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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  May 16, 2016 10:00pm-1:01am PDT

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organization just because you don't like the way they look. they can try but i don't think it's going to happen. ♪ ♪ hello everybody. just around 10:00 here on the west coast. i'm in los angeles. this is cnn newsroom l.a. donald trump is now facing the type of media scrutiny typical for a presidential nominee and he's responding by going on the offensive. in particular, lashing out at the new york time squs and a re critical of his past behavior with women. >> reporter: donald trump is going to war with the media yet again. this time taking aim at the new york times for a front page story highlighting tales of trump appearing to objectify
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women and make unwelcomed a vanlss. one of the women who once dated trufrm says her story was misrepresented. >> i made it very clear many times that i had a very pleasant relationship with donald and i never felt like i was being depicted as a piece of meat or anything like that. >> reporter: prompting trump to call it a hit piece on twitter. the story reveals instances of trump critiquing women's figures, giving a pageant consestant a kiss on the lips, as he made offhand comments that some viewed as demeaning and dismissi dismissive. the reporters are standing by their piece. >> there's no sing tool mention to donald trump and women. i think it makes it clear
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through the voices of the people we interviewed. >> reporter: this means even more media scrutiny for trump. last week it was a washington post story on the billionaire businessman posing as his own spokesman. which created more fodder for snl. >> mr. trump is the real life inspration for iron man. i'm pepperoni. >> reporter: and trump's plan to bar muslims and calling him ignorant without ever calling him out by name. >> in politics and life, ignorance is not a virtue. [ applause ] it's not cool to not know what you're talking about. [ laughter] that's not keeping it real or telling it like it is. that's not challenging political correctness. that's just not knowing what
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you're talking about. >> reporter: all of this as some gop leaders, including mitt romney and bill crystal are still trying to recruit a third party candidate to take on trump. it's an effort rnc denounced as a suicide mission. >> it's a suicide mission because what it means is that you're throwing down not just eight years of the white house but potentially 100 years on the supreme court and wrecking this country for many generations. >> reporter: now while donald trump has clearly taken the approach of slamming the media organization digging into his past and saying anything has been untrue, what has campaign has not done is taken a coheaves approach to improve his numbers with women. he has very high unfavorables among women. cnn, washington.
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joining us now, gina louden in san diego. a trump supporter and host of america trends. and here in los angeles, a clinton supporter and former l.a. counselwoman. donald trump had a couple of bad days to start off with but it just got a whole lot better today. all of this controversy, does this inoculate trump from further stories? >> i opened the story myself and waiting for the what and it just wasn't there. as we saw today, their main person in the story said actually that they miss depicted her and that he was a gentleman to her. i myself was surprised that -- it didn't seem like a whole lot of substance to the story and that makes me sad for women. because i think the more stories you have put out there in a crying wolf sort of manner, then when women have stories about
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thinks that do happen to women, people are going to be more numb to that psychologically and i hate that point. >> do you agree, wendy that there was no there there in this story to begin with and now the main person in the story says i didn't say that -- >> there were more than 50 people interviewed. and the woman who said she didn't think the way they portrayed her. but she didn't say she didn't say those words. she said those are the words i said. this isn't just about the new york times piece. donald trump in his own words, whether it be through esquire or twitter or to the new york times has been offensive to women and has said things that for most women, and in fact close to 70% of women in the united states of america say they don't like trump and think he's demeaning to women. >> donald trump's own words are the focus of a new ad by a super
tv-commercial
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pack spending $130 million attacking trump. this you're about to see is their first commercial and it will come out in the next couple days. >> you could see there was blood coming out of her eyes. blood coming out of her -- wherever. you like girls that are 5 foot 1, they come up to you know where. >> if ivanka wasn't my daughter, i'd probably be dating her. >> and you can tell them to go f -- themselves. >> does donald trump really speak for you? >> wendy, the theory out there is that all those statements from donald trump already baked into the cake, that isn't going to matter. if you're a critic, you say they're waisting their money. >> i don't think so. i think a lot of people have
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been misinformed or not focusing on who donald trump is. we all are involved so we think about it. people need to reminded of what kind of bully he's been and he hasn't been talking about policies and instead he's been offending people. it's not a reality tv show. this is about real people's lives. >> i want to get your reaction to what wendy said. but first, as a woman and a trump supporter, when you hear and see that attack ad on donald trump, what's your reaction to that? does that have any impact on you at all? >> yeah, absolutely. my immediate thought is he is a normal guy probably didn't plan to be president and the reason that works for him in such a significant portion of the voting populous out there isn't as concerned about that is simply because we have things
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like terror coming across our borders. we have a $19 trillion debt. the voteers have given both the republican establishment and the democrat establishment a chance to fix this and instead it seems to have gotten worse and worse. so, i think people see him and think he is an outsider and then i think they look one step further at hillary who's saying she's going to give bill a position and you look back at bill's record with women and even hillary's sweeping it under the rug and in some cases intimidating the women that bill abused allegedly. and you go, gosh, i don't know who is really better for women but i'm concerned with the $19 trillion debt and the fact that my family doesn't have a job. they're prioritizing oddly. >> yeah. you're saying there are other issues that are more important
