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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  April 10, 2016 1:00am-3:01am PDT

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a fireworks show turns tragnick southe trag-- tragnick southern india. nearly 100 dead, and the death toll keeps climbing:new developments in the brussels terror attacks. a cue suspect admits he was the man in the hat in this video. later, british royalty arrives in india. the duke and duchess of cambridge taking time to pay their reports to the victims of thetua 2008 mumbai attacks. welcome to our viewers here in the united states and around the world, i'm george howell. "cnn newsroom" starts right now.
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we begin this hour in india. the deadly scene at a religious festival after a fireworks display went terribly out of control, starting a huge blaze at a temple. this all happened early sunday morning in the southern state of carola. more than 100 are dead and more than 250 injured after the fireworks explosion and fire. police are charging temple authorities with culpable homicide. it is 1:30 in that part of the world. following these developments, we have more live from mumbai, india. many people killed, so many injured. there are still efforts underway to find people trapped in the rubble. >> reporter: that's right. we believe rescue efforts are still underway. there still could be people trapped inside the rubble. we don't know that for sure. but rescue efforts are very much underway.
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you know, the fire was so massive, it gutted two of the buildings within the temple complex. but the impact of so severe that several other smaller buildings within the complex fell down, and that's why when you look at the pictures you see so much rubble. there could be people still trapped inside. the death toll most certainly likely to rise. 98 people at the moment. it could rise significantly because many people are critically injured and are being treated in hospitals close by for burns, for problems due to suffocation. and also many being treated for broken bones with the impact of all those buildings falling on top of them and crushing them. we believe some bodies have been charred so badly that it's almost impossible to identify them. so overall, a really grim scene indeed with the death toll almost certainly likely to rise. >> let's talk more about the cause of the fire. what can you tell us from what
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you're hearing from investigators, and the charges that have been filed? >> reporter: yes, the cause of the fire, it was caused by fireworks. you know, this was supposed to be a night of celebration, of devotion at the temple. it's not uncommon in india to have overnight prayers at several hindu temples. as part of the celebrations, there were fireworks. there were also fireworks that were stored within the temple complex at a shed close by. and some of the sparks from the fireworks that were lit fell on these other fireworks that were stored in the shed. and that's what ignited them, creating this massive fire that basically engulfed some of the buildings just within minutes. now we are hearing from police authorities that they are registering a case of culpable homicide against temple authorities. we do not have too many details on that at the moment.
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at the moment, the focus remains firmly on getting medical attention to those who need it. the prime minister is on his way to the site. he's ordered helicopters to be mobilized to airlift people who need medical attention. we know that helicopter are on their way. we know the prime minister is taking doctors including burn specialists to the scene. the focus very much on getting medical attention to those who need it. george? >> hopefully they are able to get medical attention to the many people and also find people if they are still trapped in the rubble, that effort still underway. live from mumbai, thank you for your reporting. we'll they? touch. we move on to the investigation into the brussels terror attacks. major developments there as police say they have positively identified two key spoekuspects. first, muhammad abrini. he admits to being the
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mysterious man in the hat seen in surveillance video before and after the bombings. also, authorities arrested osama krayem, the second man involved in the attack on the brussels metro station. following this investigation, fred pleitgen is live in brussels where it is 10:05 in the morning. good to have you with us. with each arrest, investigators are getting a better sense of how much broader the terror network may be across europe. >> reporter: how much broader and how interconnected the cases where. in the case of muhammad abrini, he's been identified as the third man in the footage ofthe airport attack. he was already implicated in the paris attacks, as well, where apparently he drive salah abdeslam and others to the airport and drove one of the vehicles found in paris after the attacks took place.
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interesting also that he was able to remain on the run in de facto, the european union's capital, for several months, even though at that point in time he was already one of the most wanted people here in europe. you're absolutely right, the authorities really piece by piece getting around how interconnected this is, who played what role in the plots. certainly they hope it find out more from muhammad abrini. one of the things that's something, he himself confessed to being that third person on that surveillance footage. he apparently was confronted by the authorities here with facial recognition results. then at some point, he said, yes, it was indeed him. apparently gave details as to how he made his getaway from the airport. >> the other day we were talk, and you were at the scene of yet another raid in the area. so the question that i wanted to pose is, are investigators getting help now? throughout the community, they having people come to them, giving information?
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>> reporter: well, you know, it's interesting because they have been getting help from the local communities for quite a while. one of the big criticisms of the police in belgium has been that there have been in some cases the relatives of people radicalized going forward and saying, look, my child is in danger of going into syria, or my brother is in danger of going syria. in many cases, relatives felt that information was not taken seriously enough. of course, it is a fact that some of the people implicated in the paris attacks and brussels attacks got substantial help from some of their childhood friends in these communities. you look at the case of salah abdeslam who was on the run for several months and was found in an apartment with people he had known from childhood, with friends. the same is true for muhammad abrini. he was captured as well as two other, and were subsequently released. some of the raids have been taking place the past couple of days have been tipoffs. one of the things police told us yesterday is that we were at
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that raid that you were talking about, that large one. they say in the end, they didn't find any explosives, they didn't find weapons. they do believe that an apartment in the complex that was raided was indeed used as a safehouse by some of these terror suspects. certainly the police hope to learn more about the network from the people who have been captured. very important, of course, to capture some of the terror suspects alive. they also want to do more work with some of the local communities to get more of those tipoffs in the future. and of course, they hope for more cooperation, as well, than they have in the past. >> fred pleitgen live for us in brussels. thank you for your reporting. the u.s. secretary of state john kerry is meeting with foreign ministers for the -- and from other g7 countries. at the meeting they are discussing ukraine, north korea, and nuclear arms. this time the meeting is taking place in hiroshima, japan. that is where a nuclear weapon was found used in war. the u.s. dropped the bomb in august of 1945, leading to the
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end of world war ii. john kerry plans to visit a memorial to those killed in the bombings later in his visit. the u.s. navy forces and forces from 29 other countries are holding joint maneuvers in the waters around the middle east. they are calling this the international mine countermeasure experts. its official mission is to protect trade routes against possible threats including from isis and al qaeda. some of the exercises are taking place in the persian gulf where tensions continue to run high between iran and neighboring states. meanwhile, the u.s. air force has sent b-52 bomber jets to qatar. the aim, to help the air campaign against isis in syria and iraq. the fighter jets are replacing b-1 bombers that were pulled from qatar in january for upgrades. jar -- arwa damon with more on the current operations in the fight against isis.
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>> reporter: the aim is to cut isis resupply and escape routes. as the iraqi army attempt to advance. all along the terrain to the front lines, entirely flattened villages from battles past. when the kurdish peshmerga moved to stop the isis onslaught after the iraqi army fled. the 15th division retrained and restructured is the first unit back since then. in this operation, trying to move on a village just past the peshmerga's defensive berm. coalition air strikes and artillery pound isis targets relentlessly. we're still hearing the fighter jets overhead. a few hours ago, we were in the joint operations center watching the u.s. drone feed. there was a berm similar to this. the isis militant were lined up against it, firing on the iraqi army as they were attempting to advance. then there was an air strike.
