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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  May 15, 2016 11:00pm-1:01am PDT

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passes. i want to say i'm just hanging out. it's not that they look angry but it's they're noticing. it's like the way i feel i would notice if a bob cat drama in old trafford stadium, but it had nothing to do with manchester united's play. what caused the club's final match of the season to be susz spended? the struggle for survival among christians in syria. we will take you to the ancient city of ma lieu la under siege for years. does having a former president as a husband a blessing or a curse for hillary clinton? we'll examine the pros and cons for you. welcome to our viewers in the united states and ul around the world. thank you for joining us as we kick off the week here on "cnn newsroom."
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this is really a stunning story. a police evacuated old trafford stadium which is home of manchester united after a bomb scare on sunday. fans were rushed out when authorities found what they thought was a bomb. >> but it turned out to be a harmless training device left behind by a private firm after a drill in the stadium. christina mcfarland has the details now from manchester. >> reporter: fans arrived here at old trafford on sunday expecting to see drama on the pitch when manchester united took on bournemouth. but instead they were disrupted by events after a suspicious package was found in the north west corner of the stands. after 75,000 fans were evacuated from the stadium here and sent home, a bomb disposal team was sent in to conduct a controlled explosion of the device, which is said to have been very
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lifelike. but later on sunday night, it was confirmed that the package was, in fact, a training device, which was left behind by a private firm following a training drill. while this isn't an ideal situation for man united football club, there is a great deal of relief that the situation wasn't as dangerous as first suspected. and there is reassurance that the fans and the security staff here dealt efficiently and swiftly to the incident. the premier league have announced that the match that was due to take place here today has now been rescheduled for tuesday, the 17th, where it will draw a close to the premier league season. christina mcfarland, cnn, manchester. well, in iraq, isis has claimed responsibility for sunday's deadly attack on a gas plant near baghdad. at least ten security personnel were killed and two dozen people wounded in twin suicide bombings. >> the deadly assault sent plumes of smoke into the air and left several storage tanks
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ablaze. in just the past week, more than 100 people have been killed by isis in iraq. >> now for the latest, let's bring innia monica. she lives us live from amman, jordan. how was isis able to carry out this attack and was baghdad's governor right when he says the gas plant was inadequately protected and help was too slow to get there? >> reporter: well, i think, rosemary, the unfortunate reality after these kinds of attacks is that you do have officials coming out blaming different security agencies, blaming officials for security lapses or what may have led to an attack like this. but if you look at what the governor was saying in this case about the protection about the plant not being armed enough, not having enough weapons or the quick reaction force, the s.w.a.t. team in this case taking about two and a half hours to get there after the attack, these are things we've heard in the past following these sort of attacks. so it's nothing new to iraq.
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you need to always keep in mind that security forces in that country are really stretched thin, fighting a battle on so many different fronts. but also here, rosemary, i do remember security officials over the years telling us that when you have an enemy like this, when you have multiple attackers, suicide bombers in this case who are determined to kill themselves and kill others, it's going to be very difficult to stop them. >> yeah, understandable. and ja ma na, why are we seeing this stepped up campaign now? is this a shift in tactics? >> reporter: i think it depends on who you talk to in this case, rosemary. if you look at the situation in iraq, obviously this political crisis we're seeing, one of the worst political crises in recent months. and isis like its predecessor, al qaeda in iraq, does try and exploit a situation like this. these political differences to try and create more divisions within the iraqi to try to reunite the sectarian war.
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that's one way of looking at it. some officials would say it's because they are trying to distract the forces from the battle fronts in the north and in the western part of the country by stepping up attacks in and around baghdad. if you talk to u.s. and iraqi officials, rosemary, they would say that this is isis on the defensive, that it's lost so much territory that it is reverting back to these sort of tactics of carrying out these spectacular kind of attacks. that no matter what the motivation is here, i think what we have been seeing over the past couple of weeks does prove that while isis may have lost territory in iraq and syria, the group does still possess that ability to carry out these sort of attacks with so many suicide bombers as we have seen in recent weeks. >> understandably thi is really unnerving the population there. many thanks to you from amman, jordan. now to australia where five men are under arrest, accused of plotting to go to syria to join isis. authorities nabbed them and this boat over the weekend.
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they allegedly planned to use the boat to sale to indonesia and the philippines and then continue on to syria. the men had been on a terror watch list and were under surveillance. >> after the cancellation of their passports, when it became clear to them that they wouldn't be able to leave the country in an orthodox way, they remained under surveillance so that if they attempted to leave the country in this very unusual way, they would be able to be stopped, and they were. >> the suspects, aged 21 to 31, are charged with preparing to enter a foreign country to engage in hostile activity. if convicted, they could face life in prison. in the coming hours, u.s. secretary of state john kerry and the eu high representative will meet with foreign ministers in vienna to discuss syria and libya. kerry met with saudi arabia's king salman on sunday to talk about syria. kerry is hoping to strengthen
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the cessation of hostilities in syria, which has been undermined by fighting in some areas. the u.s. and russia will hold more talks on syria with iran and other countries on tuesday in vienna. meanwhile, jihadist groups are threatening to drive christians out of syria, burning choifns and desecrating priceless icons. the historic town of ma lieu la was recently freed after recently being seized. >> some christians still fear for their lives. senator international correspondent fred pleitgen reports. >> reporter: jesus loves you no matter how you feel, these children sing at a religion class in ma lieu la, syria's most famous christian town, which was occupied by islamist militants for six months. several towns people are still missing. >> translator: i want things to be better, like they were before and for the kidnapped people to
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come back. >> reporter: similar words from this 8-year-old. i want malula to be better and more beautiful than it used to be, she says. shocking, their reaction when i ask how many of them have had to flee their home. islamist rebels, led by al qaeda's wing in syria, invated malula in late 2013. this video by one of the groups allegedly shows a suicide blast that took out the checkpoint to the village. the rebels kidnapped 12 nuns from a convent. it took more than six months of intense battles to oust them. but scars remain. this is the convent and shrine, or what's left of it, a warning to syria's christian community. while some buildings have been restored, others remain exactly like this, completely destroys and mostly burned out. and of course many people who live in this town ask themselves
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whether christianity still here a future here in syria. syria is home to one of the oldest christian communities in the world. malula is the last place where the air amayic that jesus spoke is still in use. but groups like isis have vowed to oust the christians from this land. this member of malula's city council shows me some of the priceless icons that were damaged or looted, especially the most ancient ones. >> they stole it, and then they fire the other. >> reporter: they burned it? >> burned it. >> reporter: as we left, a christian song was playing on a loudspeaker system, and the entire town. a sign of defiance from a christian community that hopes the children, learning about their long heritage in syria, will have a future in the land of their ancestors. fred pleitgen, cnn, malula, syria. boko haram was the focus of a security summit held in
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nigeria on saturday. delegates from regional and global powers attended, including french president francois hollande. he says the fight against boko haram was a generational struggle against evil. >> this after the u.n. security council said friday the terror greep threatened regional stability. our george howe has more. >> reporter: at least 20,000 people killed since boko haram first waged war on nigeria in 2009. the terror group has been labeled the most deadly in the world by the latest global terrorism index. a threat so great, regional and world governments came together in abuja with plans to work together and to fight back. >> reporter: since the last
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meeting of delegates two years ago in paris to discuss the problem and find solutions, the islamic extremist group has been pushed out of territory it once controlled in northeastern nigeria, instead resorting to smaller suicide attacks. and with the worsening humanitarian crisis of more than 2.6 million region in the lake chad region, neighboring regions came together to discuss strategies and affirm that they're not letting their guard down. supported by the united states, the u.k., and france, that will play a key role in the fight. boko haram has been weakened, but it is still capable to conduct attacks of harassment and equally deliver suicide attacks in the middle of the civilian population. so we have to support nigerian armed forces in the regional countries, help them to be more efficient, be with them whenever it's possible. prepare their staff and provide training. >> reporter: western governments
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worry that isis' growing presence in north africa and ties with boko haram could herald a push south and create a springboard for wider attacks. nigeria has asked the united states to help with surveillance and reconnaissance and also to sell aircraft to the nation in the fight against boko haram. the united kingdom has pledged to give nigeria 40 million pounds to fight back. >> the growing cooperation between daesh in the middle east and boko haram in this region is a growing threat. as daesh faces increasing pressure in its heartland in syria, from the international coalition, there is the real risk that it increases its efforts in support of boko haram here in nigeria and across the wider region. >> our george howe reporting there. still to come this hour, police in bangladesh have made an arrest in the murder of two gay rights activists. the evidence against the suspect
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when we come back. plus land mines have blocked one of the holiest christian sites in the world. but after nearly half a century, pilgrims may soon be able to visit the place where christians believe jesus was baptized. andthe painful history they andthe painful history they bringing back for some, next. for the strength and energy to get back to doing... ...what you love. ensure. always be you.
