the wake of the powerful 6.4-magnitude earthquake. life and death lie within the cracks of the uprooted buildings in this concrete jungle. >> translator: i was so afraid that what if the rescuers
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couldn't find us that i would start screaming as soon as i heard anyone looking for survivors. since my husband and i were trapped in different rooms, we kept making sure each of us was okay. >> reporter: other were not so fortunate. more than a dozen people have died. hundreds have been rushed to nearby hospitals, and many more are still missing. rescue workers rummaged through the rubble in the early morning hours, searching for a little sign of life. >> translator: we are busy rescuing and relocating the victims. there's enough manpower at the site to carry out the rescue. as for relocation, we will provide 1,200 peds in the nearby military academy for the victims. >> reporter: the island lies near the junction two of tectonic plates making it one of the world's most active earthquake zones. in quake, a flashback of taiwan's devastating tremors of september, 1999, which killed more than 2,000 people. for now, the search for hope
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amidst a mountain of destruction continues. cnn reporting. thousands of desperate syrian people are streaming out of northern syria as government forces gain ground in aleppo. we'll have a live report, a report, rather, from the border straight ahead. you're watching "cnn newsroom." need to hire fast? go to ziprecruiter.com and post your job to over one hundred of the web's leading job boards with a single click. then simply select the best candidates from one easy to review list. and now you can use zip recruiter for free. go to ziprecruiter.com.
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as the fighting continues and intensifies around the syrian city of aleppo, the u.n. reports more than 40,000 people have been displaced by the violence. [ explosion ] >> the video you see shows the moment the russian air strike hits a civilian neighborhood. and it is with this kind of russian air support that the syrian regime has been advancing on opposition-held areas around
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aleppo which was once the country's economic hub. thousands of civilians have managed to flee aleppo. they are bottled up at syria's border trying to escape into turkey now. the u.n. says more than 300,000 civilians remain in the aleppo region. syrian forces have cut off supply lines there, and there are fears of a humanitarian disaster. more than a million syrian refugee have fled to neighboring jordan. now that tiny country is struggling to cope with the influx of people. it's now hoping that international aid will help to ease the burden. cnn has this report. >> reporter: families survive on u.n. handouts, rations, and the charity of others. but they can barely cover their $300-a-month rent. cousins say life is tough, but at least they escaped the bloodshed in syria. "if they could find jobs in jordan," he says, "life could change."
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majority of the 1.2 million in jordan are like this family, refugees in cities and towns across the country. according to unhcr, nearly nine out of ten refugees live under the poverty line. it's not just the refugees who are suffering. georges a country that's worked to build its -- jordan, a country that's worked to rebuild its economy, is burdened to cope. >> it puts burden on all of our socio-economic indicators and have put tremendous pressure on our economy that is already suffering from level of poverty and level of unemployment and jdp. >> reporter: while many jordanians are welcoming of refugees, they're feeling the impact. "young people are not finding jobs because there are syrians who would work for lower salaries," this man says. "the cost of living has gone up," which man tells us. "there's a competition over jobs and everything like rent is increasing." "the syrians are our brothers,
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but everything is more expensive. the city is congested now," this woman tells us. after years of dealing with the influx of syrian refugees, jordan says it wants to see a shift in the international approach to the crisis, expanding beyond the emergency response of providing things like blankets and shelters to more sustainable, longer term economic solutions. jordan's taking a wish list to europe. it includes requests like focused funding, as well as access to a wider range of financial support to stimulate jordan's economy. in addition to easing some of the restrictions on jordanian exports hoping it would create more jobs for syrians and jordanians. >> it is important for the world to help host countries in order for these countries to help the refugees. otherwise, if we don't deal with refugees in host countries, we will have to deal with them in every other part of the world as we have seen this crisis hitting
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heart of europement. >> reporter: jordan's message coming at a time when the world's worst refugee crisis in decades seems far from over. cnn, amman. >> that image there, so many people trying to escape the ravages of war. if you would like to learn more about the migrant crisis in europe and find out ways to help, you can head to our impact your world website. you can find that at cnn.com/impact. you're watching "cnn newsroom." millions will be watching the super bowl today. no doubt millions will be watching the ads, too. we take a look now at the business behind the funny, sometimes edgy and very expensive ads that will be rolled out during the big game. stay with us.
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it is i the day that american football fans have been waiting for all season. it is all about super bowl 50. in the united states, the carolina panthers face off with the denver broncos outside of san francisco. there are millions of fans and billions of dollars tied up in this big, big game. let's talk numbers. 114 million, that is how many people in the united states
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watched the game last year on tv making the most-watched telecast of all time. $5 million is the cost of a 30-second tv commercial for the game. it's also a record. $4.2 billion is expected to be bet on the game. most of it illegally according to the american gambling association. a bonus of $102,000 will be paid to players on the the winning team, the losers don't walk off too bad either. $51 each, and nearly $5,000, that's the average cost of a ticket to see super bowl 50 in person, making it the most expensive sporting event in u.s. history. big brands are looking to capitalize on the millions they're spending on commercials for the super bowl. brian stelzer looks at the business behind the funny even edgy ads. ♪ >> reporter: super bowl ads cost a record-breaking $5 million this year.
