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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  April 3, 2016 11:00pm-1:01am PDT

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♪ praise the lord, i'm an american man ♪ love you. love you. >> love you too. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com ships carrying hundreds of migrants are on their way from greece to turkey right now, day one of a controversial deal in the refugee crisis. after the deadly easter bombing in pakistan, christians seeking to express their faith without fear share their struggles. and in the u.s., a muslim family asks for an apology from an airline after he say they were kicked off a plane. hello, and welcome to our viewers here in the united states and all around the world, i'm rosemary church. thanks for joining us here on "cnn newsroom." and we begin in greece,
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where refugees and other migrants who wririsked their li to reach the greek isles and western europe are now on their way back to turkey. now try turkish ships have left the port of lesbos, bound for turkey. we're looking at live pictures here the migrants are being returned as part of a controversial and much-criticized deal between the european union and ankara. under that agreement, migrants who reached greece by march 20th and had their asylum request rejected or didn't apply for asylum are now being sent back. cnn's erin mclaughlin is in the port of lesbos, and phil black is in the turkish town where the ships will be arriving. we'll start with phil black there, and we know those ships are heading your way. they should reach port very
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soon. in fact, phil, talk to us about what those migrants on board have to look forward to once they arrive there. >> reporter: rosemary, we can see the vessels. they are now clearly within sight here, and they appear to have slowed on their final approach here, each one carrying around 130 passengers, reluctant passengers, you'd have to say. these are people who crossed in the other direction, with the dream of establishing a new life in europe. they are now returning to turkey. that dream, really, a total failure. what happens to them here isn't clear. and it is really the most controversial part of what you touched on there and described accurately as a controversial agreement. what we see here are facilities set up by the immigration authorities here in turkey, where it's pretty clear these people are going to be processed. the authorities don't want us to see too much.
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they've set up tents, tarpaulins to keep their activities from view. but once they are processed here they will then be removed to other centers. of course just where will depend upon where these migrants themselves are from, if they are syrian, it is likely they will be moved back to the vast camps, mostly in this country's south that housed millions of syrian refugees in this country, but if they come from other countries, well, their future is perhaps less certain, rosemary. >> yeah, and this is a real worry for so many of those people. retracing their footsteps, going back from where they came. and some of them perilous journeys to try to get where they had gotten there in greece. so talk to us about this process. i know you said it's sort of behind closed doors or tents, if you like, but what some of these families might very well be going through once they do reach
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turkish shores. >> reporter: well, what we've been told from our seem on the greek side, is that these are just men, it would seem. we're not sure where they're from, as i said, and that's really a key point, because that will play a key role in determining just how they are treated from here, how they approach this and ultimately where they are sent beyond this point. turkey has insisted, particularly given recent criticism, that it treats syrian refugees fairly, it was amnesty international that claimed recently that syrian migrants were being sent back in to syria itself. turkey denied that, that there are no forced deportations back to syria. but if these are less likely to meet the official definition of refugees, and we are told that these are those who have not officially applied for asylum,
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perhaps implying that these are what authorities like to describe as economic migrants. people simply looking for better economic conditions, a better quality of life, then they claim protection here in turkey is weaker as it was across that short, narrow body of water in europe as well. so that's where it becomes less certain. turkey commits itself, very publicly, to being generous and open to syrians fleeing the war from across turkey's southern border, but when it comes to otheeconomic migrants, it's stated desire, if you like, to protect and show generosity, that's less clear and less enthusiastic, i think you'd have to say, rosemary. >> right. certainly understand. our phil black reporting there in turkey where very soon we expect those three ships to dock there at port. many thanks to you, phil. we will, of course, go to erin
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mclaughlin where those ships departed. and we'll get her perspective, but in the meantime, for a list of ways to help those affected by the refugee crisis sweeping europe, you can visit our impact your world web page. it has links to various organizations that are working to help the refugee, and that's all at cnn.com/impact. well, the future of syrian president bashar al-assad has been a major bone of contention between the u.s. and russia and ongoing peace talks. now a syrian opposition leader is demanding that the u.s. reaffirm its intention to oust assad in any transitional government. he points to what he calls american ambiguity among increasingly tense talks with moscow. washington has referred to assad's conclusion as a non-starter in the past. azerbaijan says it will stop
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fighting armenian troops after a long-fought dispute fired up again. armenia says azerbaijan is still firing artillery. >> reporter: this is the most wide-scaled fighting that azerbaijan has attempted since restoring the cease-fire regime in 1994. >> cnn's becky anderson has more on the renewed hostilities. >> reporter: a decades-long conflict between azerbaijan and armenia flares again over the last couple days. heavy fighting in the disputed rye john has left dozens dead as deep tensions tick to military escalation. a helicopter shot down, an armenian drone, six tanks and 15 artillery pieces destroyed. both sides accuse each other of breaking a cease-fire that had brought calm to the region for years. >> it was a clear violation of
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the cease-fire regime, the international law, international humanitarian law and geneva conditions. because what the official has done in the zone of azerbaijani conflict was a conspicuous manifestation of terrorist and anti-armenian policy. >> reporter: but the foreign ministry says armenia is to blame. quote, they shelled the front line where civilians live. the acts killed and injured several civilians, damaged personal property as an aggressive country, armenia bears responsibility for the current situation, end quote. it's a region that's been in dispute for a long time. it's landlocked and claimed by azerbaijan but controlled by ethnic armenians who are backed militarily and financially by
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armenia. a fragile 1994 cease-fire ended an armed conflict that had lasted six years, leaving tens of thousands dead. sporadic fighting has marred the truce ever since. calls to stop the violence came swiftly, among fears it could quickly escalate. the u.s. and russia have called for restraint, and closer to the region, iran, an ally of armenia and turkey, a close supporter of azerbaijan, have both pushed for a diplomatic solution, calls that if not heeded could potentially open up another proxy war with deadly consequences for the region. becky anderson, cnn, abu dhabi. more flights are taking off from brussels airport, which reopened to passengers sunday. for the first time since last month's deadly terror attack.