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the entire room erupted in cheers. it was such a testimony to just how vital coalition air support is when it comings to altering the dynamics of the battlefield. the iraqis come up with the plan, the americans offer advice and integrate their capabilities of which the iraqis naturally want more. >> i think they're seeing success. success breeds success. >> reporter: colonel scott noman who refers to isis by its acronym daesh, partnered with the command. >> as we put pressure on the enemy up here, the daesh fighters are starting to surge in this area in particular because they feel the pressure toward mosul. and they know that if they lose this area it's a matter of time.
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>> reporter: that momentum is driven and sustained by the power america brings. while not right on the front lines, the u.s. presence has steadily been growing. and invariably putting troops in the line of fire. a marine was already killed on a newly established military base which we are not allowed to film. the countries intertwined on this complex battlefield. even with the current levels of u.s. support, success is neither quick nor guaranteed. operations can still end in failure. hours after we were told that only remnants of the isis fighters remained in this village, the iraqis partially retreated. in a moment of battlefield confusion, they're holding defensive positions until more reinforcements can arrive. arwa damon, cnn, iraq. now to greece.
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about 30 migrants say macedonian authorities violently forced them to return. they say they legally crossed into macedonia last month and were trying to cross into serbia. more than 12,000 migrants are living in poor conditions in the camp in greece. they've been stranded there since balkan countries closed their borders last month. the european ministers visited a migrant center in athens on saturday. it's been less than a week now since greece started sending back migrants who arrived from turkey. now greece says the controversial program needs some improvements. listen. >> translator: delays with departures were expected. we're in transition time. either system, greek or european, needs to be transformed and adapted to a new situation, to respond to it and handle the influx. we believe there after one or two weeks at most, we will see the new program starting to work. >> as the deal works presently
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for every syrian migrant returned, the e.u. will accept the screened syrian refugee from turkey. human rights groups are concerned that turkey will not protect migrants' rights. you're watching "cnn newsroom." and still ahead this hour, a bangladeshi blager ambushed -- blogger ambushed and killed for his viewers. the sixth writer murdered in bangladesh this year. more on the group claiming responsibility for the murder as "cnn newsroom" continues.
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welcome back to "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell. more protest are underway in bangladesh following the brutal murder of a secular blogger. his death the result of machete-wielding attackers who ambushed and then shot the 26-year-old writer. he died in dhaka on wednesday. an al qaeda wing in south asia has claimed responsibility. following the story, we have more live from new delhi this hour. good to have you with us. just the other day, we were speaking to our colleague, ivan watson, who described the
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protests as small but vocal in response to the latest death and demanding better protection for free speech are. these protests getting larger now? >> reporter: no, they're quite small still, george. these are students of juggernaut university, the same university that samad attended as a law student. according to locals, we've been talking to students there, probably it 100 or 200 max. still they're loud and aggressive in some sense in terms of trying to get the government to respond, to act, they're saying they're tired of what they call apathy and the government not doing enough. these attacks have happened way too many times, they say. so far, according to them, not enough of the perpetrators have been arrested. and their main concern, we spoke to one of them. the main concern is the largest impact this is going to have on bangladeshi society. it's not just about the attacks on bloggers.
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what it does is it instills fear amongst all the people in bangladesh to express what they want, do what they want, say what they want. that, they say, is very dangerous. george? >> what more can you tell us about the investigations into these claims that the death was caused by an al qaeda-linked affiliate? >> reporter: we just got off the phone with the minister there. he said they're looking into it. no arrests have been made. he denies that the branch of al qaeda, bangladeshi branch, has anything to do with them. he says this is a result of home-grown militants there behind a lot of attacks against bloggers. he also said that they have targeted two to three people, they're looking at them, watching them closely. they've been doing that for the past few days. they haven't arrested them yet because they want to make sure that these are the right targets.
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he mentioned that ten bloggers have died, been killed since 2012, and they've arrested 38 people so far for the deaths. he refutes the claim there hasn't been enough done. he says bangladesh is a secular country, but islam is the main religion. more than 90% of the country, bangladeshis, are muslim. there are anti-bless femi laws in place, and they need to be respected. they keep urging bloggers to say what you want, but be responsible about it and try not to criticize other people's religions, when it's islam, hinduism, when it's anything really. >> reporting live from new delhi, thank you very much for your reporting. we'll say in touch with you. in an unprecedented move, british prime minister david cameron has released his personal tax information for the last six years.
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this disclosure comes after mr. cameron admit that he benefited from an offshore trust that was set up by his late father. that fund was reportedly mentioned in the so-called panama papers leak. mr. cameron says he paid all the necessary taxes after selling his shares before the becoming prime minister. britain's prince william and his wife, the duchess of cambridge, are at the start of a very long week. a trip to india. the two began their visit by paying respects to the victims of the 2008 mumbai attacks. the couple will also meet with children's groups, ming well some of bollywood's celebrities and take a trip to visit. kate, live from london, always good to have you with us. good morning to you there. what can you tell us about the schedule for the royals while in india? >> reporter: the schedule is very packed. they're in mumbai today at the
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taj hotel playing tribute to those who lost their lives in the attacks. this afternoon, a cricket match with charity representatives. this evening, a glittering reception with members of the indian film world here, i think we'd say, film media, at the high commission. meeting with entrepreneurs and monday a birthday party for the queen, her 90th birthday soon. they're flying to delhi and paying tribute to gandhi and the indian soldier who died in the first world war for britain's war efforts. after that, they're going to the national park, then bhutan, and finish off to the taj mahal. their last stop, the taj mahal, the great monument to love which, of course, great pictures, significant pictures were taken of diana 24 years ago, then they fly home. >> talk to us, when the royals visit any country, how important is their presence there? when it comes to the
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relationship between the u.k. and india, what is the significance now? >> reporter: it's a very significant visit. this is their first visit for two years. the last visit, state visit made to india by any royal was the queen went to make a state visit in 1997. prince charles has been more recently, he went to stay at the taj hotel, as well. this is -- william and kate get much more attention, they get all the media attention that perhaps charles and the duchess of cornwall do not. and the requests for the royals to other countries are many more than the royals could accommodate because they're seen as such a great moment for creating diplomatic links, creating trade links, and really suggesting who are the great partners for britain in the future. certainly india, once upon a time part of the empire. and by 2030, estimated to be the most populous nation in the world. one million new people entering the work force every month or so. that suggests that britain and
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india want to create this strong relationship in the future, and certainly there are 1.5 million people of indian heritage in britain. it's something that there's a partnership they don't -- the duke and duchess want to continue. on certainly they're getting a chance for the duke to look into his something conservation, interesting elephant conservation at the national park. it covers all the bases really. >> kate williams live from london. thank you very much, and we will obviously ton watch the two royals as they continue their trip through india. you're watching "cnn newsroom." still ahead, bernie sanders clinches yet another win in the u.s. presidential race. both u.s. democratic candidates have their sights set now on a much bigger prize. that is the state of new york. the latest on the race for the white house ahead. plus, the race for the green jacket is on, as well. we will bring you all the action from the augusta masters. live in the u.s. and around the world this hour, you're watching "cnn newsroom."
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welcome back. to our viewers in the united states and around the world, you are watching "cnn newsroom." it is good to have you with us. i'm george howell. the headlines this hour -- official at a temple in southern india are facing culpable homicide charges after a fire there killed nearly 100 people. it happened in the southern state of of karola during a festival. some 250 people are injured. an unauthorized fireworks show sparked the flames early sunday morning. the third suspect in the brussels airport attack has been identified as muhammad abrini.
