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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  April 30, 2016 1:00am-3:01am PDT

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i don't have any grandparents. my mom, i guess she cooks but the last time she ever invited me to dinner was 1972, so giving that history isn't any mystery why i'm on the lookout for grandma. anybody's grandma will do. hell, i've been known to cruise rural state highways looking for grannies to abduct so they'll cook for me. it makes person sense that i conned her into making a nice lunch. is that creepy of me? >> hey, hey, smells good in here. all right. do you need any help chopping parsley. perfect. >> for lunch, we got the shrimp and sardines from earlier at the
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market, first, this. it's like a hollowed out potato filled with cheese, breaded and fried. ooh, delicious. >> it makes good with all the cheese. to dip and seal. and then the crumb bread and fry. my mother used to cook for everybody. even if it was midnight. my friends, we'd do something that we share sometimes altogether. my mom has spoken for everybody. >> the problem is, even if she knows it's only for five people, she cooking for -- >> ten, just in case. >> this is sicily, after all. this is the classic starter. also a breaded tomato salad.
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that's old school. >> because of the bread, it makes it harder. with bread, at least two days old. >> it's really good. really, really good. that's sicily right there. >> right. yes. fresh shrimp, sauteed in butter, garlic and herbs. i noticed when confronted with a shrimp or a prawn, right away. >> that is the way you see fresh or not. >> yeah. >> so typical day, when you were 15 years old, what did you eat for lunch? >> never missing pasta for lunch. >> pasta and meat or pasta and fish. >> fish, or something lovely. basically have to go around the corner to find your products. whatever we can produce in
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sicily, that's what she buy. >> watch this. out comes the bone, who needs a knife. sardines sauteed in garlic and oil, a little red pepper. that's a beautiful thing right there. another two hours here, i'll be speaking italian. or sicilian. you have to eat it hot. if you don't like this, there's really no hope for you. [ speaking italian ] >> it's something if you don't like it, i'm so happy. it's a delicious meal to eat in this beautiful home with some really good home cooked food. >> okay.
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♪ my last night in sicily. and after this, i'm going back to new york, crawling under my bed and adopting the fetal position for, like, six weeks. vegetables? i may look normal. okay, i don't exactly, but i'm not barking uncontrollably or running around shrieking with my pants wrapped around my head, which is what my instincts are telling me i should be doing. to me, one of life's great joys is cheese. no, i'm eating cheese, which makes me happy, always. and drinking wine. good wine. and a hell of a lot of it. and i'll just make it over the hump with any luck at all. we have a mozzarella here, a pepperccino. >> si.
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>> you can start with the one in the middle. >> i will. ture joins me for a final meal along with antonio, guido and guido's girlfriend, anna. this is an agritourismo. this is not a concept that exists in america, but it is a concept that should exist. okay, now please explain what it is. >> it is a hotel linked to the territory. you have to use local product, local recipe. >> penne, sun-dried tomatoes, zucchini, all from the farm. >> oh, man, that looks good. ♪ >> wow. wow, wow, wow. fantastic. >> whoa! >> some nice rabbit, olive oil, also from the farm.
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more wine. i might just make it. now, this is called agrodolce? bitter. if you talk about italy, it is the most interesting part of italian cuisine. not just gastronomically but philosophically, because it is a philosophical thing. life is too good. i need a little bitterness to remind myself of the internal tragedy of our existence. >> you're right, the sweet and sour of the life. >> one final attempt before i go to extract something meaningful on what it means to be sicilian. >> what's wrong with these people in the north? >> people from the south are coming from these greek street culture, where the philosopher while in the north came through, you know, and -- >> ooh, that's the harshest, meanest thing anyone can say.
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>> and figured out the last century, the three best writers in italy are from sicily. >> because they consider us a way to end their problems, but finally in summers, they all come here to make millions. it's a good thing for us, you know? >> in the end, it all comes back to "the godfather." we go up this beautiful mountain, this incredible town. it goes back to the 12th century. there are few places on earth more beautiful. but we are sitting in one of the -- ♪ da, na, na it was like a "godfather" theme park. look michael corleone got married there. it's so fantastic. >> you know, we just look at people with "the godfather" t-shirt, and i say, oh, my god. why people get stuck on this idol called "the godfather" movie, because there is this sense of family. >> michael had many options. he destroyed his family.
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and everything he touched. >> in a way it's fair. >> it's fair? >> indeed, a good movie, sure. >> coppola, he didn't [ muted ] it up? >> no. listerine® kills 99% of bad breath germs. this is 100% useful for a 100% fresh mouth. what's it like to not feel 100% fresh? we don't know. we swish listerine®. as do listerine® users. the very people we studied in the study of bold. people who are statistically more likely to stand up to a bully. do a yoga handstand. and be in a magician's act. listerine® kills 99% of bad breath germs so you can feel 100% in life. bring out the bold™. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80%
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following america's choice 2016 we welcome our viewers here in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell. for the second straight day, protests have turned violent at donald trump events. this the scene there, the presidential candidate was set to speak at the california republican convention. that's when hundreds of protesters turned out. they crashed police and even rushed barriers. some even crashed trump's limo forcing him to walk. later, they had this to say about the lead in the delegate race. >> we're going to hopefully close this thing out fairly soon. i think now that we cracked the 1,000 number which is great,
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right? no, it's great. it's interesting, though. i'm up by 400 or so delegates. i'll be up by more than 500 when it's over. and we'll be up by 5 million votes. and this coming week, we break the all-time record. >> so, the next big delegate prize. it is the state of indiana which holds its primary on tuesday. 57 delegates are at stake for the republicans. and as it stands now, donald trump has a substantial lead, now with just over 1,000 delegates as he pointed out. ted cruz with 572, and john kasich trails third place with 157 delegates. could prevent donald trump from clinching the republican nomination ted cruz is going to need to win in indiana and he's getting some help from the hoosier state republican
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governor. mike pence endorsed cruz. but he didn't say he was against the republican front-runner. listen. >> i've come to my decision about who i'm supporting, i'm not against anybody, but i will be voting for ted cruz in the upcoming primary. i particularly want to commend donald trump who i think has given voice to the frustration of millions of working americans with lack of progress in washington, d.c. >> today was a very, very good day. i was honored and humbled to receive the support of indiana's governor mike pence. governor pence is a strong principled conservative leader. he's someone who has earned the respect of hoosiers and earned the respect of republicans all across this country. >> we're learning more about how the democratic front-runner plans to get ahead. in an interview with cnn, hillary clinton made it clear
