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tv   New Day  CNN  May 3, 2016 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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it could be the senator's last chance to stop donald trump. so how will the gop race change after indiana? we will ask trump's campaign manager when he joins us next hour. >> on the democratic side, a very different dynamic. senator sanders is looking for an upset to reverse mow meamentd has a new strategy that will lead to a new convention. >> and hillary clinton worrying about a bad twist here at the end. we have the indiana primary covered the way only cnn can. we begin with sarah murray live in indianapolis. what's the story from there? >> reporter: good morning, chris. well, ted cruz has brought out basically every high-profile backer he's got in a late-state push here in indiana to try to get him over the top, but donald trump has been sounding awfully confident on the campaign trail saying he will lock it down in indiana and even if he doesn't,
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he'll have it locked down in the next couple of weeks, anyway. >> if we win in ind, it's over with, folks. it's over with. >> reporter: for donald trump today's primary is pivotal for new yorking rival ted cruz out of the race. >> if we win, it's over, and then i can focus -- then i don't have to worry about lieing ted cruz. >> reporter: and focus on hillary clinton. >> e-mails, bad judgment. iraq, yes, voted yes, bad judgment. libya, bad judgment. >> reporter: trump even sat down to lunch with the author of several highly critical and loosely sourced books about the clintons. >> the entire country is depending on the state of indiana. >> reporter: but cruz is still racing to overtake the front-runner, knowing if trump wins he's, he's on track to clinch the nomination. cruz, touting his newly appointed running mate carly c
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bullies. >> reporter: and at a campaign event sunday. >> they just showed it to me. i said, well, that's really cruel. went down in front of him, he kept talking. he kept talking. didn't even look like -- that was a weird deal. >> reporter: and cruz zigzagging throughout the hoosier state and even confronting trump supporters face to face. >> most candidates would have just let the protestors go do their thing. i made a different decision. i walked across the street to engage with them. >> sir, america is a better country -- >> without you. >> reporter: the senator talking with the fired-up crowd over five minutes. going to put us where we need to be. what are you going to do about the second amendment? >> this man is lying to you and he's taking advantage of you. >> reporter: ted cruz insists no matter what happens here today he is staying in the race until cleveland. of course, it's much harder to
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make that pitch to donors both for ted cruz and for the stop trump movement if they can't actually stop him here today. >> sara, thanks for all that. and rival's hillary clinton and bernie sanders locked in a very tight race in indiana. sanders looking to regain momentum and clinton apologizes for comments she made about the coal industry. cnn's chris frates is live in indiana with more. hi, chris. >> reporter: good morning, alisyn. voters already starting to go to the polls behind me in indiana and the clinton campaign bracing for a possible loss here. clinton campaign official tells me they wouldn't be surprised if bernie sanders can pull off an upset. two reasons for that. one is money. bernie sanders spent about $2 million in advertising here, clinton spent virtually nothing. a whiter state than some of the states hillary clinton won and bernie sanders tends to outperform with the white voters, but clinton folks are not super concerned because of the math. bernie sanders would have to win pie huge flubs to cut into her
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delegate lead and they don't see that. picking up workers in the manufacturing state like indiana and bernie sanders will sit down with folks from carrier and hillary clinton hasn't even been campaigning here in indiana. in fact, she was in west virginia yesterday where she apologized for a remark made back in march at a cnn town hall where she said she would put a lot of coal miners and companies out of business, and she said that remark was taken out of context. >> it was a misstatement, because what i was saying is that the way things are going now, we will continue to lose jobs. i do feel a little bit sad and sorry that i gave folks the reason or the excuse to be so upset with me, because that is not what i intended at all. >> reporter: a big apology from hillary clinton ahead of west virginia's big primary in next week. we'll keep an eye on that and on
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indiana to see if bernie sanders can pull off the upset. there are 92 counties in indiana. polls open in all but 12. turnout is key for both parties. the gop has been drawing more traffic at the polls. will it again today? cnn national correspondent jason carroll live at a polling site in terre haute, ind. how you doing, jason? >> reporter: yes. and also in vigo county where they really like to vote. it's already 6:00 a.m. polls opened a few minutes ago. already here, some voters, lining up here as well. some 78,448 registered voters. voting starting april 5th. so far, of a percentage, twice as many republicans versus democrats. you hear about bellwether counties throughout the country. this really is a bellwether county, when you consider this one fact --
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they have picked the winning presidential candidate nearly every single time since 1888. they only missed 2 twice. once in 1908, the other, 1952 when they picked stephenson over eisenhower. we're definitely going to watch this race very, very carefully. again, this is a primary. this isn't a presidential general election, but having said that, going to be watching what happens here in this county very, very closely. chris, alisyn? >> we will as well, jason. thanks so much for that. here to discuss what's happening today, washington bureau chief for the "daily beast" jackie con skucinich, da gregory and maeve reston. great to have you here in studio with us. >> very nice. >> indiana is critical, we've been saying. if ted cruz wins there tonight he can justify staying in. if he doesn't, what happens? jackie? >> we don't see cruz dropping out by any stretch of the
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imagination. it's mathematically impossible for him to piwin and we're seei his delegates of softer. the ones he courter, softer support than he may like and you might see some of those people going to trump at a convention at the end of the day if he's too weak to solidify his support. >> nobody's dropping out, period. you won't see anybody leaving the race on either side. >> you sure you want to make that -- >> absolutely. are you taking the other side, maeve reston? >> i don't know. >> you have to know. that's how this game is played. why do i say that? because we don't see motivation to consolidate on either side. bernie sanders will talk about the democratic side a little bit later in the show, but, you know, this super delegate strategy, he's finding a way to game the convention. kasich, working the phones. kasich's people believe there's a road at the convention. cruz' people believe there is a chance that trump could stumble. probably not tonight, but they believe it's there. so what do you think -- this is
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an important day, no question, but is it still long game, all across the board? >> i mean, i think that there is still a shot potentially. it depends on how close results look tonight, but it's absolutely a money game tonight. i mean, that's the big problem is that ted cruz needs advertising dollars to go into these other states, nebraska, where donald trump has already laid some money down for ads. that's going to be the big question is whether donors think that he realistically really has a path to keep him in it and whether the anti-trump forces, their donors say, okay, a total waste of money. it's done. >> david, cruz thinks he has a path and laid it out with dana bash in her interview with him. so listen to his math. >> will you support his candidacy, if he, donald trump, gets the delegates before cleveland? >> dana, nobody's going to get to 1,237. i'm not going to get to it, but neither is donald trump.
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>> reporter: what makes you so sure he won't get the delegates? getting 47% of the remaining delegates isn't inconceivable at all. >> he hasn't gotten them to date and -- >> reporter: but he sure did well last week. >> you're right. he did well in his home state, and he did well in the adjoining states, won five states last week, but in the three weeks that preceded that i won five states in a row starting with utah, then north dakota, then wisconsin and colorado then wyoming. 1.3 million people voted in those states, and by the way, i earned more votes in wisconsin than donald trump did in new york. >> so, david, what about that logic? >> look, he make as very good argument. he just has to be able to back it up, actually put the numbers on the board, bottom line. one of the things i'm picking up as i talk to republican officials is there's more republican be donors who just don't think that cruz has a path. they just don't believe that he is the alternative, and there's more of a movement towards trump feeling like, hey, look, high-risk, but also high-reward
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with trump. what's what i think is starting to coalesce here. it's certainly possible trump could stumble, certainly possible you could get shy of 1,237 but i think the narrative starts to collapse, and if trump wins big tonight in indiana, i think it is effectively over, because you can even have some other cruz states like nebraska that fall then for trump, and then he's polling well in california. so this argument that somehow he can be stopped when it hasn't happened becomes a lot thinner i think, if he wins tonight. >> the plus/minus, seems for him. the minus side, ted cruz is blaming us, saying the media is driving trump. really insiders are starting to do what david gregory says. we cannot do clinton anymore favors, because they believe she's going to be the nominee. he has a problem in-house and the man standing next to him in indiana. mike pence. this state runs on principles as much as any in that region. >> for sure. >> does he win cruz when you get
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republicans thinking about what matters to them on a policy position? >> in indiana, here's the problem. pence kind of kneecaped him also by that endorsement. >> you're buying the trump spin on that? >> no. he did endorse him, you're right, but like, yeah, ted cruz is great. it wasn't as bold throated as you expected, from someone like mike pence. you're right, ideologically aligned with donald trump. more of an expectation you need to vote for this person instead of, i like him, you should, too. >> you haven't seen the sort of chips line up the way that ted cruz wanted them to in indiana. the evangelical vote has not coalesce completely around him, talk radio is not 100% ones had side the way they were in other states, and that's really hurt him along with donald trump's momentum. i do think there's a shot we're still going to have a feisty california primary, in my home
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state, but -- and that's very complicated terrain. ted cruz has been organized there for a year. so if he can eke out at least a closer contest tonight then maybe he can make it that far and bet on his organization to keep trump from that 1,237 number. >> that conservative voter, the one who buys the cruz argument that trump is a phony, that he's not a real conservative and won't deliver on some of the promises, that's the test tonight. are there enough of those conservative voters who come out in bigger numbers? or has trump completely stomped over traditional ideology in that race? because indiana, i think, is a good testing ground for that dichotomy. >> an interesting exchange we should play for you yesterday between a trump supporter and ted cruz, who got into what some say was an ill-advised exchange with this trump supporter where they just went back and forth. so watch a moment of this. >> sir -- america -- is a better
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country -- >> without you. >> thank you for those kind sentiments. let me point out i treated you respectfully the entire time, and a question that everyone here should ask. >> are you canadian? >> do you want -- >> are you canadian? >> do you want yore kids repeating the words of donald trump? >> okay. the trump supporter has impeccable comedic timing. >> truly. >> i think more than one. >> i mean, but he -- that one -- they had, like, an eight-minute exchange. is that a good use of ted cruz' time? >> no. i don't think so. i understand he wants to engage the trump supporters, and you know, have an intelligent dialogue. that same supporter asked him what are you going to do about the second amendment? ted cruz, that's one place where ted cruz has absolutely no problem when it comes to republican voters. i don't know that that did ted cruz, kind of made him look silly. >> what about the metaphors? somebody with nothing to lose, ted cruz is a masterful litigator and fearless in that regard. we see it with dana bash, too.
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no jokes. facts on her side. he will make the case why trump won't get to 1,237. that's what he does, did it to the highest court in the land. but to a democrat not sure yet, watching that trump supporter and the kind of things he says and the way that ted cruz responds to the ugliness, responds to the insults to his face, i don't know that it looks so bad for ted cruz. >> well, it shows she willing to do the fight. >> above it, a true believer and not going to be cheap. >> condescension that maybe wouldn't -- he went on to talk about this exchange later saying, where we see civility on our side whereas the trump side is all about fighting. >> i'm getting ganged up on. david gregory, do you agree with me or everybody else? >> maeve reston and this whole west coast bias is getting hold. >> that's what i'm talking about. >> no. i tend to agree with you, chris.