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he is suspected of driving the paris attackers, as well. police have also identified osama kryem as the second person involved in the brussels attack. the two are in custody. u.s. secretary of state john kerry is meeting with foreign ministers from other g-7 countries after arriving in hiroshima, japan, on sunday. among the issues that they are discussing, nuclear arms. hiroshima is the site of the first use of a nuclear weapon in war. the british prime minister has made six years of public tax information available to the public. protesters are criticizing mr. cameron for benefiting if offshore trusts. that fund was reportedly mentioned in the so-called panama papers. mr. cameron says that he has paid all appropriate taxes. america's choice 2016 and the race for the white house and
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another win in the west for bernie sanders. the democratic presidential candidate picked up the wyoming caucuses on saturday. he's now won eight of the last nine state contests. the vermont senator claimed victory with more than 55% of the vote, bringing a major jolt of momentum to the race against hillary clinton. >> i think that it is very fair to say that we were way, way behind during the first half of this contest, but we are having, to say the least, a very strong second half. and we are closing very fast. now that wyoming is behind us, we are here in new york state. >> bernie sanders optimistic and showing momentum there. he may have won wyoming, but the 14 delegates awarded were evenly split between the democrats. here is the delegate total as it stands now. hillary clinton leads with an
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estimated 1,790 delegates. bernie sanders has 1,113 delegates. the candidates are currently in new york campaigning ahead of the state's primary. clinton says that she needs that win in order to become the democratic nominee sooner to then focus on beating the republicans. here's what she had to say. >> thank you. we are on the path to the nomination, but i need to win big here in new york because -- because the sooner i can become the nominee, i can turn and unify the democratic party like i did with president obama back in 2008. [ applause ] and the sooner we can go after the republicans full time. >> hillary clinton there pressing ahead. the democratic primary in new york will be held on tuesday, april 19th.
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of course, we'll cover it here. and the new york spotlight, it will be the main focus for the cnn democratic presidential debate. hillary clinton, bernie sanders, they face off live from brooklyn this thursday, april 14th, 9:00 p.m. on the u.s. east coast. only here on cnn. as for republicans, ted cruz has won the colorado republican state convention. he won all 13 delegates at stake on saturday and a total of 34 delegates in the state. right now, donald trump leads the national republican delegate count with 746 delegates. ted cruz has 538 delegates, and john kasich in at 145. a toeltstal of 1,237 delegates needed to win the republican nomination. now to the "boston globe." they're publishing a satirical front page in sunday's paper warning readers what presidency
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with there trump would look like. the top headline blares, "deportations to begin." another headline reads, "markets sink as trade war looms." the joke-filled paper, dated april 9th, 2017, is in the newspaper's "ideas" section. it was produced by the editorial page of the "globe," which is separate from the main newsroom of the paper. now to peru where at least three people are dead after an attack ahead of sunday's elections there. a civilian and at least two soldiers were killed when they were transporting voting materials. you are looking at some of the victims' relatives here. rebels from the leftist guerrilla group the shining path are expected to be responsible. >> translator: these terrorist element use dates like the election to try to do these things that make them more visible. but i say to you that both the armed forces and the proven national police are right now
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covering and are present in 98% of all localities across the nation. and the daughter of the former president alberto fujimori is expected to win. her father is in jail for crimes against humanity. protesters worry she would continue the authoritarian style of her father. others associate her family name with economic progress. it is unclear which candidate she would face in a runoff. the masters golf tournament headed into the fourth and final day. defending champion jordan spieth still atop the leader board, but just barely. the last round could turn out to be a classic. >> reporter: the defending champion, jordan spieth, still setting records at the masters. he leads by a stroke after saturday's third round, although that's not as comfortable as he
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thought it was going to be. he lost three shots in the final two holes. nonetheless, he is in pole position ahead of sunday's final round. >> that wasn't a fun last couple of holes to play from the position i was in. i'm not going to dodge the question by any means. it's not going to be fun tonight for a while. then hopefully i sleep it off and it's fine tomorrow. i imagine that will be the case. >> he's sitting on top of the leader board where he has been for basically the last three years here. it's -- he's going out there tomorrow, and. it's his to lose. he's been in control of the golf tournament from the first day. yeah. i mean, pressure's -- haven't got a green jacket, he has. there's a lot of pressure that comes with that, too. >> reporter: rory mcilroy had a first round seat to the spills by the northern irish man who has dropped to five shots back.
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a couple of surprises. one came from the two-time masters champion. his last win coming in 1993. he rolled back the years, though, and is in contention at two off the pace. >> different ways of getting there. and it's a lot easier for these young guys. a lot less club into the greens and they can stop the ball while mine sometimes release. when i play really, really good, bring my a-game, i can still compete. >> reporter: at one point it looked as though jordan spieth would run away with it, but he hasn't managed to do so. with seven players within three shots of the lead and scoring conditions expected to improve tomorrow, we are potentially in for a grandstand finale tomorrow. the defending champion leads, the world number one, jason day, also very much in the hunt. don riddell, cnn, august a. boxer manny pacquiao is
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going out with a big win. the welterweight powerhouse beat timothy bradley jr. by unanimous decision in saturday's bout. they had squared off twice before. he got a controversial decision in the faceoff and pacquiao got the unanimous decision in the rematch. he's hanging up his gloves to focus on his political career in his native philippines. the nba's golden state warriors two games away from basketball history after squeaking past the memphis grizzlies on saturday. they had 71 wins in their regular season. michael jordan's bulls have the most wins in a season at 72. with two games left, the warriors are setting their sights left on 73. they'll have to get past the san antonio purse first, who are undefeated at -- spurs first, who are undefeated at home. if they can do, that they'll see the grizzlies again on tuesday.
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that is shaping up to be one to watch. you're watching "cnn newsroom." still ahead, cnn speaks to a mexican prosecutor who wants interrogated el chapo. find out why the drug lord showed up 13 hours late to the interview, still ahead. "why are you checking your credit score?" "you don't want to live with mom and dad forever, do you?" "boo!" (laughs) "i'm making smoothies!"
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"well...i'm not changing." "so, how can i check my credit score?" "credit karma. don't worry, it's free." "hmmmm." "credit karma. give yourself some credit."
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welcome back to "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell. so if you have a dental procedure this week, maybe you'll want to pause in watching this story. a man in indiana says that he went to the dentist to have four teeth pulled. when he woke up, all of his teeth were gone. we have more from our affiliate wrtv. >> reporter: last month, donnie brisbee says he went to white river dental expecting to have four teeth removed. >> these two and these two over here. >> reporter: four turned into a lot more.
