Skip to main content

tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  February 14, 2016 1:00am-3:01am PST

1:00 am
♪ one of the longest serving u.s. supreme court justices dies. tributes for antonin scalia power in from across the u.s. political spectrum. scalia's death sets the stage for an especially fiery republican presidential debate in south carolina. we will bring you the highlights and the low lights to that debate. and if all of the political squabbling is getting down, we promise to give you that warm and fuzzy valentine's day feeling. by the end of this hour, you'll want to stay with us. from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, welcome. to our viewers in the united states and around the world, i'm george howell. "cnn newsroom" starts right now.
1:01 am
good day to you. antonin scalia, the u.s. supreme court justice known for his strict reading of the u.s. constitution, has died. he is one of the longest serving justices. for almost 30 years, scalia actively opposed abortion, same-sex marriage, and what he deemed overly broad interpretations of the constitution. he was also known for his inc e incisive and sometimes controversial writings. he was also known for his warm relationship with others on the court, especially with liberal justice ruth bader ginsburg. scalia died while on holiday in texas. he was 79 years old. outside the u.s. supreme court, the american flag was lowered to half staff late saturday. u.s. president barack obama offered his condolences. he praised scalia's commitment to the job and his years of service. >> just scalia dedicated his
1:02 am
life -- justice scalia dedicated his life to the cornerstone of democracy, the rule of law. tonight we honor his extraordinary service to our nation and remember one of the towering legal figures of our time. >> now fair to say a partisan fight may be brewing over the vacancy that scalia has left behind. it is up to the president to nominate a replacement, and then it is up to the senate to approve or reject that nominee. and one top republican senator hinted that that won't come smoothly. senator chuck grassley said the fact of the matter is that it has been standard practice over the last 80 years to not confirm supreme court nominees during a presidential election year. just a short time ago, my colleague, natalie allen, spoke with criminal defense attorney page pate, who has experience with the supreme court and justice scalia. >> you've had a case go before the supreme court, but you won it without having to argue before the justices. >> that's right. it doesn't happen often.
1:03 am
but there were a bunch of cases that were going up to the supreme court right after justice scalia issued the court's opinion in the booker case which changed the way that federal courts sentenced defendants. so it was a scalia case that got my case up there and sent it back, and we won. >> what do you think -- what are the main things you think about when you think of the court that was antonin scalia for so long? >> scalia clearly anchored the conservative wing of the court for a long time. ever since he was appointed in the mid '80s. while the court used to be conservative as far as oral arguments, scalia changed all that. he made the bench hot. the justices would start questioning people that came before it. litigants would go in there. if you weren't 100% prepared, scalia would know and would tweak you as much as he could to try to get at the logic of your argument. the way he wrote opinions, very different from other justices. not only did he have great legal insight and reasoning ability, he made it interesting to read.
1:04 am
he would bring in literature, he would bring in the bible. he would bring in humor. so his opinions, while sometimes caustic to the other side, were always fun to read. >> i was hearing that he would quote great literature and "sesame street." >> absolutely. both sides, that was him. >> he had a big personality, and it came through, his opinions. if he wrote a dissenting opinion, he didn't hold back. >> not at all. i think recently in the opinions in the last few years, he's even been a little bit more bietding, he was -- biting, he was. especially in cases dealing with same-sex marriage. he totally disagreed with the majority decision in that case. and you could tell from his dissent he did not hold back. >> let's talk about issues that are perfect the court right now. some very aheheady issues inclug a gun issue, and he's very pro-gun, and he was the fifth vote. it's going to be interesting how they deal with the issue without his presence. >> right. this supreme court is evenly
1:05 am
split now. it was really 5-4 on a lot of pivot pit pivotal issues, same-sex marriage, gay rights, immigration. the court was conservative 5-4. now with scalia gone, it appoint who appoint -- it depends who appoint the next justice. it could go conservative or more liberal and moderate. this is not just an important justice. it's an important seat. >> final question -- do you expect that president obama has said he will go ahead and name someone? do you expect that congress will go ahead and consider that? we're in an interesting time right now with the election. >> i cannot imagine that the senate will go ahead and pass on the nominee. the president will make a nomination, that's what he said tonight. constitutionally, he certainly has the right to do that. the way the constitution reads, the senate should give it person an up-or-down vote. i don't see how it's going to happen politics being the way they are. >> that was a big topic at the
1:06 am
u.s. republican presidential debate in greenville, south carolina. candidates, though, they did pay tribute to justice scalia saturday night. they observed a moment of silence in his honor on stage, and then the gloves came off. marco rubio said president obama, since he's in the final term of his office, should not appoint anyone to succeed scalia. and rival donald trump agreed, urging the u.s. senate to "delay, delay, delay "confirmation of nine mr. obama might nominate. the candidates were in agreement about scalia. they were sharply clashing on almost everything else. ted cruz was branded a liar, i should say, by marco rubio and donald trump. cruz fired back calling rubio weak on immigration and charging trump would nominate liberal judges. sarah murray has our debate roundup from greenville, south carolina. >> reporter: it was the nastiest republican debate so far. jeb bush sparred with donald trump, and at times seemed to
1:07 am
get under his skin. meanwhile, marco rubio went to war with ted cruz over immigration, and ted cruz final finally brought the attacks to the debate stage, questioning donald trump's conservative credentials. perhaps the moment that will be played over and over again leading up to south carolina when was donald trump said george w. bush lied about weapons of mass destruction, taking aim not just at w and the jeb but basically the entire bush family. i asked him later on after the debate whether it might hurt him in a state like south carolina which is very pro-military and has deep affection for the bushes. >> were there weapons of mass destruction? you know better than i do. the answer is no. when jeb said his brother protected us, the world came down during his brother's reign. are people forgetting that? >> reporter: there's a lot of affection for the bushes in south carolina. >> i like the bushes also. i think it's fine. i think they're fine. but he can't lie about his brother's record. >> reporter: they say the politics gets a little bit
1:08 am
sharper when you get to south carolina and when the field starts to get smaller. we certainly saw that tonight, forecasting a very tough week ahead before the south carolina primary. back to you. it was a fiery debate, and the stakes could not have been higher in the debate. the south carolina republican primary is less than a week away. earlier, cnn's erin burnett asks a panel of experts who they thought were the winners and the losers on stage in greenville. >> i think it was jeb bush's best debate. he was combative. he participated more than i've seen him in the past. and i think -- and i'm always wrong about donald trump, but i think this was also the debate in which we saw donald trump participate the moest. but i think accusing the bushes of living about weapons of mass destruction may have crossed the line in pro-military south carolina. >> this was more demolition derby than debate.
1:09 am
this was a raucous scream fest. i think there were bad moments for every candidate. you know, ted cruz has decided from the beginning that he wants to be the most conservative candidate running. i think that's what he was tonight. and that's what he wants to be. >> i thought rubio's rehabilitation strategy pretty much worked tonight. he didn't have any major gaffes. at times, he looked a little robotic. at least he wasn't repeating himself over and over again. he got in a good talking point around poverty. that's the candidate he wanted to be originally talking about poverty. i think in ways george bush was a winner and a loser -- >> george? >> george bush. you know, some people wanted to hug him. jeb did, marco rubio did, too. kasich did, as well. and then you've got lump it dumping over him. >> it will be an important vote. south carolina republicans will have their say on february 20th when their primary takes place.