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in the u.s. presidential campaign, democrats hillary clinton and bernie sanders are battling for votes in kentucky. it's a coal producing state and in the past clinton has spoken against coal mining for its environmental impact. she outlined her plans for miners' health coverage and retirement programs. >> meanwhile, sanders, who is still in this thing, is hoping to extend his winning streak there. he recently won west virginia, another coal producing state. >> and hillary clinton is pressing her husband into service on the campaign trail and is suggesting a possible role in her administration.
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it's a calculated risk that could give her opponents ammunition. >> my husband, who i'm going to put in charge of revitalizing the economy because you know he knows how to do it. >> hillary clinton hinting at a possible role for bill clinton if she were elected to the white house. the former president's part in a possible clinton administration has long been questioned, and at a rally ahead of tuesday's democratic primary in kentucky, clinton said he could help revive growth in places like coal country and inner cities. clinton touts her husband's economic record, adding over 20 million jobs in his two terms, as an asset on the trail. but republicans, including donald trump, have sought to make bill clinton a liability. the presumptive gop nominee repeatedly referencing the former president's affair with white house intern monica lewinsky, using it as ammunition
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against hillary clinton. >> she's married to a man who was the worst abuser of women in the history of politics. she's married to a man who hurt many women, and hillary, if you look and you study, hillary hurt many women, the women that he abused. she's married to a man who got impeached for lying. >> reporter: bill clinton is a mainstay on the trail, often rallying fans but occasionally raising eyebrows. back in 2008, he had a series of missteps while campaigning for his wife, including a comment on barack obama's anti-war record that angered some voters. >> give me a break. this whole thing is the biggest fairy tale i've ever seen. >> reporter: but the former president's popularity remains high, and hillary clinton is no doubt hoping to use him to her advantage, especially in a key area she may be lacking. a recent cnn/orc poll shows
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clinton leading trump on every key issue but one. on the economy, trump leads the former secretary of state by a five-point margin. >> meanwhile on the republican side, donald trump's challenges with women could get worse. "the new york times" reports trump's private conduct with women have involved unwelcome advances on comments on women's body. the republican party chairman says the trump campaign isn't being judged on his past personal behavior. >> these are things that he's going to have to answer for, but i also think they're things from many years ago. and i think that, you know, as christians judging each other, i think is problematic. i think it's when people live in glass houses and throw stones is when people get in trouble. and so as hillary clinton, as a classic clinton operation, now suddenly these things are coming out. it's not necessarily that people make mistakes or have regrets or
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seek forgiveness. it's whether or not the person launching the charge is authentic in their own life and can actually be pure enough to make such a charge. that's what i think most people look at when they evaluate people's character. again, i don't think donald trump is being judged based on his personal life. i think people are judging donald trump as to whether or not he's someone that's going to go to washington and shake things up. >> and separate to all of this, there's more going on. trump refuted a washington post story naming possible running mates. he emphasized marco rubio is not one of them. well, the former reporter who was heard on an audio recording with a man who sounds like trump is speaking out. >> trump denies posing as his own spokesman even though he has admitted this in the past. sue cause well told cnn's michael smerconish that she thinks trump himself released the 25-year-old recording to distract the public from other issues.
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listen. >> did you release this tape? >> no. >> did you have the tape? how did it get into play? >> all right. two people had the tape. i had a tape, and trump had a tape. and i don't have the tape. >> how do you think it got into play? >> well, it didn't get to "the washington post" through me. >> so? >> trump. >> you think trump dropped this tape? >> yeah. >> why would he do that? >> look what's going on this week. taxes, paul ryan, the butler. the butler did it. now trump seems to like to poll "people" magazine type stories into the array. >> and there's still more. president barack obama took aim sunday at donald trump while delivering the commencement address at rutgers university in new jersey, telling graduates to tout their knowledge, not brag about their ignorance. >> although he didn't name trump, mr. obama's target was pretty clear. >> in politics and in life, ignorance is not a virtue. it's not cool to not know what you're talking about. [ laughter ]
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>> that's not keepin' it real or tellin' it like it is. that's not challenging political correctness. that's just not knowing what you're talking about. and yet we've become confused about this. >> both republicans and democrats hold primaries in oregon tuesday while clinton seeks to push towards an overall majority in kentucky's caucuses. you can watch all day coverage right here on cnn. a series of severe storms and lightning strikes have killed a shocking number of people in bangladesh over the past several days. our meteorologist pedram javaheri joins us with more on this. >> we've had these storms come through, and the numbers are somewhere between 60 and 70 fatalities from thunderstorms alone. an incredible number when you talk about a couple of days' period in this area. we know a lot of farmers, a lot of them students and young children involved in this. want to show you exactly how this has played out because this is the time of year you begin to see thunderstorms in this part
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of the world. when you look at this particular region, very small area, surface area of land. tremendous thunderstorm activity over the past several days. in fact, we know since the first of march, almost 100 fatalities have occurred due to lightning strikes in the country of bangladesh, many of them in open fields, many of them in open spaces. you take a look at this. a recent study suggests that bangladesh is losing its forest at roughly a rate of 2% to 3% a year. just a few years ago, we know the ecological standard was to have 25% of the land covered by forest. that number has shrunk down to 6%. deforestation makes the people out across some of the farming communities the tallest object. certainly that could play a role into the large number of fatalities in a small area. you think about the odds of being struck by lightning. we've seen many numbers before, 1 in 300,000 is the most common number given. but we know the od-- a lot of p are surprised to find out that 90% of lightning victims actually do survey. if someone can administer cpr,
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you're typically available to survive a lightning strike. we know it becomes a debilitating issue. in the u.s. alone, we've had five fatalities since the 1st of january so far in 2016. that is the highest number of lightning strike fatalities this early into the season. compare that to the 90 that have occurred in the past couple of months in bangladesh alone. that's the population of the country of bangladesh. that's almost exactly half of the u.s. population. compared to this, take that population. it is actually a country roughly the size of the state of georgia in the united states with half of the entire united states population. so the population density is tremendous. of course this really makes it a far more prominent likelihood if you're out and about working in these communities and farming fields to be struck by lightning. we know climate change can play a role as well. recent studies have suggested that a 12% increase for every degree celsius warming will be occurring in lightning strike activity around our planet by the year 2,100, you would see a 50% increase in lightning strike activity. that could play a role when you
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have extreme warmth in place as well. you notice in the u.s., redly numbers available for lightning strike fay talts, may, june, july, you begin to see a spike. this is roy sullivan, known as lightning roy. he's actually in the begin es book of world records. the national park ranger from shenandoah national park in virginia. he holds the record of being struck seven times and surviving all seven times. >> wow. >> in the begguinness book of wd records. survival of lightning strikes is good if you have people around you like in a national park to be able to be resuscitated. but an incredible story. >> why so many times? >> because of his job being outside more than likely is the reason. he was just exposed to the elements. >> for him, seven is lucky. let's hope he keeps it to that. >> appreciate it. coming up, the el chapo effect. how the arrest of the notorious cartel leader is changing the drug landscape in one mexican