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i might have pulled cruz aside, probably not a persuadable voter here, but i think he makes an argument that others might hear as an effective argument against trump. >> panel, thank you very much. stick around. we have to talk about the democratic side as well. coming up in our next hour, donald trump's campaign manager corey lewendowski will join us on "new day." >> and a little switch there for gregory. bernie sanders is not backing down. the senator insists that he is a better candidate than hillary clinton to take on a republican nominee, period. but can he beat the former secretary of state in today's pivotal indiana primary? big questions. answers, ahead. ♪
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there's a lot more at play in that party. let's bring back in our panel. good to have you all three here. talking about sanders in the impact, he is largely a product of what happens to clinton today and going forward. let's play some sound, it's about coal miners but could have metaphor effect for hillary clinton now and going forward about how she feels about coal and the coal industry and what she's going to do. this is before and then when face-to-face with the west virginia coal family. >> well, i'm the only candidate which has a policy about how to bring economic opportunity using clean renewable energy as the key into coal country, because we're going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business. >> i just want to know how you can say you're going to put a lot of coal miners out of -- out of jobs, and then come in here and tell us how you're going to
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be our friend? because those people out there don't see you as a friend. >> i know that, bo, and, you know, i don't know -- how to explain it, other than what i said was totally out of context from what i meant, because i have been talking about helping coal country for a very long time, and i did put out a plan last summer, and it was a misstatement. >> now, jackie, her people will tell you all day long, you know, she was saying because of this renewable energy stuff you're going to wind up killing these coal places. you bet verify a plan for them, too, she was being supportive in both instances. it did not play that. even she called it a misstatement subpoena there a metaphor in clinton going forward? will she be attacked because of these kind of negotiated response? >> hillary clinton's biggest problem throughout the whole race has been people think they can't trust her. this does not help that narrative or help she was in
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clumpy, ohio, a natural gas state. you put those two together. it does look like that the appearance of the fact that, you know, she's saying one thing here and saying another thing in west virginia. >> she was trying to be honest, maeve, in that town hall. trying to be honest. things are transitioning to renewable energy. fracking is coming onboard. we have to figure out what gear going to do about the coal miner, trying to be honest. so interesting to see her then try to clarify her response because it's so untrump-like. trump would have said, i'm telling the truth. deal with it. this is what you have to accept, and she didn't do that, but was el telling the truth the first time. >> yes, and to back off those remarks, it's almost worse, as she had just found a way to own it and talk about it, because this is potentially where the general election will be fought. in places like coal country. the west potentially, if it's donald trump is the nominee and hillary clinton, maybe not as much in play, and he's going to go into these rust belt states
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and use those remarks against her, and you can just see that appearing in an ad over and over again, and jackie's right. it hits the trust issue for her very hard. >> and trust, a nicer way of saying trust is principle versus pragmati pragmatism, david. dealing with it with sanders. the pifurist, about a dream, sh has to answer to reality. not as enticing. against trump, ultimate the nominee, every time out of the box, versus someone who says things are not that easy. it's subtle. how does that play? >> trump will play on such a big canvas in the general election and the risk here for clinton is, big, bold strokes and then there's the more nuanced, you know, brush strokes, where she's doing a lot of campaign explain he's offering big principles. looks clumsy for clinton. talking about a debate, foreign policy, sara murray in her piece a few minutes ago, trump was
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saying, look, hillary clinton equals bad judgment. think iraq, think e-mails, think libya. you know, that's a bite-sized argument and it's a compelling argument. you've got to really get into the detail to really deconstruct those three things. that's a dynamic that i don't think always works well for clinton, and i think you saw that here in this coal explanation as well. >> yes. if we've learned one thing from this particular election year, it's that voters don't want nuance right now. >> right. >> they like slogans. they like big promises. they like bite-sized philosophies. >> right. >> and personal characteristics versus policy. i mean, i think that trump is campaigning on the idea of strength. a projection of strength at a time when america seems on its heels. that's his argument, and she's going to have to make something that's similarly concise. >> so can she pivot to a less nuanced position and make bolder proclamations or is it not her
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style? >> she can, but it will take work. hillary clinton is a policy wonk, likes getting downing into the gritty details. she la to learn to do that but we saw a little bit with the woman card. something that raised her a lot of money. an area it is bite-sliced, slogan area. >> if that's the woman card, deal me in. that was like the best slogan she could use. >> she loves playing on that terrain. that's the kind of terrain she will try to play on. they had a great fund-raising haul over the last couple of days after those trump remarks, and so she's just going to try to pivot to turn to those issues that work in her favor. >> as david said, she did bet whir it was about who you are, what you are, trump moving in that direction didn't seem to get purchase. i don't know. the first round of that salveo.h we'll see. don't tell me what i know and don't about foreign policy. like he said yesterday, she stunk. all she got was frequent flyer miles. you may want to take that on in
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a written exam all day long, but it sounds good. tough to rebut, maeve. >> and talking about president obama's comment, trying to get up the hill. she has to clean up and be more concise to bring up her favorable. >> the bumper has nothing on this. >> thank you very much. appreciate it, panel. we may have breaking news for you. stick around. we'll be right back after this. i'm terrible at golf.
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north of the city of mosul and that this person was an adviser to the kurdish peshmerga forces but back from the front line, as standard practice dictates. now, it says that the enemy broke through the front lines of the peshmerga and that is how the u.s. service member was killed in the resulting firefight. the u.s. came in with f-15 fighter jets and drones and dropped more than 20 bombs. at the same time, we are hearing from iraqi security forces in the area north of mosul that early hours this morning isis launched an offensive, an attack on their front lines, in a town in that area using several suicide bombers, and that coalition air power came in to provide support for them, and that clashes are ongoing. we are now trying to confirm whether these are the same incidents that we're talking about, and this is how that service member was killed, but this is the latest that we have
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for now and will bring you more. chris? >> a terrible, terrible concern of what it is to be an adviser for u.s. troops there in that war-torn region right now. joumana, thank you very much. check back when you have more information. the u.s. finding some cooperation from russian officials pushing for an extended cease-fire in syria's aleppo province. this following a fresh round of attacks monday and violence in reason week leaving hundreds of people dead. secretary of state john kerry says he is in touch with russia's foreign minister and tells us there are several peace proposals on the table. schoolchildren stay home again this morning in detroit. the teachers' union telling its members to call out sick for a second day in a row. at least 80 detroit public schools will be closed today. 94 of the city's 97 schools were shut yesterday after teachers were told there is not enough money to pay them past june.
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and another crisis there, 20,000 water customers in detroit will have their service turned off today if they do not pay delinquent bills. this might be the most improbable upset in sports history. a big statement, but leicester city captures england's premiere soccer title in the face of -- ready for it -- 5,000-1 odds. guess how they did it monday? never stepped on to the pitch. clinched the championship because chelsea tied tottenham 2-2. the stunning title triggering celebrations in leicester city two hours north of london, and in an epic twitter rage from piers morgeairs morgue -- pierc. the biggest surprise in sports ever. >> 5,000-1, steep odds. >> never stepped on the pitch to win it. >> and i love the knee slide of the guy who just wend like 50
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we have a cnn exclusive for you. president obama speaking out candidly defending his approach to fighting the war on terror. the president reflecting on what he says he has accomplished and what the next commander in chief needs to be ready for. here are some of what the excerpts are from cnn's peter bergen. >> reporter: what keeps you up at night now and what should the next president be most concerned about? >> i think that we have built a incredible structure of cooperation between intelligence military, law enforcement, that has hardened the american homeland, and the capacity of an organization like an isil or an
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al qaeda in the arabian peninsula to carry out a big, catastrophic attack, is much lower, but as we've seen, you now have a proliferation of groups, because of the power of social media there is a mechanism to recruit volunteers that are already located in the west that are much more difficult, precisely because they don't engage in the same kind of planning, and what that means is, is that we've got to continue to be vigilant. it means that we've got to go after isil in its core, where it allows itself to maintain the illusion that somehow it's on the march. it's going to be important for us ultimately to take them out
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of mosul, take them out of raqqah, maic sure they don't have those kind of safe havens where they can pretend that they're a state in some fashion. that will diminish their appeal, but we're going to have small groups, lone actors, who for some time will continue to find this perverted ideology appealing, and we have to be pwe have to be resilient and no react in ways that makes the problem worse rather than better. we have to understand that the kinds of special forces and intelligence gathering that we saw in the bin laden raid is going to be more often than not the tool of choice for a president in dealing with that kind of threat that sending
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100,000 troops to invade every country where an organization like this appears is going to be counterproductive and in some ways feeds the kinds of ideology that we're fighting. most importantly, we have to stay true to our values during this process. we have to make sure that we're not engaging in the kind of knee jerk anti-muslim sentiment that we've heard from some politicians. we've got to make sure that the legal structures around our intelligence gathering and our use of predators is subject to oversight. it's not always going to be easy. it's not always going to be perfectly smooth. there are going to be times where as president you make a decision knowing that there are going to the critics, and
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knowing that there's some gray areas and ambiguities you have to deal with given the realities of the situation, but overall, i think we can draw a lesson from the bin laden raid that we've got really effective people, and a government that knows how to do this, and as long as we operate from the position of confidence and strength and are true to who we are, groups like this or individuals like this can't defeat us. >> interesting to hear his insights there, and his tone. you know, that was subdued. that was a very subdued president obama. that wasn't sort of a fiery president obama. here's what we're going to do taking the fight to them. it was, what did you think of that tone? what do you make of it? >> real. poetry versus prose. if he was running for election
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right now he'd get clobbered. the reality is, peter bergen if you don't know who he is, when he nods his head it carries weight on everybody on that part of the world and knows the reality. you want to say we'll be strong, going to crush them, going to do it. it's complicated. for all the military incursions the united states has done, the risk, according to every expert, is as great or greater, and not because of what the u.s. has done but despite it. the threat is very real. easy to campaign about, very difficult to control once in office. >> you can feel the weight of that in his tone there. >> you can see it in his hair. >> that's true. let us know what you think of that exchange. find us on twitter. if the front-runners hillary clinton and donald trump win indiana today, fasten your seat belts for a battle in the general. what's the democrats' plan? to fight trump? we'll ask the democratic party, straight ahead. rs. accessible by thousands of suppliers and employees globally.
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it's a rainy start to may in the northeast. a soggy morning up and down the east coast after a night of severe storms and even hail. take a look at d.c. wow. you can see that a downed tree crushed some cars there. let's get to cnn's meteorologist
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chad myers with a look at how long this will last. what are you seeing, chad? >> one more day, and it's done, alisyn. even by about 3:00 this afternoon, done for most of d.c., but la plata, close to a very, very big storm yesterday. we'll see more of that weather into delaware all the way down to about hampton road, but this morning the story is rain. slowing down your compete, at least a half hour in a lot of spots and maybe more in some bigger airports there, bigger they are, slower they'll be and the chance of some possible severe weather around charlotte all the way to just about the delmarva pa lins eninsupeninsul. temperatures looking good. beginning to warm up, not a lot but a little bit. 56 in new york but warms up from here. look out at the desert southwest. 94 in phoenix and warmer than that tomorrow all the way to 101. so here we go. here we go with the warm-up. cooling down a couple of days but then finally back on the uphill swing as the next cold front goes by. 60 in new york. gets warmer from here and by i'd
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say monday or tuesday, back up to 75, and the flowers will be happier than they are right now. at least they're getting rain nap will help a little. back to you guys. >> i'll take it. we don't have any choice. thanks, chad. so an overwhelming majority of democrats say clinton will be the party's nominee. if that holds true, is she ready to do battle with donald trump? we're going to ask the head of the dnc, next. what's the plan for the big game? of bad breath germs% for a 100% fresh mouth.