1:10 am
switching to weather, some cold air is plunging across the great lakes in the northern part of the u.s., and it's produced heavy snow for some. also some dramatic water spouts. a possibility of that. derek van dam will talk about it. >> it's because the great lakes don't have the ice coverage we typically see this time of year. we can thank el nino for that. >> el nino is doing all kinds of things. >> our good friend. we've got lots to talk about, george. i'll show you this and great surfing footage coming in a second. first, let's explain to our viewers at home exactly what we've been experiencing. we've had some areas downwind of lake erie and lake ontario picking up two feet of snow within the past few days. this is what we're used to this time of year, lake-enhanced snowfall that occurs when we have that extremely cold, arctic air that rushes over the relatively warm lake waters of the great lakes. we're talking about water temperatures right now between 32 and 38 degrees fahrenheit which is warm for this time of
1:11 am
year. this creates a huge temperature contrast between the atmosphere and the lake water. we have the very unstable air mass that takes place. we get our lake-effect snow. sometimes when the conditions are just right, we get a bit of a spin in the atmosphere when we get that interaction with the water and the land, as well as the rushing air over this region. we get water spouts. that was the threat through the course of the weekend. and it could potentially exist into this morning across the downwind areas of lake ontario and erie. i'm not too concerned. what's more astonishing is the fact that our great lakes ice coverage has really decreased this particular season compared to the past two winter seasons. look at 2014. we had over 88% ice coverage. 2015, 60% to this particular date. now, february 14th, valentine's day of 2016, we only have a 12% ice coverage across the great lakes. you ask why is this significant? think about it -- if we don't
1:12 am
have ice, we continue to see the lake-enhanced snowfall downwind of lake michigan, lake ontario, lake erie and to lake superior, as well. this is a significant weather pattern changer for the upper great lakes. and it's all because of this cold arctic air that we've been experiencing over the eastern half of the u.s. we are going to set records this morning. we have windchill warnings and advisories for all the major cities along the east coast including new york and boston. possibly 18 record lows when people start waking up this morning. now i'm going to end with this. i want to show dramatic footage coming out of half moon bay south of san francisco. i'm a surfer, i love seeing videos. george, this is called the titans of mavericks. this wave has been described like niagara falls meeting mt. everest. that's how dramatic that was. and this was an invitation event only when the surf was just right. 20 surfers faced 18-foot waves
1:13 am
in this heart stomping competition. great aerials, and yeah, it was really just a great sight to see. >> i know you'd love to be right there. >> that would. that seems a bit scary, though, i must admit. >> thank you very much. >> thanks. you're watching "cnn newsroom." still ahead, very strong language at the normally diplomatic security conference in munich, germany, on saturday, including warnings and stern responses between russia and the west. plus, the pope wants mexican bishops to step up their fight against the drug trade. details ahead.
1:14 am
1:15 am
1:16 am
1:17 am
pressure is mounting on russia to be more knoefel who it targets in syria. on sudden, u.s. -- on saturday, u.s. secretary of state john kerry told a munich security conference session that many of russia's attacks have been against legitimate opposition groups and not isis. russia has denied bombing any civilians. the tension, however, is very clear. russia's prime minister even said saturday that russia's current relationship with the west is similar to the cold war.
1:18 am
>> translator: nature's policy with regard to russia remain friendly and opaque. one could say we've slid back to a new cold war. almost an every day basis we're called one of the most threats to nato as a whole or to europe or to the united states. >> cnn international diplomatic editor nic robertson joins us live from munich. good to have you this hour. what has been the response from nato given the icy perception stated by russia's prime minister? >> reporter: yeah, pushback from nato. i sat down with general phillip breedlove, the u.s. four-star general in command of nato military forces supreme allied commander of europe. that's his title. he told me that he sees russia and nato's perception of russia right now as a country that's not just trying to rewrite the sort of international rule book, it's trying to create a new set
1:19 am
of rules. she'd, look, russia is the one -- he said, look, russia is the one, the russian forces, that crossed the international border into ukraine. russia annexed crimea. nato sees and observes increasingly dense-growing clusters of russian military, sophisticated military air, land, and sea defense systems from the north to the south essentially of the russia/russian interests, nato, nato countries. from the north to the north of syria, one of these missile systems is being install thursday. russian missile system is being installed there. it denies area access to land forces, to potential attack by air, to the sea, as well. so from his perspective, he says that nato doesn't feel like it's in a cold war with russia. russia's open to its own interpretation. this is what he told me. >> isn't this by definition the
1:20 am
cold war arms build-up? >> well, they are entitled to their understanding of this. and their description of this. we in nato do not want to see a cold war. we do not talk about it. it is not what we want to have happen or anticipate happening. we're a defensive alliance who are arraying ourselves to face a challenge. and we see that challenge as a nation that has again decided that tell use force to change jirnly recognized borders. we take those appropriate actions to be able to assure, defend, and deter. >> russia's ambassador to the united states has weighed in on this debate, as well. he says the relationship between the united states and russia is probably at one of its lows, deepest lows since the cold war. he says that russia perceives the united states as trying to isolate it. remember, this is a very important weak for u.s./russian
1:21 am
relations because sergei laugh rohr, foreign minister, u.s. secretary of state john kerry agreed two days ago that in a week, five days from now, there would be a cessation of hostilities inside syria. and the day, that they, the united states and russia, would lead the partners in this to determine the modalities of how the cessation should happen. this is -- this hugely important step for the peace process in syria if it can be is at the whims, if you will, or caught in clearly now a public at is - deterioration in the relationship between the two countries. george? >> tensions and the relationship at a low, as you mentioned, between the west and russia. nick, so security also came up during the republican presidenti presidential debate. we heard marco rubio size up security threats. let's listen to that and talk about it on the other side. >> i think there are three major
1:22 am
threats you want to get on top of. one is, what are we doing in the asia-pacific region where north korea and china pose threats to the national security of the united states? number two is what are we doing in the middle east with the combination of the sunni/shia conflict driven by the arc that iran is trying to establish in the middle east and the growing threat of isis? the third is rebuilding and reinvigorating nato in the european theater, particularly in central and eastern europe where vladimir putin is threatening the territory of multiple conditions, already controls 20% of georgia, and a significant percentage of ukraine. >> you heard it there, reinvigorating nato. something that russia does not want to see . is there a sense at the security conference that the relationship could go one way or the other depending upon what happens in a year? >> there's a recognition that in an election year that the u.s.' hands are tied, although the
1:23 am
iran nuclear talks would speak about that despite the republicans saying they would tear up the deal. iran was convinced to go ahead and make a deal and is following through. you know, for some of nato's eastern -- eastern members, those closest to russia, and the united states and nato's allies, if you will, in the arab/sunni world in the middle east, some of what are you talking about will be music to their ears, this talk about a shia arc really reflects a sunni feeling that there's a she aas they call it, crescent of influence that -- a shia influence, as they call it, crescents of influence stretching from iran, iraq, to hezbollah in lebanon. that will be music to some sunni allies' ears. and the thought there could be stronger defenses in the countries in the east of europe that feel most threatened by russia's actions in ukraine.
1:24 am
that would certainly be something that some of those countries would welcome. in the balance, i don't think anyone expects things to change in this next year. >> nic robertson live. thank you for reporting. we move to the pope's visit in mexico. pope francis saying it is a great country, but one with a history of difficult moments. on his first visit to the nation as pope, francis urged the president to fight against corruption and drug-related violence. he also called on the clergy to be more proactive again the drug trade there. thousands gathersed in mexico city to greet the pope. shasta darlington with more on the view from mexico city. >> reporter: the crowds just keep growing. more and more people turning out. in fact, about a million expected to line the routes hoping that poep will pass by in his pope mobile. some are excited, many anxious, many holding placards like this,
1:25 am
"i love plaquito," his name in mexico. [ chanting ] >> reporter: brother francis, you're already mexican, some great chants here. from pope francis himself, we heard a lot of tough words. in the national palace talking to the president, he warned again the danger of drug trafficking, inequality, and of course corruption in mexico. then at the cathedral, he spoke to the bishops about their role in the drug war. take listen. >> translator: i urge you not to underestimate the moral and anti-social challenge which the drug trade represents for mexican society as a whole, including the church. >> reporter: the day ended at the basilica of the virgin of guadalupe, the most revered shrine in mexico and much of the
1:26 am
americana. pope francis celebrated his first mass in mexico in front of over 30,000 people using a torch it light a flame of mercy. during the homily, he talked about the down trodden, those who don't feel wanted, and of young people without a future. shasta darlington, cnn, mexico city. on sunday, pope francis visits a notoriously poor area just north of mexico city. it's an area known for the highest number of women killed there. stay tuned for live coverage from that and the rest of his visit. find it here on cnn.