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and a very warm welcome back to cnn newsroom. i'm rosemary church. >> and i'm errol barnett. we are broadcasting live around the globe from cnn headquarters. sunday's bomb scare at manchester united's home field ended up being a false alarm. authorities evacuated the stadium after finding what they thought was a bomb. they later determined it was just a training device that had been accidentally left behind by a private firm. baghdad's governor is blasting security officials after an isis attack on a gas plant just north of the capital. he says the plant was
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inadequately protected and that an elite response team took too long to arrive. at least ten iraqi security personnel were killed in sunday's attack. in bangladesh, a suspect has been arrested in connection with last month's hacking deaths of two gay rights activists. police say he is a member of a homegrown islamist militant group. there have been a spate of hacking murders in bangladesh just in the past year. in fact, groups linked to isis and al qaeda have claimed responsibility for some of those murders. for more on that and what we know about this arrest, we're joined by cnn's alexandra field. tell us about the suspect, his links, and what key information investigators need from him. >> reporter: look, it's been weeks since these two lgbt activists were hacked to death in the capital of bangladesh. the victims in the case were leaders in the lgbt community. police were initially looking for five or six different suspects. they have taken one man into custody. they say he's a 37-year-old man,
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they say he's connected to this homegrown islamist militant group. we've spoken to terrorism experts and analysts in the region who say that this group does have ties to al qaeda and we do know that in the aftermath of the murder of these two men, that the bangladeshi branch of al qaeda did take responsibility for the killings. so police are of course hopeful that the detention of this suspect could lead to other arrests of more suspects who were involved in this really heinous and brutal crime. a group of five or six men police say burst into the apartment building where these two activists were staying. they came in there armed with nievs and machetes, hacking the men to death with one of the men's mother actually inside the building at the time. but police say they were able to make this arrest because they recovered two firearms from the scene, and one of those firearms was actually traced back to the man who is now in custody. errol. >> alexandra, you were recently in bangladesh talking with
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people there. what's frightening is this isn't the only hacking attack, the only hacking death that's taken place. and a number of people have been arrested over the past few months. are people feeling relieved now, or still feeling a sense of unease? >> reporter: honestly they're not relieved by any stretch, errol because while you do see these arrests happening, people are not seeing convictions in these cases. they want the full extent of prosecution for whoever the assailants are behind these attacks. you've got u.s. officials saying nearly 40 attacks have transpired that seem to fit this same model. you've now had these secular and ath eist bloggers who have been targeted, the lgbt activists. religious minorities, academics. you've had the government coming out and saying they believe these assassinations have been organized by political opponents, but then at the same time, you've got these extremist groups which have been eager to come out and claim responsibility for the killings. there's a lot of back and forth about who is responsible. but when you talk to people in the community, they say they are
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living in fear. when you speak to activists, when you talk to lgbtsupporters they say they're all living in fear because they don't know who the next victims are and because they is see this spatd of attacks which has intensified in the last couple of months. >> at least you have this suspect now in custody. we'll see what information comes of it. alexandra field live for us in hong kong, just past 2:30 in the afternoon there. thanks. one of the holiest christian sites in the world has been blocked off to visitors for nearly half a century because of land mines. but that could soon change with the help of one organization. cnn's oren liebermann joins us from jerusalem with the details. the obvious question here, why has it taken so long to clear these land mines from one of the holiest christian sites? >> reporter: well, the baptism site is right on the jordan between the west bank and jordan. there wasn't peace between the two countries until 1994, so there was no access to the site. now there is a narrow path
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leading down, but many of the churches there are still blocked off. for the halo trust, the organization that will do the land mine removal, to get access here, they needed approval from the israelis, the palestinians, and seven different church denominations, all of whom have churches there blocked off by hand mines. now we spoke with the growth orthodox pate re acand asked him are you frustrated by this? he gave an interesting answer. he said this is the land of prophecy. time is irrelevant and a thousand years in the life of man could be one blink of an eye in the face of god. the signs around us warn of danger in three languages. here only the road is safe. beyond the barbed wire, nearly 5,000 explosive mines covering one square kilometer. >> in this particular area we're not looking to find -- >> you can see an anti-tank mine right now? >> sure. there is the first line is right here, like 30 meters from the place where we're standing. >> reporter: this mine field in the west bank restricts access
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to one of christian anitially holiest site, recognized as the biblical site of the baptism of jesus. pilgrims from all over the world bathe in the waters of this holy site on the jordan river, and a modern tourist center opened in 2011. but seven christian churches at the site have been closed for half a century. want an idea of how many land mines there are in certain spots here? see that dark ball there. that's an anti-personnel mine, and this entire field is full of them. during the six-day war in 1967, the israeli and jordanian armies laid mines here. churches were booby-trapped, and unexploded ordnance could still be anywhere. the churches have been off limits ever since. >> if we didn't do it, these mines would stay here forever. >> reporter: i speak with james cowan. he is the ceo of halo, the world's largest humanitarian mine-clearing organization.
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halo has just gotten permission to clear the mine field with the approval of both the israelis and palestinians. >> 40, 50 years later, these mines are still dangerous? >> absolutely. they would still be dangerous a hundred years from now if we didn't clear them. >> reporter: in syria and iraq isis has leveled ancient holy sites, bulldozing history and destroying precious artifacts. here the goal is to do the reverse, clearing the mine field will preserve these holy sites. pilgrims and tourists can visit once again, and this area can heal from the scars of battle. the halo trust says it will take 4 million u.s. dollars to clear all the land mines at this site. because it's not for humanitarian purns, not for farming or residential purposes, they're trying to raise that money through private donations. we have that information on our website. rosemary. >> orrin lieberman joining us there from jerusalem. many thanks to you. appreciate it. still to come, one of mexico's most ruthless drug lords returns to prison in juarez. how the city's residents feel
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welcome back. philippines president-elect rodrigo duterte has been called 9 donald trump of the east. we've mentioned that a few times. tough talk on crime has been a hallmark of his campaign. >> now he's taking things further. he is vowing to reintroduce the death penalty with public hangings. he also wants to enlist military snipers to kill suspected criminals and give police the right to use deadly force more
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often. >> i said if you resist arrest, if you offer violent resistance, may order to the police and to the military is to shoot to kill. >> duterte was only elected a few days ago, and while he has been enjoying the applause, there's one member of the president-elect's family who is not fond of the attention he's been getting. his son. >> that's right. cnn philippines spoke to sebastian duterte about why he intends to keep a low profile throughout his father's presidency. >> reporter: he didn't want his father to run for president. but when rodrigo duterte did, sebastian responded as what any supportive child would do. he campaigned for his father, a challenge for someone who has opted to keep a low profile throughout his dad's long political career. now that his father is the apparent president, sebastian is
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worried about the changes coming his way. >> i'm having a hard time because before all of this, it's the total opposite of my life. i don't really know what to expect. >> reporter: his house is right next to his dad's. their place has practically become a tourist site since the elections. for our interview, he tells us he had to exit through the back door to avoid the cameras. he brings us to their old home where he spent his childhood. he takes pride in living the simple life. he has a small business and spends a lot of time surfing. unlike his siblings, who are in public office, baste says he's rather stay out of politics. >> there are better things than politics, you know, like living the simple life and find happiness in simple things. i believe in equality. that's why i really try to live a simple life because i want to be fair to those people who are, you know -- who don't have much.