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alexandra field has more on the airport's reopening. >> reporter: the security is stepped up here at the airport in brussels as it reopens at least partially for the first time since the bombings that happened on march 22nd. this is the first time passengers could fly out of the airport. it's also a return for employees who work at this airport. the victims who died in those attacks were close to everyone's mind. there was a moment of silence before the first flight departed. just three flights leaving the airport. they were called symbolic flights, of course, this is a significant step forward, a first step forward. there are temporary check-in structures. then they go through another level of screening which meets them as they arrive at the airport. but we're told because of the extent of the damage inside the terminal, the terminal won't be fully repaired until perhaps the end of june, beginning of july. the airport won't be operating at capacity until that work is
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done. it served some 60,000 passengers a day, but they hope to build up in the next few days. alexandra field, cnn. to another story we're following now. deadly storms are wreaking havoc across northwest pakistan. at least 53 people are dead and 60 injured after heavy rain caused landslides and made the roofs of dozens of homes collapse. 81 people died during last summer's rainy season. also in pakistan, memorial services have been held one week after an easter bombing at a crowded amusement park. more than 70 people were killed and hundreds wounded. a splinter group of the pakistani taliban said they targeted christians in the attack. churches have been burned before and some are now protected by private gunmen. we are joined from the sacred heart cathedral with more on the challenges faced by christians
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in the country. this has been so difficult for people, but it also has to be pointed out that more muslims were actually killed in that bombing. but for both faiths, this has been very difficult. >> reporter: it has, and these attacks have been going on for many years now. people of all faiths coming out to form human chains to even protect churches, including muslim groups. you mentioned the memorial services. very few people compared with normal turned out for these memorial services. i went to find out what it's like for every day life as a christian in pakistan. gunmen guarding a church. i meet the pastor and say it's strange to see gunmen outside a place of worship. we have 20 to guard us on a sunday, he says. this is the most densely-populated christian area in pakistan.
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it was attacked last year. inside the free church school, there are usually 40 children in this class, but many are too scared to attend since the lahore park bombing. the pastor has buried six of his flock in one day. >> translator: our people are very poor. they can't afford the time to protest. we really need the support of muslims in pakistan. as christians, we love and pray for pakistan. >> reporter: in a national address, prime minister sharif said each and every drop of blood is being counted. the score will be settled. it's being settled, apparently, by the military and police in raids on terrorist hideouts across the country. >> what about the beast within us? >> what about the beast that is within our houses and our society. if we do not address those problems, this military operation will be amiss. >> reporter: cecil says space
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has been made for extremists in its biased laws. >> when you exclude minorities from your textbooks, start putting material that is biased toward other faiths, how will they respect minorities when they grow up? >> reporter: cecil's father, a decorated war veteran and pilot in two wars has been removed from history books. and this ad clearly says it's looking for non-muslims to clean toilets. it was later retracted but discloses the discrimination. we find people feeling isolated and neglected. >> translator: my husband is a day laborer but sometimes doesn't find work. i take cleaning jobs. >> reporter: no running water. no pavement. >> how can we live here? we are under attack.
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>> reporter: the blasphemy law has often been manipulated to persecute minorities, including christians. in a highly publicized case, a christian mother of five was sentenced to death for blasphemy. the muslim governor of punjab called for the death penalty to be revoked. he was gunned down by his own guard. at sunday service, a special song, praying not just for christians, but for citizens of all faiths in pakistan who should be seen as equals in the eyes of the state. ♪ ♪ alleluia >> reporter: and rosemary, as you mentioned, more muslims were killed in this attack, and if this is very much a policy by terrorist groups, divide and rule, say you are targeting minorities to isolate them. but of course muslims are also under attack, too. if you're not the right sex of
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islam, you could be targeted here in pakistan as well. as well as shias. the call is coming from all faiths for unity in pakistan. >> thank you for joining us with the very latest in lahore and the aftermath of that horrific blast. the u.k. has de-radicalization programs to help convicted jihadists try to reintegrate into society after they leave prison. the man considered to be one of the most effective deradicalizers says government funding is falling short. >> reporter: three years ago in london. >> because you're walking through a muslim area. you're walking through a muslim area dressed like [ bleep ]. >> reporter: the threatening voice, that's jordan horner.
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today he says he's a changed man. >> there's something which, when i was sincere to myself, i said, yes. >> reporter: back then, he was a muslim radical, praised muslim killers, he was dangerous and went to jail. today he credits this man, former cage fighter and deradicalize deradicaliz deradicalizer hussman roger for turning him around. >> anyone can reconceptionualize things for the individuals in a way that allows them to challenge their own internal beliefs, there is a very, very select few that are actually quite effective in what they do. >> reporter: getting deradic deradicalized has never been so
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important. almost half of those who have gone to syria and iraq to train for isis have come back. then there are those who radicalized and never left. but what they've covered for several years is shocking, that the scant government funding is drying up as authorities reevaluate their programs. always working on a shoestring. he is down to his last $200. in an overdraft account. >> we were doing about 70% of our work for free. what's ended up happening is that even that agreement has now disappeared. >> reporter: but he is still in demand. plenty of jail terrorists are asking for his help. >> wanted to go after a few weeks, i couldn't go on my own, and he says still have terrible nightmares and i want you to help me. >> reporter: this from a british radical who joined isis in syria, now a convicted terrorist. >> we're not able to reach those
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individuals, because there isn't an understanding there of how to deal with this phenomenon. >> reporter: he is frustrated, and so is expert douglas weeks. most say dermost deradicalizing programs can alienate. the governments strategy details hufrgeds of people who have been helped through education, criminal justice, faith charities online and health approaches to de-radicalization. in jail, horner says authorities tried deradicalizing him, using a psychological approach, telling him he was wrong, to be a good husband, a good father. nothing worked until he met roger. >> i knew i was a father, i knew i was a husband. once i knew from a religious
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perspective, what i did was incorrect, then i have to question, okay, what's the solution? >> reporter: a solution it seems may be at hand, embracing it still a challenge. nic robertson, cnn, london. we'll take a break right here. but still to come, brazil is holding an impeachment vote this week for president dilma rousseff. we will have the latest on the embattled leader's troubles and how it's affecting the upcoming olympics. that's still to come. stay with us. partment store moisturizer. revives skin to fight 7 signs of aging. with olay, you age less, so you can be ageless. olay. ageless. and to connect us with thes twonderment of nature. with the tiger image, the saliva coming off and you got this turning. that's why i need this kind of resolution and computing power. being able to use a pen like this on the screen directly with the image,
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you're back with us now, and we are taking these live pictures from turkey, where the first of three turkish boats or ships, we should say, have just arrived there from greece. and i want to go now to our phil black. he is there in turkey. so phil, let's talk about the people on board this ship, because it appears they are mostly men. is that the case for all three of those ships? and what lies ahead for these men? >> reporter: rosemary, what we have seen here are two vessels approach very slowly at this