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and for the first-time ever, the same ads will be streamed on line. is it really worth the price? food and beverage giant pepsico says it's a no-brainer. >> the investment around this platform of super bowl is a platform that for fans of the nfl is not just about that sunday. all the analysis we do, it's worth the money we're putting against. we're getting great payback across our business. >> we'll have 70,000 displaced in every one of our retailers across the country. two weeks leading up to the super bowl is the biggest purchase on snack and beverages. for sure, if you look at the entirety of it, it definitely pays off. >> reporter: how safe do you have to play it for ads? do you worry about offending one of the 100 million people watching? >> especially on a brand like doritos which is targeted to the 19-year-old consumer, we're always going to get creative which is going to offend someone. >> reporter: a common theme in doritos super bowl ads, animals and babies. ♪ >> i think five years, we finished as the number-one spot. sense of humor. you've got to entertain the
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consumers. and obviously kids and animals tend to do that. >> reporter: pepsen, on the -- pepsi, on the other hand, has focused on celebrities. from michael j. fox to cindy crawford to britney spears and elton john in more recent years. >> pepsi for you. >> reporter: how do you feel if it's worth having a celebrity? some years the celebrities are front and center in the super bowl ads, others not so much. what's theical congratulation? >> we -- what's the speculation? >> we want to understand what's their narrative and the value they're adding to the brand story. it's different from how we've traditionally used celebrities in the past. >> reporter: as for what you can expect this year, you'll have to wait until super bowl sunday. >> we'll have to wait and see the winner. thank you for watching this hour. i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. i'll be back after the break with another hour of news from around the world. thank you for watching cnn, the world's news leader.
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north korea says it launched a satellite into orbit. its neighbors and the u.s. are skeptical of pyongyang's motives. the race for the white house, the dust settles from the final republican debate for tuesday's primary in the state of new hampshire. we'll have the latest for you. plus, it is the biggest sporting event of the year in the united states, and security measures are being put in place. we will preview what that means before the start of super bowl 50. from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell, "cnn good day to you.ht now.
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we begin with our top story, that rocket launch out of north korea. the nation celebrating what it is calling the successful launch of a satellite, but the u.s., japan, and south korea say it is part of a ballistic missile test. they've called for an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council that is set for late sunday morning. south korea's defense minister has briefed members of the parliament in seoul. he says it does appear that north korea succeeded in launching a satellite. the u.s. military has corroborated reports of a new satellite in orbit. cnn is covering this story as only cnn can do with reporters around the world. cnn's alexandra field live in beijing. first, let's turn to paula hancocks from seoul. so what is the latest that you're hearing out of seoul? >> reporter: george, the defense minister, as you said, did say it appears as though the satellite went into orbit. he also said that it's not clear
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whether or not it is functioning as it could. he was briefing parliament earlier today. we also know from the defense ministry that they have, they think, found part of the rocket in the waters off of an island off the south coast of south korea. this is this afternoon the military picked it up, they've taken it for analysis, hoping that that will give it some kind of indication into what north korea's capability are. this isn't the first time that north korea has attemped one of these satellite launches. the question is just what does it gain from these satellite launches. august, 1998, mission failed. april, 2009, a provocative act, says the u.s. april, 2012, the rocket broke up one minute into flight. and december, 2012, four attempts by north korea to launch a satellite into space. only this one considered a success outside the country. north korean leader kim jong-un clearly delighted, claiming the
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satellite did reach orbit and is working. a space program north korea has pumped billions of dollars into over the years, but why? >> for weather forecasting, telecommunications broadcasting, science, agricultural mapping, all of those things. so there is a legitimate interest. however, there are also military application. >> reporter: the rocket technology used is pretty much the same whether you put a satellite on top or a nuclear warhead which is why most of the world is convinced this is simply a cover-up for a long-range ballistic missile test. these launches put militaries on alert. japan stations patriot missiles outside its defense ministry. navies rush to retrieve debris from the rocket to assess the north's capabilities. governments line up to condemn pyongyang passing new sanctions and reminding them of previous u.n. security council resolutions that bar them from developing ballistic missile technologies. showing cnn its satellite