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e-mails. bad judgment. iraq. voted yes. bad judgment. libya, bad judgment. all bad judgment. >> that was donald trump foreshadowing attacks he plans to use in the general election against hillary clinton. this as more than eight in ten democrats in a new cnn orc national poll believe hillary clinton will be their party's nominee. so how will the dnc prepare for a likely face-off with donald trump? let's ask the woman in charge, dnc chair and florida congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz. great to have you here in studio. >> great to be with you. >> a little snippet, a little taste what donald trump plans to say against hillary clinton if he do, in fact, become their party's nominees. basically, i mean, he has already telegraphed that nothing is off limits. he's going to hit her with everything he has. so how had the party preparing for this kitchen sink approach? >> all of this from the person who is the dictionary definition
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of bad judgment. you know, when the republican party is getting ready to nominate the most sexist, bigoted misogynistic candidate that we've had in the modern presidential election cycles, you know, throwing around bad judgment is -- is -- is quite a bit coming from that guy. >> let me ask you how far you'd be willing to go. because donald trump has telegraphed he is willing to go back in time and bring up bill clinton's past sexual history. would the democrats be willing to go back in time to donald trump? bring up things about his wife, his ex-wives, his marriages? >> alisyn, this election -- first of all, we have been taking this election seriously. we're taking the american people seriously. that's why, you know, i've been so proud of both of our candidates, our debates have been substantive, focusing on issues that matter to voters. so this election is going to be
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decided by voters who care about whether the person who wants to be our president has their back, is going to focus ing on creatig jobs. 73 straight months of job growth in the private sector. not take away people's health care from the 20 million who have health insurance now but add people to the health care rolls. that's going to make sure we can make education for affordable. >> you want to focus on the issue, but it seems as though voters are responding to his style and tone as well? >> no. no, no, no, no. republicans voters are responding to his stotone and h style. that is an extremist republican party that's playing out and donald trump didn't hijack the republican party. donald trump is the republican party. their voters, and who is coming out to support him and the entire wear their primary played out reflects how extreme and how off-base compared to the american people their party really is. >> you're saying if he engages
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in that asymmetrical warfare bringing up all sorts of things that might be considered sort of, you know, off limits that you're not going to? the democratic side won't go that way? >> we are going to prepare and are preparing fully to run the full gym amut of a general election. focus on the issues, but we're certainly not going to let ridiculous, extreme attacks throw off the focus of this campaign where voters really want it to remain. >> let me ask you about something that happened yesterday. hillary clinton, you know, is touring coal country, west virginia, kentucky, ohio. she was confronted by a coal worker who asked if she really does have their backs because of something says in a town hall, which was, look, coal jobs are going away. let me play to you her response. >> i i don't how to explain it other than what i said was totally out of context from what i meant, because i have been talking about helping coal country for a very long time,
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and i did put out a plan last summer, and it was a misstatement. >> is that the right tact? it was a misstatement? she was telling the truth to begin with. they do need to transition out of, you know, being solely dependent on coal to other renewable things and fracking? what she said during the town hall was the truth but now is clarifying or apologizing it? >> i didn't look at it that way at all. first of all good for her for sitting down to people who really are deeply concerned about how their jobs and their industry is going to transition as we try to make sure that we can reduce our carbon footprint and address climate change and not, you know, completely put people out of work. at the same time. and so in saying that she made a misstatement, i don't think she was backing tracking on the substance of what she said, but when you say something that comes out in a hurtful way you
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want to make sure that people understand that you still care about them, you're not just discarding them or don't care about how -- the changes are going to affect their lives. so sitting down with those people had are going to be affected by change is important. >> is it a problem that basically what he was saying that they don't know if they can trust her? >> look, donald trump is going to pull every trick out in the book possible, as he continues to cause the implosion, or the, finalize the implosion of the republican party. their primary played out in the most chaotic way. their convention will go even further, and you have a very large percentage of republican voters who now say, a majority of republican voters, who now say that they are not going to be able to reunify by november. our party on the other hand that enthusiastic voters who are coming out at our primaries saying our primaries actually energize them to support either one of our candidates. so i'm very excited about the prospect for the general election. the organization that we're
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going to have, we've been preparing at the dnc simultaneous to our primary playing out and still, alisyn, will out-organize and out-mobilize the republicans. they never did anything they said they needed to do to win a presidential election. they are alienating voters, never create add centralized voter file, we have one, have strengthened ours. we still have more advanced capability and technology in our digital tools and will be ready for them and run circles around them and on top of that our nominee, regardless of who it is, will champion the issues that matter to americans, and theirless try to drag us backwards. >> debbie wasserman schultz, thanks so much for being on "new day." we're following a lot of news including a live interview with dndonald trump's campaign manager. hets g let's get right to it. >> he's choking like a dog. >> i'm not willing to give up. >> i don't have to worry about
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lyin' ted cruz, we don't have to worry about kasich who's 1-44. >> we're going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business. [ chanting ] >> it was a misstatement. that is not what i intended at all. >> by far, bernie sanders is the strongest candidate. >> the ideology has not been extinguished. there is a mechanism to recruit volunteers located in the west. we've got to be vigilant. we've got to go after isil. >> announcer: this is "new day" with chris cuomo and alisyn camerota. good morning. welcome to your "new day." pick the word for big, important, crucial, and that's what indiana is, especially for senator ted cruz. he's hoping that the primary in the hoosier state that's just a few hours now into the voting. you can see the clock right on the bottom of your screen, that he is going to have a new momentum on a path to getting the nomination. remember, all of indiana's 92 counties are open for voting
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right now. the results are happening as we're reporting. donald trump claims the race is over if he wins big tonight. so we're going to discuss that with trump's campaign manager, mr. corey lewendowski in a few minutes here on "new day" live. bernie sanders' bid for the white house also hanging in the balance somewhat. hillary clinton hoping to deliver a knockout blow today. a disappointing finish in indiana tonight for sanders could seal his fate. so we have the indiana primary covered the way only cnn can. let's begin with sara murray live in indianapolis. hi, sara. >> reporter: good morning, alisyn. well, it is going to be all but impossible to keep donald trump from clinching the 1,237 delegates he needs to become the nominee if ted cruz cannot defeat him today right here in indiana. that's why we have seen cruz all over the state with his highest profile supporters, but donald trump sounds awfully confident going into today's primary. >> if we win in indiana, it's over with, folks. it's over with. >> reporter: for donald trump,
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today's primary is pivotal for knocking rival ted cruz out of the race. >> if we win, it's over. and then i can focus -- then i don't have to worry about lyin' ted cruz. >> reporter: and redirecting his attacks on his potential general election opponent. hillary clinton. >> e-mails. bad judgment. iraq. voted yes. bad judgment. libya, bad judgment. >> reporter: on the trailmond trump even sat down to lunch with the author of self highly critical and loosely sourced books about the clinton. >> the entire country is depending on the state of indiana. >> reporter: but cruz is still racing to overtake the front-runner. knowing if trump wins here, he's on track to clinch the nomination. cruz touting his newly appointed running mate, carly fiorina. >> carly fiorina stands up to bullies whether they are donald trump or hillary clinton. >> reporter: and putting her directly in trump's line of fire. the billionaire season at a
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campaign event sunday. >> just showed it to me. wow, that's really cruel. she went down right in front of him and he kept talking. he didn't even look like -- that was a weird deal. >> reporter: cruz spent the day before this crucial contest zigzagging throughout the hoosier state. and even confronting trump supporters face to face. >> most candidates would have just let the protestors go do their thing. i made a different decision. i walked across the street to engage with them. >> sir, america is a better country -- >> without you. >> reporter: the senator sparring with a fired up crowd for over five minutes. >> trump, he's the only one that's going to put us where we need to be. what are you going to do about the second amendment? >> this man is lying to you and taking advantage of you. >> reporter: now, ted cruz is vowing to stay in the race until cleveland no matter what happens right here in indiana, but that's going to be a tougher pitch to make not only to supporters also to his donors, if he does not come out with a victory here and looks like it's just not possible to keep trump
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from getting to 1,237. back to you, chris. >> sara murray, appreciate it. slip over to the democratic side. bernie sanders hoping to reverse his streak with a big win tonight in ind. it is the hillary clinton campaign, are they prepared for an upset tonight? cnn's chris frates live in indianapolis with more. what are you hearing, my friend? >> reporter: good morning, chris. voters behind plea alreame alre starting to go to the polls. i talked to a campaign official yesterday who said they wouldn't be surprised if bernie sanders wins here. a few reasons for that. number one, money. bernie sanders spent about $2 million in advertising in indiana. hillary clinton spent virtually nothing. two democrat graphics a majority white state. bernie sanders tends to overperform among white voters compared to hillary clinton, and, three, it's an own primary. meaning independents can vote in the democratic primary. that has helped bernie sanders in the past. now, the clinton folks aren't too concerned, even if he were to win here, because he needs to win by really big margins in
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order to cut into her delegate lead. they don't see that happening. now, the sanders folks tell me they're feeling good going into today. they have the endorsement of the steel workers, big here in a manufacturing state and bernie sanders having breakfast with the head of the local union at carrier, which made a lot of news for sending their jobs to mexico. in fact, here was bernie sanders talking about that election just last night. >> during the course of this campaign we have won 17 primaries and caucuses -- [ cheers ] -- and i have a feeling that tomorrow with your help we're going to make it number 18. >> reporter: now, hillary clinton has not been campaigning here in indiana. in fact, she was in west virginia yesterday where she apologized for something she said at a cnn town hall back in march when she said she would put coal miners and coal companies out of business saying
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that remark was taken out of context. she's apologized but a big admission in coal country ahead of the west virginia primary next week. we'll continue to watch that and watch as voters come in here in indiana, whether bernie sanders can really pull off that upset. back to you, alisyn. >> chris, thanks for that. as chris way sass iying, it decision in indiana. jason carroll is on the ground in larry bird country. terre haute, indiana. polls are open. how's the turnout so far there? >> reporter: yes. they call this, alisyn, the crossroads of america. here in terre haute in vigeeg g vig -- vigo county. registered voters of that number, about 16% have voted early. early voting starting on april 5th. of those who came out to vote already, about twice as many republicans versus democrats have been out here to vote.
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you hear so much about bellwether states. bellwether counties. this is definitely one of them. here's the reason why, alisyn. since 1888, this county has accurately picked the winning presidential candidate nearly every single time, with the exception of two times. once in 1952. the other time in 1908, when i was talking to some election workers here i said to these two young ladies sitting right over there, i said, why do you think that is? why so accurate here? both told me, common sense nap is what works here and why we're paying so close attention to this county. >> what's the one they botched? stephenson over eisenhower? you said earlier. i wonder if they walk around, ah, stephenson. let's discuss the high stakes in indiana. national spokesperson for the trump campaign, ms. katrina pierson, and national spokesperson for the cruz campaign, mr. ron nehring. this is what we call in the business, a marquee markup.