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>> he's 36 years old and have to walk around with no teeth in his head. >> reporter: wife amanda says after 5.5 hours in the waiting room, she demanded answers. >> what do you mean elected to pull all of his teeth? she said they were afraid that the infection would spread from the one tooth that was abscessed, there's blood all over him, all over his shirt. my husband is droopy eyed, he's not responsive. >> reporter: amanda says they called an ambulance, and donnie coded twice on the way to columbus regional hospital. >> he had been put to a medically induced coma, and he was laying there crying. and this dentist needs to be stopped. >> reporter: donnie says he remembers very little, but he'll never forget when it all sunk in. >> i'm so ashamed because i have no teeth now. i wake up with no clothes on. i'm scared. >> reporter: he says he still has blood clots as a result of the work. and what's worse, he says he still doesn't know why his teeth were taken. >> i just want to get teeth in
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my head and go on. >> that is just a terrifying -- feel terrible for him and that family. that was a report from melissa majado from wrtv. the grigsby family says they plan to file a malpractice suit.a consulting firm released a statement on behalf of the dental office saying the dentist is not commenting due to health privacy laws. mexico's notorious drul drug lord, juan guzman, known as el chapo, is behind bars, but his cartel is operating without him. cnn spoke with a prosecutor who worked with el chapo years ago. he remembers it vividly and says the cartel leader is poisonous. rafael romo with more on this bizarre interrogation. >> reporter: barrel after barrel of drug-making chemicals, nearly
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52 tons altogether. plastic containers full of toxic liquids totaling more than 19,000 gallons. it was all seized by mexican authorities last week in the mountains of northern mexico, turf of the drug cartel. its leader, joaquin guzman, known as ench-- as el chapo or shorty in english, has a cartel that hasn't stopped megan mcgrath meg. no surprise to this attorney, one of a handful of prosecutors who have interrogated the drug lord. "el chapo means hatred, death," he says. "he poisons young people not only in mexico but also in the united states." ortega interrogated el chapo as a suspect in 2000 as part of an investigation into the murder of a mexican cardinal. his first shock -- the suspect arrived almost 13 hours late. the explanation from el chapo
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himself made him furious. he said, "look, today i had had my conjugal visit. afterwards, i went to the steam room, and then i went to take a nap so that i could greet you as you deserve." he didn't behave as a prisoner, ortega says, but as the man in charge. custodians acted as his personal assistants. "el chapo was the prison owner at that point. it was as if he were someone inviting us to his house," ortega said. the attorney gave us a copy of the deposition he took that day, march 16, 2000. this is el chapo's signature, right above that was ortega's el chapo would escape twice in the next 15 years including his breakout last july using a
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mile-long tunnel fitted with a motorcycle on tracks. guzman remains behind bars. mexican officials have indicated multiple times that they have every intention to extradite the drug lord to the united states. the process may take from one to five years, and some fear el chapo may escape again. el chapo faces multiple drug trafficking and murder charges in mexico and in at least seven u.s. jurisdictions. ortega must wait his turn to finish the interrogation he began 15 years ago. rafael romo, cnn, mexico city. now to weather and a deadly heat wave that continues across india. residents there desperate for the cooling rains brought in by the annual monsoon. our meteorologist, derek van dam, here to talk to us about that. derek? >> reporter: george, the monsoon rains typically don't move into southern india until the end of may, early june. so people are desperate for those cooling winds to bring in
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this relief. it's just not here yet. and they'll have to deal with the next several weeks of temperatures above 40 degrees celsius quite eisley. they're co-in-- easily. they're co-existing with drought conditions, exacerbating the problems in this particular part of the world. there is south central india. the government is trucking in fresh water to help some of the local communities there. there's even been a migration of people from the smaller communities into the larger cities like mumbai so they can find the fresh water. and in fact, the indian government is launching a mobile app that's going to alert citizens if temperatures will rise above 40 degrees celsius. and the problem here sorry that we're coming off of an extremely hot 2015. if you recall, that was actually the year just last year that we had the fifth deadliest heat wave on the planet's history. that was in india. you can see the other four with the fatalities, over 70,000 people in europe.
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a few years ago, we all recall that. this is a look at the temperatures just on saturday alone. and you see the dark shade of referendum across the central and eastern sections of india. that location has had temperatures consistently over 40 degrees. that's all about the sun angle this time of year. and just before those monsoon rains settle in, it's so intense. and also, the other problem here is that we have big mountain range to the north of india, and that is blocking any kind of cooling wind coming from the north. people are desperate for the change in weather patterns to take place. how does our body react to heat? typically we sweat. the problem in india is that there's so much humidity and high deputy leve-- high dew poi levels that the cooling mechanism, our reaction to heat, when you sweat, the cooling process doesn't occur. it physically can't occur. and the problem is that people succumb to the difficult nature of heat stress. i want to end on a good note out
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of the u.s. state of florida. george, this is called a subsea art examination. the second largest artificial reef. people decided they would display their art on this artificial reef. the art is enclosed in plexiglass and mounted on silicone-sealed steel frames. by the way, they are 27 meters below the surface of the water. >> that is fascinating. >> reporter: next time you go to the florida keys, i think that should be on your to-do list. >> definitely. thank you very much. >> all right, george. you're watching "cnn newsroom." still ahead this hour, a presidential campaign for the age in the united states. we'll focus in on the one buzz word, though, that has been a constant presence throughout the race. can you guess what it is?
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welcome back to "cnn newsroom" i'm george howell. the word "liar" has become the biggest buzzword in u.s. politics. the presidential candidates can't seem to say it enough about each other. in fact, it's used so much that our jeanne moos had to sort out the "l" word mess for herself. here's her take on it. ♪ >> reporter: remember when the "l" word was all about lesbians? well, in campaign 2016, this is the "l "word on everyone's lips.
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>> he lies! i never saw a guy lie like this guy. >> reporter: trump says it about ted cruz and hillary clinton. >> she lies like crazy about everything. >> reporter: hillary says it about the sanders campaign. >> i am so sick of the sanders campaign lying about this. sick of it. >> reporter: sanders says it about trump. >> donald trump is a pathological liar. >> reporter: and trump has turned it into a nickname. >> i call him lying ted. he's lying ted cruz. >> reporter: a name even a pro-kasich super pac has jumped on. >> many call him lying why ted. lied about ben carson to win in iowa. >> reporter: slithering around like a python around his neck. >> if ted cruz's mouth is moving, he's living. >> reporter: i tell you no lie when i say the award for most accusations of lying uttered in a single paragraph goes to ben shapiro. the conservative commentator trashed trump after the female reporter was grabbed by the
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donald's campaign manager. >> look, lying liars lie. this is the trump campaign where lies are told and lies are told to cover up the lies and new lies are told in order to cover up the lies that were told about the lies. >> reporter: nine "l" words. sort of makes the measly one shouted at president obama by republican congressman -- >> lie! >> reporter: seem quaint. when it comes to the most egregious untruths -- >> pants on fire. the 2015 politifact lie goes the collective misstatements of donald trump. >> reporter: for campaign song of 2016 we nominate the castaways hit from 1965 -- ♪ lie lie lie lielie ♪ >> reporter: look likes we'll need a bigger hose. >> biggest liar. >> lie. >> reporter: new york. thank you for joining us. i'm george howell at the senior citizen auto -- at the cnn center in atlanta. we'll be back after the break.
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you're watching cnn the world's news leader.