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control center last year, north korea claims the missile tasty claims are wrong. "they are working hard to develop a satellite. the u.s. and western forces are stabbing our scientists in the heart with these claims." a satellite launch coming just weeks after a fourth nuclear test raises already heightened concerns. >> they need two pieces to their nuclear deterrent. they need the sort of weapon itself, and then they need the delivery system, a way to make people feel like we can hit you with this. >> reporter: with each satellite launch, north korea's scientists are learning a little more, whether or not the satellite launch is successful. that's clearly more important to kim jong-un than heeding international pressure at this point. george? >> paula hancocks live, thank you. now we'll turn to alexandra field live in beijing. this really flies in the face of includes efforts to bring
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stability to the region, to deescalate the situation after north korea tested an h bomb even though world powers including the u.s. have not quite confirmed that to be the case. >> reporter: and frankly, george, the timing of this is even a bit of an insult because this is the eve of the lunar new year in beijing, the most important holiday in china. despite that, official have put out a statement today in response. they're saying that they do believe that north korea should have the right to the "peaceful exploration of space." however, that is restricted according to u.n. sanctions. the statement goes on to say that china regrets that north korea would carry out this launch using ballistic missile technology. frankly, george, for now, those are the strongest words that the chinese have. provocation was pyongyang keep coming. first the h-bomb test, now a rocket launch viewed as a ballistic missile test. enough for a senior chinese official to make a recent trip to the tiny kingdom to call for
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restraint. when he returned to china, he seemed resigned. >> translator: i said all his to say and did all i had to do. i didn't know what the outcomes would be at present. >> reporter: the chinese have more leverage here than any other country, sharing nearly all of north korea's northern border. the largest trading partner and biggest international investor. the u.s. believes a tighter squeeze on the economy could force cooperation. >> with all due respect, more significant and impactful sanctions were put in place against iran which did not have a nuclear weapon than against north which does. >> reporter: its for part, china has backed u.n. sanctions targeting weapons, goods, and technology. normal trade with china continues largely unaffected. with the rescue risk -- with the risk of a collapse of a
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neighboring country in the balance, it says it took sanctions too far. >> translator: sanctions are not an end in themselves. the critical thing is to achieve a resolution of the issue. china will act in a responsible manner. in the meantime, we must point out that the new resolution should not provoke tensions that destabilize the korean peninsula. rather, push toward the goal which is negotiation. >> reporter: there are mounting signs of a cooling relationship between north korea and historically its biggest supporter. >> china is not in the positions to support one regime. >> reporter: after north korea's most recent nuclear test, china's president, pixi jinping spoke with president park and u.s. president barack obama. president xi has never met with kim jong-un in the four years since north korea's dictator came to power. so beyond china's expression of regret for north korea's launch,
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will that actually translate into any kind of action here? george, the statement goes on to say that china is calling for calm and restraint from all parties involved throughout the international community, and china is reiterating its stance here that they believe that the best path forward in terms of forcing some cooperation from north korea is through dialogue and negotiations. that is clearly a point that is directly addressed to the u.s. they are saying that pyongyang has continued with these provocations in order to get the attention of the u.s. china is advising that the u.s. needs to be in talks with north korea, that that would be more effective in their position than china going further with economic sanctions which are clearly a risk china perceives. george? >> indeed. alexandra field live from beijing. thank you very much. and reaction from around the world has been sharp. south korea's president park is pledging to protect her citizens saying the following, "we don't know when north korea is going to do another provocative action, so our government needs
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to come up with a plan to protect the safety of our people. from the u.s. and the secretary of state, john kerry saying, "the united states strongly condemns today's missile launch by the dprk. a flagrant violation of u.n. security council resolutions related to the dprk use of ballistic missile technology." and from russia, the foreign minister released this statement saying in part, "pyongyang didn't listen to the calls from the international community, once again demonstrating defiant disregard for international law." japan's prime minister, shinzo abe, calls the north korean rocket launch totally unacceptable and says he will do whatever is necessary to protect his country. >> translator: north korea has conducted a missile launch despite repeated urging by the government of japan as well as the international community to exercise self-restraint. this is totally unacceptable.