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you are the front-runner in indiana. what does this state mean overall to the election? do you think you will win, and then what? >> good morning. and, yes. i do believe we are going to win indiana, and i think the most important part about today's race is the concept that the american voters in the republican party want donald trump to be their nominee going into november. and this is extremely important, because when this race began back in june, no one really thought it was possible. those inside the establishment. those inside washington, d.c. but the voters have decided opposite, and what we're seeing today play out over the last few weeks is that they want donald trump to be that leader of the republican party moving forward. >> how do you rebut that, mr. mereing? >> -- mr. nehring? >> look at numbers going forward. regardless what happens in indiana today in order for didn't dnd to onald trump to be nominee, he would have to win on
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the first ballot. for him to get there from today, regardless of the outcome today, he would have to win the following states. he would have to win in nebraska, new jersey, new mexico, washington, oregon, california and he would have to win 90% of the delegates in west virginia. now, the only people we know so far who win 90% of delegates anywhere is some of paul manafort's clients around the world, but that is the pathway donald trump would need to become the republican nominee. that is his only pathway, and he has to win in all of those states in order to do that, because he can only do so on the first ballot. that's a pretty steep hill to climb. and that's why regardless of the outcome today we're going all the way to california, all the way to june 7th, all the way to the convention. >> that's simply not the case. >> do you accept that math, ka tre -- katrina? >> not at all. once they hired the big common core guy, this is the math they're using. donald trump needs less than 50% of delegates moving forward to achieve that goal.
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there are also some unbound delegates mr. trump will get prior to the convention going forward. we will get to 1,237 before the convention, and even if it does go past a first vote, donald trump will still be the nominee, because the delegates can do the math. donald trump is the leader. donald trump has "the" most votes. millions more votes than any other candidate in this race. he will have hundreds more delegates and national polls show him beating hillary clinton in a general election with cross-ov cross-overappeal. >> the push back for each of you. start with katrina. first is, this idea of what happens if there's a second ballot? donald trump doesn't get to 1,237, how big of a concern is that for you, given what we just saw in arizona where the cruz campaign went in there and cleaned up delegates? you can criticize the process all you like. it is the process. what do you think happens on a second vote? >> well, again, i'll say i'm not concerned. simply because the delegates can also see the math.
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they can also see the pathway. the cruz campaign has been fundamentally rejected. in over the last few weeks you have seen such desperate tactics making alliances, not making alliances, putting someone on the vp ticket 24 hours after mr. cruz was eliminated mathematically and just calling voters evil. these are the types of things that are turning off voters as we speak. we're going to win handedly tonight in indiana, continued to win moving forward, leading in all the polls. there's no way donald trump does not win this nomination. >> the pushback for you, ron, is, most people will say that donald trump needs to win 47% of remaining delegates. more than he's won to this point, but the momentum is in this favor, that way, and that with ted cruz, you've got to win more than the existing number of delegates out there. why so confident there's a path? >> well, because donald trump can only win if there's a single ballot. pretty much everybody acknowledges that. so the reality is. >> not everybody.
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>> not katrina pierson. giving you the stink eye and the head shake. >> even party leaders are saying donald trump's going to win. >> but -- okay. let's hold on the interrupting there. hold on a second. so if you take a look at the delegates who have been elected and the delegates who are likely to be elected going forward and who these people are as the grass roots activists of the republican party and donald trump, most of the analysts, independent analysts say he's never going to get more votes on a second ballot than the first ballot, because after the first ballot most delegates are unbound. after the second, just about all are unbound and at that point can exercise their best judgment. this high water mark is on the first ballot. why he's so desperate not to go to the end. we're going to the end. keeping in all of the states going forward. donald trump dnd has to win seven states including 90% of delegates in west virginia. for our team to win, win in south dakota, in montana and in
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any one of the seven states i outlined donald trump has to underperform. that's the math, that's the reality and what it takes for either candidate to win the nomination going forward and what we're going to do what does your math say, katrina? >> well, like i said. we don't need to win 70% of the delegates. like you said. 47%. and we are winning. we are ahead by a wide margin. >> i didn't say 70% of the delegates. >> in many states moving forward over 1,000 delegates and i'm sorry, ron. but the delegates aren't going to get to the convention and decide that, oh, we should pick a candidate that's behind by 3 million-plus votes, that has hundreds less more delegates. a candidate who can't even win in a state on the electoral map that can put a republican over the top. donald trump has the momentum, he has the votes, he has the energy, he has the excitement. he's the only candidate that can take on the media as well as the democrat machine. donald trump will be the gop nminee and he will win in
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november. >> quick comment from each are you on this poll. nothing about indiana. we don't do same-day polls. doesn't make sense. they range too much. in terms of the state of the party, united, 7%. divided, but will unite, 41%. divided and will not unite, 49%. now, that 49 sticks out, katrina, because that is one of the theories about trump's power, that the party, he may get half of them, but the party will remain split and that will hobble him if he is the nominee going into the general election. your response, quickly? >> well, this is nothing new. the party's been divided since they've been slamming establishment candidates down our throats and now we have a candidate chosen by the people. at the end of the day, if you're a republican that wants hillary clinton to win, you're not a republican. >> if you go into a convention and somehow come out of it alive, ron, would you have such a disabled party that you would be incapable of competing? >> well, the one person who has no ability to unite the republican party much less
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anything is donald trump, because he turn s everything ino a petty fight with staying up late at night and hate tweeting and the like. this is not the type of person who has any capability to unite anything. by contrast, five former candidates running in this united primary, governor mike pence onboard, former governor pete wilson onboard, people ranging from mark levin and jeb bush, all come behind ted cruz and we've demonstrated the ability to do that and when we're the republican nominee if that's the outcome out of cleveland, we have a clear path to get there, we will be able to put the republican party back together, and unite the party and ge on to defeat hillary clinton. any notion that donald trump can unite the republican party or unite anything is just ridiculous, because all you have to do see the type of person he's proven to be in this primary so far. >> making him the most popular
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person in the race so far. thank you both very much for making a strong case on both fronts. more players this morning. donald trump's campaign manager corey lewendowski. what does he think about the way forward? how does he make the case donald trump is uniter? hear for yourself and make your own jumplts judgments in minutes. a u.s. service member killed by enemy fire in northern iraq. live in amman, jordan, we have the breaking details. what have you learned? >> reporter: alisyn, the latest we're es guessing is from barbara starr telling us the american service member was ill canned abokilled 20 miles north mosul and as a standard practice was back a bit from the front lines but as the attacker, managed to break through the peshmerga lines he was killed in
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a firefight. the u.s. responded with an f-15 and drones, dropping more than 50 bombs. at this point, no word on any americans wounded. this news as we are hearing from iraqi and kurdish officials in northern iraq saying that early this morning isis launched a major attack, what seems to be coordinated major assault on various peshmerga front lines in north iraq, underscoring while isis has lost some territory in recent months, the group still has that ability to carry out deadly attacks and launch major offenses like this. >> chris? >> joumana, thank you very much. please, keep us updated. we'll take a break. when we come back, hillary clinton promising to continue president obama's legacy, but that may be alienating her from a key group of voters. particularly the ones feeling the bern. the independents. will her allegiance to obama hurt her?
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i don't know how to explain
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it, other than what i said was totally out of context from what i meant, because i have been talking about helping coal country for a very long time, and i did put out a plan last summer, and it was a misstatement. that was hillary clinton trying to clarify to coal country voters comments that she made as a cnn town hall in march about putting them out of business. >> well, i'm the only candidate which has a policy about how to bring economic opportunity using clean renewable energy as the key into coal country. because we're going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business. >> let's discuss this and so much more with former dnc communications director brad woodhouse, president of correct the record, and americans united for change. he's also a hillary clinton supporter. good morning, brad. >> good morning. how are you? >> doing well. so how big of an issue is, are the first comments that hillary
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clinton made back in march, or at least how they were perceived by coal miners? >> well, look, what i think you see in west virginia yesterday, i think the culmination of this, is actually a candidate that the american people will find refreshing compared to donald trump. someone who's willing to admit a misstatement, admit that something was said by her out of complete context. somebody who is willing to apologize, and what you're going to get on the other side is someone who never apologizes for anything. who's an insult machine, and, look, you know, no candidate is perfect. hillary clinton's willing to admit that. donald trump never will. i think that will be a significant contrast, you know, going forward. >> brad, you have fastened on "the" the heart of the matter here. you know, donald trump has been able to say controversial things and never have to kpla clarify and apologize. by the way, voters say they like that. they see that as a lack of double speak. is there something to that,
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that's appealing, that maybe hillary clinton should take a page from? >> i don't think so. not with regards to donald trump. when you say voters say they like that, it's voters that are supporting donald trump say that like that, which is a minority of the american voters. it's part of the republican base. it's not even the complete republican base. so you know, i wouldn't go too far saying that voters like the way donald trump speaks, or whatever. what i would say is, that i think what people will want is somebody who will level with them, be honest with them, admit mistakes. you'll never get that from donald trump. donald trump has a 7% approval rating. for example, with latino, and about a 25% approval rating with women. he got there because people can't trust what he says. >> hillary clinton has begun making another appeal against donald trump to voters. it's a new line, and basically what she's saying is that a vote
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for donald trump would undo the progress of president obama for the past eight years. listen to what she's just said. >> sure. >> we cannot let barack obama's legacy fall into donald trump's hands. we can't let all the hard work and progress we've achieved over the last 7 1/2 years be torn away. >> so, brad in a year that voters are craving change and clearly want something different, they're saying that on both sides. is bringing up the past 7 1/2 years the right sales pitch? >> look, i actually think it's brilliant. i mean, look at barack obama today, alisyn. the president actually joked about how high his approval ratings are at the white house correspondents' dinner. compared to where republicans were saddled with a very unpopular incumbent president in 2008, democrats benefit from a president right now who's above 50% consistently in the polls.