1:27 am
1:28 am
1:29 am
1:30 am
1:31 am
1:32 am
mccarthy with whom he later married and had nine children. his e
1:33 am
his exuberance attracted the attention of a republican, and ronald reagan ultimately named the federal judge to the high court in 1986. there he developed a reputation as a reliable conservative. his style helped rectify the republican faith of the high court. >> some of the justices who had been on the court for a while, well, if the new guy gets to ask all these questions, i'm going to step up and ask questions, too. >> reporter: on abortion, the death penalty, affirmative action, homosexual rights, scalia clashed early and often with more moderate or less leaning bench mates. >> if he was trying to get anybody sign an opinion, it was harder when he would use more combative language. but you know, as much as they would say, you know, i'd like to strangle nino, he was still there in many ways. >> reporter: and that helped him hone a creative, sometimes cruel
1:34 am
streak in his writing. he once referred to the junior congress, quoted cole porter, shakespeare, and "sesame street" songs. off the bench came admiration for young conservatives who wrote books and created websites and tributes. controversy, too. a hunting trip with vice president cheney at the same time the port was considering a lawsuit against number two over access to privileged documents. a sicilian gesture some interpreted as obscene and captured by a boston national airport. he called it dismissive in nature. justice scalia, a man both respected and dismissed, feared and celebrated. >> remembered in many ways. certainly as this larger than life figure, larger than bench figure, someone who embraced both the law and a life beyond the court. >> reporter: a judge who combined street smarts with a well-calculated conservative view of the law and its limits on society. >> i'm not driven. i ain't sure what i'm doing.
1:35 am
as soon as i no longer enjoy it, i am out of there. >> reporter: joe johns, cnn, washington. at the presidential debate in greenville, south carolina, republican rivals also commented on the death of antonin scalia. while they agreed that president obama should not nominate a successor to scalia, they didn't agree on much else. in fact, much of the debate was contentious and combative and at times real verbal brawls. here's a look at some of the moments that stood out from the debate. >> the next president needs to appoint someone with a proven conservative record, similar to justice scalia. >> i think it's up to mitch mcconnell and everyone else to stop it. it's called delay, delay, delay. >> we have 80 years of precedent of not confirming supreme court justices in an election year. >> it's not even two minutes after the death of judge scalia, i just wish we hadn't run so fast into politics. >> obviously the war in iraq was a fat mistake. took him five days, he went
1:36 am
back. it was wasn't a mistake. wasn't a mistake. took five days before his people told him what to say. george bush made a mistake. we can make mistakes, but that was a beauty. >> i am sick and tired of him going after my family. >> the world trade center came down -- >> he had the gall to go after my mother. >> this is just crazy. this is just nuts, okay. [ applause ] >> geez, oh man. >> thank you for including me in the debate. two questions already. this was great. >> marco has a long record when it comes to am northwesty in the state of florida, as speaker of the house. >> i don't know what he -- i don't know how he knows what i said on univision. he doesn't speak spanish. [ speaking spanish ] >> i feel like i have to get into my inner chris christie chris christie. >> you shouldn't be floibl coex core principles. >> i like donald. as an entertainer. right now as a candidate, he
1:37 am
supports federal taxpayer funding for planned parenthood. i disagree with him. that's a matter of -- >> you are a liar. you probably are worse than jeb bush. are you the single biggest liar. >> donald has this weird pattern. when you point to his record, he screams liar, liar, liar, if you -- >> where did i support it? ted, where did i support it? >> if you want to go with donald trump as president, he will appoint liberals. if donald trump is president, your second amendment will -- >> let me tell you -- >> these attacks, some are personal. i think we're fixing to lose the election to hillary clinton if we don't stop this. [ applause ] >> all right. while republicans locked horns in greenville, the comedy sketch show "saturday night live" turns its attention to the increasingly close contest on the democratic side of the race. listen. >> i like hillary clinton's foreign policy experience, but i like bernie's vibe. >> i'm obsessed with his vibe. ♪
1:38 am
♪ you can't make your heart feel something it wasn't ♪ >> bernie is change -- ♪ here in the dark ♪ in these final hours ♪ i will lay down my heart and i'll feel the power ♪ ♪ but you won't >> i like whether bernie yells -- ♪ no you won't >> but not when hillary does. ♪ because i can't make you love me if you don't ♪ >> did anybody else just get so cold for a minute? >> both bernie sanders and hillary clinton have made appearances on "snl" this campaign season. and as we've been talking about, the next big event for the presidential candidates is south carolina's primary. a few days away. republicans vote in their primary february 20th, and democrats a week later.
1:39 am
u.s. presidential candidate donald trump is anything but stylin', even on matters involving the pope. now trump is weighing in on the papal visit to mexico. ahead, what he's saying about the head of the roman catholic church. plus, for this valentine's day, a love story that is 70 years in the making. a beloved lost and found -- a love lost and found with the help of the internet. stay with us. in the right direction, it can be a burden. but what if you could wake up to lower blood sugar? imagine loving your numbers. discover once-daily invokana®. with over 6 million prescriptions and counting, it's the #1 prescribed sglt2 inhibitor that works to lower a1c. invokana® is used along with diet and exercise to significantly lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. it's a once-daily pill that works around the clock. here's how: invokana® reduces the amount of sugar allowed back in
1:40 am
to the body through the kidneys and sends some sugar out through the process of urination. and while it's not for weight loss, it may help you lose weight. invokana® can cause important side effects, including dehydration, which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up. other side effects may include kidney problems, genital yeast infections, urinary tract infections, changes in urination, high potassium in the blood, increases in cholesterol, or risk of bone fracture. do not take invokana® if you have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. stop taking and call your doctor right away if you experience symptoms such as rash, swelling, or difficulty breathing or swallowing. tell your doctor about any medical conditions, medications you are taking, and if you have kidney or liver problems. using invokana® with a sulfonylurea or insulin may increase risk of low blood sugar. imagine life with a lower a1c.
1:41 am
are you loving your numbers? there's only one invokana®. ask your doctor about it by name.
1:42 am
by now it should come as no surprise that the outspoken presidential candidate donald trump does not mince words, even when it comes to the pope. he's speaking out about the papal visit to mexico calling the message too political. we learn the criticism may work toward trump's advantage with some voters. >> reporter: donald trump is at it began, staking out a position
1:43 am
that on the face of it doesn't seem to make sense but may actually work in his favor. this time, it is trump versus the pope. pope francis donning a sombrero, mexico-bound, and stirring controversy in the u.s. presidential race. >> the pope is a very political person. i think he doesn't understand the problems our country has. we're going to run the -- >> reporter: that's the brash billionaire-turned-presidential hopeful from a box interview taking on the pope, or as catholics believe, god's representative on earth. >> i don't think he understands the danger of the open border that we have with mexico. >> reporter: the pope, who has staked out traditionally liberal views on everything from climate change to capitalism to the poor, is headed to the northern city of juarez where he will hold a prayer service with immigrants in the shadow of the fence separating mexico and the u.s. if elected, trump promises to
1:44 am
transform the fence into a wall. >> i think mexico got him to do it because mexico wants to keep the border just the way it is because they're making a fortune, and we're losing. >> reporter: it's not the first time the pot-stirring candidate has called the pope out. >> i have great respect for the pope. i like the pope. i actually like him. he's becoming very political, no question about it, but i like him. >> reporter: oh what a difference a political campaign makes. following francis' election, trump devoted, "the new pope is a humble man. very much laike me, which probably explains why i like him so much. " what gives? with all the papal poo-pooing -- >> expandsering, no question about that. in term of positioning himself with that evangelical base. >> reporter: a south carolina republican consultant and long-time adviser to gop candidates says trump may be crazy like a fox donald trump
1:45 am
taking on the pope get him attention and gets him on the radar in south carolina? >> it's a way to have some connection with the evangelical vote that cruz is expected to do well in. [ cheers ] >> reporter: trump has consistently bested cruz by deliberates in south carolina polls. but it -- double digits in south carolina polls. but it families after victory in iowa and new hampshire, he prefers to win, leaving no political stone unturned. many say there are few dplo-- f catholics in south carolina, but it may leave voters unphased. for now, a high-stakes gamble that the entertainer and businessman is making, hoping it garners him more attention and votes in the south carolina primary. miguel marquez, cnn, new york. you're watching "cnn newsroom." ahead, meets a family that's helped bring characters to life on the big screen for seven generations now. and you may recognize some of the costumes.