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>> reporter: baste intends to stay in davao during his dad's presiden presidency. he says he's not keen on taking on an official role. he's not very fond of the attention, especially now that he's somewhat become a social media heart throb. while he intends to watch from the sidelines as his dad governs, he's willing to help out if asked. he expects some resistance from the people once his father starts performing his duties. but he said his dad is tough. he says mayor duterte is a strict dad but with reason. >> really strict. [ speaking foreign language ] >> he needs to show that. he needs to show the people that he can do his job. and when he say something, that they should obey it.
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otherwise -- >> reporter: he may be planning to keep out of the public eye, but he says he's also preparing for the attacks. he already got a glimpse of this when he and his siblings were attacked of ill gotten wealth against his father. >> yes, i am expecting, but maybe i'm just going to take it like how he takes it. like how my dad takes it. it doesn't really affect me, you know. i know who i am. >> reporter: he's far from what many expect a presidential son to be. tattoos and pierced lips. but he doesn't mind. he says he's out to challenge the stereotype. for cnn philippines, davao city, philippines. drug lord el chapo recently returned to a prison in juarez, mexico, a move that is causing some unwanted effects on the
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city. juarez has been trying to recover from its image as one of the world's most violent places. >> residents want to put that past behind them and move forward but the presence of the infamous cartel leader is not helping. cnn's nick valencia has more. >> reporter: life goes on in juarez, mexico. once desolate streets traded for a semblance of tranquillity in the city just across the river from el paso, texas. not so long ago, it was infested with drug cartels. at its violent peak, there were more than 3,000 people murdered in one year. popularly known for its leader, one guzman, aka el chapo. while life on the streets has changed in juarez, with el chapo's return, the bloody past
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seems very much present. his presence has reimagined the nightmares for many. this man brought lived through the violence between 2009 and 2012. he says he still mourns the death of one of his construction workers, killed inside his business. there are many people very hurt by that war. there are many still mourning what happened during the narco war, and there's still a very latent sense of insecurity bred by the delinquent group of el chapo guzman here in juarez. painful memories he buried deep in his mind have been unlocked by the return of el chapo. even with the kingpin behind bars, some fear impunity for the cartel foot soldiers still in the city. however, the mayor of juarez tells cnn the drug lord's transfer to juarez has had no impact or relevance on the daily life of most residents. juarez now finds itself peaceful, working, and dedicated
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to produce goods and services. juarez is dedicated to creating better life conditions for its residents. >> reporter: there are obvious concerns that el chapo will escape prison for a third time. there have also been questions about the penitentiary's infrastructure. is it capable of holding him? with the spotlight back on juarez for the moment, residents would prefer to discard the unwanted attention and move on from its violent past. nick valencia, cnn, atlanta. a chinese girl group is reviving the spirit of the cultural revolution with patriotic performances. >> but for some it's only resurrecting painful memories. that story just ahead. think fixing your windshield is a big hassle? not with safelite. this family needed their windshield replaced,
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monday marks 50 years since the start of china's cultural revolution that led to a decade of chaos and bloodshed. it was launched by communist leader in part to reassert his authority over the government. >> and the early enforcers were the red guards, an army of young adults and even children. hundreds of thousands of people are believed to have been killed or persecuted.
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a former red guard tells cnn that she's haunted by guilt over her experience. she was a middle school student in 1966 and says her accusations help send a teacher to prison. >> in an interview, she says, quote, 50 years on, i am worried by the increasing leader worship we see in state media, similar to the ideological fervor that surrounded mao. we must stay vigilant. we can't have the gruesome brutality of the cultural revolution start again. end of quote there. >> those comments come as a chinese girl group faces accusations over performances that resiev some of the patriotic sentiment of the cultural revolution. matt rivers has the story. ♪ >> reporter: teenage girls belting out a song worshipping mao day dung. sounds a lot like it did 50 years ago this week when the chairman launched the cultural revolution, ushering a tumultuous decade, one where
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showing allegiance to the communist party meant singing it out loud. on this military base outside beijing, these young performers, called the 56 flowers, practiced old songs about mao and new ones about president shi gin peng. the effect in the room is a distinct air of loyalty to party leaders past and present. the manager says the goal here is to wut put on concerts. most of these girls are from poor families in far flung provinces. so this is one of the few opportunities to travel outside of where they're from. they get free meals and get paid about 450 u.s. dollars a month. that money usually gets sent back home. more than selling tickets or making money, their shows are meant to rekindle that revolutionary spirit. at this show in the great hall
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of the people a symbolic theater just off tee enman square, a banner flashed behind the singers reading, defeat the american invaders and their running dogs. some in the audience applauded, but the performance was roundly criticized online because it hearkened back to the darkest period of mao's rule. his cultural revolution was meant to rid the country of all things capitalist, but hundreds of thousands died in the ensuing violence and chaos. officially, the party has long denounced the cultural revolution. but critics say president xi has taken a page from mao's playbook, consolidating power and demanding total party control over society. but even in xi's china, pro-moetding the cultural revolution with elaborate stage shows is a step too far. so the 56 flowers group took down its website and social media accounts. for now, the music has stopped. matt rivers, cnn, beijing.
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and thanks for watching cnn "cnn newsroom." i'm rosemary church. remember you can follow us on twitter anytime. you're all saying such wonderful things at the moment. we appreciate it greatly. you see our handles there. top stories from around the world. please do stay with us. back in a moment. honey, did you call the insurance company? not yet, i'm... folding the laundry! can you? no... cleaning the windows! the living room's a disaster! (vo) most insurance companies give you every reason to avoid them. plants need planting! well the leaves aren't going to rake themselves! (vo) nationwide is different. hon, did you call nationwide to check on our claim? (vo) we put members first. actually, they called me. ♪ nationwide is on your side nationwide is the exclusive insurance partner of plenti.
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isis strikes again. a team of militants including suicide bombers kill ten people at a gas plant outside of baghdad. a fiasco. calls for an urgent investigation after a training device forces the evacuation of a man u. game at old trafford. and nobody cares. a top republican says voters aren't interested in a steady stream of negative stories concerning the past of donald trump. hello and welcome to our viewers here in the united states and all around the world. i'm rosemary church. >> and i'm errol barnett. thanks for joining us as we kick off our second hour of "cnn newsroom."