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ahead this hour, hundreds dead, hundreds dead and injured after a temperature after a fire in southern india what. rescuers continue to search for survivors. a mystery man no more. police in belgium confirmed that muhammad abrini is the man in the hat seen in surveillance video after and before the brussels airport bombings. and britain's william, prince william and his wife begin a visit to india in mumbai. we'll have that story ahead. live from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, welcome. to our viewers here in the
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united states and around the world. i'm george howell, "cnn newsroom" starts right now. we begin this hour in southern india where rescue effort are still ongoing. 11 hours after an explosion at a massive fire during a religious celebration. this happened at a temple during a festival in the southern state of karola. nearly 100 people are dead, and hundreds are injured. the fireworks display got out of control sparking flames. it is 2:31 in that part of the world p.m. that is where we have developments live from mumbai. what can you tell us about this effort to find people who may be still trapped under the rubble and debris? >> reporter: that's right. there is a massive effort underway right now to help people. first of all, to see if there are any people or any bodies still trapped under the rebel.
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there is also a massive outpouring of grief across the country and an impressive and coordinated effort across the country to get help to this area. prime minister modi reacted very quickly. he is on his way to the scene of the tragedy, taking with him a team of doctors which include burn specialists. we're also seeing indian navy ships, you know, loading relief and medical supplies. they're going to be taking it toward the area. a helicopter has landed carrying emergency supplies. and we've seen forces and soldiers deployed from neighboring states and a team of doctors. there is a massive and coordinated effort across the country to bring help to this temple complex, to bring help where they need it the most. they do need help. as you know, the death toll, 100 people now, several hundred people are injured. some of them are critically injured and are in hospitals close by where they're being
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treated for injuries, for burn, for complications due to asphyxia and suffocation, for broken bones because not only did we have massive fire, flames engulfed the buildings, we saw neighboring buildings within the temple complex in the rubble where they fear some people might still be trapped inside. george? >> the investigation is still ongoing. what do we know at this point about the cause of this fire and the charges that have resulted from it? >> reporter: what we know about what caused the fire is fireworks. it was supposed to be a night of celebration, of devotion, and part of the celebration meant lighting fireworks. what happened was that there were extra fireworks that were stored this n a shed within the complex. some sparks from the fireworks that were lit fell on these other fireworks that restored
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and ignited them. we believe there was a very, very loud sound that shook all the buildings. you know, the area was -- the complex was in flames immediately. causing so many people to lose their lives. what we know about the cause is simply fireworks. in terms of charge, what we are hearing now is that the police are in the process of filing a case, registering a case against temple authorities. we don't have too many details on that yet. the focus remains on getting medical attention to those who are injured. we are working to get details of what the police is working on, what kind of case they are going to be preparing against temple authorities. >> live for us from mumbai. thank you very much for your reporting. we'll stay in touch with you. we move on now to the terror investigation in belgium. authorities there say the terrorists who targeted brussels had originally intended to hit
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paris. police brought in a few suspects over the weekend, identifying two major suspects in the bombing at the brussels airport and metro station. now prosecutors say that their terrorist cell was planning an attack in paris. the arrests of key members forced them to strike closer, closer home to belgium. we'll go live to fred pleitgen, who is following the story for us. with the new arrests, are investigators getting a better send of how broad or how wide this -- better sense of how broad or how wide this network might be across europe and possible other attacks? >> reporter: absolutely, george. it seems that they've already gotten a wealth of information so far. if we look at the newest statements by the belgian federal prosecutor's office, they seem to have a better sense of what the group was planning. of course, that would also give them somewhat a better sense who've still might be out there and what sort of attacks might have been planned for the future. it's interesting this new information that came out. there was speculation when the
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attacks happened whether or not the original aim of the terrorist attacks might have been a different place than brussels. you'll recall, they happen three days after salah abdeslam, believed to be one of the logistical, not mastermin ds mmt logistically behind the attacks, was arrested. i want to read a statement from the belgian federal prosecutor's office because it is interesting. they say the federal prosecutor's office can confirm that numerous elements in the investigation have shown that the terrorist group initially had the intention to strike in france again, eventually surprised by the speed of the progress in the ongoing investigation. they urgently took the decision to strike in brussels. that is something that meshes with some of the information we were getting after the brussels attack. you'll recall there is a laptop that was found by the suicide bombers that apparently had this man saying he felt the group was close to being captured,
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especially since abdeslam had been imprisoned, and that therefore, they felt they needed to strike quickly. some of that seems to be corroborated. more importantly probably, it seems as though the belgian authorities are making a lot of progress trying to decipher, as you say, how wide the network might be, and especially who still might be out there who could be dangerous, not just for the security in brefls brussels but in other european places, as well. >> you say making progress. the question, are investigators getting more help, more support from people in these various neighborhoods who may know something or know people who may possibly be involved? >> reporter: well, look, obviously the attacks that happened in brussels and attacks in paris, as well, were a great shock to the authorities. of course, also to many people in these neighborhood, as well. it is a complicated picture that you find when you go to some of these neighborhoods. i've been to places like
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molenbeek, places where radicalized people came from there. in some cases, families did go to authority and said our son is in danger of being radicalized or our brother is in danger of going to syria. in some cases they feel authorities didn't act on the information they were given. on the other hand, we have also spoken to the mayor of molenbeek who said of course we need more community outreach. we need to make sure that we give these people a different path than the path that some of them have taken. it is a complex problem, one that obviously comes into being from decades of policies that have been in place in this country, decades of these places becoming the way that they are now. it certainly has been identified as something that the authorities need to deal more with. also, community leaders need to deal more with, as well. >> complicated indeed, as you point out. fred pleitgen live in brussels.
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thank you. the u.s. secretary of state john kerry has arrived in hiroshima, japan. he's meeting with other foreign ministers from g-7 countries to discuss ukraine, north korea, and nuclear arms. later, secretary kerry will visit a memorial for the people killed in the first use of a nuclear bomb in war. it happened in hiroshima in august of 1945. the united states dropped the bomb leading to the end of world war ii. before heading to japan, john kerry made a surprise visit to afghanistan. he met with officials there to discuss political infighting. just after his plane took off, though, four explosions went off in the capital city. nick paton walsh was on the ground from kabul and has this report. >> reporter: those four explosions seemed to mostly hit the diplomatic areas of kabul, the key parts of the
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infrastructure. they came pretty much minutes after john kerry had departed the country. we had a night suggesting -- a note suggesting he was airport significantly before we heard the actual explosions. it's unclear where he was. initial reports suggest it was rockets and that we're not hearing of many major injuries at this stage. late at night here, scant information available. goes to hammer home frankly how fragile security is. not just here in kabul, even at a time of lockdown for a key %-pp with this very volatile fighting season in the warmer months, expected to start soon. john kerry was here, he said clearly to try and shore up the national unity government that he helped create a number of years ago now, in between the president here now and the man he fought the election against, the man who's the country's ceo, abdullah abdullah. not necessarily known to have the best working relationship
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here. many have said the administration is hamstrung by the rivalry. many key posts not yet filled. john kerry was here to make an explicit demand that the government should work as hard as it could toward the afghan people in the months it has left before it hits key deadlines for its future ability to exist, frankly. above all, i think the agenda here has been about security. the taliban on the march in helmand where they are deeply threatening its main city at this stage and across the country where u.s. officials are accepting how last year was a terrible year for afghan security forces. they lost 5,500 soldiers. afghan civilians bearing the brunt of the violence. 11,000 of them injured and killed last year. 3, 500 dead. a terrifying bleak summer we may have ahead in afghanistan. i think frankly the fact that the lockdown put in place for someone like john kerry, the u.s. chief diplomat coming here,
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being unable to prevent those four explosions hammers home how fragile afghanistan is and so much that needs to be done to put the taliban on their back foot when, frankly, now they're doing so well on the battlefield, they're refusing all demands for talk peace at the table. cnn, kabul. there is more of nick's reporting in afghanistan that we'd like to tell you about. you don't hear much about them, but there are battles being waged against militants across the country now where it shows how far the taliban has advanced. >> reporter: hundreds of americans and britains died for helmand. many in this town with the u.s. army involved heavily in clashes. now afghanistan is quickly watching helmand.