1:46 am
sfx: cell phone chimes start with a positive attitude... and positively radiant skin. aveeno® positively radiant moisturizer... with active naturals® soy. aveeno® naturally beautiful results®.
1:47 am
1:48 am
1:49 am
welcome back to "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell.
1:50 am
american and british actors are getting ready to shine in london for britain's film awards. sunday evening, this year's baftas will be hosted at the opera house. cnn will take you there for the event. stay with us for it. now a story about a family of taylors who have been helping to create movie magic for seven generations now. the angel family, one of the biggest providers of costumes to the film industry. from the recent oscar nominees in "the bridge of spies" to classics like "star wars," you've line seen their magic at work. cnn takes you through the family's breathtaking london warehouse. >> reporter: the warehouse of angel costumers. >> we believe in make-believe. >> reporter: this is part of the 8.5 miles of clothing they have stored here. housinging the imaginations of some of most famous directors, writers, and designers in the
1:51 am
world. >> this is one of my favorite films. it's got a label here, i think, that will probably say clint eastwood. >> we've got company. >> reporter: for seven generations, tim angel's family has been making costumes worn by some of the most beloved characters on the stage and screen. >> "fiddler on the roof" which we did and "the king and i" which we did. "star wars" was one. we worked on "game of throne." "the danish girl." >> the only person to make history -- >> reporter: they play host to a multitude of worlds, including mars. >> i loved "the martian." when they were doing that, the costuming would come here to get inspiration for what they do. >> reporter: "shakespeare in love." >> yeah. >> i insist. >> reporter: just feeling the detail is extraordinary. >> this was my week with marilyn. >> it is my special pleasure to
1:52 am
introduce a woman who clearly needs no introduction. she had a false bottom. >> reporter: a false bottom? >> yeah. because marilyn monroe had a very narrow waist and big hips, i presume. >> reporter: yes. it adds up to an awful lot of work. but even the simplest concepts still need an intricate attention to detail. one of the films they worked on recently was "lady in the van." >> this is maggie smith from "lady in the van." it all looked believable. and my mother-in-law sewed it. >> reporter: even with a meticulous organizing system, things still go missing. including one of the most iconic costumes of all time. obi-wan kenobi's robe turned up one day. >> it was a monk's robe that had been hired out. >> reporter: someone
1:53 am
inadvertently hired the original obi-wan kenobi -- >> not just one person. i think loads of people. >> reporter: angel says they never know whether the film they're working on will be successful. but often it's enough just to know they've played their part in making movie magic. >> we're working in a make-believe world. we're working with people that are larger than life, and it's great. you know, you still get starstruck. ♪ >> reporter: cnn, london. still, it is valentine's day in many parts of the world. we have a story now about a couple who met in the 1940s, but they parted ways for 70 years after a big misunderstanding. now they are reunited and inspiring others to never give up on finding true love again. ivan watson tells us how their children and some total strangers helped out. >> reporter: norwood thomas never stopped thinking about
1:54 am
joyce morris. the pair first met in 1944. she, a 17-year-old british girl living in london. he, a 21-year-old paratrooper for the u.s. forces. young love blossomed. >> we kissed their roman was interrupted when thomas was deployed to fight in world war ii. after the war, he returned to the u.s. and invited morris to join him. she misunderstood his letter and thought he was already married. she refused his invitation, and they went their separate ways. they married other people. thomas eventually became a widower. morris got divorced. last year, one of her sons found thomas on line, and they reconnected on skype after more than 70 years. >> i say good morning to you every morning. >> i will say good morning --
1:55 am
>> i won't be missing you. [ laughter ] >> and i will say good morning back to you. you broke my heart. >> i don't believe that for a moment. >> what would you do if i could give you a squeeze? >> oh, it would be lovely. >> reporter: a crowdfunding campaign raised enough money to make that actually happen. this week, thomas made the journey from virginia to adelaid. >> you're still vertical. >> give you that squeeze. >> reporter: a couple that first met just before d-day, reuniting seven decades later just in time for "v" or valentine's day. >> you're the most wonderful thing that could have happened to me. >> reporter: ivan watson, cnn. >> that is a great story. ivan, thank you very much for that. and before we close this hour, i want to challenge you not to find love in your heart
1:56 am
when you see these images. volunteers from the american heart association wrapped newborn babies at the washington hospital in a special red and pink outfit, you see it there, just in time for valentine's day. i have to say, it does not get more lovable than that. we thank you for being with us this hour. i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. i'll be back after the break with another hour of news from around the world. you're watching cnn, the world's news leader.
1:57 am
1:58 am
1:59 am
2:00 am
one of the longest serving u.s. supreme court justices dies. the political wrangling over who should secede him starts immediately. under a week until the next presidential primary. the republican contenders have heated words for each other on the debate stage. and residents of a southern california neighborhood yearn for an opportunity to return home months after a gas leak forced them out. from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, welcome, to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell. "cnn newsroom" starts right now. the u.s. supreme court has lost one of its most
2:01 am
conservative voices. for almost 30 years now, antonin scalia made a name for himself on the high court with his biting whit and penetrating questions. outside the supreme court, the american flag was lowered to half staff late saturday. meanwhile, in a debate on saturday night, the republican presidential candidates hinted at the fight ahead. it will be between president obama, who will nominate a successor, and the senate, who will hear or reject that nominee. >> i do not believe the president should appoint someone. it's not unprecedented. it's been over 80 years since a lame duck president has appointed a supreme court justice. it reminds us of this -- how important the election is. that someone on the stage will get to choose the balance of the supreme court, and it will begin by fill being the vacancy that there's now.