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final section of the journey. and now you can see behind us the first of them has come into dock. what we've been told from our teams on the greek side is that yes, they've only seen men board these vessels this morning. but we're not sure where they're from. we're going to zoom in and try to show you a little more closely what we can see here. you can see faces through the tinted glass there, those windows. so we know around 130 people. we know that those migrants that are traveling, they, themselves are escorted aboard with roughly an equal number of european officials, security escort, if you like, maintaining security a aboard the vessel. and from here they're going to disembark, and just beyond what i can show you here, the turkish immigration authorities have set up essentially a registration point, a processing center, there's some tents, desks, mostly hidden by tarpaulins from
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our view, they don't want us to see what's happening there. and then once these people are processed, they're going to be moved. but we doesn't ren't really kno. that's not clear at this point. we don't know where these migrants are from. if they were syrian, we would think they would move toward one of the many large camps that house nearly 2.7 million migrants that have fled the war from that country. but the future of those shipped back from greece and europe becomes less clear, if ne come from other countries that don't have a solid claim to traditional refugee asylum or protection. turkish policy here is, is not to grant permanent asylum to the people that are fleeing the conflict in syria, but to protect them, allow them to stay on turkish territory until their
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conflict is resolved. in the event that people from other countries, and we expect them to be, it's unclear what turkish policy will be towards them, whether they will be allowed to stay here or whether they will be deported back to their countries of origin. >> our phil black keeping an eye on the situation there as we watch this first of three ships dock there in dakeeley. we will return to him when the other two ships have docked, keeping an eye on that story. we will be back here on "cnn newsroom." and inside jokes and school night. good, clean food pairs well with anything. try the clean pairings menu. at panera. food as it should be. he is.rrible at golf. people say i'm getting better. no one's ever said that. but i'd like to keep being terrible
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and a warm welcome back. you are watching "cnn newsroom." welcome to our viewers here in the united states and of course all around the world. i'm rosemary church. want to update you on the main
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stories we're following this hour. azerbaijan has declared a cease-fire with armenia, but they say armenia is still firing artillery. dozens were killed in a new wave of fighting saturday. and azerbaijan says one of its helicopters was shot down. a spokesman for al qaeda's affiliate, al nusra front, is dead, that's according to the observatory for human rights. he was killed in an airstrike sunday along with his son and at least 20 other militants. it's unclear whether the strike was launched by a syrian or russian aircraft. three ships carrying migrants have left the greek port of lesbos. the first ship has just arrived in turkey. they are being sent back as part of a controversial deal to stem
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the influx. it's expected thousands more will make that same journey from greece to turkey in the days ahead. let's go to erin mclaughlin. she joins us from the port of lesbos in greece. what have you been seeing from your vantage point as migrants were put on those three ships heading to turkey, and were these all men who boarded them? >> reporter: rosemary, let me first show you what's going on behind me. i don't know if you can see. a very small group of protesters gathered here across the port. they're saying wake up, europe, start the dirty deal. they're chanting eu, shame on you. the primary concern is that the country that these migrants have now gone to, turkey, is not a safe country, something that we've heard from many different international organizations, such as amnesty international. now the deportation process itself, from here, has been, for
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the large part, peaceful. it began in the small hours of the morning. buses arrived at a detention center not far from here under the cloak of darkness. migrants were boarded onto those buses and then put onto ships to leave for turkey. now who those people are and how they have been chosen, it's not entirely clear. the deportation process has not been a transparent one. it's not clear what the nationalitying of thonational ities of those individuals are. for the most part men. we didn't see any women or children. and the greek authorities have told us those are individuals who did not apply for asylum here in greece. now also interesting to note, this deal between turkey and the eu is very much dependent on these deportations acting as a deterrent, sending a message to migrants in turkey, don't risk
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your treasure. don't risk your life making this very perilous crossing here to greece. but as the buses were coming in to port here this morning, we saw coast guard arrive, a boat full of migrants arriving here in greece, likely to be taken to the very same center that those migrants came from, rosemary? >> and talk to us about the flow of these migrants being put on these boats. we know of course these three have left. one of them has arrived in turkey. the other two are about to arrive. we're keeping a very close eye on that. how many more would we expect to see, the flow during the day and the days ahead. >> reporter: well right now, an eu official telling cnn that three boats, two boats expected to leave with some 250 people on
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board from the island of lesbos. today we saw three boats. we also know that boat the are also expected to leave from kios, an island not far from here. and according to that eu official, these deportations are set to take place today, tomorrow, and wednesday. but, again, we're circling back to officials who are being very tight-lipped. the information has not been made public, just in terms of the precise numbers of people on those ships and the nationalities of those individuals. >> all right, erin mclaughlin keeping an eye on the situation there from the port of lesbos in greece. many thanks to you. the u.s. presidential hopefuls are focussing on wisconsin, one day before that u.s. holds the next round of primary voting. republican ted cruz needs a win there to stay viable against donald trump. he's hoping the new york
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billionaire's brisk style will not sit well with the traditional politeness of wisconsin voters. he kept up his traditional style. he demanded that john kasich who is trailing far behind bow out of the race. >> so i'm way over 50%. but with kasich, it's harder, and he shouldn't be in. and let me tell you. he wants to get to the convention. that's okay. go to the convention, and announce that you want to be president, but you shouldn't be littering up the process, because that's what he's doing. it's really a disgrace, i'll tell you. and if he's doing it, and i mean it. if he's doing it, then marco and all of these other guys should have just stayed in and kept all these people in. it's really not fair. >> cnn politics jeremy diamond
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has more on trump's motive for wanting kasich to quit now. >> reporter: with less than 24 hours from the next primary. he focussed some of his fire on john kasich. that's a little unusual given that he's spent most of his time talking about trade and hitting ted cruz and scott walker of of course endorsed cruz just last week. but donald trump went after john kasich, talking about kasich being a nasty guy, calling him a disgrace for staying in the race, saying it would be harder for trump or any other candidate for that matter, to snag the 1237 delegates needed to get the nomination before a convention. of course now it's looking like a very strong potential that things could be headed for an open convention. donald trump and ted cruz as well as john kasich, all now focussing their efforts on the
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delegate game, hoping they can lock in support of some of these key delegates who could potentially on a second ballot sway the math and give the republican nomination to one candidate or another. donald trump certainly now understanding that he has to focus on that. he's put a team in place, and he'll be going forward now, hoping to get a win in wisconsin. but if he doesn't, he's turning his head to new york, of course, his home state where he's leading in the polls right now. >> well, u.s. house speaker paul ryan has been mentioned as a possible republican nominee if donald trump, ted cruz and john kasich all fail to win enough delegates. but during his trip to israel on sunday, he swatted down the idea. ryan ran for u.s. vice president you recall back in 2012. he cited the crowded republican field and his young family as reasons why he won't run. and remember to join us here on cnn all day tuesday for complete coverage of the critical wisconsin primaries.