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today's missile launch, which follows a recent nuclear test is a clear violation of u.n. security council resolutions. we will resolutely take measures acting in cooperation with the international community. we intend to take all possible measures to ensure the safety and the peace of mind of the japanese people. >> the japanese prime minister shinzo abe saying it is totally unacceptable. and now france calling north korea's rocket launch a senseless provocation. and it is urging the u.n. security council to take swift and severe action when it meets in about six hours from now. john neilson wright heads the asia program at chatham house, a london-based think tank, and joins us live from paris. good to have you with us this hour. we appreciate your insight. look, whether the launch is for scientific purposes or a test for intercontinental ballistic missiles, it is no doubt showing other nations north korea's
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increasing power and ability to deliver that power, frankly. so what are your thoughts about what happened and how the world is responding and reacting to it? >> if the initial reports suggesting the north is able to test a rocket that is in fact longer than its last test, some are speculating it might reach as far as 13,000 kilometers, long enough to reach the united states, and possibly also carry a heavier payload than the last test that took place in december of 2012, it would be yet again further confirmation that the north koreans are developing their military capabilities in a way that is deeply worrying to the international community. precisely because what the north koreansme koreans, want is to apply a nuclear warhead on a long-range missile. i think that explains in part why the international community has responded so swiftly and will almost certainly be a convening of the u.n. security council in the next six hours or
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so. and there's a strong effort on the part of individual states and collectively between renewed sanctions on the north. the problem is, those sanctions don't seem to have much effect in dissuading north korea from engaging in these provocations. >> that is the question, whether more sanctions would really make a difference in this case. i'd like to also ask you, in your opinion, internally, in north korea, what do you believe the motivation is for this? is it to show the rest of the world its strength, or is it to demand some sort of concessions from other nations to somehow get more aid? what do you believe the reasoning is for these continued provocations? >> i think it's probably both of those reasons and perhaps a third. kim jong-un wants to present himself as a legitimate and strong leader of his country. he's been in power now for about four years but still is young. part of his strategy is to persuade his people that he can
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deliver two key thing -- economic prosperity for his country but also the sense that this is a strong, if you like, defiant nation able to resist foreign pressure. in addition to that, of course, he wants to try and persuade the united states to sit down and engage in negotiations without recognition to the foreign end to peace treaty with the united states. he wants the u.s. to accept de facto at that north is a nuclear power. something that, of course, washington can't do because it would effectively amount to recognizing this pattern of flagrant violation of the treaty and open a pandora's box of potential armed race. >> i'd like to ask you about the relationship between north korea and china. obviously this flies in the face of chinese efforts to de-escalate the situation there after the reported h-bomb testing that north korea conducted.
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you know, also trying to maintain stability. how does this affect relations between the two nations? >> it certainly doesn't help them. i think the chinese will continue to be irritated. but they're in a difficult position. they really don't want to embrace the tougher sanctions that i'm sure the americans and their allies will be calling for. from the chinese perspective, further pressure from the north that might destabilize the regime is both strategically not in china's interests, and they worry about the potential collapse of a regime, the outflow of perhaps tens of hundreds of thousands of refugees across the border and the opportunity for the united states to extend its strategic influence across the peninsula. the chinese will, therefore, as they have been recently call on the united states to actually sit down and have talks with the north koreans. that's precisely what the north koreans want, what washington wants to avoid particularly this year of all years, an election year whether american
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politicians would jump on any hint that the obama administration is developing anything other than a tough line against north korea. >> john neilson wright with geopolitics there, explaining your thoughts on this north korean rocket launch. we appreciate your time, again, with the chatham house london-based think tank. thank you very much. are you watching "cnn newsroom." still ahead, news of the north korean rocket launch came as the u.s. republican presidential candidates squared off in a debate in new hampshire. you will hear their reaction to the launch and other highlights of the debate. stay with us. i've smoked a lot and quit a lot, but ended up nowhere. now i use this. the nicoderm cq patch, with unique extended release technology, helps prevent the urge to smoke all day. i want this time to be my last time. that's why i choose nicoderm cq.
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welcome back. the race for the white house, it is just two days now until the new hampshire primary. very important event, and the latest cnn/wmur poll shows donald trump out ahead of his republican rivals in the state with an 11-point lead over marco rubio. on the democratic side, bernie sanders leads hillary clinton in a 2-1 margin. the republican candidates squared off in their final debate before tuesday's primary. the current front-runner in the race, donald trump, pitched his "make america great again" motto, saying he knows how to deal with china. listen. >> we're going to win with trump. we're going to win. we don't win anymore. our country doesn't win anymore.
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we're going to win with trump. people back down with trump. that's what i like, and that's what the country is going to like. >> mr. trump, thank you -- >> i deal with the chinese all of the time. i do tremendous -- largest bank in the world is in one of my buildings in manhattan. i we'll do them. they tell me, they have total, absolute control, practically, of north korea. >> meanwhile, chris christie fired away at marco rubio, criticizing his level of experience and knocking him for what he called a memorized speech. listen -- >> i like marco rubio. and he's a smart person and a good guy. but he simply does not have the experience to be president of the united states and make these decisions. we've watched it happen, everybody, for the last seven years. the people of new hampshire are smart, do not make the same mistake again. >> this country already has a debt problem. we don't need to add to it by electing someone who has experience at running up and destroying the credit rating of the state. let's dispel with the fiction that barack obama doesn't know what he's doing. he knows exactly what he's doing.