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she plans to rise above the attacks of donald trump. here's jeff zeleny with this report. >> i have a lot of experience dealing with men who sometimes get off the reservation in the way they behave and how they speak. >> reporter: hillary clinton is talk about donald trump. >> i'm not going to deal with their temper tantrums or their bullying or their efforts to try to provoke me. he can say what he wants to say about me, i could really care less. >> reporter: speaking to jake tapper since all but clinching the nomination, clinton looked at her attempt to take on trump. >> if you're demeaning women, you don't believe equal pay is an issue, you are really insulting to women, i don't see how that adds up either. >> reporter: the back and forth over clinton overtaking the presidential race. >> if hillary clinton were a man, i don't think she'd get 5%
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of the vote. >> reporter: the clinton campaign is trying to turn his campaign against him. but clinton is taking the high road. >> we're going to talk about what we want to do for the country and he can continue on his insultfest. but that's the choice he's making. >> reporter: in california trump making that choice again. >> when i can focus on hillary, as i say, crooked hillary, when i focus on hillary, she'll go down easier than any of the people we just beat. >> reporter: while trump calls himself the presumptive nominee, clinton won't go there just yet. >> i consider myself as someone who's on the path. obviously i'm very far ahead on both the popular vote and delegate count. >> reporter: the acro-moni of two weeks ago has faded. >> i'm sure a lot of people are surprised to learn you supported
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the raising of the minimum wage to 15 bucks an hour. >> wait a minute. >> i was pleased when senator sanders said the other day he's going to work tirelessly, seven days a week to make sure donald trump is not president. >> reporter: sanders is saying a little more than that. >> we need a 50-state strategy. we need to plant the flag of progressive politics in every state in this country. >> reporter: it's a feeling clinton well remembers. when a presidential bid dies. she said she's not worried about unifying the party. >> i think when i dropped out the polling was that 40% of my supporters said that they would not support senator obama. thank flishgs the vast majority of them did. this is a natural process that i think will play itself out. >> that was cnn's jeff zeleny for us. we're also following events
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in syria. both the united states and russia say they have reached an agreement of renewed cessation of hostilities in that country. the truce does not involve aleppo. many died when air strikes leveled a hospital and a clinic. some civilians say now they are seen too terrified to even go to a hospital, even if they are injured. nick paton walsh has this report for us. >> reporter: as disbelief still reigns in how air strike could kill dozens at a hospital thursday, it happened again. another air strike. one of 20 that hit rebel-held areas of aleppo friday activists said slammed into another medical facility. it is fortunate, but also chilling, that these scenes of destruction don't have people in them. because of the air strikes, civilians here are said to be too scared to go to this and
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other hospitals. they have been for days says the manager but the ms-backed hospital thursday. >> they are not only afraid to go to the hospitals. they are afraid to be on the streets. they are afraid to be targeted and hit. >> reporter: describing the last pediatrician in aleppo. one of six killed in thursday's strike, seen here tending to patients. his devotion to his work. >> i asked him why won't you get married? he said if i get married then i won't be here in aleppo for much time. my wife will be in turkey, and i will have to spend half of my days in turkey and the other half in aleppo. >> reporter: children know his devotion were so often victims here. this baby brought from the wreckage could have been one of the doctor's patients, a tiny
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vein for an iv drip. he said this scene haunted the day on dr. mars died. the boy left to tend the corpse of his younger brother. to beg to change places. this passes the childhood has done for years. those born into the world, you could only hope they may outlive it. nick paton walsh, cnn, beirut. >> the situation there dire. and this story, a story of children. certainly drives it home to you, i'm sure. for more context on what's happening. let's go live to cairo egypt. ian is following this in aleppo. ian, it's good to have you. so, what to make of the cessation of hostilities? is there still hope there?
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or is it fair to say this is no longer viable? >> reporter: well, george, you may remember that last february is when they graded the cessation of hostilities between the government of bashar al assad and his allies and the western-backed rebels. not part of that was isis and al qaeda-affiliate, al nusra front. but the u.n. special envoy to this crisis has said that it is hanging by a thread. and that really is generous right now, with the violence that we're seeing, it looks like it's all but over, and in the last eight days, you have 244 people killed. and this included 43 children and 27 women. so it does look at this point that the cessation of hostilities, if not hanging by a thread, are dead. >> beyond aleppo, are there
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other areas where fighting continues? >> reporter: there is fighting in other parts of syria right now. and if you look at the corridor, the main road that's going from damascus to aleppo, you have fighting around cities of homes. homa, and some around the fighting of assad, western-backed rebels and al nusra front. and there is fighting also in the eastern part of syria as well. against isis. the enjoy to the u.n., the russian envoy, said that the syrian government is preparing for an offensive to take raqqah. raqqah to be the capital of isis. and deresore important because of the oil in that area. >> i just have to mention nick paton walsh's report.
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the simple fact that people not aware of the situation that's been happening for so many years in syria. for people to be afraid to go to the hospital and see the images of children dealing with such a hellish situation. is there anything being done to revive the cessation of hostilities? >> reporter: there is an effort under way. the special envoy is putting pressure on the united states, on russia, to get the sides back together. the negotiations had been suspended because the western-backed rebels are saying that the syrian regime isn't abiding by them. but they're also not able to get aid into these areas that are under siege. but there is a push to bring these sides together to get that -- get that cessation of hostilities back in action. but the human toll also.
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hospitals and medical centers have been targeted dozens of times over the past two years. so this isn't just an unusual occurrence. this is the sort of thing that people in syria are living with on a daily basis. >> sadly, realistically that is the situation they're dealing with. ian lee is in cairo. thank you for your reporting. you're watching "cnn newsroom," still ahead, why kenya is planning on deporting millions of dollars worth of ivory. you're watching "cnn newsroom." hey there, hi. why do people have eyebrows?