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in iraq, baghdad's governor is blasting security officials following an isis attack on a gas plant just north of the capital. he says the plant was inadequately protected, and an elite response team took too long to arrive. >> at least ten security personnel were killed in sunday's attack, and two dozen people wounded. the assault sent plumes of smoke into the air and left storage tanks ablaze. >> and for the latest, let's bring in ja ma na karachi. ja ma na, how was isis able to carry out this deadly attack, and was baghdad's governor right when he said the gas plant was inadequately protected and help was too slow to come? >> reporter: well, i think, rosemary, what the governor is saying here is something we've heard officials say in the past after similar attacks, talking about the forces protecting certain installations, certain infrastructure, saying that they're not armed adequately,
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that they have small arms. they're not able to face the force that was attacking. and, again, criticism of the forces responding, the quick reaction force here that according to the governor took more than two hours to arrive on the scene. but we need to keep in mind here that the iraqi security forces are really stretched here. they are fighting a battle on so many different fronts. and also, rosemary, you're talking about more than half a dozen attackers, suicide bombers, car bombs. this kind of attack is difficult to stop in a case like this. it's not one suicide bomber, and i do remember security officials over the years when we see these sort of attacks in iraq would say that when you have attackers like this who are determined to kill themselves and to kill others, it's going to be very difficult to stop them. >> and joe ma na, explain to us why we're seeing this stepped up isis campaign now at this time. is this a shift perhaps in tactics? >> reporter: well, there's a lot of speculation here about what
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isis is doing over the past couple of years, rosemary. you mentioned we're seeing this uptick in attacks, especially in and around baghdad. some attacks also in the north. if you look at the timing of it, this comes at a time when iraq is facing one of its worst political crises in a long time. some who say this is isis trying to exfloit this chaotic seen to try and exacerbate political and sectarian tensions in the country with the end goal of trying to reignite the bloody sectarian war in the country. some others would say it is trying to shift the focus away from the battlefields in the north and the western part of the country, trying to raise concerns about attacks in baghdad. if you talk to u.s. and iraqi officials, they say that this is isis reacting to recent losses. brett mcgurk, president obama's special envoy to the global coalition against isis was in amman yesterday and he addressed this in a press conference. here's what he had to say.
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>> and now the caliphate as they call it, this perverse caliphate is shrinking. so they are very much on the defensive. they have not retaken any territory really since their operations in ramadi going all the way back to may. >> reporter: u.s. officials say that isis has lost about 45% of the territory once controlled in iraq and about 20% of the territory controlled in syria. while it has lost territory as the past couple of weeks can show that the group still has that ability to carry out these continuous, really high-profile attacks we have seen taking place almost on a daily basis now in iraq. rosemary. >> just after 10:00 in the morning there in amman jordan. many thanks to you. rosemary, jihadist groups are threatening to drive christians out of syria, burning churches and desecrating priceless icons. the historic town of maloula was
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recently freed after being seized by isis militants. but some christians still fear for their lives. our senior international correspondent fred pleitgen joins us from damascus to discuss what he saw, fred, just tell us about the people and especially the children you spoke with there, still fearing for their lives. >> reporter: yeah, absolutely. fearing for their lives. errol, in many ways also fearing for the very existence of christianity in this part of the world. one of the things we have to keep in mind is of course this is really the cradle of christianity. you look at some of the places here in syria. it really is some of the first places that christians went to when the religion was founded. now many of them, of course, fear for their lives. also fear for a lot of holy sites here in this country. and many of them have already fled this country. let's have a look at what we saw when we visited the traditional town of maloula. jesus loves you no matter how
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you feel, these children sing at a religion class in maloula, syria's most famous christian town, which was occupied by islamist militants for six months. several townspeople are still missing. i want things to be better, like they were before and for the kidnapped people to come back, this 7-year-old says. similar words from this 8-year-old. i want maloula to be better and more beautiful than it used to be, she says. shocking, their reaction when i ask how many of them have had to flee their home. islamist rebels led by al qaeda's wing in syria, invaded maloula in late 2013. this video by one of the groups allegedly shows a suicide blast that took out the checkpoint to the village. the rebels kidnapped 12 nuns from a convent. it took more than six months of intense battles to oust them. but scars remain.
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this is the same convent and shrine, or what's left of it. a warning to syria's christian community. while some buildings here in maloula have been restored, others remain exactly like this, completely destroyed and mostly burned out. and of course many people who live in this town ask themselves whether christianist still has a future here in syria. syria is home to one of the oldest christian communities in the world. maloula is the last place where the aramaic that jesus spoke is still in use. but groups like isis have vowed to oust the christians from this land. this member of maloula's city council shows me just some of the priceless icons that were damaged or looted, especially the most ancient ones. >> they stole it, and then they fire the other. the new one, they fire it. >> they burned it? >> burned it. >> reporter: as we left maloula, a christian song was playing on
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a loudspeaker system in the entire town. a sign of defiance from a christian community that hopes the children learning about their long heritage in syria will have a future in the land of their ancestors. so as you can see there, errol, this is a very proud christian community. it's one with a long tradition and one that is still very defiant. but also one that has been decimated over the past five years that the civil war has been going on. just to give you one little example. we were talking in that report about how maloula is one of the last towns where the aramaic that jesus christ spoke is still the language that's in use. well, they had an institute there to keep teaching aramaic, to make sure that language survived. but the person who headed that institute has also fled that city of maloula so that is not in use anymore. it's that slow attrition that you see here with the christian community here in syria that has many people not just in that town of maloula but other places as well very worried.
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>> beyond the open, which is so many lives being lost, you have history being lost, and people fleeing to get to safety as well. fred pleitgen live for us on the streets of damascus this morning. eight minutes past 10:00 a.m. there. isis has claimed responsibility for a suicide blast at a military base in southern yemen. security officials say the bomber attacked the base's main gate early sunday. >> the blast killed at least 30 troops and wounded 29. an hour later, another suicide blast targeted the convoy of a yemeni security official, killing two of his guards. four others were wounded in that attack. and now to what was really a collective sigh of relief. manchester united fans were in for quite a scare on sunday. police evacuated their home stadium of old trafford after finding what appeared to be a bomb. >> but they later found it was just a harmless training device left behind by a private firm after a routine drill.
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>> pretty incredible. our christina macfarlane is live from old trafford in manchester. how big of an operation was this to clear a stadium of, what, some 75,000 people minutes before a premier league match? >> reporter: yeah. half an hour before the match was actually due to take place, errol. it was a major operation. 75,000 fans who had traveled here, 5,000 or 7,000 of which had traveled all the way up from bournemouth to be here, evacuated and then sent home. then sniffer dogs were sent in by the greater manchester police, and eventually a bomb jaud squad was deployed here to carry auto a controlled explosion of a suspect's package. only seven hours later for us to be told that it was in fact a fake bomb left here by a private firm who were conducting a training exercise earlier this week. now, the manchester united chairman released a statement last night saying that this incident will of course be fully investigated just to find out exactly how this was possible.
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the tickets for the match that was due to take place yesterday have been refunded, and the match itself has been rescheduled to take place here at old trafford tomorrow at 8:00 p.m. it all amounts to an extremely costly and embarrassing mistake by manchester united football club. it's estimated that the incident yesterday could have set them back somewhere in the region of $5 million. this morning we had a statement from the manchester mayor and the crime commissioner, who have called this an outrage. they said that it's a massive inconvenience to the fans. it wasted police time and army bomb squad resources. and it put people in unnecessary danger. but as you say, errol, there is a feeling of relief today that it wasn't something that was significantly more serious and that, in fact, there was no danger on the scene. and the security forces in place here responded very swiftly to the event as it was unfolding yesterday. >> yeah. i mean really the only silver lining is that people were very
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complimentary to officials who were able to -- you know, because they thought it was a real threat, clear the stadium in an efficient amount of time. as you say, this was a mistake that cost at least $5 million. i know it's the obvious question, but how could a private company conduct training and then leave the fake bomb behind? are there any leading theories on that? >> reporter: well, no theories yet, errol. but we do know that security drills of this sort are happening with more -- you know, more regular occurrence, more frequency in major sporting stadiums, not just here in the u.k. but across europe. and the code red evacuation that was culled here yesterday was actually part of an increased security measure that's been in place here at the old trafford stadium since the paris attacks last year. you'll remember that a suicide bomber had attempted to enter the stade de france during a france v. germany friendly last year.