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>> chris, your state got hit by a massive snowstorm two weeks ago. you didn't want to go back. they had to shame you into going back. >> no. >> then you left after 36 hours and came back to campaign. those are the facts. the bottom line is that the fact that barack obama doesn't know what he's doing is not true -- >> there it is. the memorized 25-second speech. there it is, everybody. >> heated debate among the republicans. the presidential candidates are making their last stops across new hampshire, counting down until tuesday's critical vote. that state may be small, but there are a lot at stake as cnn's fredricka whitfield reports. when it comes to voting, anything goes. good-bye, everybody -- >> reporter: in the final push across the granite state, candidates are energizing big crowds and getting personal. >> thank you. >> reporter: new hampshire voters are tough, traditional setting the bar high, expecting facetime and demanding candidates understand what they need. >> i don't think they want to hear a different message. they want sincerity and consistency. but they do also expect these
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candidates who are running for the highest office in the land to understand their concerns locally, as well. >> reporter: do you think the candidates are put to a test in a different way here? >> absolutely. and really significantly. as president of the state chair association, i get to go all the state party events where oftentimes presidential candidates come. it's like madonna is showing up or lady gaga or some rock star. they're just so -- amazed that this person's in the same room with them. people are on average like, yeah, whatever. what is your position on nuclear disarmament, what is your position on health care. >> i'd love to have your vote -- >> reporter: the leaders of the state's democratic and republican parties agree on something else -- voters here don't tow the party line. this is a red state, though. >> purple state, fredricka. purple state. >> reporter: anything goes, is that your feeling? >> we have 43% of the electorate independents, plus those who are unregistered to vote can register that morning and vote.
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>> new hampshire is notoriously independent in their decisionmaking. and i say all the time whether they're a registered republican or democrat or an independent, they consider themselves to be independent. any candidate wanting to be chosen must first register at the state capitol. mr. house speaker, sean jasper. any presidential candidate has to begin right here at the state house. >> absolutely. >> reporter: before their name ends occupy up -- ends occupy a ballot for primary. >> only $1,000 to get on the ballot. >> reporter: what makes new hampshire unique in the presidential race? >> i think we're unique because we're a small state geographically. we have a great diversity of ideas and thoughts within our population. >> reporter: after filing here, candidates are steps away there another concorde tradition, the barley house. brian, this is your spot, the barley house. it's become a fixture on the campaign trail. >> yes, it has. we've pretty much had most of the candidates come in here. not everyone. >> reporter: restaurant owner
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brian shay says there's still plenty of time before the general election. you've got pictures of everyone who's been through here. especially within the past 15 years. >> yes. >> reporter: michelle bae bachm hillary clinton -- >> newt gingrich. and funny story, newt gingrich was in here, and a reporter asked, you know, are you seriously running for president? and he said, of course i am. i'm at the barley house. so that kind of confirmed it for us. it was kind of cool. >> reporter: many here agree it's pretty cool, rolling out the welcome mats for all the candidates and anyone else excited about the first primary state and race to the white house. >> when people say, oh, why new hampshire -- there's no laws. come on in -- there's no walls. come on in. we don't check i.d.s at a town hall meeting. you could be a democrat, republican, you could be from california, you can be from florida. >> reporter: every candidate maximizing every minute in the final hours to win new
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hampshire. fredricka whitfield, cnn, concord, new hampshire. >> so big stakes for the primary in new hampshire tuesday. here's the thing -- snow may be on the way, is on the way, for the u.s. northeast. so the question now, derek van dam, will that affect voter turnout? >> a good question. we saw a similar event in iowa about five or six days ago in play with the caucuses. now the primaries in new hampshire with the potential of snow looming on the horizon. >> they're used to cold weather. >> they're used to cold weather in that part of the world. but it's all about how much snow and how cold will it get, and will that impact voter turnout. here's a look at some of the graphics just to highlight this and time it out for you at home. we do have a storm system. a traditional low pressure that's going to move right along the new england coastline. that pink line that you see there is the freezing line. i've stopped this tuesday
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morning at about 6:00 a.m. as people start to wake up and go about their business, of course, tuesday throughout the course of the day as the primaries. notice the shading of blue on the back side of the system. it's north or above that purple line. that's indicating precipitation, and because it's below or above the purple line, that means it will be frozen precipitation, snowfall, and yes, some of our computer models depending on which computer model you actually believe this time around, gives us up to six, even eight inches of snowfall for new hampshire. you can see that into concord and the manchester region, the shading of blue. again, up to a half a foot. this is the north american model. it's not been the most trust worthy this year to say the least. the european has tended to do a little bit better in terms of forecasting heavy snow events. nonetheless, that is still picking up on another one to two inches of snowfall for the state of new hampshire. one thing we have for sure in the bag is a cold, cold blast of
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air that's going to impact the state. and many other states over the -- over the eastern and central portions of the united states. concord's forecast on tuesday, high of 30. and again, a bit of cloud cover, perhaps rain. george, i've got to show you this video. some vehicles got stuck on an ice that quickly melted at a festival. the winter fest in lake geneva, specific. it was also the u.s. snow-sculpting competition. people thought it was safe to actually park their cars on the lake. well -- >> not a good idea it seems. >> not the best idea, no. fortunately, no people inside of the cars. they're still trying to figure out how to get the vehicles out of the water. that is probably not how they planned to spend their saturday. >> i've been to lake geneva. it is cold there. >> it is. beautiful, as well. hopefully they can get the cars out of the water. >> derek, thank you very much. >> thanks. you are watching "cnn newsroom." still ahead, the next half hour i should say, there is international outrage after north korea launches a rocket.