2:02 am
we need people on the bench that understand the constitution is not living and breathing document, it is to be interpreted as originally meant. >> the next president needs to appoint someone with a proven conservative record, someone as justice scalia that consistently applied the philosophy, that didn't try legislate from the bench, that was respectful of the constitution, and then fight and fight and fight for that nomination to make sure the nomination passes. >> if the senate needs to stand strong and say we're not going to give up the u.s. supreme court for a generation by allowing obama to make one more liberal appointee. >> the u.s. president barack obama says that he will nominate someone to fill the opening in due time. he has close to a year remaining in his term. he also praised justice scalia's years of service. >> just scalia dedicated his life to the cornerstone of our
2:03 am
democracy. the rule of law. tonight we honor his extraordinary service to our nation and remember one of the towering legal figures of our time. >> the democratic u.s. presidential candidates are also weighing in on scalia's death. they are blasting republican calls to block whomever the president nominates to replace him. >> now i'm sure we'll all have a lot more to say about this in the coming days. let me just make one point -- barack obama is president of the united states until january 20th, 2017! that is a fact, my friends, whether the republicans like it or not. election vs. consequences. the president has a responsibility to nominate a new justice, and the senate has a
2:04 am
responsibility to vote. >> i very much hope that president obama will bring forth a strong nominee, and that we can get that nominee confirmed as soon as possible. the supreme court of the united states has nine members, not eight. we need that ninth member. a lot of important issues coming up. >> so what is the significance of this empty seat now on the supreme court bench? i'm joined now by elizabeth lydra, president of the constitutional accountability center, and joins us via skype from washington. good to have you. >> great to be with you. >> thanks for taking time with us today. we've heard president obama indicate that he will nominate the successor. so what is the likelihood of the president's nominee to fill the
2:05 am
vacancy? >> that's up to the senate. the president has been elected until the last day of his term. that includes appointing justices when a vacancy arrives on the supreme court as it has with the sad passing of justice scalia, whose passing we mourn and give our condolences to his friends and family and the d.c. community and beyond. there's no reason why the senate should not fulfill its job after the president does his job of appointing a nominee to then consider and confirm that nominee if the president. there are plenty of qualified jurists out there from the pool in which the president will be choosing, and there's no reason why everyone can't do their job according to the constitution and according to the will of the people. they already weighed in on this when they re-elected president barack obama in the last election. >> if you look at it from the perspective of the partisan divide here that's playing out on the election cycle now, you heard the republicans in the
2:06 am
debate overnight saying, look, even donald trump delay, delay, delay. so talk about whether that can happen. the senate actually blocked this. and help us understand the thurmond rule. >> there have been suggestion says that the next president should be the one to choose the nominee. but i don't think that that really is what the constitution had in mind. when you have the president elected for a full term, you have the procedure by which the president appoints the supreme court justices or puts forth nominees for the roles, and senate has its constitutional job of considering and confirming those nominees. so that's the way that the constitution works. and you know, you might want to try to put in partisan politics to gum up the process, but that's not really what our nation's founding charter has in mind for how this process should work, although i think they probably would not have in mind
2:07 am
the way that the senate is working dysfunctionally currently in the first place. i would note that the supreme court is one of the branches of government that actually has the highest approval ratings among the public. and i think it's because it doesn't have the partisan dysfunction that keeps it in almost permanent gridlock that we see in the senate. and so i think it would be a sad testament to the institution that justice scalia gave so many years of service to, to introduce that dysfunction into the supreme court and leave them short staffed for what could be a year or more. >> a little less than a minute left. i want to ask you briefly, help us understand the balance of the court now and what happens to the cases that have yet to be heard. >> so the court can continue to consider the cases that are before it this term. and there are extraordinarily important cases to the american people before the court ranging from immigration to abortion to
2:08 am
voting rights. those cases will be considered by eight justices. if there is tie, a 4-4 tie, there will be no precedent set by the supreme court, and instead the lower court ruling will be affirmed by an evenly divided court. that's the language they use. a lot of cases could swing differently without justice scalia. perhaps more important, there isn't a full complement of jusz, and that's the way the supreme court -- justices. and that's the way the supreme court works best for the american people. >> thank you very much for your insight. >> my pleasure. now more on the republican debate that happened in greenville, south carolina, and there were fireworks. the plan contenders for the white house faced off on saturday, exactly one week before their critical south carolina primary. the stakes could not be higher. the candidates went after each other no-holds-barred. marco rubio and donald trump accused ted cruz of being a liar.
2:09 am
cra cruz fired back. >> marco went on univision in spanish and said he would not rescind president obama's illegal executive am nesto his first day in office. i have promised to rescind every single electionislative action on -- >> first of all, i don't know how he knows what i said on univision because he doesn't speak spanish. second of all, the point -- [ speaking spanish ] >> this is a disturbing pattern now. for a number of weeks now, ted cruz has been telling lies. he lied about ben carson in iwo. he lies about marriage, he's lying about all sorts of things. now he makes things up. >> ted cruz support legalizing people in this country illegally, and only now -- >> knowingly false -- >> rubio and trump went head to head on whether george w. bush kept the u.s. safe when he was president during 9/11.
2:10 am
>> on behalf of me and my family, i thank god all the time that it was george w. bush in the white house on nev9/11 and glore. [ applause ] [ cheers ] >> i think you can look back in hindsight and say a couple things. he kept us safe. not only did he keep us safe, but no matter what you want to say about weapons of mass destruction, saddam hussein was in violation of u.n. resolutions, an open violation, the world wouldn't do anything about it. george w. bush enforced what the international community refused to do. he kept us safe, and i am forever grateful -- >> how did he keep us safe when the world trade center came down? [ cheers and boos ] >> i lost hundreds of friends. the world trade center came down during the reign -- [ booing ] >> he kept us safe? that's not safe. that is not safe. >> in the background under donald trump, you heard another
2:11 am
key participant in this debate. it was the audience. that crowd -- off stage, it was boisterous, loud, and spirited. earlier, my colleague, natalie allen, spoke with the director for the center of politics t university of virginia. she asked about the audience's reaction to the candidates. >> this was a mob scene on the stage and also in the audience. the audience was completely out of control, and so loud and obnoxious, at times you couldn't hear what the candidates were saying. >> i was going ask about the audience joining in the bloodbath per se. donald trump is trying to hold back on vulgators he's used before, and the people are wanting this bloodbaths. what does that say about these part of the voters and what they're looking for perhaps in a president or the issues? >> well, they're angry.
2:12 am
certainly the trump followers are. that's his 35%. that's his one-third of the republican party. there are a good many people in the other two-thirds who feel the same way. you saw that. there was booing and all kinds of activities of one sort or another directed at just about every candidate, encouraged by the candidate. i lost count how many time bush and trump engaged and poked at one another in a direct way. there was nothing subtle about anything they said. of course ted cruz and marco rubio went after one another. i think rubio missed having chris christie there to do the attacks on him. all of them except for kasich and ben carson were fundamentally negative. >> right. and kasich and carton kept trying to be -- carson kept trying to be the anti-negative.
2:13 am
then it would go back to what it was. jeb bush got a zinger in saying to trump, ronald reagan didn't tear down people the way donald trump does. he tore down the berlin wall. he seemed to be more on game and message when it comes to taking on trump. what did you think? >> oh, i thought he's done well the last several debates. what's interesting to me is his poll numbers haven't moved. his campaign did a superb job in packing the audience. i think that was obvious to everyone. he's at 11% approximately in the polls in south carolina. trump is at about 35. bush is actually in third or fourth place. so he would have to gain an awful lot from this debate, and it would have to last a full week which doesn't sound like. in our world today, it's amazing how quickly bumps like events from debates can fade. >> absolutely. what's your takeaway other than the fact that this was blood
2:14 am
sport there in south carolina at this debate? as far as anyone that got significant points on the conservative issues that matter to these voters? >> mainly, natalie, they reinforced the support they already have. they realize they're not going to make converts at this point. this campaign's been going on seemingly forever. what they have to do in south carolina and elsewhere is to motivate the people who already like them to turn out disproportionately. they want to potentially get a rocket boost into the next series of primaries. >> you're watching "cnn newsroom." some strong language at the normally diplomatic security conference in munich, germany, on saturday, including warnings and stern responses between russia and the west. stay with us. "beth" by kiss ♪ beth, i hear you calling.♪. ♪ but i can't come home right now... ♪ ♪ me and the boys are playing.♪.
2:15 am
♪ ... all nig♪t text beth, what can i do... [siri:] message. pick up milk. oh, right. milk. introducing the newly redesigned passat. from volkswagen. a blade. many blades. tsharp blades.g. blades here, blades there. some more over there... whoa! that's not another blade. this is shielding. with lubrication here and here. the new gillette with proshield lubrication before and after the blades shields from irritation for a close, comfortable shave. the new proshield from gillette. the best a man can get. and one proshield refill gets you up to one month of shaves.