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a warm welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. you are watching "cnn newsroom"
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and it is good to have you with us. i'm george howell. the headlines we're following for you this hour. this just in from cnn. a car bomb east of baghdad has killed at least 24 people, wounded 38 others. it struck a busy live stock market about 60 kilometers or 40 miles from the iraqi capital. in the united states, presidential race. hundreds of people protested a donald trump presidential speech for a second day. things got chaotic as some protesters even clashed with police and rushed barriers. they also forced the billionaire to hike to the venue's back door. you see it there. china is refusing to allow a u.s. aircraft carrier to dock at a port. according to the navy times, the quote timing of the carrier arrival was, quote, inconvenience. this comes among disputed territorial claim it's in south
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china sea. the united states and russia say they have reached an agreement on a renewed called cessation of hostilities for parts of syria. the cease-fire does not include aleppo. that is where at least 230 people have been killed in past week alone. dozens died with an air strike at a hospital and clinic there. a sign of hope in the middle of disaster, that's how is one red cross worker is describing the scene of a building collapse in kenya. at least seven people have been killed there. and now the search team continues. rescuers trying to reach those feared buried in the rubble. but the red cross said they have been able to communicate with several sir visors. dozens have been rescued including two babies and several children. zbluth of the building collapse in nairobi national park, kenya is about to start the largest burn of illegal wildlife products in history. the president will light a match to a massive stockpile of ivory
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tusks and rhino horns. it's a way to get people to pay attention to the fear poaching crisis. more on kenya's efforts to protect its wildlife. >> reporter: a heavy burden for kenyans to bear. never has the continents poaching epidemic been so visceral than the endless train of elephant tusks, forming something of a graveyard to the iconic species. and soon this will turn into a crematory. >> we have a pumping station, there we've got a mixing tank where we'll be mixing kerosene and diesel, 50% each. and then we'll pump it down individual pipes to each tower, we call these ivory tower us. >> reporter: it's the ivory of around 8,000 elephants, combined
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with the rhino horn, this bounty would be worth an estimated 172 u.s. dollars on the black market. the potential income that could be generated from the sale has been difficult for many cash-strapped african governments to accept. money that could be put, perhaps, towards conservation, but kenya believes it's worth absolutely nothing. >> from a kenya perspective, we're not watching any money go up in smoke. because from our perspective there is no intrinsic value. kenya believes the only valve the irery is tusks on a live elephant. >> reporter: it's a process that goes back to 1999, a kenyan way to deal with the crisis. and now an audience to reach. >> they never saw the 1989, 1990
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crisis. they were not subject to the pressure that we brought on the world's markets in those days. so we have to do it again, and that's what we're doing. >> reporter: a record number of rhinos were poached in africa last year, around 1,338. and with the stockpile, an elephant is killed every 15 minutes for its tusks. each pair of these tusks tells an individual story of an elephant's life. and you can tell just what kind of life it was by the grooves and markings that you can see here. you can tell its approximate age and oftentimes how it died as well. there are huge tusks that way up to 110 pounds each. then there are those, tiny tusks belonging to babies, never given the chance to mature or live. the fire could last up to a week. organizers hope the village and stigma will be burned into memory forever.
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nairobi, kenya. >> an elephant killed every 15 minutes for its tusks. that is amazing. cnn there cover this torching event beginning at 1:00 p.m. london here on cnn. ted cruz has washington insiders out there his campaign. we will explain why he may need to mend some fence, build some bridges to take down his biggest rivalry. plus, you'll hear by democratic front-runner hillary clinton says she's open to working with her rival bernie sanders. that's ahead. and locks it in. for supple, hydrated skin. hydro boost. from neutrogena
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the u.s. state of indiana, some analysts say it is a make or break moment for u.s. republican presidential candidate ted cruz. he's already put a lot of work into portraying himself as a washington outsider through his campaign. but now, he will have to appeal to conservative leaders in order
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to derail the current front-runner donald trump. manu raju reports the bad blood may be already too thick. >> reporter: former house speaker john boehner did not hold back his true feelings about ted cruz. >> solution lucifer in the flesh. >> reporter: many republicans on capitol hill are piling on. >> you got the former speaker basically calling him a miserable s.o.b. that's harsh. i wouldn't have called him miserable. and the other incident, he calls him in lucifer in the pleasure. somebody better contact lucifer for a comment. he's probably upset about this. >> green eggs and ham.
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>> reporter: no love lost between members of congress and ted cruz. battles over raising the debt ceiling and the defunding of obama health care which caused a 16-day shutdown and calling mitch mcconnell a liar. >> i cannot believe he would tell a flat out lie. >> reporter: do you think he should apologize about those remarks about mitch mcconnell, calling him a liar on the floor? >> well, i stood up and said he should. that was the wrong thing to do. contrary to the rules. ♪ here's what i tell everyone ♪ >> reporter: on the campaign trail, cruz hasn't head back. cruz's allies say he's the only one who will stand up for conservatives. >> i think it helps ted cruz because it says what's wrong with washington. >> reporter: privately, cruz has done some damage control enlisting former texas senator fphil graham, a longtime
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washington insider. some of he's allies think he should do more. >> i think ted would be well served to reach out to his colleagues. i know he is to some. at the end of the day, the more support he gets from across the spectrum of the republican party, the more viable alternative he becomes to trump. >> reporter: unpopularity is something cruz has struggled with. in his book "a time for truth" cruz writes, as a skid of being an unpopular nerd. >> we were called capitulators, surrenders. we were told we were impure. we didn't measure up. >> even if cruz is trying to play nice behind the scenes, he is getting hit with the so-called washington elites when he's out on the trail. he's hitting them hard. on friday, cruz tried to link them to donald trump. listen here.
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>> there was a reason yesterday that john boehner praised both donald trump and hillary clinton. if you want to see more leaders in the republican party like john boehner, then donald trump is your guy. if you want to see more leaders like harry reid and nancy pelosi, both of whom donald trump has given big checks to, donald trump is are your guy. whether it's hillary clinton or donald trump or john boehner, people are fed up with corruption that they get rich and the working people get left behind. i believe the people of indiana want people who stand with the working people who don't look at indiana as flyover country the way donald trump and hillary clinton do. instead, look at it as america's heartland. >> ted cruz there with carly fiorina, his new pick as v.p., as they both focus in on indiana. now to the democrats,
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candidate bernie sanders withdrew a lawsuit against the party's national committee. sanders had accused the party of blocking his access to a critical database. now sanders is taking a more unified tone. saying the ultimate goal is to block the republicans from winning the presidency. >> we intend to win every delegate that we can. so that when we go to philadelphia in july, we're going to have the votes to put together the strongest progressive agenda that any political party has ever seen. >> his rival and now the democratic front-runner is moderating her approach against sanders. now that hillary clinton is enjoying a boost after winning most delegates up for grabs in the northeast on tuesday. in her first interview since that win, clinton talked with
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cnn's chief washington, d.c. correspondent jake tapper. here's what she had to say. >> senator sanders issued a statement that night that suggested he's not necessarily running to win anymore. he's running to advance progressive causes on the democratic platform. specifically, named $15 minimum wage at the national level. medicare for all. breaking up the banks, changing our trade policy and passing a tax on carbon. are these issues where you think you could make a deal with senator sanders behind some common ground and get those issues on the platform should you be the nominee? >> well, i certainly look forward to work with senator sanders in the leadup to the convention in the leadup to the platform it will be a progressive platform. i've run on a progressive agenda. i really welcome his ideas, his supporters' passion and commitment. because the most important thing
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is for us to win in november. there is no more important goal. i was pleased when senator sanders said he's going to work tirelessly to make sure that donald trump is not president. because that has to be our primary octave. >> are there specifics where you say i can do that? >> well, we're going to walk, we're going to work together. want the same goals. we want to raise the minimum wage. the republicans of donald trump don't want to. we want to get to universal health care. the republicans don't seem interested in that. we both want to deal with climate change, something they deny. as we go down the list, we have so much more in common, i said that in my remarks tuesday night in philadelphia. the connection between myself and my supporters and senator sanders and their supporters is really very strong. we're going to be unified and have a tremendous progressive agenda to run on in the fall.