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than what what he may or may not have said. hillary clinton on the campaign trail, spending her time mocking donald trump. listen to this. >> let's suppose -- here's the question. so, what is your plan to create jobs? his answer is i'm going to create them, they're going to be great. i know how to do it but i'm not telling you what it is i'm going to do. >> is that a fair point here? what hillary clinton is essentially saying is there's no policy there by donald trump and she's making this point by making fun of him? >> yeah, i hear that a lot. and i look at his website and i don't understand why people continue to say there's no policy because there is policy out there. hillary has essentially admitted she would be a third-term of the obama administration, whereby
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now one in five families don't have a single person in that family employed. something is not working about the establishment rule in this country and i think people see a business whose man and say at least it looks to me that the way the voters are responding at this point. >> wendy? >> i think the important part is hillary clinton's been talking about issues. the fact there should be equal pay for women. about the fact that we need to look at job creation across this country and child care for so many of the families that want to be able to go to work but can't afford child care in this country. she's talking about the issues and i think her point is we haven't heard what trump is really talking about and his policies are and when he does, he flips and flops about minimum wage and whether there should be one or not. american people want to know how they're going to get through the
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next month and have a job and provide for their children. >> i think we all agree this will be a race to the gutter in some respects. we had this interview in the new york times. he plans to throw bill clinton's infidelities in hillary clinton's face. just getting nasty with hillary won't work. you have to get people to look hard at their character and get women to ask them selves if she's truly sincere because she's been really ugly in trying to destroy bill's mistresses. is this really the kind of presidential campaign that republicans want to run? >> well, the thing that i think is significant about bill's mistresses is number one that she does plan to include him in her administration. she brought him back into the this picture, which does sort of make him fair game. paula jones was paid $850 thousand to shut up, that
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hillary intimidated many of these women. juanita whose lip she says was bitten through. if she would say those things that my husband and i let go and hid and swept under the rug in the name of politics, during my husband'sed administration were inexcusable, i apologize. but we're not hearing that from her. i think that honestly, it's a fair game topic when hillary has handled it the way she has. i don't think it's fair to the women who are victims of bill clinton and many have never had an apology of any kind. >> the argument is that beyond what gina is saying that you get one, you get the other. bill clinton's now being charged with fixing the economy. >> i think if we look back at the administration of bill clinlten and the reduction in
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the deficit. we had a strong economy. we were at a time when people in this country felt as though our country was getting better. so, when you say i'm going to look at my husband and he's had good ideas. he has a proven track record. we're going to be a partner in that. hillary clinton is going to be the kind of person she's always been. which is she's principaled and she's going to fight for the american people. >> she said bill clinton would be in charge of fixing the economy. and today when asked if he would be in the cabinet. look at her reaction here. this is when she was asked if he would be in the cabinet and shook her head wildly and said no, he's not going to be in the cabinet. are they walking him back here, wendy? >> no, she will count him as an
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advisor, as she always a has. the most important thing is that hillary clinton is going to focus on breaking down the barriers for families who want to succeed. she knows about foreign policy. when you tink about the kinds of reaction we've had across this world to a donald trump presidency, they're scared what that's going to mean for the united states and this world. she's going to bring people together. >> is that a fair point? we've heard from the london mayor, the british prime minister, there are concerns about donald trump, his temperament, the temporary ban for muslims. if he's elected president, will have to work with allies of the united states. >> actually, many foreign leaders have reached out to donald trump and said they want to have conversations with him now that he is the presumptive nominee because he is the one
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who's said he's going to bring jobs back. he's going to stop the influx that is causing crime. i live on the border. i know the crime. i see it every day and i know it's the immigrants in this country that are most damaged. the jobs are taken from them and the violence is on the the immigrants in this country. so, he's taken those issues head on and said the establish in both parties have failed this country economically, from a foreign policy standpoint and a security standpoint. while you compare that with hillary clinton who's vowed to destroy the coal industry, who will do nothing when you think about jobs like the keystone pipeline and she's done nothing to disavow the current administration and the ones prior that have let us to get to a place of doubling our debt in just last the eight years and
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eliminating 1/5 of families from the work force entirely. something has to change right now. $19 trillion of debt strapped around the neck of our children. i don't know if that's what voters can stomach for much more, john. >> i want to finish with john kasich. he spoke exclusively to cnn. and he was asked in particular if he had been approached by somebody, anybody about this third party independent run. he said he had been, wouldn't say who called but had this to say. >> we're not a third party kind of a country. just to run a campaign to block somebody to me -- at the same time, i wanted to win and get to an open convention, my basic deal was not to stop somebody else. it was to be about the ideas i had. >> so, wendy, what does it say
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to you that some republicans would be willing to blow up their own party? >> i think what we're seeing every day is that donald trump is a reality tv star, not a presidential candidate. kasich included in that. when i asked if he was going to indorse donald trump, he said my daughters and my wife are watching. i think that speaks volumes about his concern and every one of us who see our children watching what donald trump says and what he stands for is not what america wants. >> do you have concerns with children listening to a campaign rally? >> i have real concerns and as a mother, i have a special needs child and i have big concerns with how obama care is failing our country and hillary said she will expand that.