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he's as popular now, or his approval is as high as when re-elected in 2012. i think probably senator sanders would have done better in this primary to be more supportive of president obama, and i do think it's the right approach. i think as people reflect on this presidency and they look at where we are in terms of unemployment, in terms of job growth, beginning to do a little more in terms of wages ticking up just a little bit. they need to do more, but i think people are looking back on it saying it's a lot better than what his opposition, been a lot better than what his opposition would lead you to believe. >> donald trump is also doing something interesting. he is, for the first time, starting to mention these young, dissatisfied, unemployed struggling bernie sanders supporters. listen to this -- >> people look for a job and they have to quit after four, five months. they stop looking for a job and
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they're considered statistically employed and it's ridiculous. no. i think a lot of these people are going to join my campaign. i think a lot of bernie sanders's young people are going to join my campaign and i see it all the time. >> brad, does he stand a chance of winning over bernie sanders supporters? >> no, hell no. alisyn, no way. this is a fantasy of donald trump. remember, a lot of these people really are disaffected economically, and i think there are, there are catch phrases that donald trump uses that may be attractive to them. there are also people who are really supportive of progressive causes. like lgbt rights. like fighting this crazy transgender law going on in north carolina, who are really in favor of a woman's right to choose and reproductive rights. donald trump said we should criminalize women, punish women who seek to get an abortion. so i don't think there's in chns that tho chance those supporters will turn to donald trump. not at all. >> brad woodhouse, thank you. >> thank you. over to chris. all right. let's bounce to the gop side,
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and take a look at what's going on inside donald trump's campaign. does he need to close the door in indiana? does he have an easy path to 1,237? or is it almost impossible as team cruz suggests? trump's campaign manager corey lewendowski, the man in the middle, next. (vo) whatever your perfect temperature... you'll enjoy consistent comfort with the heating and air conditioning systems homeowners rank number one. american standard heating and air conditioning. a higher standard of comfort.
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donald trump is hoping to knock out his rivals in indiana tonight. the hoosier state could be do or die for ted cruz. so the question is -- what will cruz do to stop trump in indiana? joining us now, trump's campaign manager corey lewendowski. good to have you, sir. >> thanks for having me. >> good luck to you as we wish all the campaigns. cruz says this, give you the opportunity. i'll throw you the pitches. see if you can hit them. they say indiana actually doesn't matter that much, because mathematically, donald trump has to win too much territory to get to 1,237. he has to win a larger percentage of delegates than he has to date. now, our numbers say he needs to win 47%. a little higher than he's won to date. cruz says it's even more than that. do you accept that, that indiana
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doesn't matter and you have to win too many. >> indiana does matter anymore, they're perpetuating that because they're losing. what else are you going to say? ted cruz received an endorsement from pete wilson, win in indiana before you can come to california and win. bottom line is, donald trump will be the nominee and after tonight when the people are indiana vote and they will vote for donald trump he is not only the presumptive nominee but going to be the republican nominee moving forward. ted cruz is mathematically eliminated and should unite behind donald trump so we have one singular message. bringing our message of make america great again and defeat hillary clinton come november. >> first ballot, you just said. a big issue for cruz also. he says, maybe on the first ballot he gets to -- i don't think so. that first ballot the most votes donald trump will ever get. you get to the second and third ballots, when just by the third
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all delegates just about will be free to vote their conscience. is what ron nehring just said. when they do that, trump's done. do you accept the notion that the first ballot is your best and maybe only chance? >> we're going to win on the first ballot. >> what if you don't? what if you're at 1,236? >> it's not a question. if we're close, donald trump is the greatest negotiator and dealmaker the country has seen. he will get the votes. >> you know what we saw in arizona, cruz went in and sucked up all the delegates? >> the 99 delegates in florida, committed to mr. trump. we need the party to come together. we're trying to unify and will have more than 1,237 delegates, should have a good delegate count tonight we hope. we've seen in the last two weeks ted cruz received literally no delegates between the new york primary and the five northeast states. zero delegates in the last two weeks. >> he says that was a homer. this was your area. >> pennsylvania is a kmcompetite
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state in a general election you have to win it. donald trump dominated every area in the last five states. if you're going to be successful in november, beat hillary clinton, you have to be competitive and win in pa panch pennsylvania. >> say you're right. put up the poll, not indiana. we don't play with same-day polls. too much variation, but on the water r party and its unity. is the gop united? 7%. divided but will unite. 41%. divided, won't unite. 49%. is this a pyrrhic victory for donald trump? gets in, get out. the nominee, only half the party with him, hobbled going into a general perhaps against hillary clinton and a united democrat party? >> i think what you've seen over the last week is you've seen a number of people from washington, d.c. to the state party leaders coming onboard and supporting donald trump. you see more and more endorsements. mr. trump never played the endorsement game but we're honored to have those. support in pennsylvania, we've
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seen. across the country, more members of congress saying united behind donald trump. people who weeks ago would say i can never support you are calling saying for the good of the party we're getting behind donald trump and make sure when you are the nominee and you will be the nominee with a united front to go after the democrats, that's happening every day. we are growing this party, bringing more people in who have never been involved and that will allow us to be successful come november. >> absolutely no doubt you'll get to 1,237? >> beyond that. probably 1,300 or more. first they said mr. trump wasn't going to run, wasn't going to file papers. 17 people later going through the gop nominee where of pundits, professionals said it wasn't going to be an option. >> no question, a surprise. >> going to be the nominee and the president come november. >> a lot of ifs. that's part of the process. you're supposed to be on the enthusiastic and optimistic side of those ifs. say he gets to 1,237, gets the
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first ballot, that nomination. now in a general. do you think that he will start to address some of the things that people in your party but certainly outside your party keep pointing to? whether it's something small, like put out your taxes. stop playing the audit game. put them out. part of the things people do in a general election. the harsh language. whether it's an women, about latinos, whether it's about saying that china is raping the u.s. it's not presidential. >> the american people are smart. and it's time to talk to the american people like they talk at home. and politicians who are all talk, no action, are very good in making empty promises for the last 30 years they've gone to washington, d.c., said they're going to do something and didn't. we have 21 trillion dollars in debt. if we don't do something about that, not just our children but our grandchildren saddled with that forever. renegotiate trade deals a problem long-term. donald trump will go there as the president, bring people together. bring jobs back to our country which is it's time we put
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americans first. make sure the military is the strongest military we ever had, hopefully not have to use it but the best. and put our country first. the message donald trump brought and making america great again has been his message since day one. that resonates. you don't have to pander to the american people and promise things that can't get delivered. donald trump gets up, talks about his message. it resonates and we've grown the republican party and more people voted in the republican primary process than ever before. seen a massive increase. >> last part, certainly true. turnout numbers, no denying them and momentum of disaffection donald trump is building. no question. why is he an example of exactly what he says he's against, this pandering. i'm going to bring back jobs. how? i'm going to tax a tariff on companies that won't bring their jobs here. that's congress. that's not the president. >> he's -- look, leadership starts at the top and congress has to have a good partner at the top to work with. he'll be able to do that.
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the only person in the race created private sector jobs. tens of thousands of people he's employed over the years, still employees many of those people. you need that mind-set to the american people, when is spend less, get more. create good jobs so people can have a good family. have a strong homeland security. have a strong immigration policy so we don't have illegals pouring across our border anymore. the mind-set this country needs and donald trump will bring it to the white house. >> i appreciate a compelling case on "new day" as always. i want to ask you something as we leave. we've been following money for the veterans. no question you raised a lot of money for them. the question, where it went. veterans groups, donald trump gives them a lot of money and time when not running for president. they're have asking where is that money and accounting for it. having trouble with the campaign. look to you for help. will you give us help and make sense of that? >> happy to. mr. trump raised millions of dollars for the veterans. not just through his foundation but donated personally, his own
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personal checkbook to help veterans causes. the money he's raised distributed to not just the 22 veteran groups we outlined but many, 78, mamany, many more. >> put those questions down. that's all we ask. corey lewendowski, good luck to you going forward as we wish all the campaigns. >> thank you. an american service member killed by enemy fire in iraq. we'll tell you about the breaking news and deteriorating situation there. y for you alert the second his room is ready. so he knows exactly when he can settle in and think big. and when josh thinks big you know what he gives? i'll give you everything i've got and then some... he gives a hundred and ten percent! i'm confident this 10% can boost your market share. look at that pie chart! boom! you've never seen a number like that! you feel me lois? i'm feeling you. yeah you do! let's do this! watch out he just had a whole thimble full of coffee... woot! woot! the ready for you alert, only at laquinta.com. la... quinta! yeah! you premium like clockwork. month after month. year after year.
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following breaking news out of iraq. a u.s. service member killed by enemy fire just north of mosul. officials say the american was
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advising peshmerga forces when a firefight broke out and the enemy broke through the front lines. coalition responded dropping more than 20 bombs. let's discuss with with cnn analyst and commanding retired general for europe and the 7th army, mark kirkland. thanks for being here. >> thank you. >> as we've learned sadly again calling somebody an adviser does not mean they will be out of danger. what does this casualty mean for the battle today? >> you've hit it right on its head. it doesn't mean you're not going to see combat as an adviser or out of harm's way. this adviser indicators are he was in a town north of mosul, and certainly the peshmerga has been attempting to strangle supply lines in and out of mosul from isis over the last several months. one of the areas they're operating and this was an attack. they're in combat and providing
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advice and assistant to the peshmerga forces and in harm's way, to be sure. >> general what can you tell us about what's happening on the ground in iraq today? >> well, a couple places in terms of the military actions. there is the continued preparation to conduct the attacks into mosul. happening around that area, they are strangle out all the areas, isolate isis within that city and operations are going pretty well, all indications. the peshmerga and iraqi forces ar interacting well. however, in baghdad, use the word fire-brand volved since wee fighting him, attempteded to stop all reform within the government and attempted, in fact, to push it faster. mr. al abadie, the new prime minister, is attempting to get rid of the corruption and those
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who would counter rationalism in iraq. he's moving slowly because a lot in the government are attempting to hold on to their positions. he wants it to go faster and is separated from the rest of the shia militias in that regard. >> and troubling video what happened in baghdad this weekend. i believe we can play it for everyone and just read the cnn news bulletin's hundreds if not thousands of 23followers broke into parliament saturday waving iraqi flags, ransacking rooms and sitting at lawmakers' desks while gesturing at the cameras. this just sounds like it's really deteriorated. what's the answer here? >> well, the interesting thing, let's carry it forward a little bit more, alisyn. they did that, and then they left. so this was a message, a very strong message sent by al sadr saying, get your act together. let's get rid of these corrupt
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officials and let's bring iraqi back to iraqis. let's bring iraq back to iraqis. so this was a very interesting dynamic. he, in the past, sadr has conducted these marches, these assaults, these kinds of things, and then stayed and continued to fight. he left the parliament after saturday, and they went to conduct their religious festival in the nearby town, which is inside of baghdad. a huge religious festival going on through tuesday. and then he said, i'll be back on wednesday, and i expect action by the iraqi government. this is causing mr. al abadie significant problems, trying to do the right things but moving very slowly. that's the way you have to do it in iraq. in fact, the arabic language has a term for it, shui shshgs way, little by little and mr. sadr wants no part of that. >> watching what happens there tomorrow. while we have you, general, what it's happens in syria? happening with the truce talks?
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>> yes. it's not going very well, alisyn. the assad government is attempting to maintain their control over damascus and the cease-fire continued there and mr. kerry and the others have enabled that to happen in damascus, but further north in aleppo, things are just going to hell and a hand basket. it is a horrible situation. russian and syrian fighter jets supporting ground troop its continuing to conduct strikes against what they call terrorists and we would call freedom fighters. joined by iranian forces, irgc forces and leppenese hezbollah to conduct operations against the syrian free forces. aleppo is a mess. mr. kerry is attempting to get safe zones in that city, but i don't think he's going to get much traction with the russians in doing that. they want to stomp out anyone that's going against the assad regime, and, in fact, some of the cease-fire talks occurring over the last weeks in my view have been ruses, and we're going
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to see aleppo fall soon, i believe. >> goodness. lieutenant general mark hertling, thanks for your perspective and the expertise this morning. >> thank you, alisyn. on the political side, one primary win and a seemingly failed stop trump alliance with ted cruz. that seems to be the legacy for john kasich in this election thus far. should he pack it up? next.