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we'll show you what's behind that anger ahead. plus, taiwan in the aftermath of a powerful earthquake. families cling to hope that their loved ones may have survived as rescue efforts continue. we're live from atlanta and broadcasting around the globe this hour. you're watching cnn worldwide. incredible bladder protection from always discreet that lets you move like you mean it now comes with an incredible promise. the always discreet double your money back guarantee. always discreet is for bladder leaks and it's drier than poise. try it. we're so confident you'll love it, we'll give you double your money back if you don't. incredible bladder protection. double your money back guarantee. that's always discreet. dad, yoh no, i'll take you up to me off rthe front of the school. that's where your friends are. seriously, it's, it's really fine. you don't want to be seen with your dad? no, it's..no.. this about a boy? dad! stop, please.
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welcome back. to our viewers in the united states and around the world, you're watching "cnn newsroom." good to have you with us. i'm george howell. in headlines, north korea is claiming it successfully launched a satellite into orbit. the launch is widely believed, though, to be a cover for a long-range missile test. it comes just a month after
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north korea claimed to successfully test a hydrogen bomb. the world powers have not yet confirmed that to be the case. at least 20 people are dead after a 6.4-magnitude earthquake in taiwan. you're looking at live images near the epicenter of the quake. search crews are going through a collapsed apartment building there looking for more survivors. more than 70 people remain unaccounted for. with just two days until the new hampshire primary, the republican presidential candidate, marco rubio, was criticized by chris christie and jeb bush over his level of experience during a presidential debate on saturday. the latest polls show donald trump leading in that state among republicans. anti-migrant protests took place in several european countries on saturday from the united kingdom to the czech republic. clashes broke out at a demonstration in france where marchers defied a ban on
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rallies. police say that ten people were arrested there. you see that happening there. some were armed with blunt weapons and knives. south korea's defense minister has told parliament it does, in fact, appear that pyongyang has launched a satellite. and the u.s. military has confirmed that two objects including what they believe is a new satellite went to orbit shortly after north korea launched a rocket. the united states, south korea, and japan all say the launch, though, was a front for a long-range missile test. michael fern is the journalist in tokyo and joins us with the japanese perspective and reaction to what happened. good to have you with us again. look, we've heard from the prime minister there, shinzo abe. we heard earlier in the show where he called this totally unacceptable saying he will do whatever is necessary to protect the country. what more are you hearing about reaction there from japan? >> well, we also heard from the defense minister who called this
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a significant provocation against japan and a threat to the peace of the international community. he said that although north korea is calling this a satellite launch, it will further their ballistic missile program. he also said that there are some things that suggest that this rocket was not significantly different from one launched three years ago. he said the fact that it split into portions which fell apart from one piece in the same places as that launch in december, 2012, do suggest that the rocket was similar to the one launched in december, 2012. now we are getting information from a defense adviser. he says that north korea has been making progress in its nuclear program. he says that it will continue to do so. says it will improve -- he says
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tell improve accuracy and payloads, including eventually nuclear payloads. the previous one had a range according to the defense ministry of around 10,000 kilometers, which could take it to the mainland of the united states, but only if it had a small warhead fitted. there are doubts that north korea can do that yet. as grant newsome says, this could be something in the cards coming up soon. >> i also want to ask you about relations with other countries. countries that do have differences but are coming together from china to japan to japan to south korea from, you know, china to the united states. how does this bring the nations, or does it? >> well, it does because the perceived from north korea or the real threat from north korea will obviously make nations work harder together.