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t right now hillary and donald seem to be tied, as you've seen, and that's very unusual at this stage of an election. so, there's something he's saying that's really resonating with the american public. they're concern woued with the bigger picture and don't want to get in the gender identity politics, the victimization that constantly takes place. i think they want to talk about what is great about groups of pepp people and many see donald trump as a real vehicle to that. >> we'll end it there. but thank you both for coming in. it's been a great discussion and donald trump the candidate consta constantly underestimated all the way along. we'll have more on that new york times story and more on the newspaper's response to his out
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rage. and chaos at a nevada democratic convention.
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welcome back. everybody. coming up to 23 past 10:00 here in los angeles. hillary clinton is fighting on two fronts before primary contests in kentucky and oregon tuesday. she's going after republican donald trump and trying to slow bernie sanders' momentum. here's senior washington correspondent. >> reporter: john, as hillary clinton travelled across kentucky today, it's clear she's facing two rivals but spent most of her time talking about donald trump. mathematically speaking she would lose kentucky and oregon and still keep her lead in d delega delegates. >> i'll tell you what the truth is and you know it's time people stop listening to republican pop gand aa aau -- propaganda about
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economy, education and health care. >> reporter: but she had a more urgent task in mind today, her battle with bernie sanders. she's hoping to interrupt his recent winning streak. campaigning in kentucky on the eve of tuesday's primary. >> i want to help bring back the kind of economy that worked for everybody in the 1990s. >> reporter: and revealing more about bill clinton and his role in her white house. >> i've already told my husband that if i'm so fortunate enough to be president and he will be the first gentleman, i expect him to go to work. >> reporter: it's another way to fire up democrats. offering two clintons for the price of one. she wants nothing more than to focus exclusively on donald trump. >> so, he's the question -- >> reporter: even envisioning
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what a debate with him would sound like. >> i'm going to create them, it's going to be great. i know how to do it but i'm not going to tell you what it is i'm going to do. >> reporter: sanders campaigning today in puerto rico and trying to speak spanish. and clinton is only 140 delegates away from hitting the marc needed to hit the party's nomination. she needs to win 60% of the remaining delegates. sanders needs 102%. an unreachable goal. no matter the size of her lead, some sanders supporteders simply won't accept it. raw tensions at the democratic convention. booing, shouting. even a chair being thrown. the fight growing so intense over delegates, they're shutting
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down the meeting early. but this democratic family feud may seem polite compared to hillary's fight with trump. he's the one person democratic leaders believe can unify their party. >> i've been called everything but i've never been called a quitter and i will not quit on you. >> she's trying to clarify remarks about bill clinton's role. he would not be in a cabinet position. and going forward, it's clear she's not going to clinch the nomination after kentucky and oregon, she will not hit that magic number until she reaches the california primary here on june 7th. john. thacnks for that. los angeles times columnist is a
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pulitzer prize columnist. i want to get back to the story with donald trump. because we've seen on all networks, she was on cnn a couple times, recently a couple of hours ago, essentially saying she was misquoted and the piece was a hit piece. >> they misquoted me. what they did was put part of what i said together. basically, you could spin it anyway you want if you're a spin doctor. i just didn't like the way it came off. i asked several times if it was a negative piece because i didn't have anything negative to say about my experience with donald. >> among his tweets, he put this out there. the failing new york time sz embarrassed by the totally
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dishonest story they did on my relationship. and we're getting word from a trump campaign aid that he's considering suing the new york times. do you think, as an experienced reporter, does he have a case? >> as a reporter experienced in dealing with donald trump, i think he is considering saying he's going to sue. i think the chances he'll follow through are close to nil and the chan chances he could win a libel suit against the new york times are less than nil. it's basically libel proof. he's a public figure. there was nothing libelous in it. and if you read through the entire piece, it was in fact very strong. it had a lot of quotes, stories from women not necessarily roan lane, but many of the others who have worked for him. many of them told similar
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stories about how this is a guy you work for, as long as you can give him what he wants, whether it's companionship, friendship, or make money for him, then he treats you very well. but the moment that ceases, he treats you very badly. he's demeaning, basically his behavior is detestable. he starts criticizing your periods as a woman, criticizes your behavior. this is the donald trump i think we've come to know in his public statements about women. >> the new york time s is standing by the story and the reporters who wrote the story explained what they were trying to do. >> the big picture is we're talking about a pattern of behavior, the way donald trump interakt interacts privately. the world knows how he talks to or about a woman from twitter or the howard stern show.