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thank you! thank you! what a week! we sat down, we kicked back,
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and we watched tv! [ cheering ] this win is just the beginning! it doesn't end here. because your laundry can wait! keep those sweatpants on! order another pizza! and watch on! [ cheering ] don't wait a whole year for xfinity watchathon week to return. upgrade now to add the premium channel of your choice so you can keep watching. call or go online today. the hoosier state, center stage today in the 2016 race. see the clock on your screen. voting is already started. this is a big one. donald trump says if he wins in indiana, it is over. ted cruz insist st the gop race will go to a contested convention and trump cannot get to the magic number before then.
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so what does it all mean for the third man in, governor john kasich. time to bow out. three term u.s. senator, judd greg. always an honor, sir, to have you. >> thank you, chris. >> judd, don't be so humble. let's use you for a metaphor. you endorsed john kasich. >> that's a high bar. >> no, he endorsed john kasich. you are an unbound delegate. you said you'll vote for the nominee unless it is cruz. cruz is the man who is in an alliance with the man you endorsed, john kasich, to stop donald trump, a man who you say you will vote for if he is the nominee. what's going on in that party, judd? >> well, i guess we've got quite a mix mash of activity going on. that's not unusual in a political party, because
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political parties are made of a lot of different interest groups. the democratic has an even more significant issue of where they're going. so as a practical matter, that's the way you develop consensus in a party. a lot of different people have a lot of different views. bring them together hopefully under one sent and once you get a nominee, you move forward. >> why so passionate in your opposition to cruz? what is it about him that you believe is unacceptable? >> well, i just don't think he is the type of person i would want to trust with the presidency. and as a result, i would have -- i wouldn't be able to vote for him to be president. i guess i would write in paul wri ryan or something like that. >> or you should write in john kasich if he stays race. you did endorse him. >> they would both be very good presidents. >> the polls in ohio recently, just the past few days, suggesting it's time for kasich to get out of the race. that's his home state.
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what do you think the best reason is for john kasich to stay in the race? obviously him getting the 1,237s an impossibility at this point, at least on a first ballot. >> well, i think the reason to stay in the race is nobody does have the majority. when somebody gets the majority, and i saw you had corey lewandowski a little while ago, a new hampshire shows, all roads lead to new hampshire, he said they're going to get to 1,300, and if they get the majority, it's over. everybody would awould have to step out. i've been to fenway park a number of times, in the 9th inning, a lot of things happen. you have to wait until somebody gets to the majority, john kasich has run a substantive campaign, he has proved that he can produce. he has been a superb governor,
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very strong member of the house of representatives, so i think until there is a clear winner, people like john kasich have a right to stay in the race. >> do you think if donald trump gets close but does not get to 1,237, and it goes to a second or third ballot, do you think the chances of surviving the convention are slim? >> i think it depends on how close he is. if he is within 50 delegates, it's going to be hard to deny him the nomination. if he is 150 away, then you've got an open convention. >> there are polls out and we don't play with the state whose are up for primary the same day with polls, there is too big a cut of margin, but about your party, is it united, what will happen in the future, and the numbers are as follows. 7% say the party is united. 41% say it is divided but will unite. 49% say it is divided and won't unite. is there a growing possibility
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or probability that your nominee will be hobbled by the process of getting to that point? >> absolutely. no question that's true. there is a large percentage, not a majority, not a plurality, but a significant number of republicans concerned about the two front-runners because of the fact that they don't see them as being in their arena relative to policy or maybe their style is something that they're uncomfortable with. and that is going to affect the chances of whoever the nominee is of being successful in november. i don't think there is any question about that. on the other side of the coin, though, i look at the democratic party, i think they have a much more serious problem, because they're basically moving forward with a socialist agenda being their alternative, and you've got somebody who has run, won many primaries, who is a socialist. that's a fundamental break of market economies. we're not talking in our party about fundamentally breaking our
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goals. they're conservatives and talking a conservative dialogue. the democratic is splitting along the line of changing the entire country and moving down the road of socialism. >> we may not look that good, but wait until you see the other guy. judd greg, thank you so much. >> very good point. >> thank you for joining us on "new day" as always. >> thank you explaining it much better than i did. >> no, you're the man with the idea. take care, sir. a lot of news this morning. news about iraq, the election. let's get to it. >> if we win, it's over. >> nobody will get to 1,237. >> i got this guy, cruz, lyin' ted. >> i think he's crazy. >> you don't get to slap an r on your jersey and lead the republican party. >> he didn't even do anything. i would have helped her, okay. >> i'm going to tell you what i'm going to do so you can hold me accountable. >> our ideas are the future of america. >> we're going to give it all
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we've got. 100% effort. >> tragedy for this country if we end up with a republican in the white house. >> the olympic flame reaches brazil. >> countdown to the 2016 olympics begins. this is "new day." welcome. it is tuesday, may 3rd, 8:00 in the east. moment of truth is here for senator ted cruz in indiana. voters in the hoosier state already heading to the polls this morning. is this the texas senator's last chance to stop donald trump, and if trump wins, what does that mean for cruz and kasich tomorrow? >> the stakes just as high for the democrats. hillary clinton, hoping close out bernie sanders. decisive win tonight he needs. indiana could go his way, and he is not going any where. we've got the primary covered
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only the way cnn can. let's begin with sarah murray, live in indianapolis. how goes it there? >> reporter: well, good morning, chris. it is quite a rainy day here in indianapolis. that didn't stop the candidates from barnstorming. ted cruz brought out every surrogate he could think of to help make his final push, but donald trump is sounding awfully confident heading into today's primary. >> if we win in indiana, it's over with, folks. it's over with. >> reporter: for donald trump, it is pivotal for knocking ted cruz out of the race. >> if we win, it's over. then i can focus -- i don't have to worry about lyin' ted cruz. >> and redirecting his attacks on the general election opponent. hillary clinton. >> e-mails, bad judgment. iraq, voted yes. bad judgment. libya, bad judgment. >> on the trail monday, trump sat down to lunch with the author of several highly critical and loosely sourced books about the clintons.
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>> the entire country is depending on the state of indiana. >> but cruz is still racing to overtake the front-runner. knowing if trump wins here, he is on track to clinch the nomination. cruz, taunting his newly appointed running mate, carly fiorina. >> she stands up to bullies, whether it is donald trump or hillary clinton. >> and putting her directly in trump's line of fire. >> the billionaire seizing on fiorina's fall on sunday. >> they showed it to me. i said wow, that's really cruel. she went right down, he kept talking. he didn't even look like -- that was a weird deal. >> cruz, spent the day before this crucial contest zigzagging through how the the hoosier state, confronting trump supporters face-to-face. >> most candidate wos have let the protesters do their thing. i made a different decision, i wa
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walked across street to engage with them. >> fired up crowd for over five minutes. >> trump, the only one that will put us where we need to be. >> this man is lying to you and taking advantage of you. >> reporter: now, ted cruz has said no matter what happens today in indiana, he is going to stay in this race until cleveland, but donald trump certainly feels already like he is the presumptive nominee and you heard him, alisyn, he said if he wins here, it's over, done. this primary is finished. back to you. >> we will talk to our pundits about that very thing. thank you very much. the democratic race in indiana is expected to be tight tonight. sanders looking to regain his momentum. meanwhile, clinton apologizing for comments she made about the coal industry. cnn chris frates live in indianapolis with more. hi, chris. >> reporter: hey, good morning, alisyn. as you can see behind me, the voters are going to the polls and managing expectations.
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clinton campaign official telling me they wouldn't be surprised if clinton lose, and they point out several reasons. number one, money. sanders has spent $2 million. hillary clinton spent virtually nothing two demographics, a white state, majority white state. bernie sanders does better with white voters than hillary clinton does. three, it's an open primary. it has also helped bernie sanders in the past. but the clinton folks even if bernie sanders were able to pull off an upset, they're not overly concerned about it. would he have to win by wide margins, and they don't see it happening. take a look at bernie sanders. they feel good today. they feel like the steelworkers endorsement, bernie sanders will sit down with the head of the local union at carrier for breakfast today. of course, they're making headlines because they are sending jobs to mexico. hillary clinton hasn't been
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campaigning here for the past few days in indiana. in fact, she was in west virginia, where she apologized for something she said during a cnn town hall back in march. she said that she would put coal workers and coal companies out of business, and she since said that remark was taken out of context. >> it was a misstatement, because what i was saying is that the way things are going now, we will continue to lose jobs. i do feel a little bit sad and sorry that i gave folks the reason or the excuse to be so upset with me, because that's not what i intended at all. >> reporter: so a big apology there in coal country ahead of the big primary in west virginia next week. we'll watch that and see what happens in the close race between clinton and sanders. we've got our eyes all over it today. >> are you eyeing the donuts as well? what do they have to eat? >> they do have donuts, and the wonderful poll volunteers offered them to us.
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we are dry, we are warm, and there are donuts. >> i was going to ask, you got a little powdered sugar right there. heading to the polls in turn out going to be a big deal. pes he shal especially for the under dogs. live in tera haute, indiana. a county with a healthy his oh tory of voters. lining up since the polls opened at 6:00 a.m. steady stream coming through. let me throw some numbers at you. 78,000 about registered voters neither county. 16% voted early. started on april 5th. so far, twice as many republicans versus democrats who have come out to vote. we've talked so much about bellwether states, bellwether counties. this is one of them.
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they've bigpicked the president election since 1888. think about that. 30 out of the past 32 presidential elections, this county has gotten it right. two exceptions. once was in 1902, the other in 1952. so two exceptions there. every other time, they've picked the winning presidential candidate. obviously this a primary, not the general election. but when you talk to these folks over here and ask them why in particular place are you guys so good at picking the winning candidate, they said common sense. we'll see what common sense tells us when the polls close later on today. alisyn. >> we sure will, jason. thank you so much for that. so how long can ted cruz hang on if he loses to trump tonight. let's discuss this and much more with former communications director for jeb bush and communications advisor for the anti-trump our principals pact, tim miller. and former white house reagan
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contributor, jeffrey lord. >> indiana wants us. >> we shall see about that, jeffrey. but, tim, i want to start with you. you've made it your mission since jeb bush got out of the race to stop trump. is tonight, is indiana the last chance to stop trump? >> look, indiana is important, but no, the last chance to stop trump is the last moment before he gets 1,237 delegates. we said this, i said this when i started this effort after leaving the jeb bush campaign, that at least as far as i'm concerned, this a fight worth having. all the way up to 1,237 delegates. obviously the campaigns will have to make decisions for themselves, but as far as the anti-trump movement is concerned, that will continue. >> jeffrey, ted cruz has a plan to prevent donald trump from getting to the 1,237. he has his own math. let me play that logic for you. >> will you support his
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candidacy if he, donald trump, gets the delegates before cleveland? >> dana, nobody will get to 1,237. i'm not going get to it, but neither is donald trump. >> what makes you so sure he won't get the delegates? i mean getting 47% of the remaining delegates isn't inconceivable at all. >> he hasn't gotten 47% to date. >> he sure did well last week. >> you're right. he did well in his home state and he did well in the adjoining states. he won five states last week. but i'll tell you in the three weeks preceding that, i won five states, utah, north dakota, wisconsin, colorado, and then wyoming. 1.3 million people voted in those states. i earned more votes in wisconsin than donald trump did in new york. >> okay, so jeffrey, let's talk about this. primaries, donald trump got more than 47% of the delegates, but not in all of the primaries. does ted cruz have a point?