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i really think that will help us win the election and it will also help us govern. >> do you think if he withholds his support until the convention that will hurt your chances in november should you be the nominee? >> i don't have any reason to believe that. i know when i dropped not june, i immediately endorsed senator obama. we had differences in our campaign. we had different issues. we had run a tough race. i endorsed him. i began working for him. of course, we talked about the platform. he asked me to nominate him at the denver convention. we went through some of the same process. in fact, i think when i dropped out the polling was 40% of my supporters said they would not support senator is obama. thankfully, the vast majority of them did. this is a natural process that i think will play itself out. >> it's interesting because of all the people in the world there's probably no one who knows what bernie sanders is feeling more than you.
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>> right, right. >> take us back to 2008 what you think senator sand serious going through because it's like, oh, i came so close but -- >> it's hard, jake, you throw yourself into these campaigns body and soul. you work 24/7. your family, your supporters, everybody is so invested in trying to win. and i'm very proud of my campaign. grateful that i have such strong support. but i absolutely understand, you know, senator sanders has been a passionate advocate for positions that he cares deeply about. i think that's been helpful to the democratic primary process. he's brought millions of people into the process which i think is also very good for the democratic party. but there comes a time when you have to look at the reality, in fact in '08 i was much closer in popular vote and pledged delegates than is the case right now. but eventually, i just decide i'd had to withdraw and support
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senator obama because the goal was to make sure we had a democrat in the white house. >> the democratic front-runner hillary clinton speaking with our own jake tapper there. so when you think of the word "bamboo" you might think baskets or gardens. the economy is king for this. building a skyscraper. you can imagine that? the story next. intense hydration and locks it in. for supple, hydrated skin. hydro boost. from neutrogena
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the sears tower there also known as the willis tower in chicago, so when you think of skyscrapers and what goes into building them you probably don't think that bamboo can be involved but in hong kong, builders are using bamboo. cnn correspondent ivan watson has this very interesting story. ♪ >> reporter: 30 stories up, hanging on a bamboo pole, this is how they build and repair skyscrapers in hong kong.
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with scaffolding made of bamboo. it's a common sight in these urban canyons, towering ladders of sticks trusted by the workers who cling to them. it's all the more remarkable when you consider bamboo is technically the largest member of the grass family. ♪ to get a better sense in how this very modern city uses such an ancient technique for construction, i went to bamboo scaffolding school. so this is the bamboo? >> bamboo. >> reporter: the master wen che junge complains because it's stronger, it's more flexible than medal scaffolding and that allows him to work at dizzying heights. you've worked 88 stories up on bamboo. i can see a lot of clouds from up there, he says. the key to this job is a safety technique master wen calls riding the bamboo, keeping an
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ankle locked around the pole at all times. you keep your gloves and your helmet? >> yeah. >> reporter: as for the scaffolding, you make it look so easy. it's held together with simple knots made of nylon strips. maybe you can finish this one for me, because i've ruined it. i should probably stick to my day job. it goes up like that. the people who do this work are proud of their craft. bamboo scaffolding is an art, the scaffolder says. a chinese traditional art that can be traced back thousands of years. it's certainly an example of an ancient skill that continues to be taken to modern day heights. ivan watson, cnn, hong kong. >> that view is a doozie, wow. okay, so there say public feud between the u.s. first family and the british royals.
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but not to worry, it is all for a good cause. president barack obama and first lady michelle obama tweeted a challenge to prince harry over the evictus games. the prince recruited her majesty to help. >> the american out here is incredibly fast. >> that's very good. >> message? here. see it together? >> yes. >> hey, prince harry, remember when you told to us bring it at the invictus games? >> careful what you wish for. >> oh, really, please. >> it seems that the royals got the last word there.
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we'll see what happens at the competitions in orlando, florida, starting may 8th. we thank you for watching this hour of "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. i'll be back after the break with another hour of news from around the world. stay with us. is better for your skin than wearing no makeup at all? neutrogena® cosmetics. with vitamins and antioxidants. now with foundations in shades for more skin tones.