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hour goal was to pull back and say how does he interact in the office with somebody he's dating or trying to date? and that is why meagan and i spoke to dozens of women who walked us through those interactions. and frequently there was a power dynamic at play. this is a very wealthy man with a lot of connections and influence and it's something that i think harbored over a lot of these interactions. >> and this controversy plays into trump's trengt strengths. the media are out to get me. >> if you drill down into the story, you saw a lot of reporting on behavior that was frankly detestable, demeaning to women. if you give somebody like donald trump a small opening, he will drive a truck through it. i think he's managed, at least for his own supporters, to have
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discredited the story. but i don't think the story is discredited or discreditable. it supported, as the reporter said, the description of the way he behaves and conformed with how he treats women in public and on the campaign trail. >> thank you for coming in and talking about what is obviously an ongoing story and highly critical story of a donald trump and one he oblae did not like. when we come back, our doctors in the u.s. have a landmark procedure that could some day help wounded veterans. home, car, life insurance obviously, ohhh... but with added touches you can't get everywhere else, like claim free rewards... or safe driving bonus checks. even a claim satisfaction guaranteeeeeeeeeee!
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thanks for staying with us everybody. you're watching cnn newsroom live from los angeles. donald trump is lashing out against the new york times, calling its in-depth look at his relationships with women a fraud and a hit piece. a former girlfriend says the times spun her comments to make trump look bad. time sz stas is standing by the saying none of the facts are in dispute. and during a rally in kentucky, hillary clinton mocked what she thought trump hypothet. john kasich is making it clear he will not reenter the race as a third party candidate and he declined to indorse trump and
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ini emphasized he would not be his running mate. they call it the first successful pen transplant in the united states. doctors are optimistic he'll regain full function. here with the story. >> reporter: 64-year-old thomas manning suffered a debilitating accident. his out look was bleak until this first in the nation penile implant. doctors say he's progressing forward through a path of recovery. >> he's doing amazing. i'm really impressed with how well he's handling things and he's a positive person and his out look is he wants to share this technology with others. >> reporter: many survives say they suffer in silence. now through this ground breaking procedure, doctors' aim is three fold. >> number one, replace the gen
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tailia, and number two, restore function of the urinary tract and three, potentially achieving sexual function. >> they have only performed this twice before. once in china that ended in failure after a couple days and another in south africa which resulted in the birth of a healthy baby last year. and here with us now. doctor, congratulations to you, your team and your patient, thomas matting. what's your prognosis now? is he expected to regain full function? >> the goals were first to restore normal external gen tailia and i think we've achieved that and secondary, normal urinary function and that's a couple weeks away and after that, achieving sexual function and that's going to take time for the nerves to grow
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back but we're very hopeful it will work. he's doing very well so far. very positive person and positive patient. we couldn't ask for more as drz from a patient. we're very hopeful. >> have you learned enough now from this procedure for you to consider it safe and effective? >> it's ongoing. we're cautiously aumoptimistic. we're hopeful that we can eve eventually achieve success and extend them to younger patients and particularly wounded warriors. that's been our goal from the start is to be able to restore men and women -- mostly men who have given the ultimate sacrifice and lost urinary tissue and we hope to eventually be able to restore that kind of tissue in those patients. >> because many u.s. veterans
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who are listening to this news today, this gives them the kind of hope which i guess they haven't had up until this point. the big question is how long before those soldiers may be -- or this procedure will be available for wounded soldiers? >> well, i think we have to proceed cautiously and do a couple cases at a time. but i'm hopeful we can start soon. this is a devastating problem for these young warriors and they've -- they're very despondent and some of them even consider taking their own lives. so, we're hopeful we can make it happen quickly because they need us and we have a way to make it happen and we're going to make it work as best we can as soon as we can. >> you said this is an incredibly complicated procedure. can you liken it to any procedure that are almost routine now?
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to maybe a hand transplant or anything along those lines? >> yeah, that's a great question. we have the abilities from a microsurgical standpoint to make this operation routine. i think it's something certainly within our wheel house and attainable in the short term. so, we're hopeful. it's uncharted waters for us in a way, so we need to make sure we can manage the immunological issues of rejection as well as we can with a hand or face. so, until we have a little more data and cases from which to draw our experiences frumom, we won't really know that answer. but our experience as a surgeon lets us know this is possible and hopefully we can make it a success and then broaden the application to many more patients. >> as far as mr. manning is
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concerned, will he have to take drugs for the rest of his life so the body doesn't reject the transplant? >> yes. that's a great question. he absolutely will and he's committed to that. part of the equation for us. i mean, technically, we can do these operations very successfully but the bigger hurtle is getting rid of the drugs that are needed to prevent rejection and our lab is working very hard at that to eliminate that problem and -- but as i said, that's the second part of this equation. you need to make sure it works technically, surgically and then we can move on to that problem. >> he's a great patient on so many levels. he wants to remove the stigma assoc associated with genital cancers. >> he's a pioneer here and we're
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very grateful he's been so willing to share his experiences and really share his pain. even before this transplant, he counselled other patients and he wants to do so more. he's so patriotic, he wants to make sure this works for a young wounded warriors and we're very grateful he is that way and we're hopeful this procedure we're working on which we're learning as we go along in a way irk withes for him. we're in this together. so, we all want the same end point and hopefully we can get there. >> okay. doctor, congratulations and we wish you and your patient, mr. manning, all the very best. >> thank you very much. the u.s. is advising americans not to go to north korea. not that they ever recommended it in the first place. why the state department has issued a travel warning hi how are you?