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>> no, he doesn't have a point. i mean, what is happening here is that millions of people are voting for donald trump, popular votes, but delegates. this is ongoing. we're going to go on after today to new jersey, california, and we have all these uncommitted delegates, and i have to say, l ali, whenever they get close to a nomination, you have lot of people that break because they want to be with the inner. that would apply if all of this were reversed and it were ted cruz ahead. i don't think he is right. i am a little astonished, i'm supporting the republican nominee. senator cruz can't bring himself to say that. i find it astonishing. >> tim, if ted cruz loses indiana, then what for him? >> no, look, i see all of the
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reagan pa reagan -- i think ted cruz can make the case, continues to make the case that he is the heir to a reagan legacy. might i add, on a competitor network this morning, donald trump broke the 11th commandment in the grossest way possible, where he accused ted cruz's father, rafael cruz, of being involved in the jfk assassination. this is false tabloid press he is spreading, and this a guy that wants to unite the party. this is ridiculous. it is all ridiculous. >> in case people missed it and were watching "new day" as they should be. >> i saw it on twitter, alisyn. i was watching "new day." >> very well played. what donald trump said on a morning show is that, i'll just read it to you, the story comes
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courtesy of national enquirer. his father was with lee harvey oswald prior to oswald being shot. >> come on. i saw it in the grocery store. i have no knowledge beyond that. i'll check the warren report here on the bookshelf. >> look, jeffrey, you're laughing, and you're taking it in stride, but donald trump is using "the national enquirer" as a source for what he is saying on national tv. is that a good idea? >> i think this is why people love him. there are some things that are not worth taking seriously. this is probably one of them. >> jeffrey, i want to stick with you for one second. people have been talking about party unity and the republican party needs it. in the latest poll just out, of republican voters, only 7% believe that the republican party is united. donald trump has been talking a lot about party unity. what's his plan? >> well, he is very good at this
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kind of thing. i mean, again, alisyn, you can't do the kind of things he has accomplished in business without bringing people together to accomplish a project. so i expect that he will be reaching out and frankly, that's already started. he has had meetings with different people of different stripe whose are either skeptical of him or not endorsed him, willing to get together with him. i think he will have a very serious effort to do this and i'm sure he'll succeed. the ultimate choice here is between donald trump and hillary clinton. and -- >> divide the whole campaign, jeffrey. he is not going to unite the party. all he has done the whole campaign is demean his opponents, demean women. this is not a man that is capable of uniting the party. conservatives will stand up to him, because you know, he is not qualified, and he is not capable to be the president of the united states. >> jeffrey, you can respond.
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last word. go ahead. >> you're being overruled by the voters of the republican party. >> over half the voters have gone against him, jeffrey. >> 67 counties here in pennsylvania. that means all of them. the only republican to ever do so. all i can tell you, you're not getting the votes. go out there today and get the votes. >> he won't get them in the general. >> we'll see what happens today, tim, jeffrey, thank you. >> thanks, alisyn. >> let's get to chris. politics to the re-al teechlt breaking news, u.s. service member killed in iraq by enemy fire. pentagon correspondent, barbara starr. this is the big fear, told advisors, told not in harm's way, and then mosul, a hot zone, back from the line, and yet another service member, gone. >> indeed, chris. a difficult morning here at the pentagon. this u.s. service member killed about 30 kilometers north of
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mosul, working with forces about a mile and a half, two miles behind enemy lines, when isis broke through the frontline, a fire fight ensued and we're told the service member was killed in action at that point. u.s. f-15s, drones, rolled in quickly, dropping more than 20 bombs on the location, trying to get control back into peshmerga hands. under the rules of engagement, they must stay behind the front line. but when the enemy forces break through, it is combat indeed. this is now the third time we have seen this. we had a marine killed at a fire base. we had another army soldier killed in a hostage raid. combat, indeed, comes to iraq
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and syria. alisyn. >> thank you for that update. we have more breaking news to tell you about. a six month old baby girl and a toddler have been pulled alive from the rubble of that deadly building collapse in nairobi, kenya. after the seven story building fell apart in the kenyon capital, 135 people to safety. they say nearly 100 others remain missing. the death toll there, up to 21. here is an interesting one for you. the marine corps is investigating whether it mis-identified this photo. it was snapped in 1945 by an ap photographer. now two amateur history buffs who claim that the main identified as john bradley is actually harold henry schultz, a private first class navf corps
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man from detroit. they're looking into the matter. >> whoa. that would be earth shattering. >> it would be. would it mean what the picture means. it would to the families, but does it change what makes it iconic? >> i don't think so. but i just think that that's one of the illustrations of sort of the difference of social media and modern times. it could never happen today. oh, that isn't that guy today. see, this one, that's the wrong guy. like things have changed. it's funny it would be so many decades later. >> is your thumb a phone or a photo in that little -- >> that was a phone. >> i was showing you a photo on my phone. >> i got it. >> yeah, that was what my thumb was. >> that's strange. so this man has a delegate mountain to climb, but bernie sanders, senator from vermont, says he is in the race, period. he believes he will beat hillary
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clinton. so what is his plan to win in delegates, and to win at the convention in the alternative? his campaign manager, jeff weaver is here to make the case.
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for bernie sanders right now. simple math would tell you that he needs to win about 95 plus
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percent of the remaining delegates, but there is a channels, and certainly a strategy in indiana and beyond. let's discuss it with the sanders campaign manager, jeff weaver. good luck in the primary today, as we wish all the campaigns. give me. >> thanks chris. >> give me the theory upon which you win indiana and the theory upon which even if you don't, there is still a path. >> well, chris, look, this 95% of delegate math you laid out is not the math, because what we're talking about now is earning pledged delegates. there a whole set of super delegates, as you know is separate and don't vote until the convention. they're made up of party leaders and elected officials so the number to win is much larger, much smaller than what you laid out. the truth of the matter is, neither candidate will get to the convention with the number of pledged delegates needed to win. we're going to have an open
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convention. they'll choose the nominee in this case, which candidate is better able to take on the republicans in the fall. the truth of the matter is, polls for months now have been consistent. a poll showing yesterday, donald trump beating hillary clinton, but the polls have been consistent that senator sanders is a much stronger candidate against the republicans than secretary clinton is. for good reason, chris. he is very strong with independents, very strong with young people, who don't a traditionally come out and vote but have for him. >> let's unpack that. the polls do show that he does better on the national mash ups than the clinton does. there is a secondary rationale, which you also outlined, which is independents and young voters. you consistently say, they haven't been captured in the primaries, because many are closed. make the case as to why you believed independents and young voters make bernie sanders more
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formidable. >> look, when you look at the national head to head polls or actual outcomes in the primary and caucus states, bernie sanders wins independents over secretary clinton, often 70/30. young people come out for him overwhelmingly, that's been documented. i mean, in some cases, he gets 70, 80% of those voters. those were key to barack obama's rise, his successful run for the presidency. he won in the general election, indiana and north carolina, both states out of the reach of democrats, and president obama did that by winning young people. that was the only age cohort he won was 18 to 29 in those states. bringing out young people, energize young people, bring independents to vote for the democratic ticket, not just president but up and down the ballot, critical to success in november. bernie sanders has demonstrated -- >> but senator obama beat clinton with democratic voters, and that's how he got the
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nomination. your guy is down 2.5 million votes, 2.5 million more voted for clinton. >> well, look, in terms of this, how many people have voted for whom, you know, the truth is that bernie sanders has won, as you know, won a lot of caucuses states, you have much lower turnout washington state and georgia, that's not really a good reflection of strength when in fact bernie sanders has been so strong in these caucuses which under count the number of voters. some of these other states had primaries where he has won overwhelmingly with 60, 70% of the vote, would he have a higher vote total. i don't think that's a good reflection of the overall strength of the candidate in this case. >> all right, weaver, you want to keep beating back my testing of your propositions, i'm going to use your own words against you. >> go ahead. >> super delegates, stop
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mentioning them, they only vote at the convention, completely irrelevant, they shouldn't have been put in in '84, times have changed. now you guys can't stop talking about super delegates. you're working super delegates, going back to the states you did well, change the propositions, big part of your strategy. now you're all about the super delegates what is it, weaver? >> well, look, chris, you know, we didn't create the super delegate system, but that's a system in place right now. the truth of the matter is, whoever becomes the nominee of the democratic party is ultimately going to be chosen by the super delegates. they are the people who will put the winner over the top. so you can't just ignore super delegates. thisser a you out there. a huge percentage of the delegate pool and we are talking to them and at the end of the process, i'm talking about now, but at the end of the process, when all is said and done, they look at the race and they decide who is the strongest candidate in the fall, they look, you know, take into consideration
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how the candidates did in their state and move forward. but you can't ignore the super delegates. they exist. >> jeff weaver thank you for being on "new day" as always. i wish you good luck in the primary today, as we wish all the campaigns. take care. >> thanks, chris, appreciate it. can donald trump a knock-out punch in today's crucial primary. former governor john sununu, often surprises us. he is next. ♪ [female narrator] you listen when your body says: "i'm tired." or, "i'm hungry." what if your body said something else might be wrong? gynecologic cancers - cervical, ovarian and uterine cancers - have symptoms. so pay attention. if your body says something may be wrong....
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will you support his candidacy, if donald trump gets the delegates before cleveland. >> nobody will get to 1,237, i'm not going to and neither will donald trump. >> ted cruz is pulling out all the stops in indiana, in what could be his last chance to stop donald trump from reaching the 1,237 mark to clinch the republican nomination. joining us now to discuss this, former new hampshire governor and chief of staff to president george h.w. bush, and former romney advisor, john sununu.
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>> how are you doing? >> i'm doing well. thank you for being here. is indiana, ted cruz and john kasich and anyone's last chance to stop donald trump? >> well, it seems like every week is a critical week in this crazy primary season, but indiana is obviously very crucial. indiana and california are probably the last two very significant important states determining who does go to the convention, either with a majority or without a majority. >> so if donald trump wins today, in indiana, then is he going to get to the 1,237 or agree with ted cruz that he will not reach the 1,237? >> if he gets indiana today, he is quite close to getting to the 1,237. i suspect he probably won't reach it, but he may be arguably at a point where an appeal for unity might get him the last couple of dozen votes when he
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gets there. i do know that as you talked to the states around the country, the party leaders are making plans for the two contingencies, where before they were hoping it would not be trump. they're now making plans if it is trump and isn't trump. the biggest concern they have, of course, are the down ballot candidates, governors and senators and folks in congress and the state legislatures, and they're concerned about whether or not trump can bring out enough republican votes to at least help those candidates not lose to their opposition. >> look, governor, you've been very honest about how you were not in the trump camp, and that you believed in the efforts to try to stop trump. are you now getting your arms around the possibility, the very real possibility that he could soon be the nominee? >> well, i believe in numbers, and the numbers keep piling in, and so you have to deal with that.