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well it may indeed be april, but that's not going to stop heavy snow from hitting the northeastern united states. our meteorologist karen maginnis joins us now for the forecast. can't believe it. spring but there's still snow. >> yes, there's actually video of a man mowing his yard. that doesn't sound unusual, but his yard is covered with snow. this across the midwestern united states where we've seen back to back clipper systems. they're referred to as clippers because they move at a clip. they move rather rapidly. and we've seen a succession of them move across the midwest. i want to point this out. we had a dramatic temperature change, in ten minutes. this was at o'hare airport. these are going to show you hourly temperatures, but there was an 8 degrees celsius or 17 degree fahrenheit temperature drop in ten minutes when that clipper system moved through o'hare. the temperature was hovering right around 22 degrees. this is going to be hourly.
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and we're looking at temperatures just above the freezing mark. so as that clipper system swept through, it dropped the temperature dramatically. hundreds of severe weather reports, literally from the great lakes, the midwest, the ohio valley into the northeast, into the new england area, where we had screaming winds. take a look at this video out of oakley, ohio in the vicinity of cincinnati. downed trees. this particular tree looked like it clipped the edge of this home, landed on a tree, winds were gusting about 100 kilometers per hour. and then in indianapolis, pretty much the same thing. as we saw downed trees. downed power lines, and we even had a report of a semi tractor-trailer that was blown over. some of the winds were gusting up to 115 kilometers per hour. a wild ride for april in the u.s. back to you. >> unbelievable.
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so hard to predict, isn't it? thanks so much karen, we'll talk again soon. still to come, a muslim woman says she felt humiliated and helpless after her family was kicked off a u.s. flight. why the airlines says they removed the passengers, back in a moment. and i didn't get here alone. there were people who listened along the way. people who gave me options. kept me on track. and through it all, my retirement never got left behind. so today, i'm prepared for anything we may want tomorrow to be. every someday needs a plan. let's talk about your old 401(k) today.
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brazil is struggling to fill the seats for the olympic games in rio this summer, with just four months before the opening ceremony, only half of the ticketing have been sold. the new minister of sports says public officials must work to boost confidence in rio's ability to host the games.
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brazil's economy is suffering its worst recession in 25 years. the country is also in the midst of political chaos, with massive protests and accusations of government corruption. president dilma rousseff faces an impeachment vote this week. a british doctor is accused of giving band performance enhancing drugs to top athletes. the doctor is denying close claims, but the sunday times says it sent an elite runner undercover who got the doctor to prescribe him banned substances. the alleged clients include premier league football players, tour de france cyclists and cricketers. it's also reported that the anti-doping agency knew about the potential wrongdoing two years ago but did not alert officials. an independent investigation has been ordered into the case.
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a muslim family is demanding an apology from united airlines after being kicked off a flight last month in chicago. the parents say it happened after they asked for an extra strap for their child's booster seat. that's when they say a united employee told them they must get off the plane due to a security issue. >> is it a discriminatory decision or is it because -- what is the reason? >> it is a safety of flight issue. >> united airlines says it rebooked the family on a later flight over concerns about the child's safety seat. the council on american islamic relations is representing the family and says, quote, we are tired of muslim-looking passengers being removed from flighting for the flimsiest reasons. lawmakers in several southern u.s. states have recently debated bills that address religious concerns over the righting of gays, lesbian
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and transgender people. one bill in north carolina has become law. nick valencia looks at the measure's impact so far. ♪ >> reporter: it's saturday in raleigh, north carolina. and this is a mid-day drag show. a fundraiser for lgbt awareness. candace cox is the woman of the hour. >> for me personally, is that every time i close my eyes and i say a prayer and i ask my god as a person of faith, how he feels, he doesn't seem to have a problem with it, and my parents have no problem with it, and their opinion matters to me. >> reporter: cox is transgender. >> black transwoman is used to it. >> reporter: she says she's one of the tens of thousands of transgendered people in north carolina affected by the public facilities privacy and securities act. if's a new state law that requires trans people to use the
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public restroom related to the gender on their birth certificate, not how they identify. >> it puts us in danger, and it's open discrimination. it's no different than the jim crow laws that we had here in the south. >> you look cute. >> reporter: at home, she and her husband say now that she'll be required to use the men's room, they worry she'll be physically assaulted or worse. >> i would say most of the attention is because people do not understand what the bill actually does. >> reporter: state house republican pro tem stem is one of the supporters. he said it's not about giving them special rights. >> we have lots of accommodations in the bill for those in special circumstances, but we're trying to protect the reasonable expectations of privacy of 99.9% of our citizens who think when they're going into a restroom or a changing
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room or a locker room that they will be private. >> junior counselor. >> reporter: 19 surgeries, two trips to fithailand, more than 100,000 dollars later, she is passable as a many would, but that doesn't make it any easier. >> we're all literally the same. and we're all fighting for the same thing. we all just want to be accepted. we want to know that we're not going to be discriminated against. >> reporter: nick valencia, cnn, raleigh, north carolina. >> and we'll take a short break. still to come, two burglars are behind bars thanks to the very clever thinking of a group of children. how they helped police catch the suspects. there's a clue. back in a moment.
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technology moves faster than ever. the all-new audi a4, with apple carplay integration. here's a story that will definitely cheer you up. in england, some quick-thinking kids were crime-fighters for a day, helping police catch two suspected burglars. it began as an easter egg hunt in the english countryside.