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the u.s. state department has issued a stepped up travel warning for north korea. not an out right ban. concern over pyongyang is growing after a series of weapons tests. details from todd. >> reporter: america and its allies gearing up to defend against kim jong-un's aggressive missile defense. warships will join south korea and japan to conduct anti-missile drills off the coast of hawaii next month. the war ships designed to shoot down long range missile won't be targeting a missile that's fired. they'll be tracking a plane standing in for a missile. sharing intelligence on its trajectory. >> if one of them detects a missile launch, he can pass it off thuo the other country.
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>> they say this is a clear respontaneous to his missile tests. he detonated a nuclear bomb in january. and then last month, he fired a ballistic missile from a submarine and blasted a medium range missile off a mobile launcher. a test that has experts worried. >> this missile has mobility. north korea can take it to multiple locations and launch practically undetected. >> a key question now. if kim launches multiple missiles simultaneously, could the u.s. and its allies shoot them down? >> with a greater number, a greater sacheration, it becomes more difficult. >> reporter: and that's just the threat from longer range missiles. the most immediate threat to south korea and the american troops there is kim jong-un's artillery and short-range missiles which wouldn't be detected in advance. there's a no-win scenario
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that keeps everybody awake at night. >> reporter: at the military stand off simmers with north korea, diplomatic tensions escalate. the state department says don't travel to north korea. the state department's been so frustrated with americans going to north korea and getting in trouble, that this comes with a list, details of things americans can do in pyongyang that will get them arrested. any religious activities, taking pictures where you shouldn't, going shopping where you shouldn't and in the clear case of bear, they worn you can be arrested in pyongyang for tampering with or removing political signs. >> and we'll take a short break. when we come back, amazon's echo device, artificial intelligence which could be creating new
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world of art 23i8ificial intelle with a new device called echo. >> alexa, what time is it? >> 6:24. >> what's the meaning of life? >> it depends on the life in question. >> alexa, turn the lights on. apple has siri. google has now those voice assistants that live in your phone or tablet. amazon's alexa lives in your home. she dwells in a series of amazon devices with a microphone always listening for you to say the wake word. amazon's making a huge push into two different market trends with this device. artificial intelligence as well as the internet of things projected to be a $14 trillion market. and even though amazon doesn't
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disclose sales numbers, investors are bullish on this sleeper hit. >> what's interesting about this product is that apple doesn't have one of these yet. there's a rumor that google is going to introduce theirs. but this is the first truly smart home hub that wee've seen that people are using and getting great reviews and that makes sense. >> you don't have to be nearby for it to hear you. alexa, who 1 are ewon the warrie last night? >> the warriors beat the trail blazers 125-121. >> it's making the family more acquainted with everything amazon offers. >> i want to hear cold play songs. >> shuffling cold play. >> just like amazon's other hardware products, they're always trying to inties you to
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pay for time. alexa, turn the volume up. >> reporter: placing an internet connected microphone in the middle of your house may leave some with privacy concerns. they say it will only start listening wunonce you say "alex" though a curious reporter asked if it had ever wire tapped using the echo. the fbi would neither confirm or deny. and instead of apps, amazon says the echo has skills. over 1,000 of them and services from company like uber, smart home devices and news updates from cnn. >> alexa, who is cnn's samuel burke? >> sorry, i can't find the answer to the question i heard. >> clearly, artificial inhadtelligeninhad
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te e -- intelligence has a ways to go. >> and the most disturbing part of that report is that samuel burke lissens to coldplay. and newsroom continues after this. what a lovely home you have. is this your family? yea, that's my daughter, my son, and that's my... hey, kool-aid man! ...husband. oh yeah!!! [ crashing ] [ electricity crackles ] hey at least you got your homeowners insurance through progressive. by bundling it with your car insurance you saved a ton! yeah. do you want to see the rest of the house? -i can actually see a lot of it. -oh. don'tlive in paris. when you airbnb, you have your own home. so, live there.