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since that incident occurred, the security here at old trafford have stepped up their work towards these particular type of incidents. and of course there is a heightened sensitivity at the moment as we head towards the european championships 2016, which are due to kick off in just under a month's time in stadiums all across france. so it is definitely a security measure that is being stepped up in the wake of those paris attacks and as we head into this summer with the football championships. >> it's a good thing they train for these kinds of things. it's a good thing everyone was safe in the end. but i'm guessing whoever had the responsibility of picking up that fake bomb may be out of a job. christina macfarlane life for us this morning. we appreciate it. definitely trouble ahead for that person, whoever it was. and donald trump is facing a challenge winning support from women voters. a new in-depth report from "the new york times" could offer so
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reasons why. plus one of the holiest christian sites in the world may soon be more accessible to visitors after nearly half a century. we'll tell you why it's taken so long. stay with us. went to ancestry, i put in the names of my grandparents first. i got a leaf right away. a leaf is a hint that is connected to each person in your family tree. i learned that my ten times great grandmother is george washington's aunt. within a few days i went from knowing almost nothing to holy crow, i'm related to george washington. this is my cousin george. discover your story. start searching for free now at ancestry.com
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donald trump lags in support among female voters, and the republican presidential candidate's challenge in that arena could get worse. >> that's right. "the new york times" reports trump's private conduct with women has involved unwelcome advances and comments on women's bodies. but the republican party chairman says the trump campaign isn't being judged on his past personal behavior. >> these are things that he's going to have to answer for, but i also think they're things from many years ago. and i think that, you know, as christians judging each other, i think is problematic. i think it's when people live in glass houses and throw stones is when people get in trouble. and so, you know, as hillary clinton is a classic clinton operation. now suddenly these things are coming out. it's not necessarily people make mistakes or have regrets or seek
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forgiveness. it's whether or not the person launching the charge is authentic in their own life and can actually be pure enough to make such a charge. that's what i think most people look at when they evaluate people's character. again, i don't think donald trump is being judged based on his personal life. i think people are judging donald trump as to whether or not he's someone that's going to go to washington and shake things up. >> and separate to this, trump is denying posing as his own publicist in an interview from years ago. this is what the 1991 conversation sounds like. >> what is your position? >> well, i'm sort of handling pp p.r. i can tell you off the record. if i can talk off the record, i can tell you that she didn't care if he got bad p.r. until he got his divorce finished. when he got a lot of bad financial stuff he liked it because it was good because he could get a divorce. once the divorce is finished, if you notice since then, he's
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doing well financially and he's doing well in every other way. >> all right. i hope you were listening closely to that. cnn's jake tapper asked trump's convention manager about the denial despite trump's admission that he has posed as his own spokesman in the past using a pseudonym. >> is the campaign claiming that isn't mr. trump? >> i could barely understand it. i couldn't tell who it is. donald trump says it's not him. i believe it's not him. >> in 1990 under oath he testified that he did use the name john baron. in 1991, he told "people" magazine that he did use the name john miller. so this has already been admitted previously. i don't understand why now -- >> i don't know those facts to be true or not. i just know he said it's not him. i believe him. i don't even nope the relevance of this frankly other than it's 25 years old. >> and the former reporter who was heard on that audio recording is speaking out now. >> yeah. get this. sue carswell told cnn's michael
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smerconish that she thinks trump himself released the 25-year-old recording to distract the public from other issues. >> did you release this tape? >> no. >> did you have the tape? i mean how did it get into play? >> all right. two people had the tape. i had a tape, and trump had a tape. and i don't have the tape. >> how do you think it got into play? >> well, it didn't get to "the washington post" through me. >> so? >> trump. >> you think trump dropped this tape? >> yeah. >> why would he do that? >> look what's gone on this week. taxes, paul ryan, the butler. the butler did it. now trump seems to like to poll "people" magazine type stories into the array. >> all right. we've got more for you. donald trump says britain won't be worse off in trade negotiations with the u.s. if it leaves the european union. >> president barack obama has warned britain would move to the back of the queue in u.s. trade deals if it exits the eu. but told trump itv's piers
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morgan that won't happen if he becomes president. >> he said, look, if you do this, then you, britain, will be back of the queue when it comes to trade with the united states. >> i don't -- >> if you become president and we've come out of european union, what would your view be about where britain should sit in priority terms with trade deals with the united states? >> i don't think they'd be heard at all. i mean they have to make their own deal. britain's been a great ally. >> would they be back of the queue? would they be front of the queue? >> britain's been such a great ally, as an example going into iraq. okay? with they, they'll always be treated fantastically. >> would we be treated front of the queue? >> i'm going to treat everybody fairly. it wouldn't make any difference to me whether they would be in the eu or not. >> we wouldn't be back of the queue for trade? >> you would certainly not be back of the queue. i can tell you. >> then came a discussion on london's mayor and mr. trump was not too happy about recent
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comments. >> he says i hope donald trump loses the election. my message to donald trump and his team is your views of islam are ignorant. >> all right. well, when he won, i wished him well. now i don't care about him. i mean it doesn't make any difference to me about him. let's see how he does. let's see if he's a good mayor. >> are you offended by what he says? >> i am because he doesn't know me. i think they're very rude statements and frankly tell him, i will remember those statements. very nasty statements. >> british prime minister david cameron has also criticized trump over his position on muslims, and trump has said he doesn't care. >> and though he didn't name him directly, president barack obama seemed to take aim at trump during a commencement speech at new jersey's rutgers university. listen. >> in politics and in life, ignorance is not a virtue. it's not cool to not know what you're talking about. [ laughter ]
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that's not keepin' it real or tellin' it like it is. that's not challenging political correctness. that's just not knowing what you're talking about. and yet we've become confused about this. >> well, the democratic presidential hopefuls are battling for votes in kentucky. it is a coal-producing state, and in the past hillary clinton has spoken against coal mining for its environmental impact. on sunday she outlined her plans for miners' health coverage and retirement programs. >> bernie sanders is hoping to extend his winning streak meanwhile. he recently won west virginia, which is another coal-producing state. now bangladesh has been hit hard by severe thunderstorms in the past week. but there's also been an astonishing rise in the number of people killed by lightning strikes. >> yeah. our meteorologist pedram javaheri is here to talk more about this because this is a hiej concern. >> it is. you know what's really interesting is to think about
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the united states for example. we've seen a record number of lightning strike fatalities in the u.s. alone. five is that number in the first four months of the year so far. in the past several days, the number is estimated between 60 to 70 fatalities in bangladesh when it comes to lightning strikes. it really is incredible. it's a much smaller country. to show you what happened here, we know a lot of people involved being farmers out in an open area, many young people and students involved as well as far as the lightning strike fatalities. an incredible event when you think about just the sheer size of this particular region. go in for a closer perspective. since the 1st of march, the lightning fatalities have actually exceeded around 90 or so people in that particular country of bangladesh. we know deforestation has been a major issue in recent years. for the ecology to be sustained in this part of the world, in bangladesh in particular, you want to have the land area, 25% of it be forested. that number has come down to about 6%. you take the trees away, you take the forest away, now people
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exposed to the elements. that can play a role when it comes to lightningify talts that we've seen in recent days and years. look at this. the otds of being struck are 1 in 300,000. but in an entire lifetime, they're actually quite higher. they're about 1 in 12,000. a lot of people are surprised to learn about 90% of lightning strike victims do survive. they have debilitating illnesses throughout honor life a lot of times but there's a high probability of survival if someone is close by, can resuscitate you, and that certainly could increase your likelihood of surviving. in the u.s. there is that number of five so far in 2016. look at bangladesh's population. that is almost exactly half of the u.s. population, but when you take the country's land area, you put it into a u.s. state, it e kwafts roughly to the u.s. state of georgia with half of the entire population of the country of course very densely populate. that alone really increases your likelihood of being exposed to the elements. you notice this. in the u.s., a lot of data