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but the police noticed a police helicopter overhead and two man running. what do they do? they form a human arrow to point police to the suspects. how about that. it does take a village. the 80th masters tees off this week. and arguably, it's the most prestigious. our patrick snell looks at the top contenders. >> for golf fans the world over, this 80th edition of the masters can't come soon enough, a star-studded field literally champing at the bit to be let loose. this is the 30th anniversary of the legendary jack nicholson's grand slam title at the age of 4wh 46, when the golden bear became the oldest man to ever win it. and last year, the texan, who also won the u.s. open, would become the tournament's
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second-youngest ever winner after tiger woods, but 2016 has so far proved frustrating, despite a stand-out start to the year which saw him record a huge eight-shot win in hawaii. for so long, touted as the best player to have never won a slam title, the popular aussie finally laid that ghost to rest. day had his sixth victory in his last 13 starts. a year ago all the talk centered on rory mcilroy and augusta. but the four-time major winner had to play second fiddle to
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jordan spe jordan speed. keep a close eye on adam scott who's clearly adapted well to having to ditch his longer putter, quickly coming to grips with a shorter one. already having won twice this season. also looking to win the coveted green jacket for the second time in three years. patrick snell, cnn. >> and thank you so much for watching "cnn newsroom." i'm rosemary church. don't go anywhere, though, i'll be right back with another hour of "cnn newsroom." stay with us. more "stay" per roll.
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fulfill a dream. hello and welcome to our viewers here in the united states and all around the world. i'm rose mary church at cnn global headquarters, this is n "cnn newsroom." and we begin with the migrant crisis. many have risked their lives in flimsy rafts and boats to reach the shores of greece in search of a better life, looking at live pictures here. some are being returned to an even more uncertain future, the first of three turkish ships ferrying migrants and refugees back to turkey from greece has just arrived in the turkish town of dikili. this is part of a controversial deal between the european union and ankara, one that's being denounced by human rights organizations. and we want to look at the points of the deal on handling refugees.
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turkey will now take back all migrants who arrive in greece from turkey without asylum status. they will resettle one asylum seeker but every returned to the country of turkey. the eu will speed up $3.3 billion in promised funds and visa requirements will be waived for turkish citizens by the end of june. both will negotiate the possible ex-session of turkey to the eu. and our phil black is in dikili, the turkish coastal town where the ships are docking. one of the three has certainly docked at this point. phil black, let's go to you first and talk about this processing procedure. we watched this first ship
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arrive there in dikili, and we watched the men on board, and those who are accompanying them disembark. so talk to us about what happens to them now. what do we know about that process? >> reporter: rosemary, you can see the first of the vessels, as you mentioned there has docked behind us. we're going to take you in and show you a little closely what is going on. turkish firms have gone aboard. they've set up that tarpaulin, the barrier to try to conceal from the assembled media here what's happening, but what we can see is one at a time, fairly sparsely, the migrants are being escorted off the vessel with one person escorting each of the migrants. they're then taken to an area where they're registered and processed. again, tarpaulins and barriers have been set up so we can't show you what's going on there
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either. most have pakistanis. some afghans as well, and we are told two syrians who have agreed to return voluntarily. the syrians, it is likely will be allowed to stay in the vast camps with the millions of other syrians granted protection here. those who have fled the conflict from across the border. the future of those from other countries is less clear. what we're hearing from the interior ministry is that those who are not syrians will not automatically be deported, but their cases will be considered on a case by case basis. but what we expect is that from here shall the registration, the processing, they'll be moved somewhere else nearby temporarily before being disbursed more broadly to the sorts of camps or centers that the turkish authorities consider appropriate, rosemary. >> phil, for any of those
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migrants for pakistan or afghanistan, how long would we expect them to stay in turkey before they're returned to their homeland? >> reporter: we really have no idea at this stage, rosemary. it's that unclear. their futures are that uncertain. we know they are making this return journey they never hoped to make. think about it, whenever they crossed this body of water in the other direction they did it with the hope of a new life in europe. now we are told bit interior ministry that their cases will be considered. we don't know what that means, but in most countries this is a long, slow process. it's not something that happens quickly, but what it means is that for these people here, their lives are now just under the cloud, really, a tremendous uncertainty. >> our phil black joining us
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live from dikili as we watch those people who have disembarked from that first ship. let's go to erin mclaughlin who is at the port city of lesbos. we are learning, they're learning more about the men who were on board that boat. talk to us about that. we understand they're pakistanis. they're from afghanistan. also some syrians, but what do we know about the numbers of those, those men on board? >> reporter: well, rosemary, the greek police just confirming to cnn that some 202 migrants in total were sent to turkey today. 136 returned from the island of lesbos. this island and then 66 from the island of kios, two pakistanis
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voluntarily returned. there were bangladeshis returned from kios, some 42 afghans among those returned. these individuals, we understand, from greek authorities, had not applied for asylum in greece. so they're seeming to be more economic migrants, and their peaceful deportation, which happened today, seeming to send a very strong message to other would-be migrants in turkey, not to risk their treasure, not to risk their lives in making that perilous journey to greece, that there is a strong possibility that they could be sent back to turkey. now the key question is, are people, are would-be migrants in greece listening, i'm sorry, in turkey, listening to that message. it was interesting, as the buses arrived earlier this morning to load onto those ships, the migrants coast guard vessel also arrived, towing behind it a gray
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dinghy. on board that coast guard vessel, more migrants from turkey, no doubt being sent to the same detention center that the migrants that were being sent back to turkey originated from. so authorities here saying in the past few days since this deal was signed, they have seen a dip in numbers here. less migrants arriving from greece, from turkey, rather, to greece. but they're saying time simply will tell if that message is reaching would-be migrants or simply did those numbers dip due to weather. it's still unclear. but again, very strong message being sent from eu officials this morning to not, especially to economic migrants, do not risk that perilous journey from turkey to greece. >> all right. just after 10:00 in the morning there in lesbos and dikili. many thanks to erin mclaughlin
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and phil black in dikili. as erin mentioned, turkey is not a safe country fort migrants. amnesty international says turkey is forcibly returning some to syria. we will speak with a top official at amnesty international about that in just a few minutes. want to turn now to pakistan, where memorial services have been held across the country, one week after an easter bombing at a crowded amusement park. more than 70 people were killed and hundreds wounded. a splinter group of the pakistani taliban says it targeted christians in the attack, and this is not a first, churches have been bombed before. sigh ma mosen joins us. let's talk about these terrorists targeting minorities.
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>> reporter: it's not just christians. shias, and even certain sects of muslims. they're trying to divide society in pakistan. i look at daily life in pakistan, and many minorities, technically christians, feel very isolated from the rest of society. let's take a look. gunmen guarding a church. i meet the pastor and say it's strange to see gunmen outside a place of worship. we have 20 to guard us on a sunday, he says this is the most densely christian area in pakistan. it was attacked last year. inside, the free church school. there are usually 40 children in this class, but many are too scared to attend since the
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lahore park bombing. the pastor has buried six of his flock in one day. >> translator: our people are very poor. they can't afford the time to protest the deaths. as christians, we love and pray for pakistan. >> reporter: omar sharif said every drop of blood is being counted. the score will be settled. it's being settled apparently by the military and police on raids on hideouts within the country. >> what about the beast within us, the beast within our society. if we do not address those problems, this military operation will be amiss. >> reporter: successive governments have made space for extremists. the roots of radicalization in pakistan are in its biased laws. >> when you exclude the role of religious minorities from your textbooks.