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donald trump is accusing "the new york times" of libel after a damning report about his treatment of women. plus as isis suffers losses on the battlefield, it's launching more terrorist attacks in cities. and later this hour, gays and lesbians fearing for their lives in bangladesh. cnn speaks to some too afraid to show their faces. >> hello and welcome to our viewers here in the united states and all around the world. i'm rosemary church. >> and i'm errol barnett. thanks for joining our two-hour block. this is "cnn newsroom." in just a matter of hours, voters on opposite sides of the united states will cast ballots in the latest round of presidential primaries. >> kentucky already held its
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republican primary, so it's just the democrats there this time with 61 delegates at stake. in oregon, 74 democratic delegates are up for grabs, and 28 for the republicans. >> the media scrutiny of donald trump has ramped up since he became the presumptive republican nominee, and he's responding by going on the offensive. >> sara murray reports he's lashing out against an in-depth report on his past behavior with women. >> reporter: donald trump is going to war with the media yet again. this time, taking aim at "the new york times" for a front-page story highlighting tales of trump appearing to objectify women and make unwelcome advances. today one of the women featured in the piece, who once dated trump, says her story was misrepresented. >> i made it very clear many times that i had a very pleasant relationship with donald and that i never felt like i was being, you know, depicted as a
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piece of meat or anything like that. i was never offended by anything that he had said. >> reporter: prompting trump to call the story a hit piece on twitter, adding, we have exposed the article as a fraud. the story reveals instances of trump critiques women's figures, giving a pageant contestant an unwanted kiss on the lips, and promoting women to high-profile corporate positions even as he made comments that some viewed as demeaning and dismissive. the reporters who interviews dozens of women are standing by their piece. >> i think it makes it clear through the voices of the people we interviewed. >> reporter: the transition means even more media scrutiny for trump. last week it was a washington post story on the billionaire businessman posing as his own spokesman. >> mr. trump is the real-life inspiration for iron man.
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who am i? i'm his fullbapublicist, joey pepperoni. >> reporter: critiquing struing plan to bar muslims from the u.s. and calling him ignorant without ever calling him out by name. >> in politics and in life, ignorance is not a virtue. it's not cool to not know what you're talking about. [ laughter ] that's not keepin' it real or tellin' it like it is. that's not challenging political correctness. that's just not knowing what you're talking about. >> reporter: all of this as some gop leaders, including 2012 gop nominee mitt romney and weekly standard editor bill kristol, are still trying to recruit a third-party candidate to take on trump. it's an effort the rnc chair denounced as a suicide mission. >> look, it's a suicide mission for our country because what it means is that you're throwing
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down not just eight years of the white house but potentially 100 years on the supreme court and wrecking this country for many generations. >> reporter: now while donald trump has clearly taken the approach of slamming the media organization that has been digging into his past and saying that anything in this "new york times" report has been untrue, what his campaign so far has not done is take a cohesive approach to prove donald trump's numbers with women. he does have very high unfavorable among female voters and that's something he's going to have to deal with if he hopes to be victorious in november. sara murray, cnn, washington. >> joining me now from our new york bureau is republican strategist brian morgan stern, who was previously supporting marco rubio for the republican nomination. thank you so much for talking with us again. >> my pleasure. >> well, the trump campaign has spent the last few days putting out fires on various issues including his behavior with
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women. and now a former trump girlfriend is disputing "the new york times" version of her account of events. what impact is all this likely to have on the trump campaign given his negatives with women voters? >> well, time will tell. it's obviously, as you mentioned, it's sort of damage control and trying to change perception. and the way trump, you know, the campaign rolls things out like this, it's entertaining. it gets into the nitty-gritty. it involves new characters and personalities in this performance art that has been the campaign thus far. so people will pay attention. so to the extent that it's effective, you know, it's going to reach a wide audience. but in terms of voting, obviously the primaries are largely over on the republican side. so this will be borne out with polling data as we, you know, get closer to the general election and there are more statistics for us to analyze along those lines.
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>> over the weekend, there was a lot made of trump apparently pretending to be his own p.r. guy some years back. is this all just to distract from him failing to release his taxes as some people have suggested, or is this what we're going to see from now right up until november? >> it is sort of classic trump in that it is this, you know, weird sort of conspiracy theory where there's like a smidge of deniability but not really. and it captivated people. i mean it's such a bizarre behavior and sort of funny and a little bit harmless. but it's something that is going to be reported on because it is so weird that to the extent he's trying to distract, if that's the goal, it's certainly working. it also just keeps his name at the top of the headlines and continues to captivate people with, you know, how strange a character donald trump is. >> and then, of course, in an interview on itv's good morning britain, trump responded to
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british prime minister david cameron calling him divisive, stupid, and wrong in regards to his temporary ban on all muslims. trump said he's not stupid. how does that play out for republicans? is it embarrassing? is it cringeworthy? >> i think that when a world leader calls out an american, the natural response at least oftentimes on the republican side is they want a tough guy. so trump coming out saying, you know, i'm not stupid, and you're not starting our relationship off very well, you know, basically coming out with that sort of a strong stance is the sort of reaction most republican primary voters would want. >> then of course as this all plays out, we are seeing more of how trump and hillary clinton will likely target each other. lots of attacks on character of course and calls for policy details. now the bill clinton factor in regards to the economy. what advice would you give each side if you were in the driver's seat for each campaign right now?
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>> well, obviously jobs, jobs, jobs. but the other side of the coin is that in addition to informing the american people how you're going to get the economy going again, how you're going to protect them from terrorism -- and those are probably the two key issues. in addition to that, it's going to be telling them why your opponent shouldn't win, and expect that to be a key focus. because negativity drives voter turnout often more than poztist. and obviously hillary has already telegraphed she's going to come out and say donald is a loose cannon. he's already telegraphed he's going to call her corrupt because of the e-mail controversy with classified information being on her own personal e-mail server. i don't expect either one of them to pull any punches. this is going to be a battle royale, and i think everybody is gearing up for it. >> and negativity as you mentioned, we'll see how it all develops.