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available on when lightning strike fatalities happen. almost certainly every single year, holiday weekends, we see a spike in them. almost always the numbers are somewhere on the order of three out of four being men versus women that are struck. interesting to compare the countries, and we know lightning education. far more people lightning aware in this country than potentially in bangladesh where they're out on the farm. they still got to work and they don't go inside. >> in some cases, they will run toward a tree to get shelter, and that's probably the worse place you can go. >> we take that for granted in the united states of knowing not to do that. maybe not the case in other parts of the world. >> important information. thanks, pedram. >> appreciate it. well, thousands of land mines have surrounded one of the holiest christian sites in the world. now some of the churches on the site may get their first visitors in 50 years. plus hear how a woman went from being a victim of human
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a warm welcome back to those of you watching here in the state skpsz those of you tuned in all around the world. it's your last half hour of "cnn newsroom" with us. i'm errol barnett. >> i'm rosemary church. time to check the headlines. at least ten security officers are dead after isis militants attacked a gas plant near baghdad sunday. police say the assault began with a suicide car bomb explosion at the plant's entrance. baghdad's governor slammed security there saying the facility was not properly protected. the republican party
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chairman says donald trump is going to have to answer for his behavior around women. a "new york times" report said the presidential candidate's private conduct with women has involved unwelcome romantic advances and commentary on their bodies. reince priebus says the campaign isn't being judged on trump's personal life. manchester police say the suspected bomb that caused an evacuation of old trafford stadium on sunday was just a training device. authorities say it was harmless but looked very real and had mistakenly been left behind by a private company. ♪ the cnn freedom project is dedicated to shining a light on human trafficking and ending modern-day slavery. norma ba cityist thought she was
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going to ajapan for a modeling job. >> instead she became someone's property. she struggled to cope with the trauma after she regained her freedom. she took up running to recover, and that's led her to some remarkable achievements. >> reporter: the miles don't matter to norma. they gather and pool like the rain she pushes through or the tears she so often shed. >> i haam an endurance athlete breaking records but there was a part of me that not a lot of people knew that i'm a survivor of human trafficking. >> born to a desperately poor family in mexico, norma's father died when she was 11. when a friend told her about a modeling job in japan, she saw it as a big break in her lifetime of clouds. >> i remember my mother saying, i'm afraid, but i can't stop you because this is the only chance, you know? and we all desperately want it to be true. >> reporter: it wasn't. she says the agency delivered
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her to a members club, who told her she must repay all the money it took to bring her to japan as an escort. >> you cannot go to the police. i cannot go home until i pay my debt. >> reporter: and that left her, she says, vulnerable to all kinds of abuse. >> i was drugged on my way home from the club, drugged and beaten. nobody wanted to help me because i had been a bar girl, so hi no value. >> reporter: after several years, she managed to pay off her debts and leave. she later married, moved to canada and had two children. for years, she says she numbed the pain by drinking. but she realized if she was going to do more than just survive with her children, she would need to thrive. >> so i started running because i didn't want them to hear me crying at night. >> reporter: six months later, to everyone's astonishment, she qualified for one of the world's most privilege race events, the boston marathon. >> i just became an incredible runner because of the incredible amount of stress that i had to management. >> reporter: then she had her big idea. she would break the world record
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for the longest triathlon in history, and she would do it to send a message. >> i designed the triathlon to follow human trafficking smugglismuggl smuggling route. >> they didn't quite get it. >> brad reilly of the anti-slavery group i empa cheese joined norma's team. he documented her journey in a film called "be relentless." >> i wanted to look like angelina jolie, but i think i look like mickey roark, the wrestler. >> destroying the inside of my mouth. it was very painful. that was probably one of the most painful things i've ever done. >> reporter: the journey took 64 days. all told, she racked up 3,762 miles, shattering the previous guinness world record. along the way, there were roadside accidents, malfunctioning gpss, and constant inclement record. but for norma, this was a test
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that had little to do with punishing waves or pounding the pavement. >> as an athlete, i would celebrate it because i would break world records. but as a survivor of human trafficking, i was shamed. by living large, by being as big as i can be, i empower every single victim. i ran the last two miles with survivors of human trafficking. the healing comes from seeing them, from seeing every single one of those young girls being unbroken. i just want them to be proud of me. i want to do them proud. >> reporter: and for every step she takes, every mile she ticks off, norma is proving that somebody once trapped in a nightmare can now live out her dreams. >> wow. she is just incredible. there's more to this. in part two of our story, our reporter looks at the almost superhuman way norma is coping with her ordeal while raising
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awareness for other victims. take a look. >> reporter: in 2014, norma set out to break the guinness record for world's longest triathlon. over the course of several months, she ran, biked, and swam more than 3,700 miles. traveling from cancun, mexico, to washington, d.c., following a known route of human trafficking victims. >> human trafficking is what happened to you. it's not who you are. >> so impressive. we will bring you that story at this time tomorrow. it's all part of cnn's freedom project series. surviving to thriving, all this week on cnn. philippine president-elect rodrigo duterte won the country over with tough talk, especially on handling crime. he's escalating that rhetoric lately, vowing to reintroduce public hangings. >> he also wants to deploy military snipers to take out suspected criminals and enforce strict curfews at night. on top of all that, he says he will empower police to use
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deadly force more often. >> i said if you resist arrest, you offer violent resistance, my order to the police and to the military is to shoot to kill. >> duterte stressed that the law couldn't be effectively enforced without fear of what will happen if it is broken. parts of one of the holiest christian sites in the world have been blocked off to visitors because of land mines. a narrow path leads to the site where christians believe gejesu christ was baptized. but churches at the site on the jordan river have sat empty for 50 years. that could soon change, though, with the help of one organization. cnn's orrin lieber mann joins us now from jerusalem with some details on this. orrin, incredible churches left
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empty for 50 years or so. why has it taken so long to clear these land mines from one of the holiest christian sites? >> reporter: well, the biggest problem is that until recently, until the mid-'90s, there wasn't peace between israel and jordan that would allow people to access this site. after that, halo, the world's largest land mine-clearing organization, had to get permission from the israelis, the palestinians, and seven different christian denominations who don't always get along. now they have that permission, and they're trying to make this happen. they're trying to open up these beautiful churches thate got a very close look at to the public once again. the signs around us warn of danger in three languages. here, only the road is safe. beyond the barbed wire, nearly 5,000 explosive mines covering one square kilometer. >> in this particular area we're not looking to find an anti-personnel mine. >> and you can see an anti-tank mine right now? >> yeah, sure. there is the first line is right here, like 30 meters from the place where we're standing.
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>> reporter: this mine field in the west bank restricts access to one of christianity's holiest sites, recognized as the biblical site of the baptism of jesus. pilgrims from all over the world bathe in the waters of this holy site on the jordan river at a modern tourist center opened in 2011. but seven christian churches at the site, all different denominations, have been closed for half a century. want an idea of how many land mines there are in certain spots here? see that dark ball right there? that's an anti-personnel mine. and this entire field is full of them. during the six-day war in 1967, the israeli and jordanian armies laid mines here. churches were booby-trapped, and unexploded ordnance could still be anywhere. the churches have been off limits ever since. >> and if we didn't do it, these mines would stay here forever. >> reporter: i speak with james cowan outside the romanian orth dock church. he is the ceo of halo, the
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world's largest mine clearing organization. halo has just gotten permission to clear the mine field with the approval of both the israelis and palestinians. >> 40, 50 years later these mines are still dangerous? >> absolutely. they would still be dangerous a hundred years from now if we didn't clear them. >> reporter: in syria and iraq, isis has leveled ancient holy sites, bulldozing history and destroying precious artifacts. here the goal is to do the reverse. clearing the mine field will preserve these holy sites. pilgrims and tourists can visit once again and this area can heal from the scars of battle. halo estimated it will take about $4 million to clear this entire area of land mines. because it's not for humanitarian purposes, which is to say it's not for residential or farming purposes, halo is raising this money from private donations. we have that information if you're interested in donating on our website. rosemary, i've been to this area quite a few times now. it's a beautiful area, and it will be even more so once it's open to visitors again. >> incredible report there.