2:16 am
first - they limit where you earn bonus cash back.es at you? then - those places change every few months? i think i'll pass... quicksilver from capital one puts nothing in your way. you simply earn unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere. you can't dodge the question... what's in your wallet? does the smell of a freshly fill you with optimism? do you love your wireless keyboard more than certain family members? is your success due to a filing system only you understand?
2:17 am
does printing from your tablet to your wireless printer give you a jolt of confidence? if so, you may be gearcentric. someone who knows that the right office gear helps you do great things. and there's one place that has it all. office depot officemax. gear up for great. a u.k. group that monitors the syrian war says that turkey is now targeting kurdish rebels in northern syria. those kurds known as the wtg are backed by the united states. they're seen as terrorists by turkey. the syrian observatory for human rights says turkish shelling killed two fighters on saturday. turkey's prime minister calls the claims that the kurds fired over the border into his country first.
2:18 am
pressure is mounting on russia to be more careful about who it targets in syria. on saturday, the u.s. secretary of state, john kerry, told a munich security conference session that many half is's attacks have been against legitimate opposition groups and not isis. russia has denied, though, bombing any civilians. the tensions, they are still clear. russia's prime minister even said saturday that russia's current relationship with the west is similar to the cold war. >> translator: the policy with russia remains friendly and apickaway. -- and opaque. one could say we've slid back to a new cold war. almost an every day basis we're called one of the most threats to nato as a whole or to europe or to the united states. >> cnn international diplomatic editor nic robertson joins us live from munich. good to have you this hour.
2:19 am
we heard that icy statement by russia's prime minister about relations with the west. now we understand that russia's president putin and u.s. president obama spoke by phone specifically, talking about ukraine. what more can you tell us about that conversation? >> reporter: well, talking about ukraine and about syria, we've got a few more details now. these have been released by the kremlin. what the kremlin said was president obama and president putin discussed the importance of finding a common strategy to tackle terrorist inside syria. that this was the only way to fight isis going forward. now, of course, this is a very important part of the conversation. the united states and russia are supposed to be having conversation now because they are leading the task force that is to set the modalities of a cessation of hostilities inside syria that's stopped come into effect in five days now. a key part is this issue of who are the terrorists and who aren't. sergei lavrov, the russian
2:20 am
foreign minister here, on thursday went that agreement was hammered out, indicated that they were getting closer to determining who the terrorists are. russia's been often saying that it's targeting the terrorists. as we heard from secretary of state john kerry, they're hitting civilians. they're going to judge closely what russia does. obviously if they're hitting the opposition that's supposed to be getting into the talks here, this is what secretary of state john kerry said, then there's very little chance of political talks happening. the atmosphere here in the security conference has been tense. those comments made by the russian prime minister really indicate that tensions that exist between russia and the west at the moment. i asked the allied commander in charge of nato forces, the u.s. four-star general, phillip breedlove, if he felt that there was a cold war developing with russia. he doesn't think there is. he sees russia, as he told me, as trying to not just rewrite
2:21 am
the international rulebook, but to remake the rules. they're the ones that have crossed the international border into ukraine and crimea, are building up sophisticated military sites from the north all the way into northern syria. threat that can take them by the sea and by land. this is what he told me. isn't this by definition the cold war build-up? >> they are entitled to their understanding and description of this. we and nato did not want to see it work. it is not what we want to happen or anticipate happening. we're a defensive alliance who are arraying ourselves that face a challenge. we see that challenge as a nation that has again decided
2:22 am
that tell use force to change internationally recognized borders. so we take those appropriate actions to be able to assure, defend, and deter. >> reporter: an indication of the tension that's exist when it comes to trying to set this cessation of hostilities in syria that president putin and president obama are talking about directly to each other on the phone. george? >> and russia and the united states directly tied together when it comes to starting peace in syria. we will have to continue to monitor how these conversations go. ni nic robertson, thank you for reporting. in mexico, pope francis saying mexico is a great country, but one with a history of difficult moments. on his first visit to the nation as pope, francis urged the president there to fight against corruption and drug-related violence. he also called on the clergy to
2:23 am
strengthen their stance against the drug trade. as mary maloney reports, day one of the pope's historic trip kicked would have cheering crowds and a special welcome ceremony. [ cheers ] >> reporter: thousands greeted the latin american pope on his trip to mexico city on saturday. pope francis stopped to meet the adoring crowd on his oasis to the national palace -- on his way to the national palace, handing out rose rows. ♪ >> reporter: mexico's president welcomed the pope with a special ceremony where frances later delivered his first -- francis later delivered his first major address aimed at the country's religious and political leaders. >> translator: experience teaches us that each time we seek the path of privileges or benefit for a few to the detriment of the good of all, sooner or later, the life of society becomes fertile soil for
2:24 am
corruption. >> reporter: the pope also spoke about his visit to young people -- >> reporter: a people with a youthful population is a population able to renew itself. enjoy tigris river look to the future with hope. >> reporter: francis wrapped up his first day with a mass at the basilica of guadalupe. >> translator: today i come as a missionary of mercy and peace. also, as a son when wishes to pay homage to his mother, the blessed virgin of guadalupe, and place himself under her watchful care. >> reporter: i'm mary maloney reporting. ♪ from mexico and now to the u.s. state of pennsylvania where at least three people were killed after heavy snow and whiteout conditions contributed to a pileup involving at least
2:25 am
60 vehicles on a major u.s. highway. police say more than 70 people were injured. the pileup began saturday morning, and interstate 78 is still shut down in both directions. derek van dam here, our meteorologist joins us to talk about the weather conditions at the time of the pileup. >> i'm from the great lakes myself. i've encountered the snow conditions that reduce visibilities in a matter of mere seconds. this is exactly what they experienced on this pennsylvania highway near mile marker 7.5. look at this aerial shot. it was, unfortunately, a deadly day. a devastating day for over 60 vehicles and trucks. very, very scary moments to say the least. and you can imagine what people hell to c-- who people had to contend with reading accounts as the snow came in quickly, drifted over the roadways and reduced stroiblt less than one or two city blocks. they tried to pull off to the side of the highway, and as they
2:26 am
did so, that's when they were struck from behind. scary moments. this is the radar from pennsylvania. we'll zoom in to the harrisburg region, just to the north and east. that's where fredericksburg is near mile marker 7.5 o update 78. there was indeed heavy snowfall across that region. this is thanks to the arctic air that is blasting the united states. started across northern greenland and eventually made its way across the great lakes and into the new england coastline. what it's done, it has created the lake-effect snow band that continued to carry across the eastern half of the u.s. we get that warm water with cold wind rushing over top of that. we get instability and eventually snowfall. it's astounding to see what happened this year compared to the past two winter seasons in terms of great lakes ice coverage.
2:27 am
normally, we would have mainly ice coverage that continues to blanket the great lakes area. but unfortunately this year that hasn't been the case. the lake-effect snow machine has not been cut off just yet. >> derek van dam. thank you very much. you're watching "cnn newsroom." we'll be right back. sfx: cell phone chimes start with a positive attitude... and positively radiant skin. aveeno® positively radiant moisturizer... with active naturals® soy. aveeno® naturally beautiful results®. i thione second it's there.day. then, woosh, it's gone. i swear i saw it swallow seven people. seven. i just wish one of those people could have been mrs. johnson. [dog bark] trust me, we're dealing with a higher intelligence here. ♪ the all-new audi q7 is here. ♪
2:28 am
it took joel silverman years to become a master dog trainer. but only a few commands to master depositing checks at chase atms. technology designed for you. so you can easily master the way you bank. i missed a payment. aw, shoot. shoot! this is bad. no! we're good! this is your first time missing a payment. and you've got the discover it card, so we won't hike up your apr for paying late. that's great! it is great! (both simultaneously) thank you. at discover, we treat you like you'd treat you. get the it card with late payment forgiveness.