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we've seen a united front from south korea, the united states, and japan in pushing for an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council. in pushing for sanctions against north korea. also, grant newsome telling me that going forward, cooperation and information sharing between japan and the u.s. in terms of these kinds of threats will improve exponentially. so it really is forcing companies together. there is some differences, of course. china very concerned about the u.s./south korean plan to adopt a new anti-missile program that they see could also be used to spy on china. some countries feeling friction because of the nuclear test. >> michael fern live from tokyo. thank you very much for your reporting and insight there. now to taiwan where more than 70 people remain unaccounted for after a
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6.4-magnitude earthquake that struck early saturday. this is the moment that a 7-year-old boil was rescued from a massive pile of rubble. an apartment building completely collapsed on him and many others. at least 20 people have died. since the earthquake hit, families have been patientsly watching the rescue operation continue, clinging to home that their relatives will be rescued next. >> translator: we have two apartments on the sixth and eighth floor. that means they in the deeper parts of the debris. of course our rescue schedule will be slower than others. we can not it because it can't be fast. nothing can be achieved by rushing things. >> let's go to evelyn chen, a reporter with taiwan network s.e.t. tv, joining us from the epicenter. good to hear from you again.
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thank you. we've seen the images of the search continuing there. i want to ask you, are authorities still hopeful that they can get many people out of the rubble from these buildings? >> reporter: yes, the rescue efforts are still ongoing. there's a lot of hope that the rescuers have located three people here on the north side here. one can clearly respond to the rescuer and say her name. besides that, there are her husband and 2-year-old son. however her husband and 2-year-old son, they're not optimistic. the rescuer is trying to dig a bigger hole so that can get inside to get the family out. right now here we can see they are keeping -- keep throwing rocks out of the windows. and there are groups waiting
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here. now here there is another challenge because this building is still swaying slowly to the north side. they're afraid that it will fall apart again. people are asking why this building collapsed. we have found some empty oil cans inside the hold of the building. there's criticism about is this an unstable building. >> thank you. looking at the image, again, for viewers, you see how precariously -- how dangerous it is for people to get into the building and try to rescue survivors if they are in there. again, more than a day after this earthquake happened. weather, temperatures also an issue there. you're watching "cnn newsroom." ahead, thousands of desperate syrians streaming out of aleppo
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as government forces gain ground in northern syria. a live report from the border straight ahead. plus, football fans, they are preparing to watch the party, the big party, the super bowl. and we will break down just how staggeringly lucrative this game will be this year. stay with us. discover card. i missed a payment. aw, shoot. shoot! this is bad. no! we're good! this is your first time missing a payment. and you've got the discover it card, so we won't hike up your apr for paying late. that's great! it is great! (both simultaneously) thank you. at discover, we treat you like you'd treat you. get the it card with late payment forgiveness.
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thousands of desperate syrian people are streaming out of aleppo as fighting intensifies around the city. with russian air support, the syrian regime has been advancing on opposition-held areas around aleppo which was once that country's economic hub. the u.n. reports that more than 40,000 people have been displaced so far by the
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violence. for the latest, let's go to our senior international correspondent, war damon, live at the turkish -- correspondent arwa damon, live at the turkish border. there are disasters there. what are you seeing? >> reporter: from this vantage point, we're actually not seeing much. that despite the fact that authorities insist they have an open-door policy when it comes to syrians trying to flee the violence, this is herely not -- clearly not an open door. the border crossing remains closed with tens of thousands on the other side, some of them specifically on the other side of the crossing in and of itself. others scattered around the various differentville thajs are in close prominent -- different villages that are in closepproxiimtd to t-- close proximity to the border. they are providing tent and food, but it's not enough. there have been tents set up on
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the other side, but blankets have not been distributed. the tents do not provide any warmth and very little shelter from the elements. up until this morning, it had been raining pretty heavily. and there's very little whether it comes to food, water, and other basic necessities that one would need to survive in these circumstances. and these circumstances being when you are forced to make that impossible decision to flee your home because are you under constant bombardment, and therefore, fleeing with literally only what you can carry on your back now. this exit is being caused by, as you mentioned there, this intensified russian aerial bombardment that has allowed regime troops to make significant advances. what we're talking about at this junction is people predominantly fleeing from the aleppo countryside. the united nations is warning that when it comes to the city of aleppo itself, upwards of 300,000 people may potentially be in harm's way. >> arwa damon live at the turkey/syria border.
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thank you for your reporting there. as thousands of civilians flee aleppo, they join an exodus that stretches across the region and well into europe. their presence hasn't been welcome in many places. anti-migrant protesters vented their anger in cities across europe on saturday. from the czech republic to the u.k. these are images from a rally dresden, germany, planned by a far right group pushing for tougher immigration laws there. in france, people clashed with police, and several were arrested. they were protesting the migrant camp at the port city called the jungle which houses an estimated 6,000 people. cnn was at the protest in france, and we have this report. ♪ >> reporter: striking out for the marseilles, the protests for the migrants camped on the
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outskir outskirts. "they should go back to where they came from," this man says, "before we rip their heads off." [ chanting ] >> reporter: not much love for journalists here either. "you don't understand the problems we have here," this man shouts at the press corps. the police are out in large numbers, and they don't mess around. [ speaking in french ] >> reporter: the last warning, he says that the police will use force if the protesters don't go. that the meeting is banned. what they've been doing is moving in and arresting the key troublemakers who are presumably known to police. at this gathering, there seem to be more police than protesters. it doesn't take long to break this up. around 20 arrested of the 2 hundred or so who showed up. france has been in a state of emergency since the paris attacks last november. that gives police special powers which human rights groups have criticized for unfairly targeting immigrant communities.