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>> nick paton walsh on how they're defecting to the other side, in "saving helmand from the taliban," monday here on cnn. about 30 migrants say macedonian authorities violently forced them to return to greece. they say they crossed legally into macedonia last month and were trying to go on to serbia. more than 12,000 migrants are living in poor conditions in the camp in greece. they've been stranded there since balkan countries closed their borders last month. some say they are now losing hope. >> translator: we feel like we are in prison. i feel like i am in prison. i'm banned from moving anywhere or replying anywhere. two months in europe, and we experienced more injustice than five years of war under bashar al assad. there is no humanity here.
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>> it's been less than a week since greece started sending back migrants who arrived from turkey. athens acknowledges the controversial program needs some improvements. you're watching "cnn newsroom." ahead this hour, students have gathered outside a university in bangladesh protesting the brutal death of a bangladeshi blogger. his murder is not the first of its kind. details ahead. a royal tripoli india. find out what william and kate have planned for their first visit to the country coming up. open up a lot of dawn. tough on grease...yet gentle. dawn helps open... something even bigger. go to facebook.com, dawn saves wildlife. like @pigskinsusan15, who writes,
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your concert style might show your age, your skin never will. with olay you age less, so you're ageless. olay. ageless. in southern india, nearly 100 dead after the fire that you see at the temple pictured before the tragedy. these are images of the aftermath of the fire that happened there. a fireworks show during a festival sparked the flames. more than 250 people are being treated at hospitals with various injuries. we're following the story for you. in bangladesh, more protest are underway following the brutal murder of a bangladeshi secular blogger. machete-wielding attackers ambushed and shot the 26-year-old writer in dhakaa odds. an al qaeda linked affiliate in south asia has claimed
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responsibility. cnn has more on the story live for us from new delhi this hour. good to have you. this has been described just last hour, as you told us, as small but vocal group of protesters. what can you tell us about their demands given the latest murder? >> reporter: i think the students of juggernaut university, the same university that samad attended as a law student, they've been protesting all morning, blocked the roads leading up to the campus. again, as you mentioned, a small group according to locals there, maybe a maximum of 200 to 300. that's not a lot of people considering we're used to when we talk about protest in this part of the world. still, they are still determined. what they're demanding is action and just from the government. they're saying enough is enough. way too many attacks have happened. they are tired, they say, of the government's apathy and the culture of impunity.
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so they want the government to act. and the other thing they keep mentioning, this is, you know, more of the larger impact that these kinds of attacks and bloggers are having on bangladeshi society. it's worth mentioning that bangladeshi muslims are by and large moderate. they're not like some of the communities we see perhaps in the leaf or pakistan. there's a very vibrant intellectual community. they discuss ideas, all kinds of ideas, so many news channels there, publications, as well. there is this fear that these attacks will suppress this kind of thought, instill fear so regular people, not just bloggers who are outspoken and vocal about these things, who are atheists in in this case, but regular people will be too scared to talk and express their feelings. that, they say, is dangerous for society looking to change and is progressing. george? >> on that point, what can you
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tell us about officials saying that if you criticize a religion, it has to be done responsibly? >> reporter: that's right. that's what all the officials we have been talking to the law minister, they keep reiterating the point saying, look, bangladesh is a secular country. it is a constitutional right. freedom of speech is a constitutional right. people should have the right to use that right. at the same time, people should be responsible because bangladesh, islam is the main religion there. more than 90% of the people are muslim. people should be responsible about what they say and respect all religions because that in itself is a right. george? >> as far as the cause, when it comes to the investigation, the people behind it, what more do we know?
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>> reporter: we just got off the phone with the minister not too long ago. he said there are these -- bangladeshi branch of al qaeda has taken responsibility. he denies the claims and says he thinks and believes that it's actually home-grown militants that's behind this latest attack, and in fact behind most attacks against bloggers. no arrests have been made so far, but they are crolosely watching two to three people. arrest haven't been made because they are not 100%% sure they're targeting the right people. still, an investigation is underway. he wanted to mention that 38 people have been arrested so far and face prosecution for the death of ten bloggers since 2012. he refutes the claims that nothing has been done and people have not been prosecuted. >> thank you for reporting live from new delhi. we'll stay in touch. britain's prince william and his wife, the duchess of
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cambridge, are at the start of a week-long trip to india. the two are currently meeting with young cricket players and representatives from three children's charities. earlier, the royals paid their respects to the victims of the 2008 mumbai attacks. later, the couple is due to ming well some bollywood celebrities there. for more on the royal couple's trip to india, we're joined once gain by royal commentator and historian kate williams. good morning to you there live in london. >> good morning, george. >> it's good to have you, as always. >> thank you. >> this is certainly an important trip to india and a packed schedule for the two royals. >> reporter: it's a very packed schedule. they've tried to cram in 22 engagements in under seven days because they want to get back to their children. we see them in mumbai, then they're going to delhi, and from there they're going to a national park to discuss the question of poaching. they'll go to bhutan to meet the king and queen, historic visit.
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then they're coming back to delhi and will go to agra, the last stop of their tour, 24 pictures after diana took the historic pictures there. they'll pose at the taj mahal and fly home. they flew overnight from london last night. they haven't had a chance to rest. they went straight to the taj hotel, meeting the people who suffered and struggled during the terrible bombing there in 2008. allowing the -- meeting members of the cricket match and children at various charities. a nonstop tour. >> any time any royals visit a specific country, it's a big deal. specifically in india, how is the couple received? >> they're received very well. there are historic link between britain and india. over 7,000 soldiers in india died -- 70,000 soldiers in india died as part of the first world war struggle. william and kate will honor them. and there are so many of
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extraction who live in britain, 1.5 million. the there's a close and friendly relationship between britain and india. the known went in -- the queen went in 1997, charles went more recently. and significantly for william and kate, we see the beginning of them taking on a more statesman-like role. the queen is cutting back on foreign travel. it's too much for her. she's about to turn 90. and william and kate themselves are about to assume the role that once upon a time the queen did, of creating trade and diplomatic links and creating a presence of britain across the world. >> i'd like to show our viewers what we're seeing here on the other side of the screen, live images of the royal couple there in mumbai. and i'd like to ask you just about the significance specifically when it comes to the mumbai attacks. the simple fact that they are there to visit and pay their respects. >> yes, the mumbai attacks if 2008, terrible attack on the taj hotel, a popular, very expensive
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hotel. i've stay thursday. it's very, very nice. president obama stay thursday, as has prince charles. william and kate have chosen it particularly to stay as opposed to others. the british high commissioner's residence. they're showing respect to those who suffered, those who died, and those members of hotel staff who were awfully brave during the occasion. also to show to the world and many in britain, as well, that life must go on. there have been concerns about attacks, that the royals shouldn't be there, the security is -- with the heightened terrorist alert. what william and kate are saying here is that life must go on and we must not be cowed by terrorism. an important message. >> thank you very much for being with us again as the royal couple spends nightmare india. >> thank you. also in the u.k., in an unprecedented move, british prime minister david cameron has released his personal tax information for the last six
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years. mr. cameron admit he benefited from an offshore trust set up by his late father. protests criticize mr. cameron, though, after that fund was reportedly mentioned in the so-called mpanama parents leak. he says he paid -- panama papers leak. he said he paid the taxes shortly after becoming prime minister of the u.k. coming up, a powerful symbol of military power is joining the fight against isis. more on the b-52 bombers sent to qatar and the effect of america's air campaign in iraq. live in the united states and around the world, this hour, you're watching "cnn newsroom." question, are my teeth yellow?