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when you start putting material that is biased or discriminatory toward other faiths -- >> reporter: his father was a pilot in two wars and has been removed from the history books. and this ad clearly says it's looking for non-muslims to clean toilets. the ad was later retracted, but exposed the institutionalized discrimination. we found the christian community feels isolated and neglected. >> translator: my husband is a day laborer but sometimes doesn't find work. i only get cleaning job. >> translator: it's clear our area is rejected because we're christians. no pavement, no running water. >> how can we live here? we're under attack. >> reporter: the blasphemy law has often been manipulated to persecute minorities, including christians. in a highly publicized case, a christian mother of five was
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sentenced to death for blasphemy. the muslim governor of punjab called for the death penalty to be revoked. he was gunned down by his own guard. at sunday service, a special song, praying not just for christians, but for citizens of all faiths in pakistan who should be seen as equals in the eyes of the state. ♪ alleluia >> reporter: rosemary, this really is a battle for mind-set here in pakistan, and when the church bombing happened i w was there where they formed a human chain of all faiths. those discriminatory laws include the fact that christians can't even become prime minister or president in pakistan. and until laws like that are
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changed, things won't get better here. >> indeed. the best form of attack is this kind of unity. a british doctor is denying allegation that he's been doping about 150 elite athletes. and the u.k.'s anti-doping agency is also under scrutiny. it has known about the case since 2014, but apparently failed to take action. let'sitgen live from london. what is likely to happen to the doctor involved and the u.k.'s anti-doping agency? >> reporter: well, it's still pretty early on in this investigation, rosemary, but it certainly is serious allegations both against this doctor and the anti-doping agency as well. if you look at the doctor, he apparently, over years, admitted to giving athletes, professional athletes, substances such as hgh and epo.
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apparently, he said that he did this in some undercover interviews, given to the sunday times newspaper here in the united kingdom where he said think were athletes from the english premier league, tour de france, of course track and field athletes, also, that received some of this doping treatment. on top of this apparently, he tonig doesn't have a license to practice medicine in the oounted kingdom. none of them at this point have any criminal repercussion. at this point all this is a journalistic vision by this newspaper. it does shed quite a light on the u.k. anti-doping agency where it has known about this case since 2014, because there was a whistle blower who came with information and said this is going on. this man admitted to this. you need to check this out. apparently they did but said they didn't have anything to
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substantiate that this was some wider-spread doping operation that was going on. tese are certainly very serious allegations, both against the doctor and the u.k. anti-doping agency, and of course there may be even more serious by the fact that we in an olympic year, we're very close to the rio olympics. so certainly, this is the last thing that sports here in britain and sports worldwide need at this point in time, rosemary. >> indeed. there has been a lot about this type of story. what's interesting is, this antidoping agency, not actually initiating a further investigation. >> reporter: yeah, it is quite interesting that they would get information from this whistle blower and then say that they had nothing that would further substantiate the allegation against this doctor. at this point in time we don't know how closely they actually looked into these investigations. maybe the information they got was not strong enough to further some sort of investigation into the practices of this doctor. maybe they feel like they didn't
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have jurisdiction at this point in time. those are things that are still going to be found out. of cou course english politics is involved. they want to look into this, not only because it's bad for the u.k. anti-doping agency, but because the anti-doping agency is very important in the world of anti-doping agencies. on the one hand, it's tachxed with testing russian athletes after they had their doping scandal in late 2015. and it's going to play a big role in the run-up to the olympics. and if they have any sort of thing like this investigation that sheds a bad light on the u.k. anti-doping agency, it's going to make things very difficult in the run-up to the efforts to stop doping at the olympics in rio this year. >> indeed, and fred pleitgen,ly st -- you will stay on this story and bring us updates. a decades-long conflict
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between azerbaijan and armenia has flared up again. and we will have more on a declared cease-fire ahead. plus, the u.s. presidential hopefuls are gearing up for the next round of primaries. the latest from the state of wisconsin. and after 15 seasons, the hit show "american idol", is fading into history. a look at this week's finale later in the show.
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right now the u.s. presidential hopefuls are focussed on one state, wisconsin. its key primary is just one day away. and republican front runner donald trump is trailing in polls there, behind senator ted cruz. the billionaire businessman said his other rival, governor john kasich, who is far behind in the delegate count, should pull out of the race all together. meanwhile, democrats hillary clinton and bernie sanders are accusing each other of taking significant donations from the petroleum industry. and when the democratic contenders are not attacking each other, they're railing
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against republican front runner donald trump. >> so let me mention to you cnn poll came out little while ago. we were beating donald trump by 20 points. [cheers and applause] and here in the great state of wisconsin, the last poll that i saw had us beating in wisconsin, trump, by 19 points. >> now a lot of republicans may be wringing their hands over the rise of donald trump. but look at wisconsin. and it's clear, mr. trump is just saying what many other republican politicians have long believed. >> well, donald trump may be firmly on the minds of hillary clinton and bernie sanders, but among wisconsin republicans, ted cruz leads the polls.
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he is what some people who showed up to see the texas senator had to say. >> i think senator cruz is the man who can do the job. i like everything he has to say so far. i get a good passion and a good feeling when i listen to him speak. i don't get that from any other candidate. >> i like his biblical views, what his plan is for us as a family and where he wants to take our country, not just politically, but biblically. >> i wanted to see him speak in person. he comes across as a little remote on television. >> it's too early to say who will win the general election, but there is one county in wisconsin who has a long history of picking the winning candidate. >> i heard we were predicting
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the outcome since 1964. i wouldn't call us a microcosm of the united states. [ thunder and rain >> i support bernie sanders. >> probably cruz. >> i'm going to vote for donald trump. >> i will vote for kasich. >> i will vote for hillary, and i will do so happily and proudly. >> my name is nancy mcdowell, and right now i live in winter wisconsin. if i were going to be one of those pure ideology people and vote my conscience, of course i'd vote for bernie sanders, but bernie sanders, even if he became president, i don't think would accomplish very much. ♪ >> trump has a very good chance to become president.