2:29 am
2:30 am
a warm welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. you're watching "cnn newsroom." good to have you with us. i'm george howell. the headlines -- u.s. supreme court justice antonin scalia has died. for almost 30 years now, he was one of the court's most conservative justices. he was known for his opposition
2:31 am
to same-sex marriage and gun control and for his witty and incisive decision and legal comments. one week before south carolina's republican primary, the republican presidential candidate clashed at their debate saturday night. marco rubio and donald trump accused ted cruz of being a liar. cruz then fired back saying that rubio is weak on immigration. and trump is unreliable as a conservative. russia's prime minister is calling his country's relations with the west the new cold war. he made the comments at the munich security conference on saturday. nato's europe commander says he does not agree with medvedev's comments. more on the death of supreme court justice antonin scalia and the political storm brewing to replace him. scalia was not a politician. as cnn's joe johns reports, he has always been a conservative republican standard bearer.
2:32 am
>> reporter: i, one, do solemnly swear -- >> reporter: the first italian american to sit on the nation's highest court, justice antonin scalia was a conservative in thought but not in personality. antonin gregory scalia was raised in elmhurst, new york city, the only child born of a sicilian professor and sicilian mother. they instilled in the precocious child a love of words and debate. i was somewhat of a greasy grind, i have to say. i studied real hard. >> reporter: a top student at private catholic schools in the city, scalia's interest in law began in college. so, too, an interest with maureen mccarthy, with whom he later married and had nine children. his exuberant embrace of conservatism attracted the attention of a republican, and president ronald reagan ultimately named the 50-year-old federal judge to the high court in 1986. there he developed a reputation as a reliable conservative.
2:33 am
and his own style helped liven the public face of the high court. >> some of the other justices, including justices who were already on the court and had been on the court for a while, well, if the new guy gets to ask questions, i'm going to sort of step up and ask questions, too. >> reporter: on abortion, the death penalty, affirmative action, homosexual rights, scalia clashed early and often with more moderate or less leaning bench mate. >> if he was trying to get anyone to sign an opinion, it was harder when he would use more combative language. you know, as much as they would say, you know, i'd like to strangle nino, he was still theirs in many ways. hone a creative, sometimes cruel streak in his writing. he once referred to the junior congress, quoted cole porter, shakespeare, and "sesame street" songs. off the bench came admiration for young conservatives who wrote books and created websites and tributes.
2:34 am
controversy, too. a hunting trip with vice president cheney at the same time the port was considering a lawsuit against number two over access to privileged documents. a sicilian gesture some interpreted as obscene and captured by a boston national airport. he called it dismissive in nature. justice scalia, a man both respected and dismissed, feared and celebrated. >> remembered in many ways. certainly as this larger than life figure, larger than bench figure, someone who embraced both the law and a life beyond the court. >> reporter: a judge who combined street smarts with a well-calculated conservative view of the law and its limits on society. >> i'm not driven. i ain't sure what i'm doing. as soon as i no longer enjoy it, i am out of there. >> reporter: joe johns, cnn, washington.
2:35 am
justice scalia daeps's death is triggering an election yeear battle as president obama will nominate a successor in due time. republican senate majority leader mitch mcconnell says the vacancy should be filled by the next u.s. president. meanwhile, the republican con tirn tenders for the white house paid happenor -- paid honor at the debate. the debate was contentious and combative. here's a look at some of the moments that stood out. the next president needs to appoint someone with a proven conservative record similar to justice scalia. >> i think it's up to mitch mcconnell and everybody else to stop it. it's called delay, delay, delay, delay. >> we have 80 years of precedent of not confirming supreme court
2:36 am
justices in an election year. >> it's not even two minutes after the death of judge scalia, i just wish we hadn't run so fast into politics. >> obviously the war in iraq was a big, fat mistake. took him five days, he went back. it was a mistake, wasn't a mistake. took five days before his people told him what to say. george bush made a mistake. we can make mistakes, but that was a beauty. >> i am sick and tired of him going after my family. >> the world trade center came down -- >> he had the gall to go after my mother. >> this is just crazy. this is just nuts, okay. [ applause ] >> geez, oh man. >> thank you for including me in the debate. two questions already. this was great. >> marco has a long record when it comes to amnesty in the state of florida, as speaker of the house. >> i don't know what he -- i don't know how he knows what i said on univision. he doesn't speak spanish. [ speaking spanish ] >> i feel like i have to get into my inner chris christie. >> you shouldn't be flexible on core principles.
2:37 am
>> i like donald. as an entertainer. right now as a candidate, he supports federal taxpayer funding for planned parenthood. i disagree with him. that's a matter of -- >> you are a liar. you probably are worse than jeb bush. you are the single biggest liar. >> donald has this weird pattern. when you point to his record, he screams liar, liar, liar, if you -- >> where did i support it? ted, where did i support it? >> if you want to go with donald trump as president, he will appoint liberals. if donald trump is president, your second amendment will -- >> let me tell you -- >> these attacks, some are personal. i think we're fixing to lose the election to hillary clinton if we don't stop this. [ applause ] you're watching "cnn newsroom." canada is resettling thousands of syrians. still ahead, we travel to calgary to see what refugees faced when they arrived in their new country. stay with us.
2:38 am
want to survive a crazy busy day? sfx: cell phone chimes start with a positive attitude... and positively radiant skin. aveeno® positively radiant moisturizer... with active naturals® soy. aveeno® naturally beautiful results®.
2:39 am
this clean was like pow! can a toothpaste do everything well? it added this other level of clean to it. it just kinda like...wiped everything clean. 6x cleaning my teeth are glowing. they are so white. 6x whitening i actually really like the 2 steps. step 1, cleans step 2, whitens. every time i use this together, it felt like... ...leaving the dentist office. crest hd. 6x cleaning, 6x whitening i would switch to crest hd over what i was using before.
2:40 am
2:41 am
welcome back to "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell. it is a long way from the civil war in syria to the canadian west. thousands of syrian refugee are making that journey, hoping that canada can offer them a brighter future. cnn's drew griffin looks at how the city of calgary is coping with the influx of people and the security concerns. >> reporter: it's quiet, but it can barely contain the joy inside. this is calgary's margaret chisholm resettlement house. cries, laughter, and everywhere
2:42 am
children. syrian refugees plucked from uncertain futures in jordan and lebanon settled under the program to be accepted as newly landed immigrants. anush newman helps run the center. in three years, she says, everyone you see will be able to become a canadian. >> they really have nowhere else to go. >> no, they can't because the surrounding countries such as where they were, they don't give them citizenship. they'll remain as refugees for the rest of their lives. >> reporter: zyad arrived just ten days ago. he and his wife and four children fled aleppo, syria. >> they led because there was constant bombardment. they worried. many times they came close to death. they decided let's leave before it gets worse. he took his family and left to settle as refugees. >> reporter: do you miss it?
2:43 am
>> translator: of course, of course. it's my heart. we're very, very happy and very, very relaxed. >> reporter: for the first time in years, we feels his family is safe. there's a long way to go. they speak almost no english. they are new to just about every canadian custom. we shake hands with men and boys, but not with the women. >> we do a lot of parenting skills. >> reporter: the director here says that, too, will change and soon. >> in two months, you won't recognize the children as refugees. ten days ago -- they didn't even know they were coming to canada. now they're here, obviously, so we realized that they have a lot of fears and a lot of hopes. >> reporter: most arrive in families. there are only a few single syrian men. as in the u.s., the program has raised concerns about safety and terrorism. i've got to ask you, they don't look dangerous to me.