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a residential building collapses in kenya's capital. and hours later, people are still feared to be trapped in the rubble there. plus, the ush and russia, together with a renewed truce for parts of syria. but the major city that needs most of the help is left out and still under fire. also, this --
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>> easiest entrance i've ever made. >> shouting and insults, protesters descend upon a donald trump event for a second day in a row. live from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, welcome to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell, "cnn newsroom" starts right now. good day to you. we begin this hour with a deadly building kol flaps kenya that killed seven people in that nation's capital. the several multistory building collapsed on friday. rescuers are trying reach those they fear buried in the rubble but the red cross said they have been able to community with several survivors. one red cross working describes the scene as trying find hope in
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a sea of devastation. those rescued, two babies and several children. the cause of the collapse still unknown but heavy rains and floods may have played a role. cnn is live in nairobi, kenya, robin krull joins us on the phone there. it's good to have you there. we've seen the images from the collapse. what you can tell us about where things stand now, when it comes to findi ing survivors who may stilling trapped in that rubble? >> reporter: well, it's a race against time, george. and the rain has not abated throughout the evening. the rain started yesterday afternoon, very, very hard and has continued throughout the night which we understand has hampered rescue efforts. as well as the traffic in that area has been really bad box of the rain which slowed down the rescue officials in being able to reach the scene a lot earlier. we do understand that the kenyan
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defense force is at the scene and assisting. however, the problem is that kenya does not have the equipment that might exist in other places that are used to getting earthquakes and landslides on a regular basis. they don't have the sort of equipment or search and rescue dogs. they are trying as hard as possible but it is proving quite tough. >> robyn, what can you tell us about the situation for those people who did you asurvive but now left without a home? >> reporter: yes, the seven-story building, obviously had a number of inhabitants. that's part of the problem, nobody is sure just how many people were living there at the time of the collapse. that's what the red cross is doing, putting up satellite stations trying to map out those missing. and anything out how many people potentially can be trapped inside. for those that don't have a home
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to go to. there's been appeals going out on social networking for help for those people. but a number of them are badly injured but they are at main hospitals in nairobi at the moment. >> and we're looking at these images. it is a desperate scene there as these teams continue to look for survivors. on the phone, cnn correspondent robyn kriel. thank you for your reporting. heavy rain and flooding not only might have contributed to the bidding collapse but may have contributed to the survivors. eric van dam is here to tell us more zbrup know, george, some property owners actually bypass building regulations, they cust costs and they want to maximize their profits. meaning, they'll put a building just about anywhere they can in a small amount of space withou doing the due diligence of seeing if this is an area to put
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a building. this building was on the edge of a river, which is prone for flash flooding. that took place. and helped to wipe out the bottom floors and the floors above it actually held. you can see the first images coming out of nairobi, the actual scene when daylight emerged this morning. early this morning. it's now just past noon, i believe. interestingly, did a bit of research the architectural society of kenya says about 50% of structures in nairobi are not even up to code. so you put a susceptible building like this in a low-income area of nairobi, you have all kinds of problems special,ly when heavy rain occurrences take place. getting to my graphics, this is a climatological breakdown. you see that spike right in april and may. we are smack dab in the middle of the rainy season in nairobi,
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kenya. you will see in one moment, we almost experienced that amount of rain in a four-day period. let's take our google technology and zoom into the northern suburbs of nairobi. it's between the river to the south and the river to the north. it's difficult to see on this map. i realize that. but we zoom in a little closer, and that gray stretch of buildings there on the riverside, that's the area where the building collapsed. and this particular riverbed is prone to flash flooding. especially when we get nearly 200 millimeters in a four-day period. look at the satellite. convection popping up one after another. convection another name for thunderstorms. and produces a significant amount of rain in a short period of time. this is the time of year when the rain pushes north and settles in places like tanzania
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and kenya. we could get anywhere between 50 to 100 millimeters of rain fall going forward. what that mean, the flood threat is not over. we'll end sbhi of the images coming out of nairobi. this was also the concern, george, that traffic jams actually led to a delay in the rescue efforts at the collapsed building. so it is all kinds of problems all around in nairobi at this point in time. >> thank you for being with us. following another story here on cnn, a car bomb east of baghdad has killed at least 24 people and wounded 38 others. it struck a busy live stock market about 60 kilometers or 40 miles from the iraqi capital. the bomb detonated late saturday morning local time. there has been no claim of responsibility at this point. now, moving on to syria, the united states and russia say they have reached an agreement
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on a renewed temporary truce for parts of that country where there has been heavy fighting but the truce does not include aleppo where air strikes and surging violence has killed several hundredfire to that cit other areas as well. following the situation in syria, cnn's ian lee is live this hour in cairo, egypt. ian, it's good to have you. what is the world to make of this cessation of hostilities? this temporary truce? is there still hope for that or is it fair to say it's no longer viable now? >> reporter: well, george, the special enjoy to syria, stefan demesora say it's hanging on a thread. now if they're able to, united states and russia to get at least a cessation of hostilities, a cease-fire, if you will, that will be san important step forward. but without aleppo, part of that
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violence in that city will continue. 244 people have been killed, according to the syrian observatory for human rights of which 43 are children and 27 are women. and so, it is very important that they get aleppo involved in the cessation of hostilities, but the other important thing about this is getting humanitarian aid to people who are under siege. and that is one thing that the syrian rebels, the western-backed rebels have been complaining about. is that during this past cessation of hostilities which began in february, saying that the aid hasn't been able to get to the places were it's desperately needed. but what about beyond aleppo?po, are there other areas where fighting continues?
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>> reporter: according to the syrian observatory, we have seen fighting and violence really on this corridor from aleppo going along that main road there on the countryside along the areas of homs and the al qaeda affiliated al nusra front as well as isis, there has been continued fighting against them. also we're hearing from the russian envoy to the u.n. in geneva saying that the syrian government is preparing an offensive to retake the cities of raqqah, and deir ezzor, and no timetable has been given when that will begin or when they hope to retake the cities. >> so you say a focus now on raqqah. ian lee live for us in egypt. thank you so much for your
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reporting. the pentagon is disciplining 16 military personnel over a hospital bombing in afghanistan. it happened last year in kunduz. the air strike killed 42 people there. the target was a taliban center 400 meters or about 1300 feet away. u.s. officials say the punishments include suspension and retraining, but no criminal charges. >> the interpretation here, the legal interpretation and our understanding of this, the fact that this was unintentional and unintentional action takes it out of the realm of actually being a deliberate war crime against protected locations. that is the principal reason we do not consider this to be a war crime. >> the group that ran the hospital, doctors without borders, says the punishment isn't enough. its operation coordinator told
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our nick parker they are out of proportion for the damage. >> of course, we cannot be happy we're in this military investigation. as you know, we've been requesting since the following days after the attack that independence and international fact finding be commissioned would lighten the events into -- the events into this issue could never happen. so, today, we remain with more question than answers, so, it's a fixed feeling. >> understood. as you say, it is rare that the united states would launch any kind of investigation into its military. and even rarer, which is the main point, that it would launch independent investigations into a war zone. they have said that they've done everything right in the situation and it was a mistake.