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brian morganstern, thank you so much. pleasure to talk with you. >> my pleasure. meanwhile john kasich, anyone remember him? he is crushing the hopes of some in the republican party. in an exclusive interview, the former presidential candidate declined to endorse trump and further emphasized how he's not inclined to even consider being trump's running mate. as for a third-party run, listen. >> we're not a third-party kind of a country. you know, and just to run a campaign to block somebody, to me -- see, because at the same time, i wanted to win, and i wanted to get to an open convention. my basic deal was not to stop somebody else. it was to be about the ideas i had. >> tuesday's primaries in oregon and kentucky are the next contest for democrats hillary clinton and bernie sanders. >> but clinton is also sparring with donald trump as she tries to outrun sanders. it's a difficult maneuver.
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senior washington correspondent jeff zeleny has more on this angle. >> i'll tell you what the truth is, and you know it's time people stop listening to republican propaganda about the economy, education, and health care. >> reporter: but before she can take on republicans, hillary clinton had a more urgent task in mind today. >> pledged delegates. >> reporter: her battle with bernie sanders. she's hoping to interrupt sanders' recent winning streak. campaigning across kentucky on the eve of tuesday's primary. >> i want to bring back the kind of economy that worked for everybody in the 1990s. >> reporter: and revealing more about bill clinton and his role in her white house. >> i've already told my husband that if i'm so fortunate enough to be president and he will be the first gentleman, i expect him to go to work. >> reporter: it's another way to fire up democrats. offering two clintons for the
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price of one. she wants nothing more than to focus exclusively on donald trump. >> here's the question. so what is your plan to create jobs? >> reporter: even envisioning what a debate with him would sound like. >> his answer is, i'm going to create 'em. they're going to be great. i know how to do it, but i'm not telling you what it is i'm going to do. >> reporter: but sanders isn't going quietly. campaigning today in puerto rico and trying to speak spanish. >> el pueblo depuerto rico -- >> reporter: clinton is only 140 delegates away from hitting the mark needed to reach the party's nomination. she needs to win only 16% of the remaining delegates. sanders needs 102%, an unreachable goal unless a flood of super delegates suddenly came his way. no matter the size of her lead, some sanders' supporters simply won't accept it. raw tensions on display at the
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weekend nevada democratic convention. booing, shouting, even a chair being thrown. the fight growing so intense over delegates, authorities shutting down the meeting early. this democratic family feud may seem polite compared to what's awaiting clinton in her fight with trump. >> this is crooked hillary clinton. >> reporter: he's the one person democratic leaders believe can unify their party. >> i've been called nearly everything, but i've never been called a quitter. and i will not quit on you. >> reporter: now, her campaign is trying to clarify some of those remarks she made about exactly what role bill clinton would serve in her administration. she said he would not be in her cabinet at all, and her spokesman said it's a bit premature to offer any formalized role because she does not of course have the nomination. there is no doubt she is looking forward to taking on donald trump. she will not hit that magic
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threshold of delegates until she reaches the california primary on june 7th. jeff zeleny, cnn, los angeles. >> joining me now is theron johnson. he's a former regional director for president obama's 2012 campaign. secretary clinton is working hard to woo those kentucky voters. she's offering bill clinton as an economy czar. she made almost a dozen campaign stops in the state, flooding the airwaves in ads. how badly does she need the kentucky win for upticks and for her narrative. >> i was very happy to see that the campaign is spending time in kentucky because quite frankly, errol, this is what they're really supposed to be doing right now. but the tough position that hillary clinton is in right now is that at a time where she pretty much has the nomination clinched, i mean she's only 133 delegates away from basically sealing the nomination, but she's got to spend time in kentucky because bernie sanders
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has been pretty much on a winning streak and winning some key democratic primary states. now, one of the things that i was very happy to hear was her tone in kentucky. i mean she's talking about again strengthening the middle class, talking about making sure we do everything we can to strengthen the affordable care act. she also was talking about jobs, but particularly around the issues of stagnation with women workers. and so at a time where she's in a state that probably is not going to go for her in november, but she would stay on message, which is a general election message so that shee'l b prepared to go and beat donald trump in november. >> but she still has this bernie sanders issue. i mean what happened in nevada? you got bernie sanders' supporters there who were essentially ready to throw chairs they were so upset at delegate rules changing in a way that negatively impacted their candidate. could should outrage show itself again? >> no. i think what -- one thing about what's going on on the democratic side right now is if
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you talk to most voters, whether they're a bernie sanders supporter or a hillary clinton supporter, they all agree that we've got to be unified to beat donald trump in november. now, bernie sanders, i think, stopped running for president, airliner, about a month and a half ago, and that's when he figured out it was basically mathematically inconceivable that he could be the nominee for the democratic party. however, with him staying in the race, the clinton campaign has got to be a little frustrated because they know that they pretty much have this in the bag. but bernie sanders consequently cannot ignore his voters. at a time when this day was raising $40 million in one month, he's racked up a lot of wins in some key primary states, he's got to stay in the race and stay strong. but ultimately what hillary clinton cannot do is allow bernie sanders, with his speech that he's really been giving for the last 30 years, drive her to the left. she's got to stay middle, kind of middle-right and remain sort of a centrist candidate that can be able to go up and beat donald trump in november. >> well, i can feel some bernie