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a warm welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. you are watching "cnn newsroom." it is good to have you with us. i'm george howell. the headlines we're following this hour -- rescue operations are underway in southern india after an explosion and fire that killed nearly 100 people. it happened in the state of kerala during a festival there. hundreds are injured. an unauthorized fireworks show sparked the flames early sunday morning. belgian prosecutors say that the terrorists who attacked brussels set out hit paris instead. they added that the arrests some key members of their cell forced them to hit closer to home than in belgium. many of the suspects in custody already had ties to the last attack in paris. the british prime minister has made his personal tax information public, six years'
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worth. protesters criticizing david cameron from benefiting from an offshore trust. mr. cameron says he's paid all the appropriate taxes. u.s. secretary of state john kerry has been meeting with foreign ministers from other g-7 countries after arriving in hiroshima, japan, on sunday. on the agenda, nuclear arms. hiroshima is the site of the first use of a nuclear weapon in war by the united states. the u.s. air force is sending b-52 bomber jets to qatar. the aim is to help the air campaign against isis in syria and iraq. the fighter jets are replacing b-1 bombers that are being upgraded. our senior international correspondent, arwa damon, has more on the impact of u.s. operations in iraq in the fight against isis. >> reporter: the aim is to cut off escape rights as the iraqi
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army attempts to advance. all along the terrain to the front lines, entirely flattened villages from battles past. when the kurdish peshmerga moved to stop the isis onslaught after the iraqi army fled. the 15th division retrained and restructured is the first unit back since then. in this operation, trying to move on a village just past the peshmerga's defensive berm. coalition air strikes and artillery pound isis targets relentlessly. we're still hearing the fighter jets overhead. a few hours ago, we were in the joint operations center watching the u.s. drone feed. there was a berm similar to this. the isis militants were lined up against it, firing on the iraqi army as they were attempting to advance. and then there was an air strike. the entire room erupted in cheers. it was such testimony to just how vital coalition air support
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is when it comes to altering the dynamics of the battlefield. the iraqis come up with the plan, the americans offer advice and integrate their capabilities of which the iraqis naturally want more. >> i think they're seeing success. and they -- success breeds success. >> reporter: colonel scott noman who refers to isis by the arabic acti acronym daesh -- >> the fighters are starting to surge in this area in particular because they feel the pressure toward mosul. they know that particularly in this area if they lose this, it's only a matter of time because the momentum is on the security forces' side. >> reporter: that momentum albeit shaky is driven and sustained by the power america brings. while not right on the front lines, the u.s. presence has steadily been growing.
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and invariably putting troops in the line of fire. a marine was already killed on a newly established artillery base which we are not allowed to film. america and iraq's fates are to a certain degree inextricably intertwined on this complex battlefield. even with the current levels of u.s. support, success is neither quick nor guaranteed. operations can still end in failure. hours after we were told that only remnants of the isis fighters remained in this village, the iraqis partially retreated. a moment of battlefield confusion. they're now holding defensive positions until more reinforcements can arrive. arwa damon, cnn, iraq. america's choice 2016 and the race for the white house and another win to the west for
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bernie sanders. the democratic presidential candidate picked up the wyoming caucuses on saturday. he has now won eight of the last nine state contests. the vermont senator claimed victory with more than 55% of the vote, bringing a major jolt of momentum now in the race against hillary clinton. >> i think that it is very fair to say that we were way, way behind during the first half of this contest, but we are having to say the least a very strong second half. we are closing very fast, and now that wyoming is behind us, we are here in new york state. >> sanders may have won wyoming, but the 14 delegates awarded were split evenly between the democrats. here's how the delegate total stands as of now. hillary clinton leads the overall count with an estimated 1,790 delegates. bernie sanders has 1,113
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delegates. the candidates are currently in the state of new york campaigning ahead of that primary there. clinton says she needs that win in order to become the democratic nominee sooner, to then focus on beating the republicans. here's what she had to say. >> thank you. we are on the path to the nomination, but i need to win big here in new york because -- because the sooner i can become the nominee, i can turn and unify the democratic party like i did with president obama back in 2008. [ applause ] and the sooner we can go after the republicans full time! >> the big prize now is new york. that democratic primary will be held on tuesday, april 19th. the "boston globe" is publishing a satirical front page in sunday's paper warning
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readers what a donald trump presidency might look like. here you go. the top headline on the fake front page reads, "deportations to begin." another headline reads, "markets sink as trade war looms." the joke-filled paper dated april 9th, 2017, is in the newspaper's ideas section. was produced by the editorial page"globe" which is separate from the newsroom. and hillary clinton and bernie sanders, they face off live from brooklyn this thursday, april 14th, 9:00 on the u.s. east coast, only here on cnn. as for republicans, ted cruz has won the colorado republican state convention. he won all 13 delegates at stake saturday. and a total now of 34 delegates in that state. right now, donald trump, though, leads the national republican
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delegate count. he has 746 delegates. ted cruz with 538 delegates, and john kasich, 145. a total of 1,237 delegates are needed to win the republican nomination. let's look now at some of the key dates that are coming up in the u.s. presidential race. april 19th, one of the richest delegate prizes. that is the new york primary. then, april 26th, connecticut, delaware, maryland, pennsylvania, and rhode island hold their democratic and republican primaries. that's one to watch. campaigning continues through the spring to summer culminating in the national party conventions, republicans meet in cleveland on july 18th where they will officially choose their presidential candidate. the democrats then choose their candidate a week later in philadelphia, and then it is on to the general election in november. now on to peru and elections there. at least three people are dead after an attack ahead of
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sunday's vote. a civilian and at least two soldiers were killed when they were transporting voting materials. you're looking there at some of the victims' relatives. the guerrilla group the shining path is suspected to be suspected. keiko fujimori, daughter of alberto fujimori, is expected to win the first round of the election. ahead, political scandals and the zika outbreak are some of the problems weighing on brazil. the country hopes the upcoming rio olympics will be a game changer in turning around its image. plus, a 16-year-old has invented a device he hopes will help those with hearing issues. hear the personal inspiration behind his creation. stress sweat. it can happen anytime to anyone. stress sweat is different than ordinary sweat, it smells worse. get 4 times the protection against stress sweat.