2:44 am
>> no. they are fantastic people. they've gone through hell. >> reporter: while in the united states, there's still deliberation over how many or if syrian refugees should be brought into the country. by the end of february, canada will have reached its goal of bringing 25,000 syrian refugees on to its soil. confident that its screening process can tell the bad guys from the good. >> most canadians are not that worried about the security issue for the people we've selected. >> reporter: ian holloway, dienst university of calgary -- dean of the university of calgary law school, also works with the canadian government reviewing its security intelligence operation. he says the refugees canada brings in are screened and, quite frankly, he sees them as no threat at all. >> we feel that we have been able to take reasonable measures to not guarantee -- you can never guarantee these things -- but to do everything we can to
2:45 am
satisfy ourselves that the people we've taken in are not likely to be bad guys. tripoli make sure, canada follows the progress of its newly arrived immigrants for two years. all the children will go to school. families will be helped to find work, housing, and their ultimate goal -- a permanent home in their new country, canada. drew griffin, cnn, calgary. there's a new call for help in the u.s. city of flint, michigan. that's where residents are dealing with a water crisis. mayor karen weaver is asking for $55 million to replace every lead pipe in her city. officials discovered lead in the city's water supply after the city changed its water source back in 2014. soon after that, an outbreak of legionnaire's disease began, sickening 87 people, nine of those people died. experts believe the corrosive water gave the bacteria a chance to grow.
2:46 am
southern california gas company says it's temporarily controlled a gas leak near the city of los angeles. thousands of families in porter ranch have been forced to leave their homes because of that leak that started last october. one family even says they've had enough and just want to go home now. cnn's sarah sider in has this report -- sara sidner has this report. >> reporter: when we got our stuff together and left because we had to, we knew it was -- it's -- sorry. it felt like all that we had worked so hard to do was really, really being taken away. they were taking away the home we had for our kids. they were taking away all the little stuff you put into a home that makes it your kids' home. we actually woke up, and the smell was strong. it smelled like it was something
2:47 am
leak i leaking in the house. >> it smelled like gas. >> i've got a 7-year-old, chase, and a 5-year-old, my little girl, london. one has autism. every family with a kid with autism tells you essentially routine is what makes it possible to function. they began telling us, no, it's nothing to worry about. no long-term effects b. a month in is when we started hearing they're underreporting the benzene. they're underreporting benzene. if anybody googles it, which we did, is a carcinogen. this is something that really can hurt you. . it's set him back in a way that i can't tell you how upsetting it is as a family. change is scary to them in a way that -- even more than to say
2:48 am
somebody not on the spectrum. it's almost paralyzing to them. >> reporter: what do you miss the most? >> school. >> reporter: when you talk about them, i can see the frustration and anger and really kind of hurt. how have you been handling this? >> when you tell your kids you can't go back, what that -- message, this isn't safe anymore, right? we can't make good on the promise that we made that your home, where we picked to raise you, would be safe. they've taken that ability away from us as parents. you want to talk about mad, right? >> reporter: when would you like to move back into the house if you could? >> tomorrow. >> reporter: that fast? >> yes. i would like it keep it. they would use a big tape and put it around where the hole is. americans and others have been paying very close attention to that, and of course we will obviously follow that story, as well.
2:49 am
some of the biggest names in british and u.s. film will gather in london on sunday evening. of course, we will have that story for you later, as well. stay with us. ool. that's where your friends are. seriously, it's, it's really fine. you don't want to be seen with your dad? no, it's..no.. oh, there's tracy. what! [ horn honking ] [ forward collision warning ] bye dad! it brakes when you don't. the newly redesigned volkswagen passat. right now you can get a $1,000 presidents' day bonus on new 2015 or 2016 passat, jetta, or tiguan models. plumping surface cells for a dramatic transformation. without the need for fillers. your concert tee might show your age...your skin never will. olay regenerist. olay. ageless.
2:50 am
and try regenerist micro-sculpting eyeswirl. it instantly hydrates to plump and lift. shall we say, unnecessarily complex.h back cards are, limiting where you can earn bonus cash back... then those places change every few months... please. it's time you got the quicksilver card from capital one. quicksilver earns you unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere.
2:51 am
doesn't get much simpler than that. what's in your wallet? does the smell of a freshly fill you with optimism? do you love your wireless keyboard more than certain family members? is your success due to a filing system only you understand? does printing from your tablet to your wireless printer give you a jolt of confidence? if so, you may be gearcentric. someone who knows that the right office gear helps you do great things. and there's one place that has it all. office depot officemax. gear up for great. parking is hard to find. seems like everyone drives. and those who do should switch to geico because you could save hundreds on car insurance. ah, perfect. valet parking. evening, sir. hello! here's the keys. and, uh, go easy on my ride, mate. hm, wouldn't mind some of that beef wellington... to see how much you could save on car insurance, go to geico.com.
2:52 am
ah! (car alarm sounds) it's ok!
2:53 am
american and british actors are getting ready for britain's film awards sunday evening in london. the film carroll and bridge of spies lead the night with nine nominations. hosted by stephen frei and cnn will take you to the red carpet. and we have a couple who met in the 1940s, parted ways for 70 years after a big misunderstanding but now they are reunited and inspiring others to never give up on finding true love again. ivan watson and their children. >> i'm gonna give her a squeeze. >> norman thomas never stopped thinking about joyce morris. the pair first met 1944. she lived in london, he a paratrooper for the u.s.
2:54 am
young love blossomed. >> we snugged when it was dark and no one could see us. >> and thomas was deployed to tomorrowly to fight in world war ii. -- normandy i. >> after war he wrote her and invited her to join him, she misunderstood and thought he was already married. so they went their separate ways. may met other people. thomas became a widower, morris got divorced. last year they reconnected on skype after more than seventy years. >> and i say good morning to you every morning. >> and i lsh. >> [ inaudible ]. >> and i will say good morning back to you. you broke my heart.
2:55 am
>> oh. i don't believe that for a moment. >> what would you do if i could give you squeeze? >> oh it would be lovely. >> a crowd funding campaign raised enough money to make that actually happen. this week thomas made the journey from virginia to adelaide. >> well you're still vertical. hello. >> give you a squeeze. >> a couple that met just before d-day reuniting seven decades later just in time for van times day. >> about the most wonderful thing that could have happened to me. >> barack obama and michelle obama will be spending valentine's day apart but that did not stop them from professing their love for one another. he even prepared a funny poem with the help of talk show
2:56 am
hostelen degeneres. ♪ ♪ >> anybody call the situation room, because things are about to get hot. >> roses are red. violates are blue, you are the president and i am your boo. >> i obamacare about you more than you even know. [ applause ] that's right -- >> michelle i've ed made a lot of decisions as president. the best decision i ever made was choosing you. i love you. and ellen, happy valentine's day. >> thanks for watching. "new day" is next. and for others best of quest starts in a moment. you are watching cnn, the world's news leader.
2:57 am
i swear i sw seven people. seven. i just wish one of those people could have been mrs. johnson. [dog bark] trust me, we're dealing with a higher intelligence here. ♪ the all-new audi q7 is here. ♪ want to survive a crazy busy day? sfx: cell phone chimes start with a positive attitude... and positively radiant skin. aveeno® positively radiant moisturizer... with active naturals® soy. aveeno® naturally beautiful results®. when your cold makes you wish... ...you could stay... ...in bed all day... ...you need the power of... new theraflu expressmax. new theraflu expressmax. the power to feel better.
2:58 am
it took joel silverman years to become a master dog trainer. but only a few commands to master depositing checks at chase atms. technology designed for you. so you can easily master the way you bank. ♪ under starry skies above. of miles, ♪ ♪ don't fence me in. ♪ let me fly any time, ♪ any airline that i love, ♪ don't fence me in. ♪ give me a mile and a half ♪ for every buck i spend. ♪ double my miles when the first year ends. ♪ ♪ no annual fees, ♪ no blackouts, ♪ let the fun begin. ♪ don't fence me in. get the discover it miles card.
2:59 am
3:00 am
president obama orders flags at half staff this morning upon the death of u.s. justice ant anyone scalia. >> died in his sleep on a trip to west texas. his death has evoked an outpouring of sorrow. and with his death the campaign season takes on entirely new shape. i'm christi paul. >> and i'm victor

51 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on