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do you have faith in the transparency of the investigation? >> what can i say? it's not an independent investigation. of course, an investigation was performed out of the line of command. but it's still an internal investigation for us performed by the u.s. military who are the perpetrator of the attack. of course, how can we have safety in this issue. >> and your response to the punishments that were announced? >> the reaction is that it's out of proportion decisions, i mean, the -- there was a destruction of a hospital, 42 people, wounding of dozens of staff and the services for the local population has been stopped from one day to another. so, of course, it's a very deep
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feeling that these are completely out of proportion to what we're facing. >> still ahead here on "cnn newsroom," hundreds of people came out to disrupt donald trump's speech in the state of california. we'll show you what the candidate had to do when protesters blocked his motorcade. stay with us. kinsusan15, who writes, "now my boyfriend wants to talk on sundays. just so many words." your boyfriend's got it bad. maybe think about being single until the start of the season. ♪ (music pl♪ throughout) uh oh. what's up? ♪ ♪ ♪ does nobody use a turn signal anymore? ♪
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for the second day in a row, protests turned violent at a donald trump event. the republican front-runner was set to give a speech at california's republican convention. but protesters blocked his motorcade forcing him to walk. to the venue's back entrance. cnn's sumlin serfaty has this report for us. >> reporter: tensions rising in california. a large group of demonstrators flooding the streets outside the california republican convention, protesting donald trump's appearance. >> that was not the easiest entrance i've ever made. >> reporter: the gop front-runner's motorcade dodging the crowds, trump forced to enter and exit on speech on foot to avoid the protesters. >> we went under a fence and through a fence. oh, boy, felt like i was crossing the border. >> reporter: the protests occurring a day after hundreds of demonstrators slashed with
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trump supporters outside the valley in costa mesa. all of this as trump sells his candidacy to gop insiders in california, one of the last primary states in june 7th that could play a decisive role in delivering trump's 1237 delegates he needs to secure the nomination. >> we have far more votes than anybody else. we're going to hit that number quite easily. >> reporter: as trump focuses on closing out the race in california, ted cruz is slogging it out in the trenches of indiana. he cease the primary as crucial to blocking trump's path to the nomination and pushing the race towards a contested convention. and the senator is pulling out all the stops. >> i think governor mike pence is an optimistic positive unifying force. >> reporter: cruz pickin up the support of indiana governor mike pence. >> i'm not against anybody.
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but i will be voting for ted cruz. >> reporter: but pence's endorsement lukewarm. >> whoever wins the republican nomination of the united states, i'm going to work my heart out to get elected this fall. >> reporter: also offering plenty of praise for trump. >> i particularly want to commend donald trump who i think has given voice to the trustation of millions of working americans with a lack of progress in washington, d.c. >> reporter: trump who also courted and hoped for the endorsement of pence -- >> that was him. he may not endorse -- i don't think we'll endorse anybody. and he may endorse us. >> reporter: not giving up on cruz. >> have we branded this guy or what? i mean, he probably -- he probably -- i see him walking into these beautiful corridors in washington, hey, lying ted, how are you doing? >> reporter: saving the fiercest
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fire for hillary clinton intensifying his attacks on his potential general election rival. >> crooked hillary, she said very strongly, i don't like the tone of donald trump. the tone. now, she's shouting all night long reading off teleprompters. >> reporter: taunting clinton calling her the most dishonest person to have ever run for the president is one of the all time great enablers. >> i really want to beat her more than sanders. >> john kasich says that some people may be born gay, speaking the a town hall event in san francisco, the third place republican presidential candidate was pressed on the subject by a questioner that sexual identity is determined at birth and not a lifestyle choice. here's part of kasich's comments. >> i believe in marriage, i just went to a gay wedding.
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a buddy of mine, you know, got married. my wife and i went to the wedding. it was great, it was fine but do you feel people are born gay? >> i'm not getting into the analysis of this and that. >> it's not analysis. are people born gay. >> our next question -- >> you know, sir, probably. i don't know how it all works. look, are they? in all probability, they are, okay? >> now, turning now to the democratic side of the presidential race, the bernie sanders campaign has withdrawn a lawsuit against the democratic national committee. it claimed the party blocked the campaign's use of a critical voter database. and a sanders staffer improperly accessed data from the hillary clinton campaign. the democratic front-runner hillary clinton is responding to the latest round of attacks from donald trump. >> i have a lot of experience
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dealing with men who sometimes get off the reservation and the way they behave and how they speak. >> a little later this hour, you will hear more from that interview and what clinton says she plans to do to defeat donald trump here on "cnn newsroom." in the coming days, jokes, jabs and much more is expected in washington as celebrities, journalists and politicians all attend the hottest political roast in that city. it's the white house correspondents' dinner. and this will be president barack obama's last appearance as the u.s. president. but as sarah murray reports, one controversial figure is trying to avoid the scorching. guess who? >> reporter: welcome to nerd prom. the one day of the year where celebrities flock to party with the elite. this year, one won't be making
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the trip. gop front-runner donald trump. as trump recently explained to the hill i was asked by every single group of media available to mankind. i decided not to go. you know why. i would have a good time and the press would say i looked like i wasn't having a good time. trump was probably referring to that time when he came as a guest of the "washington post" in 2011 and appeared to be unamused to be the bunt of many jokes. >> donald trump has been saying he'll run for president as republican. which is surprising because i just assumed he was running as a joke. [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: president obama having just released his long form birth certificate at the insistence of critics including trump dug in even deeper. >> no one is prouder than to put this birth certificate matter to rest than the donald. and that's because he can finally get back to focusing on the issues that matter.
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like did we fake the moon landing? [ laughter ] >> reporter: just days earlier, trump boasted about the role he played in urging obama to release the form. >> saying that the president should release this -- >> i have done a great service to the american people. i got him to release a birth certificate that he should have done three years ago. >> reporter: the issue clearly got under obama's skin. >> we do not have time for this kind of silliness. >> reporter: by the time nerd prom rolled around, obama got the last laugh. >> all kidding aside, we all know about your credentials and breadth of experience -- [ laughter ] for example, seriously, just recently in an episode of "celebrity apprentice" at the steakhouse, the men's cooking team did not impress the judges from omaha steaks. and there was a lot of blame to go around. but you, mr. trump, recognized
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that the real problem was a lack of leadership. and so ultimately, you didn't blame little john or meatloaf [ laughter ] you fired gary busey. and these are the kind of decisions that would keep me up at night. [ laughter ] [ applause ] well handled, sir. well handled. say what you will about mr. trump, he certainly would bring some change to the white house. let's see what we got up there. >> even though trump insisted he enjoyed the dinner, it certainly didn't appear that way said former white house adviser david axelrod. >> there were certain series of jokes and everybody was looking at trump who seemed mildly irritated by them. and by the end, kind of walked out of the thing.