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you have to deal with the situation that's real. not the situation that you wish occurred. i want the republican party to come out of this election with a victory. my biggest concern in the past about donald trump was that i felt very strongly that he could not beat mrs. clinton. i still feel that way. but at this point, i think it's important for me and for others who care about this party to make plans to deal with the fact that if he does get the nomination, it's going to be a very different campaign than we've ever seen. i think you're going to see probably a multitude of get out the vote efforts, rather than relying on a single party effort. i think you're going to see candidates trying to figure out almost district by district how close or how far they go from mr. trump if he is at the top of the ticket, and i think you're going to see a much more artful handling of support and nonsupport, as they go into november than you've ever seen
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in any presidential race. >> that's interesting, because we're already seeing evidence of this. establishment, republican establishment figures who had either been on the sidelines or had been vocally anti-trump now do seem to be warming to him, just to list some. john cornyn, senator bob corker, orrin hatch. let me read what he says. i think he, meaning trump, can be great, if he'll get serious about being president and i think he will. he is a clever, smart guy, who will want to be remembered for doing great things. i have a feeling he can make that transition. are you as confident as senator orrin hatch? >> look, i think what you're hearing is people recognizing that they've got to deal with the reality. and certainly going into a general election in november, you try and minimize the differences within a party. that's what orrin is doing.
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each one of us will have to search for language that provides both political unification, if you will of the party, and still satisfies our internal concerns. that's the struggle we're all going through. we're going to have to, if it turns out to be donald trump at the top of the ticket, we're going to have to figure out how to deal with it probably on an individual basis. >> are you prepared to do that, governor? do you have the dictionary for what that would sound like coming out of your mouth? >> i think can handle it. look, i have said i will vote for the republican ticket top to bottom. i've said that all along. if trump is the nominee, i'll cast my vote for him. i am concerned there is a lot of republicans out there that may not do the same. and what you're hearing from corker and hatch and others is an effort to try to make sure those republicans stay with the fold so that we don't lose the senate. we don't lose the governors and don't lose the congress. >> governor john sununu, thank
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you. >> thanks, alisyn. have a great day. >> you too. let's get over to chris. whatever air doinyou're doi for a second. a burning building, a hair-raising rescue. this person just fell. it is what happened when that kid came close to the ground. who saved him? how did they save him? a real hero is with us, and you're going to him from him in just a second. accessible by thousands of suppliers and employees globally. but with cyber threats on the rise, mary's data could be under attack. with the help of the at&t network, a network that senses and mitigates cyber threats, their critical data is safer than ever. giving them the agility to be open & secure. because no one knows & like at&t. ...another anti-wrinkle cream in no hurry to make anything happen.
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if you want it know only five things today, here are the five things to know for your new day. donald trump declaring the race is over. if he wins the indiana primary tonight. ted cruz vowing to forge ahead, as long as he sees a path to the nomination. things much tighter on the democratic side. bernie sanders urging voters to turn out in droves, while clinton looks to shut out sanders with a big win in the hoosier state. a second day of teacher sick-outs has shut down 94 of detroits 97 public schools today.
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teachers are furious after being told not enough money to pay them past june. starbucks, hit with a lawsuit for allegedly under filling its iced drinks. a chicago woman wants them to pay as much as $5 million to folks who have bought an iced drink in the last decade. starbucks says this suit has no merit. the sports are set to end-all upsets. leicester city capturing premiere league title, in the face of, wait for it, 5,000 to 1 odds, they did it monday without even stepping on to the pitch. they clinched the championship when chelsea tied tottenheim. for more on the five things to know, go to cnn new day.com for the latest. you're no michaela, but well done. >> that stings, but true. all right, in less than an hour, the olympic flame begins
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the first leg of the three month cross-country journey to the 2016 re-y 2016 rio games. live in brazil with more. hi, shasta. >> reporter: good morning. that's right. any minute now, the president should be emerging in the doorway right behind me with the flame. i've got to tell you, it's not lost on the crowds here, that she may not even be the president as early as next week, if she is forced to step down and face an impeachment trial. olympic organizers hoping the torch relay beginning today will spark some of the olympic fever in brazil, diverting attention from the economic whoas. we'll see volleyball players, surf champions, as well as a 12-year-old refugee girl, one of 2,000 welcomed here in the
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country. this is just the beginning. this a 95-day tour around the country. the torch will visit 300 cities and towns. 90% of the population will have the chance to get close to it, to participate. of course, if they choose to. an exciting moment here in brazil. back to you guys. >> shas ta, thanta, thanks. he rushed, brushed and attacked, but then he rebuked and had to snack. that's what donald trump says about his opponents. he says they're coming at him from all angles. but it doesn't matter. you know why. he has the message that connects. the case to be made, when we come back. >> you are i poet and you know it.
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all right, one of the main divisions in both parties, when it comes to donald trump, i don't think what he says versus i like exactly what he says. let's breakdown what it is about the message that's resonating and a cause for concern. mark preston, executive editor to do exactly that. good to see you, my friend. so people who say he is rude, he is crude, i wouldn't let my kids talk like that. what are they missing about the appeal of the message and how it's delivered by donald trump. >> let's talk about three important traits that donald trump has effectively used so far in this campaign. tone. he projects confidence. whenever donald trump is on stage or in an interview, he never backs down. always confident in what he says. his cadence, he simplifies the
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message to a point where it is very, very easy to understand. and he isunscripted, when he stands before i rally, he is able to talk that is acceptable to the audience and understandable for the audience. he simplifies the message into bite-sized bits of information that people can rally around. >> let's take an example of where what he says and where it often leads him, and what the catch can be. here is a taste of our most recent interview. >> we're going to keep jobs in this country. >> how? >> they're going to move to mexico, make air conditioners. >> how? >> to hurt our country. that's not going to happen. >> how? >> you know the other thing -- how? it's simple. we're going to put -- make them pay. there will be consequences, you're not going to take your company, move to mexico, and then sell them in our country and not have consequences. the consequences are tariff or a
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tax. >> two things. first thing, hamilton got 16 tony nominations, a record, huge, best thing going in politics right now. put that to the side. then why did i ask him how so many times. in truth, as you know, the phone is tricky. i wanted to make sure he heard me. with that said, he does like to give you the slip as well as any of them. but he goes from a big claim, i'm bringing back jobs, how, a tax or tariff. that's congress. that's not the executive. how does he wind up keeping momentum when the promise in how he'll do it don't match up? >> because he simplifies the message. he does it in a way where he puts all of the blame on washington and he has been, not only to the obama administration, but stretching back to the bush administration. he also projects this tough guy image. something that he says that we haven't seen here in washington. you know, i went back and looked at polling over the past two months.
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right now, seven in ten americans, about seven in ten, think the country is going in the wrong direction. so when you have donald trump go out there and say that he is going to make sure jobs stay in the country, that's a very appealing message. if you look at the congressional approval rating, or rather disapproval rating, 78% disapprove how congress is handling its job. donald trump has to appeal in a way that will draw these people to support him. >> so what do you think the balance is between trump bringing in these people you're talking about, these disaffected with, the damage he does presume below with latinos, with women, with moderate people on the independent side? how do you see the balance? >> i see that it has worked well for him in a primary, in a republican primary where he is appealing to a certain segment of the really party, but as we head down the road to a general election, he has to moderate language when he talks about hillary clinton playing the woman card, for instance, that's
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kind of a weak argument in the sense that most people would support hillary clinton playing the woman card when it comes to issues such as equal pay and what have you, and you cannot, you cannot, you cannot, you cannot alienate a growing population such as latinos in this country when you're talking about getting them out and building a great wall across the southern border. >> that's interesting, what he says versus what people hear. mark preston, thank you very much for making things clearer. we have to show everyone this incredible video. this is three children, one by one, being dropped from the fourth floor of a burning building. believe it or not, this story ends well. we will find out how, from one of the american heros who saved the day. we'll speak with him, next. en hn settle in and think big. and when josh thinks big you know what he gives? i'll give you everything i've got and then some... he gives a hundred and ten percent!
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they saved three children and their moms. one of those heroic men, daniel raimondo joins us now via skype from south korea. sergeant, you are the man of the hour. oh, my gosh, when i wash this video, it makes me break out in hives. tell us about the scene, when you saw this burning building and you showed up. >> yeah, they were just like that, you know, walking through the street. getting ready to get some dinner, there was some smoke where i was and headed into that direction. >> what make you think -- give us the blanket idea, how you executed it. >> first, when we got to the area, it was like there was no screaming coming out of the building. we felt that was a good sign, that everybody was out. naturally you would think a fire in the building, you would hear screaming. that wasn't the case. low and behold, after a few
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short moments, there was some screaming coming out of the fourth and fifth floor so we ran up to the building. at that point, one woman sh falling down to the ground, we retrieved her and brought her to a safe haven. we heard the baby screaming and her mother, and that's when me and another individual started to have a really quick discussion about what do we do. there is this baby that will jump out of the window and we're going to be able to catch her, we're talking four to five stories. during that conversation, a blanket came out of the conversation and we ran to one of the most popular things, a blanket. so one ran to the store, where i followed him, and came out with a blanket, unraveled it, as we're unraveling, a bunch of people in the vicinity came to the rescue and we moved toward
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the building and lo and behold, after contemplating, please throw the baby, please throw the baby, she did just that. she threw the baby. >> i was going to ask you that, how hard it was to persuade her to drop the baby out the window. it is so counter intuitive. >> it was quite difficult. especially when you look at the video, the last baby was the most difficult in my eyes. she wouldn't let her go for some reason. he just remember looking at her and through all the turmoil and all the commotion going on, i just begged and pleaded, please throw the baby down. i just remember her screaming at the baby, i love you, i love you, i love you, next thing you know, she dropped the baby. >> how hard was to it to catch them in the blanket? >> well, children, it wasn't so difficult, i believe they were two, three, four years old. they were quite small. quite a few people were holding
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the blanket. it was a matter of when the first one came down, she bounced a little bit into the front of it and that's when in the video, you see me grabbing her and taking her to a safe location. and then obviously coming back to the scene to where lo and behold, another baby getting ready to be thrown out the window and then another one. of course, at the end, the mother had to come down, and as you saw, the smoke and the fire was just horrendous and really smokey where you could barely see her at that point. you know, everybody was screaming. he was yelling up to her, you have to jump, you have to jump. and she jumped too. then all of a sudden, she comes down into the blanket, and you could just imagine, we're not talking about a baby here. we're talking about a woman who i think, i believe her to be to have been pregnant. so she winds up hitting the blanket and we moved down with the blanket and i felt her hit the ground, and believe it or not, somebody before all that, you know,

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