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orren lieberman joining us from jerusalem just after 10:40 in the morning. many thanks to you as always. actress susan sarandon is known for speaking her mind no matter how controversial. what she's saying about one of hollywood's most famous directors after the break. if you have allergy congestion, muddling through your morning is nothing new. ...your nose is the only thing on your mind... ...and to get relief, anything is fair game. introducing rhinocort® allergy spray from the makers of zyrtec®. powerful relief from your most frustrating nasal allergy symptom* ,all day and all night. hasn't your nose been through enough already? try new rhinocort® allergy spray. muddle no more®
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the world's biggest operational airplane, the only one of its kind, has landed in perth, australia. the ukrainian cargo jet received an enthusiastic welcome there. >> rob scott reports thousands of people were there to see the giant aircraft touch down. >> reporter: the co-loss us of the clouds, the an tow nov 225 on final approach to perth airport. this is the world's biggest plane, and this is its first visit to australia.
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it's in perth to deliver some massive cargo. a 116-ton generator for a mining company. the monster plane drew a monster crowd. some 16,000 came with cameras and phones at the ready. >> love it. it's a beast. it's fantastic. >> massive. well worth coming down. >> reporter: built during the cold war era of the 1980s, the one of a kind aircraft was built to carry the russian space shuttle. when that program ended, the plane was transformed into a cargo carrier, capable of transporting loads no other aircraft can. >> it is 100% product of ukraine. it was designed in ukraine. it was manufactured and operated from ukraine. so this is to be proud of. this is a master piece. >> reporter: it took the giant jet five days to get to per eth from kiev. delays in kuala lumpur meant in touched down two hours late.
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but for those who waited, it was well worth it. >> absolutely bueautiful aircraft. loved it. >> reporter: what a fitting way to welcome this giant jet to australia. a water cannon salute for the undisputed king of the skies. a plane so by, the wright brothers to take their first flight in its cargo hold. it will take 12 hours to off load the generator. >> it will leave at about 5:30 in the morning on tuesday. >> after this particular experience, they're looking for more very large cargo to bring out to australia. so we may well see this giant of the skies once again. >> reporter: rob scott, 7 news. >> how about that? we'll take a short break here. still to come, susan sarandon isn't keeping quiet about abuse allegations against a fellow actor. we'll have the details for you straight ahead. and i couldn't wait to get my pie chart.
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welcome back. receipt hod chili peppers front man anthony keedis is expected to make a full recovery after he had to go to a california hospital over the weekend. >> the band's website says he had complications from intestinal flu. his illness forced the band to
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cancel a concert saturday and another one tuesday. kim serafin of in touch weekly magazine joins me now to talk more on hollywood news. kim, agent resz and activist susan sarandon didn't hold back when it came to the topic of woody allen when she was at the cannes film festival. what all did she say? >> of course these sexual assault allegations, rumors have been swirling around woody allen since the festival started really because his film "cafe society" opened there, and his son, ronan farrow had written that op-ed, had written that column basically chastising the media for not asking more questions. people have been asking a lot of the stars and slents there their thoughts on woody allen. susan sarandon did not hold back. she basically said, i believe he sexually assaulted someone, a child, and i have nothing good to say about him. now, woody allen, i should mention he met with a group -- a small group of reporters, and he said, i have nothing more to say about this. i've said everything i am going
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to say. i have so moved on. so he is having nothing to do with any of these celebrities who are saying anything about him really. he just doesn't want to talk about it. he said all he is going to say about this topic. >> indeed. questions are being asked, but he's not answering basically. and we are learning that fans of prince won't be able to remember him at a memorial until august. what more do you know about that and of course any other news on the star? >> yeah, of course everyone is waiting to see are there any new developments with prince? now, there was a service, a memorial service held for him at the church, at the jehovah's witness church kingdom hall that he attended, that he was a regular attendee of services there on sundays. they held this on sunday. there were some celebrities there like sheila e. was there apparently. sin bad was seen walking in. but his sister made a facebook post, and she said that she would not be there. his remains would not be there. but she said she wasn't saying anything against any memorials that would be held for prince.
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she said everyone deals with grief in their own way and that she welcomes any and all memorials, public or private or otherwise, for prince. but she did say that a service for the family and for his fans would probably not be held until august. so for any people that were thinking they could go and attend some sort of memorial, this might not happen until the end of the summer according to his sister. >> that's a long way off, isn't it? and a british bookmaker has suspended betting on who will be the next james bond because tom hiddleston is the favorite apparently. fill us in on how that got to that point. >> it's so interesting because there have been all these rumors. since really people expected that daniel craig might not be back as james bond. so there have been so many predictions. would it be idris elba? would it be tom hardy? that was another one i think a lot of people thought maybe was someone who could potentially be the next james bond. damian lewis was another one that had swirled around. so bookmakers have these bets
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out. but now this british bookmaker is suspending bets because tom hiddleston was seen meeting with the director and the producer earlier is someone who people think is definitely going to be the next james bond. so much so that he stopped the bets. so this is very interesting because i wonder if people really believe this or if it was just because he was seen meeting with the production team. it will be interesting because there have been so many rumors again. i mean there were rumors that even a woman could be considered as james bond way back in november. they had to actually stop the betting. perhaps tom hiddleston could be the next james bond. >> everyone has our own view. it is a very subjective thing who will be the next james bond. kim serafin, many thanks to you as always. "the washington post" says ben carson named john kasich, ted cruz and chris christie as some of the potential u.s. vice presidential candidates for the
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presumptive republican nominee, donald trump. >> but donald trump says that's not true. meanwhile, "saturday night live" poked fun at the search for potential v.p.s. watch. >> do you have any idea, sir? >> what about john kasich? he's smart, experienced. he could help us in ohio. >> he said he's not interested. >> he's a loser. big, fat loser. what about nikki haley? >> also not interested. >> ted cruz? >> hard no. >> paul ryan. >> he said not right now, but he will see you in hell. >> you are such a special candidate. maybe, just maybe, the person you've been looking for this whole time is standing in this room right now. >> you're so right. ben carson, you want to be vice president? >> heck yeah.
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>> there is more news after this break. >> we'll see you tomorrow. take care. it's all thanks to our birds eye chef's favorites side dishes perfectly sauced or seasoned. what are you..? shh! i'm live tweeting. oh, boy. birds eye. so veggie good. . . you won't see these folks they have businesses to run. they have passions to pursue. how do they avoid trips to the post office? stamps.com mail letters, ship packages, all the services of the post office right on your computer. get a 4 week trial, plus $100 in extras including postage and a digital scale. go to stamps.com/tv and never go to the post office again.
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donald trump on defense as new reports about his past raise questions about how he does business and how he treats women. clinton and sanders battling ahead of tuesday's contest ahead of oregon and kentucky. more than 100 people dead in the past few days. isis claims responsibility for violence rocking iraq. good morning. welcome to "early start." i'm john berman. >> nice to see you. i'm christine

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