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it's clear that heavy-handed policing isn't confined just to them. in a country where the authorities have had more than their share of problems this past year. the new residents kept their distance, down at the so-called jungle. the infamous shantytown near the entrance to the channel tunnel, they dream of crossing to the u.k. even as new container units go up to afford them better housing. their temporary home becoming each day more permanent. cnn, france. you're watching "cnn newsroom." still ahead, the super bowl will be played today. we will take you behind the scenes for a look at the unprecedented security measures that are being taken around the stadium. i think it landed last tuesday. one second it's there. then, woosh, it's gone. i swear i saw it swallow seven people. seven. i just wish one of those people could have been mrs. johnson.
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the threat of the zika virus is not scaring partygoers from one of the biggest parties on the planet, despite brazil being ground zero for the sdee-- for disease. more what is being done to keep carnival safe. >> reporter: carnival is in swing. at the black parties, hundreds across the city.
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also the official parades. officials are trying to get out the word about the zika virus and the mosquito that spreads it. take a look at the t-shirt, coming out on the street, trying to get people to sing songs involved in zeke arch the problem, is not a -- zika. the problem is, not a lot of people are listening, even with the news that scientists here have detected the zika virus in "saturday night live" amp people say the kissing karen -- in people say it is transmitted by saliva. >> we still don't have proof. >> we're killing mosquitos, we're killing zeke a. >> translator: i'm a milk and not worried. some people are. >> reporter: that doesn't mean that officials aren't taking steps to try and minimize contact with the mosquitoes, fumigating, going house to house to eliminate the pools of standing water. they want to make sure that six
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months before the olympics -- [ cheers ] [ inaudible ] >> reporter: carnivale is remembered only for the fun and not for spreading the zika virus. shasta darlington, cnn, rio de janeiro. >> shasta darlington in the middle of it all in rio. here in the united states, there is another party about to get underway. this sunday, it is all about super bowl 50. the carolina panthers face the denver broncos at levi stadium outside of san francisco. there are millions and billions of dollars tied up to this massive game. 114 million. that is how many people in the united states watched the game on tv last year making it the most-watched-telecast of all time. $5 million is the cost of a 30-second tv commercial for this year's game. also a record. 4.2 billion is the money expected to be bet on this game. most of it illegally according to the american gambling
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association. a bonus of $102,000 will be played to the players of the winning team, and losers walk away not too bad either, $51,000 each. nearly $5,000 is the average cost of a ticket to see the super bowl 50 in person, making it the most expensive sporting event in u.s. history. security officials are concerned the super bowl could also attract some negative attention. our dan simon has more on the unprecedented security measures taken around the stadium. >> reporter: while most everyone will watch the game on their big screen at home, the screen in this room will be tuned to a different channel. this is one of the key command centers for the super bowl where law enforcement watches live monitors near the stadium and monitors airspace. all part of unprecedented secured to keep fans safe. >> thank you very much for giving us the ride. >> we were happy to do it. these are the best air crews in the country. >> reporter: we took a ride
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aboard a black hawk helicopter with the head of the u.s. customs and border patrol, commissioner gill kerlikowsky. tasked with keeping close eyes on the skies above the stadium. these helicopters are equipped with cameras that can see the faces below. one of many technologies deployed to keep fans safe. with the recent attacks in paris and san bernardino, law enforcement is on an even heightened alert for an attack on a big, high-profile target. some 60 federal, state, and local agencies are involved in protecting the bay area. one would think that would be a strong deterrent. we think that participating in an event where we're public about the amount of effort, planning, and assets should serve as a deterrent. we really want somebody, if they were planning to do something, to really think very hard about it. >> reporter: agents are also
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tasked with screening every cargo truck that end terse the stadium. these are x-rays on wheels that look for explosives. we could easily see that the large truck had stage equipment. we can't actually show what's on the screen for security purposes, but you can get a good sense as to what's in those vehicles. back in the black hawk, these choppers will be airborne during the entire game along with the air force f-15s just in case someone violates the airspace. >> customs and border protection has been involved in the last 15 super bowls in our air and marine operations involved in the last ten. the day after the super bowl, they'll start planning for the next one in houston. >> reporter: houston is the home of super bowl 51. there's no off season for law enforcement. dan simon, cnn, santa clara, california. >> thank you for joining us. i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. the news continuesa after the break.
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