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my name's kathy overland, and i'm the business manager for fishing has no boundaries. and we're based in hayward, wisconsin where it started 30 years ago. to have every single other person running for the president's position jump on him and pounce on him instead of addressing issues that they feel are important. there's, they're not any better. the free education that bernie sanders has commented on, i, i do question that. where is the money going to come from? and where do we place a value on education if there is no cost? >> what do i think of the republican side? i heard it referred to as a clown car more than once. i did not come up with that expression. ♪ i support bernie sanders. i think he genuinely cares about people succeeding in this country, and i don't get that sense from our other candidates. >> you know, they're so busy attacking each other that
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they're not saying what's going, what they're going to do about anything that goes on. i think it's a case of the least evil is my way of looking at it. because none of them are, in my opinion, are worth a damn >> how can i help you. >> i was kind of thinking trump, but i am not so sure i like all the conflict and negativism that's coming out of things and kind of volatile, i guess would be a good word for it. >> you have to stand up for what you want in a candidate, and i don't support every single thing that donald trump has said, but i don't support every single thing that most politicians have said. >> the only two i think are probably trump and bernie sanders. and trump scares me.
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>> looks like the county is the one to watch. and remember to join us here on cnn all day tuesday for complete coverage of the critical wisconsin primary. dozens of migrants are arriving in turkey this hour. but m but will some of them be sent on to syria? the very country they fled? we will talk with an official about that. back in a moment.
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a warm welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and all around the world. you are watching "cnn newsroom." i'm rosemary church. want to bring you up to date on the main stories we have been
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watching this hour. in northwest pakistan, residents are dealing with deadly storms, at least 45 people are dead and 30 injured after heavy rains caused landslides and made the roofs on many homes collapse. an investigation is under way now after a deadly train crash sunday in the u.s. state of pennsylvania. officials say this amtrak train partially derailed after hitting a piece of construction equipment on the track. two amtrak construction workers died. dozens of passengers were injured. the first of three ships carrying dozens of migrants has arrived now in the turkish port of dikili. the migrants are being sent back from greece as part of a controversial deal between the european union and ankara to stem the migrant influx. it's expected thousands more will make that same journey in the days ahead. well, human rights
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organizations have denounced the eu/turkey migrant deal. amnesty international's director for europe and central asia says turkey is not a safe country for syrians who have fled their homeland and is getting less safe by the day. he joins us now from london. thank you, sir, for being with us. now we have learned, just in the last hour in fact, that these are men on board the three ships bound for turkey, and these men are from pakistan, apparently, afghanistan, sri lanka, mostly economic migrants, but some are syrian, and those are the ones that worry you. what are your main concerns with them returning to turkey? >> well, what we documented, of course, the week before last in one province in the eastern syria border provinces of turkey are a number of specific incidents. we spoke to individuals involved, being detained in cities, rounded up, herded back
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to syria in groups of between between 100 and 200. we documented a number of cases in great detail. it's an open secret that this is happening on a more frequent basis. we estimate with some confidence, that over the last few weeks as this deal has been looming, one, two, perhaps even a few more thousand syrians have been returned to the conflict that they're fleeing from, rendering turkey a fairly unsafe place to be returning more unregistered syrian refugees back to. >> what is likely to happen to these men at the moment? and it could be women and children the further down the line here. but what is likely to happen to these syrian men once they are returned to syria? >> it's very difficult to say. i mean, there is some hope that that turkey, under pressure, will refrain from practices of return to syria.
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in principle, the syrians return, possibly others as well, claiming asylum or other protection status in turkey, will go through a process that will grant them that. and they'll be able to get on with their lives. but we've seen, we've seen afghans involuntarily returned to afghanistan from turkey, syrians picked up, even in the western border provinces, those that were not registered in turkey being detained and shipped back. so there is a very real risk that syrians being returned currently under the eu/turkey deal will slip into a system that sees them forcibly returned to syria, unless turkey getsity act together very quickly. >> when you look at this european union deal with turkey, is there anything worth saving in that deal? anything worth redeeming at all? >> well, some of the essence of the deal is not structurally unsound. the idea of bringing turkey up to a level to which it would
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indeed be a safe country to return asylum seekers, other economic migrants is sound in principle if coupled by the other virtue of this dpeeal is organized transfer of refugees, syrian primarily, but possibly others from turkey to the eu. so there is, somewhere in this deal, a construct that is potentially sound. hou however, right now it depends on two fallacies, one, that there will be orderly procedures in greece to determine asylum status, and two, that turkey is a safe country for refugees and migrants, which it isn't for syrians. it isn't for afghans, and it isn't for others seeking refugee status in turkey. both these things being in place, it will take a long time. there is something salvageable in this deal. >> thank you so much for joining us and sharing your perspective
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with us. we appreciate it. >> thank you. azerbaijan says it will stop fighting armenia once again. a cease-fire was declared, but armenia says azerbaijan is still firing artillery and blames the country for the latest violence. >> reporter: this is the most wide-scale fighting that azerbaijan has attempted since restoring the cease-fire regime in 1994. >> cnn's becky anderson has more on the renewed hostilities. >> reporter: a decades-long conflict between azerbaijan and armenia flares again over the last couple of days. heavy fighting in the nagorno-karabakh region. and a helicopter is shot down.
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artillery pieces destroyed. both sides accuse each other of breaking a cease-fire that had brought calm to the region for years. >> it was a clear violation of the cease-fire regime, the international law, international humanitarian law and the geneva conventions. because whatever official has done in the zone of azerbaijan conflict was a conspicuous manifestation of terrorist and anti-armenian policy. >> reporter: but the foreign ministry says armenia is to blame, quote, armenian armed forces shelled the settlements near the front line where civilians closely live. the action by the armenian side killed and injured several civilians, damaged personal property. as an aggressive country, armenia bears responsibility for the current situation. end quote. it's been in dispute for years.
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the land is landlocked and claimed by azerbaijan but controlled by ethnic armenians who are backed financially and militarily by armenia. a 1994 cease-fire ended conflict that had lasted for since years, leaving tens of thousands dead. sporadic fighting has marred the truce ever since. calls to stop the violence came quickly after fear it is could quickly escalate. closer to the region, iran, an ally of armenia, and turkey, a close supporter of azerbaijan, have both pushed for a diplomatic solution. calls that if not heeded could potentially open up another proxy war with deadly consequences for the region. becky anderson, cnn, abu dhabi. we'll take a short break right here. but coming up next, flooding hits pakistan, killing dozens of people.