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welcome back to "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell. political scandals, protests, and the zika virus. brazil couldn't have asked for a million challenging lead up to the olympics, and with four months to go, only love the tickets have been sold -- only half the tickets have been sold. as shasta darlington reports, officials are confident the games will be a success. >> reporter: on the ground, the obstacles seem nearly insurmountable. from dueling political protests fueled by a crippling recession and massive corruption scandal to a zika virus pandemic, spread by mosquitoes and linked to devastating birth defects. so far, those obstacles haven't had the impact you might expect.
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♪ >> reporter: the glossy promo videos show, preparations for the 2016 olympics actually are looking pretty good. more than 95% of the venue's complete without going over budget. organizers are betting the olympics way a game changer. >> we want the games to be the turnaround moment. we want the games to bring good energy. we have been working for almost ten years for the moment to happen. >> reporter: a challenge still to be overcome, only half the tickets have been sold. can they fill these stands? >> we're confident in the olympic tickets that we're going to sell. everything that we have remaining. around the beginning of the torch relay. >> reporter: he says brazilians are always late buyers. as for international tourists, organizers still expect half a million visitors to descend on rio. the hotel association says there haven't been any cancelations despite the spate of bad publicity. in fact, just the opposite.
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they say with the cheaper currency, the hotels are almost 100% booked already. on the beach, tourists are concerned but not enough to stay home. >> there are so many beautiful things here, but i -- i know as well about the corruption and -- about the problems that the society has. >> we're kmmore concerned about the zika virus. >> we're going to show case the city and probably have in 2017 a lot of people want to come to rio. >> reporter: perhaps for those magic encounters like we had with this singer who sums it all up. ♪ >> "one city, a thousand enchantments." el nino has been the catalyst for extreme weather palt earns across the world --
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patterns across the world. now we have more from derek van dam to tell us about that. >> reporter: el nino has been the hot topic world in the weather world. now we're starting to transition into la nina which is, we'll call it its evil twin, we'll say. this has to do with the temperature of the waters in the central and eastern pacific. we've got an interesting graph on the screen you're looking at. i'm going to try and break it down, simplify as much as possible. what you're looking at is called an ensemble model forecast. basically all the super computers in the weather world compiled into one, and it projects this el nino circulation and what the ramifications of it actually are. we peaked with el nino, the warming of the ocean waters in the eastern pacific, around november of 2015. now we've dropped into what is the progression into a la nina season, meaning they are starting to cool, at least the ocean temperatures across the central and eastern pacific. that has huge ramifications across the world's weather.
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let me break it down, north america first. in an el nino season like we are coming off of, the jet stream shifts southward, we see the increased wind shear. this impacts the development of hurricanes across the atlantic season. wind shear is the change of wind with speed, with height, and with altitude. and you cannot have hurricane development with strong wind shear in the atmosphere. that often inhibits that hurricane potential and lowers the number of hurricanes that impacts the united states and central america, for example. as we work into a la nina season, the jet stream that we saw to the south in an el nino moves north. we decrease our wind shear. that means we increase the number of hurricanes that form across the atlantic. this is significant because the index that's predict the amount of -- indices that predict the amount of hurricanes for the upcoming season have started to roll out in the past five days or so. average for the atlantic season
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around 12 named storms. we have about six on average for hurricanes, two major. we've already had one named storm this season so far. so we're starting to get our season underway, a little on the early side. time will tell if we come across with 12. look at the video quickly out of russia. i know, george, you've never seen something like this. i certainly haven't. wow. spring skiing at its finest, i guess, in russia. taking advantage of warm weather, and selfie sticks apparently. this is -- this is what they do in sochi, russia, this time of year. >> well, take a look at that. derek van dam, thank you very much. you're watching "cnn newsroom." ahead, a 16-year-old spent two years fine-tuning a special device to help his grandfather and hopefully others in the future. hear his story as "cnn newsroom" continues. this is lulu, our newest dog. mom didn't want another dog. she said it's too much work. lulu's hair just floats. uhh help me! (doorbell)
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charmin ultra soft gets you clean without the wasteful wadding. it has comfort cushions you can see that are softer... ...and more absorbent, and you can use up to 4 times less. remember, that's charmin in there... no wasteful wadding! we all go. why not enjoy the go with charmin. a 16-year-old in the u.s. state of kentucky took matters into his own hands. this after visiting india where he saw how hard it was to get help for his grandfather's hearing problems.
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reporter casey cunningham from wave has more on the creation. [ beeping ] >> reporter: for two years, mukang ventkadkruishnan tankered with tones. two years is a long time especially -- >> i'm only 16, two years is a long time to work on something. >> reporter: he created a hearing test and aid. >> it eliminates the made it for a doctor jag together. >> reporter: first the tests. different sounds at different frequencies. >> you plug in headphones in the normal jack. you hear the sound, you click green. if you don't, you click yellow. after the test is completed, the device programs itself to be a hearing aid. >> reporter: a double-duty device, something even he wasn't sure that he could create. >> i'm surprised it turned out okay. you never -- it's hard to see something like this working. i wanted to quit a lot of times in the middle. >> reporter: besides his
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incredible persistence, there's a big reason why he didn't quit. >> the summer after my freshman year, i went to india. i state department wi-- i staye with my grandparents. my grandfather has had hearing loss for a while. >> reporter: it became his job to help get him to a doctor for a hearing aid. the experience was less than ideal. >> the process took forever to find an audiologist, and once we got there, they ripped us off. i looked into it more and got the idea. >> reporter: when he got home from india, he went to work. >> i taught myself how to program on line. >> reporter: and to build the device at a price that more people can afford. >> yeah, $60 is what it is now. and it's crazy that they cost $1,500 each when you can do it for $60. >> reporter: two years working on the project, and he still plans on making improvements. >> when you actually get the solution, it's the best feeling in the world break through and get the moment, aha, ureek ai love that feeling.
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that's what kept me going. that and my grandfather, keeping him in my head. there are others like him who wouldn't be able to afford the device. that's why i'm working on the project. >> that is so cool. his main goal for the device is to make it smaller and more user friendly. he hopes to distribute the hearing aid to people who can't afford more expensive ones. good on him. now to a remote, uninhabited island. thinking by three stranded mariners paid off. they were rescued after a navy plane spotted palm fronds spelling out the word "help" in the sand. the coast guard says the castaways had been on the island for three days. officials say the sailors' small vessel was swamped by a large wave, and they were forced to swim two miles to shore at night. wow. and finally, we leave you this hour with china and a colorful show of cultural pride. the celebration of the yellow emperor. the storied founder of chinese civilization. every year, revellers in
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mainland china and taiwan celebrate their heritage and mark the emperor's birth. these pictures from the emperor's home city in mainland china. almost 10,000 people from inside china and around the world came together for that brig celebration. we thank you for being with us this hour. i'm hogeorge howell in atlanta. for viewers in the united states, "new day" is next. for others around the world, "the best of quest" starts in a moment. thank you for watching cnn. the world's news leader. courtyard, the official hotel of the nfl,
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the greatest collection of shows free with xfinity on demand. this cnn breaking news. >> good morning too grateful to you with us. we're following some breaking news this morning. in fact two story. one, a temple fire in india that's killed nearly a hundred people. and new details about the deadly terror attacks in europe as well. >> we're going to begin in brussels where prosecutors say that the terrorist whose organized the deadly attacks in belgium last month initially planned to hit france, again. >> but as they saw how quickly the investigation into last year's attacks in pairs was moved they switched gears and

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