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and didn't hang around. >> reporter: in just five short years, how things have changed. trump began doling out checks to gop causes and landing speaking spots at conservative functions. now, he's the gop front-runner and it appears the joke is on washington. >> a lot of people have laughed at me over the years, now they're not laughing so much. >> that was cnn's sarah murray there for us. don't forget to join cnn for the special coverage of the white house coverage of the dinner beginning sunday midnight london time. kenya is planning on incinerating dozens of tusks of ivory. and from the death of students years ago. wearing no ?
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welcome back to our viewers here in the united states, and around the world, you are watching "cnn newsroom." and it is good to have you with us. i'm george howell. the headlines we're following this hour -- car bomb east of baghdad has killed at least 24 people, wounding 38 others. struck a busy live stock market about 60 kilometers or 40 miles from the iraqi capitale city. in nairobi, kenya, at least seven people are dead and more than 100 injured after a residential building collapsed. the red cross says workers have been able to communicate with some survivors trapped in the rubble there. dozens have been rescued include
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two babies and several children. a u.s. aircraft carrier has been denied dock at a hong kong port. according to the navy times, chinese officials told the u.s. consulate, the quote, timing of the carrier's arrival was, quote, inconvenient. this comes amid heightened tensions with territorial claims in the south china sea. the united states and russia say they have reached an agreement on renewed cessation of hostilities for a cease-fire. 2 does not include aleppo where 32 people have been killed in the past week alone. the u.s. says it hopes to expand that truce to the city. kenya is about to start largest burn of illegal wildlife products in history. in nairobi national park, the president will light a match to a massive stockpile of ivory tusks and rhino horn. it's a way to get people to pay attention to the approaching
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crisis there. cnn's robyn kriel has this report for us. >> reporter: a heavy burden for kenyas to bear. poaching epidemic been so visceral than the endless train of elephant tusks, forming something of a graveyard to the iconic species. and soon this will turn into a crematory. 12 tons of ivory set ablaze. >> we have a pumping station, there we've got a mixing tank where we'll be mixing kerosene and diesel, 50% each. and then we'll pump it down individual pipes to each tower, we call these ivory towers. >> reporter: it's the ivory of around 8,000 elephants, combined with the rhino horn, this bounty would be worth an estimated 172 million u.s. dollars on the black market.
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the potential income that could be generated from the sale has been difficult for many cash-strapped african governments to accept. money that could be put, perhaps, towards conservation, but kenya believes it's worth absolutely nothing. >> from a kenya perspective, we're not watching any money go up in smoke. because from our perspective there is no intrinsic value. kenya believes the only value of the ivory is tusks on a live elephant. >> reporter: it's a practical that goes back to 1989. a kenyan way to deal with the crisis. and now an audience to reach. >> they never saw the 1989, 1990 crisis. they were not subjected to the pressure that we brought on the world's markets in those days. so we have to do it again, and that's what we're doing. >> reporter: a record number of rhinos were poached in africa last year, around 1,338.
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and with the stockpile, an elephant is killed every 15 minutes for its tusks. each pair of these tusks tells an individual story of an elephant's life. and you can tell just what kind of life it was by the grooves and markings that you can see here. you can tell its approximate age and oftentimes how it died as well. there are these huge tusks that weigh up to 110 pounds each. then there are those, tiny tusks belonging to babies, never given the chance to mature or live. the fire could last up to a week. but organizers hope the village and stigma will be burned into memory forever. robyn kriel, nairobi, kenya. >> an elephant killed every 15 minutes for its tusks. in south south africa,
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prosecutors dropped the accusations back in 2009 before mr. zuma's election. the high court called that decision irrational. the country's opposition leader agrees. >> we've always maintained that the decision to drop charges against jacob zuma was irrational and should not have been discontinued. we welcome that both sides must be continued and jacob zuma must get what he always wanted, his day in court. >> they'll have to decide whether they should reinstate the charges. that is just one of the many scandals mr. zuma has been weathered. there have been other corruption charges but all dismissed. in 2006 he was tried and adwited of raping a young family friend. he said he showered after the encounter to, quote, minimize
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contracting the disease. recently, south africa's highest court said zuma used funs update his private home. he's been ordered to pay $15 million. the head of mexico's criminal investigation agency is under investigation himself now. an independent human rights panel wants to know why he did not initially disclose that he had been to the site where a charred bone fragment was found. as cnn's rafael romo reports, the fragment belongs to one of 43 students who went missing more than a year ago. [ speaking in a foreign language ] >> reporter: this is a video at the center of the controversy. it shows the director of the mexican criminal investigations agency arriving at the crime scene on october 28, 2014. tomas cerron seen here in the
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baseball hat is investigating the disappearance of students from a rural college. there's just one problem. he never mentioned the river in the official report. a member of the independent panel of investigators established by the interamerican commission on human rights. he says the work of forensic experts, photos and videos taken that day were not included in the official investigation. far from clarifying the situation, the explanations given so far by mr. cerron clearly showed that his behavior goes against basic investigative international standards, he says. but cerron defended his actions saying nothing significant was found on the 28th. as i have demonstrated my presence at that location in broad daylight have been witnessed by commissioners on human rights as well as tens of journalists was legal, cerron
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said. the office of the u.n. commissioner for human rights said it was not at the river that day. they have opened an investigation into cerron's behavior and way he and other investigators have handled the case of the missing students. parents are demanding answers from authorities. they marched on the streets of mexico city again this week, holding banners with pictures of the missing and chancing where are our children? out of 43 students who are missing, the remains of only one have been positively identified. cerron says the remains of bone fragment was found the next day on the 29th. >> you're watching "cnn newsroom." still ahead -- the democratic presidential front-runner hillary clinton, you'll hear how she's responding to the latest attacks from donald trump. and how she plans to defeat him. stay with us.
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thank you! thank you! what a week! we sat down, we kicked back, and we watched tv! [ cheering ] this win is just the beginning! it doesn't end here. because your laundry can wait! keep those sweatpants on! order another pizza! and watch on! [ cheering ] don't wait a whole year for xfinity watchathon week to return.
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upgrade now to add the premium channel of your choice so you can keep watching. call or go online today. america's choice 2016, and the u.s. presidential race, donald trump is increasingly focusing his attacks on hillary clinton. and he's repeatedly criticized the democratic front-runner for sending e-mails on her private account while she was secretary of state. clinton says those e-mails were not can classified at the time. but trump is really hoping his new favorite nickname for clinton will stick. he's what he had to say. >> when i can focus on hillary, as i say, crooked hillary, when i focus on hillary, she'll go down easier than any of the people we just beat.