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how much longer the torrential rain will last. we'll take a look at that. we're back in a moment. parents d my grandparents. i was getting all these leaves and i was going back generation after generation. you start to see documents and you see signatures of people that you've never met. i mean, you don't know these people, but you feel like you do. you get connected to them. i wish that i could get into a time machine and go back 100 years, 200 years and just meet these people. being on ancestry just made me feel like i belonged somewhere. discover your story. start searching for free now at ancestry.com.
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torrential rain and flooding in northwest pakistan has caused at least 45 deaths and left dozens of people injured. the storm has led to landslides and damaged dozens of homes, causing roofs to collapse. we want to turn to our meteorologist, karen maginnis who has been keeping a close eye on this deadly flooding. any end in sight to this? >> the computer models are suggesting that this is going to ease up. but this is referred to as pre-monsoonal moisture. here are some of the reporting stations that we've seen, in excess of 100 millimeters. that is probably more than they see the entire month. but it just depends. it is going to be in a very isolated area.
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northern pakistan, northern afghanistan. that's where we've seen big clusters of thunderstorms, and there you see the impact after the water comes sweeping through. this is out of kabul, where it looks like several men are trying to move the car out of floodwaters. another view as we look toward peshawar, pakistan, where even some of the farmlands, the floodwater has pushed some of that rich farmland away. well, in the forecast, you can see a little bit of that moisture still making its way into northern afghanistan and pakistan, with primarily snowfall across the mountains, but some of these can become a little bit more enhanced. and so you might see, still, some isolated areas, where those rainfall totals are going to be more substantial than others, but very isolated. across europe, we've got what is going to be a slight risk for severe weather across the iberian peninsula. but look at that long stretch of moisture that's going to feed
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into, across france, also germany and the lowlands. there's another system that's going to push on in across ireland and northern ireland. take a look at the precipitation amounts that we're expecting over the next 48 hours, and even this over the last few hours as i've been looking at it has changed. we looking at southern spain and southern portugal to see the most precipitation. now it looks like it's going to remain a little toward the east and up along the spain and france border. and then pushing in to eastern france as well. showery weather expected for paris as well and extending up towards brussels and maybe towards frank fort and stuttgart, looking at scattered showers and storms there. just the usually expected showers through dublin and eden borrow and london. it is time to say thank you for the music. coming up, we look at the legacy
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of "american idol", as the show waves good-bye after seasons. and the west indies,
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it's the show that launched the careers of some of music's biggest stars. now after 15 seasons, american idol is coming to an end. ♪ ♪ my father god to thee ♪ author of liberty >> that is kelly clarkson, who won the very first season of the show back in 2002. she is scheduled to appear on the show's finale, along with country super star and fellow idol winner carrie underwood. "american idol's" final week begins monday. so as american idol fans try to
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digest this news, let's talk about why the show is ending at this time, what legacy it leaves behind and how it plans to mark the end of an era. >> yeah, it really is, we say the end of an era all the time. but really it is for "american idol", because it really did start this trend of all these voice singing competition shows, and even though some of them are really popular and "american idol" ratings have donropped through the years, they have produced amazing talent like jennifer hudson, like carrie underwood, so you have huge names that came out of "american idol", and you really didn't see that with a lot of competition shows that are still doing well in the ratings, like "the voice", for example. it made stars out of people like simon cowell and ryan seacrest.
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so even the judges became stars. that's its legacy, that it did produce talent. it wasn't so much about the judges, like "the voice", where you're caring about the judges and their cross talk and what they think about each other more than the contestants. >> it helped to be the first, didn't it? now another story creating a lot of buzz, caitlyn jenner, to make an appearance on the show "transparent", and she also took home her glad award. how's that being received? >> caitlyn jenner has been such a voice for the transgender community. so to go on, she's going to appear now on an episode or maybe more episodes of "transparent", which is such a great show. it's a show that has won two golden globes, five emmies, and it's been a force in the world of transgender talk and what people talk about and know about. and making it relatable to a lot of people. and that's what caitlyn jenner
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has done, even her persona and her show "i am cait." the creator said she was thrilled to have her, a dream come true, i think is what she said, to have caitlyn jenner appear on the show. >> and dream come true for her no doubt. and finally, very quickly, the batman superman seems to be losing a little steam and suffering a little in china. what's going on there? and will it make enough to cover costs? >> yeah. it opened at one of the biggest openings of all time last weekend and has been one of the biggest drops, really that you can imagine. 67% drop down to $52 million in the united states and dropped internationally. it still has made over $600 million internationally. so it's still doing okay, but not to what people expected. it did have bad reviews, not
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great reviews, i guess i should say. so i think people expected it to do better this weekend because it really is the start of this new justice league franchise. people are looking at how will this affect the franchise. "suicide squad", that's opening this summer, and you mentioned a lot of the international box office. in china it didn't do as well. although did open better than the "man of steel" movie did. it's affecting movies like that. but we'll have to see how it does the third weekend. it really is interesting, because it didn't open against anything big this weekend. so to take such a huge drop, 67%, was a big surprise to a lot of people. >> a lot of competition out there. kim serafin, thanks so much. the west indies are champions of the cricketing world. the team the indies eliminated, we were there to see who the
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fans were pulling for. >> reporter: england versus west indies, who would have predicted this lineup for the final at kolkata's gardens. and for indians who are still mourning the exit of their team from the semi-finals, a bit divided as to who to support. >> i expected india to qualify for the finals, but yes, i'm sure that west indies is going to take both the world cups. >> i love india. [cheers and applause] >> reporter: at this local bar many were expecting a low-key final. so there was a lot of disappointment. but perhaps most importantly, this city is still reeling after that tragic highway overpass collapse. but still, as we know, cricket is a religion here. so full house at the stadium. and pretty good crowd here.
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after theories, west indies has within the final, becoming the first to win the t20 world cup prize for the second time. as you can imagine, indians are excited, even though west indies is the team that knocked india out. many are saying at least they can say they lost to the winning team. kolkata, india. do remember you can always follow me on twitter anytime at rosemary cnn. early start is up next for our viewers here in the united states. for everyone else, there's another edition of "cnn newsroom." have a great day. . .
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in just one day, voters cast their ballot in key primary election. frontrunners donald trump and hillary clinton behind in the polls. could a key loss blunt their momentum? investigators revealing new information in the tedly new de rack derailment. and a mass deportation happening right now. shipping thousands from greece to turkey. we are live. good morning. welcome to "early start." i'm christine romans.

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