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>> and clinton is responding to trump's attacks. she gave cnn her first interview since winning big in last tuesday's primaries. our jake tapper began by asking her what she thought about trump's speech on foreign policy. here's what she had to say. >> i certainly read about it, and i think it's quite concerning. his talk about, you know, pulling out nato. his talk about other countries having nuclear weapons which runs counter to 70 years of bipartisan national policy. his idea to have a secret plan to get rid of isis. he's not going to tell anybody. i found it disturbing as senator of new york and secretary of state for four years i know the stakes hire. we face some real challenge and dangers in the world. i don't think loose talks about loose nukes, i don't think turning our backs on our
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strongest allies, i don't think having a secret plan say smart way to go forward in leading the world which is what we must do. >> some issues he's going to run on your left. one might be the use of force and military intervention. whether it's libya or iraq. what will your response be when he says hillary clinton is part of the group that gets us into these wars? >> well, look, i think that i'm always someone who uses military force as a last resort. it's not a first choice. as secretary of state, i talked about smart power and diplomacy. and development. i'm the pun who put together the post sanctions on iran welcomed them to the negotiating table which put a lid on the nuclear program. there was a real potential that military action might have been taken in order to prevent iraqi
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from getting a military weapon. when you have somebody who is tough and get eresolved. doesn't tell you how he's going to do it, i think we'll have a lot to contrast at. >> he as said if you were a man, you'd be 5% in the polls. how do you respond to that? >> you know, i don't respond to his attacks on me. i was someone who got 18 million votes the first time i had. i now have 2 million more votes than donald trump. more than 12 million votes to his 10. so it doesn't really square with reality. what i worry about is the way he attacks all kinds of groups of people. i want to be their spokesperson. i'm going to stand up for them. you know, attacking me, demeaning me, talking about playing the women's card, well, there are a lot of women out there who are really struggling. women working on minimum wage. women not being paid fairly. and trying to balance family and
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work and working really, really hard. women who have a lot of legitimate concerns as i said tuesday night, if play the women's card means standing up for the concerns that women have that they express to me, then deal me in. because that's exactly what i've always done for decades, what i will do in this campaign. >> he has taken politics to a new place with his negative branding of people. whether saying jeb bush has low energy or talking about lying ted cruz. and for his supporters, it's really worked. he has lately taken to calling you i believe, corrupt hillary. and he's had some rather personal and pointed tweets. have you learned anything from watching the way that republicans dealt with him in the primaries that will inform with how you will deal with such an unconventional candidate? >> well, remember, i have a lot of experience dealing with men who sometimes get off the reservation in the way they
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behave and how they speak. i'm not going to deal with their temper tantrums or their bullying. or their efforts to try to provoke me. he can say whatever he wants to say about me. i could really care less. i'm going to stand up for what i think the american people need and want in the next president. that's why i've laid out very specific plans. there's nothing secret about what i want to do with the economy, with education, with health care, with foreign policy. i've laid it all out there. he can't or he won't. i can't tell which. so we're going to talk about what we want to do for the country and he can continue on his insultfest. that's the case he's making. leicester city is standing on the door step of history. we'll talk about their improbable run to the top of european football.
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♪ (music pl♪ throughout) uh oh. what's up? ♪ ♪ ♪ does nobody use a turn signal anymore? ♪
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welcome back to "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell. leicester city football club will play for the english premier league title on sunday. at the beginning of the season their odds to win were at 5000
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to 1. but they're here now, and have one more team between them and history. the bad news, though is that the team is storied manchester united states. lie chester city versus manchester united city seems more like a david versus goliath matchup. if you look at the current history and not the current standings, united have won a 20 english titles more than any other club. while leicester have none so far, they're on course for the first lead title in their 132-year history. look at their revenue, manchester united earned $574 million last season. leicester city's revenue, $151 million. united also has the largest staid. old trafford seats more than 75,000 people. lie chester's king power stadium, just 32,000 fans. manchester united also rules
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social media with 7.5 million twitter followers. leicester city has a little more than 500,000 followers. leicester city has power, his jersey, king power. is a way of new footballers. our christina macfarlane visited thailand to see how it's inspiring young players. >> reporter: this is what lie chester city's effect has on the rest of the world to become the club's nick thai star of the future to wear the blue and white shirt. it's part of the new reality tv show in thailand. takes place all over the country under the watchful eye of a team
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of scouts. it's one way how the club's owners are giving back to their homeland. >> translator: the owner of leicester city is thai, this is the first step to give thai players that opportunity. >> reporter: it's not the only place the owners are making an impact. in august, leicester city are rumored to be sending a team of coaches to help the national team qualify for the 2018 world cup. if anyone knows about succeeding against the odds it's leicester. >> good scout, grit analysis can mean more than hundreds of millions of pounds. that thai football can take something from leicester, i think we have the edge. >> reporter: the thailand top sports is showing how it's changing attitudes across the country. >> problem with a thai society is that sometimes, we're too
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humble. and when we say i have this dream to be the best player in the history of the game, people would say you're too cocky. but now commissioner has shown if leicester can win the number one premier league in the world why can't thailand qualify for the world cup. >> reporter: but if thailand were to succeed in the upper echelon of the game it's here at the grassroots level that real work needs to be done. they've will be running a football program here in the city's biggest slum for the past two years. the goal is to help the kids play their way out of poverty by providing a pathway to football future. >> the big way is to have them to be mature. arrive on time. have good food. sleep good. they're living in a slum, so the conditions around them are not really good for that. it's possible for me to see them in the program, in a few years.
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>> reporter: really? >> yes. >> reporter: there may only be one leicester city shirt in the sea of manchester united stat, liverpool, but there's no doubt who they want to be be if it's to filter down to the slums in the back streets of bangkok, it could be the new era of football in the land of slums. >> children in thailand, pulling for leicester city all the way. we'll have to see what happens. we thank you for being with us this hour on "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. for our viewers in the united states, "new day" is next. for other viewers around the world "amanpour" starts in a moment. thank you for watching cnn, the world's news leader. is better for your skin
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you see the applause and you hear the cheers there from rescue workers as children are pulled alive from the rubble of a collapsed building in kenya. cnn is in nairobi where the death toll is climbing as crews continue to dig for survivors. anti-trump protests turn violent in california forcing donald trump to abandon his motorcade, hop

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