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sanders supporters getting ready to throw chairs at the tv right now with you saying he ended his campaign. they would disagree. clinton, we've seen she's starting to mock donald trump. this is something he does regularly to his opponents. but will that work for her? will calling him a loose cannon when his unconventional style is part of his appeal really benefit the clinton campaign? >> listen, i think that she's basically saying and what everyone is seeing from donald trump since the day he decided he wanted to run for president in 2016. i mean this is a gentleman who has shown a total disrespect for women. i mean you've seen the polls. he's doing terrible with women voters. i mean he now says that, i want to ban all muslims coming into the u.s. then he comes back last week and says i didn't really mean all muslims. i only mean some muslims and a temporary ban. look, we all agree on the democratic side that donald trump does not have the temperament nor the experience, nor the policy ideas to go and
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basically lead the united states of america. and so i think what you're going to see from hillary clinton is a stronger approach with stronger language to really remind the american people when the two are facing each other that this is a race about the future. and this guy is clearly promoting hatred. he's living in the past, and i think that those two visions are going to be front and center, and i think the american people are going to basically make the right choice. and that choice is going to be hillary clinton. >> lots of important issues of course, but it's a face-off we all do want to see. fireworks are guaranteed. tharon johnson, thanks for your time today. >> thank you. a neighborhood in syria's capital is struggling to recover after five years of war. but now some rebels are putting down their weapons. we will look at whether reconciliation can have a lasting effect in the country. we're back with that and more. (announcer) need to hire fast?
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and otezla's prescribing information has no requirement for routine lab monitoring. don't take otezla if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. otezla may increase the risk of depression. tell your doctor if you have a history of depression or suicidal thoughts, or if these feelings develop. some people taking otezla reported weight loss. your doctor should monitor your weight and may stop treatment. side effects may include diarrhea, nausea, upper respiratory tract infection, and headache. tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, and if you're pregnant or planning to be. ask your dermatologist about otezla today. otezla. show more of you. welcome back, everyone. iraqi forces are fighting to retake key towns held by isis, particularly mosul. >> a u.s. envoy says the militant group has ramped up terror attacks in the country to
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make up for territorial losses. chief u.s. security correspondent jim sciutto has more. >> reporter: isis strikes again inside iraq. the latest target, a natural gas plant in the capital, baghdad, killing ten. a string of deadly attacks by the terror group in the last seven days has left more than 100 dead and 200 wounded. u.s. special envoy brett mcgurk visiting jordan says isis is resorting to terror to make up for a series of losses on the battlefield. >> it relies on suicide attacks or getting spectacular headlines. >> reporter: the u.s. is now trying to add to isis' battlefield. working with local security forces and local tribes to retake the strategically important town halfway between jordan's capital, amman, and baghdad. but the bigger prize is mosul. under isis control for nearly two years, iraq's second largest city is the target of repeated
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coalition air strikes and intelligence operations. >> we have already begun the process of isolating daesh in mosul. we are doing precision air strikes in mosul almost every day. we have a lot of information from working with the people who are inside mosul about what daesh is doing inside the city. >> reporter: president obama has vowed to retake mosul before he leaves office. >> my expectation is that by the end of the year, we will have created the conditions whereby mosul will eventually fall. >> reporter: but now the timeline appears to be sliding once again. the nation's top intelligence chief telling "the washington post," quote, we will retake mosul, but it will take a long time and be very messy. i don't see that happening in this administration. in syria, the u.s. may soon be fighting on two fronts with osama bin laden's successor warning that al qaeda will soon establish its own caliphate in the region.
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>> our jim sciutto reporting there. in syria, the government claims local reconciliation efforts are working to help persuade rebels to lay down their arms. but the u.n. does not have a lot of faith in that. >> yeah, it wants nationwide reconciliation to end the distrust throughout the country. cnn's fred pleitgen in a part of damascus that's been ravaged by fighting and is only now returning to a semblance of normalcy. >> reporter: like so many places in syria, the ca.com neighborhood in damascus is scarred by five years of war. but now some civilians are returning. >> translator: i was forced out of here three years ago. this is the first time i'm able to go back. >> reporter: the syrian army says a local reconciliation project helped silence the guns here. enticing some rebels like this man to lay down their arms. i think reconciliation like this
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is the only way forward, he says, even though it might take some time for many rebels to latch onto the idea. the syrian military claims between 150 and 200 rebels have defected in kadam, leading to a dramatic drop in violence. as you can see, there's widespread destruction here in this front line neighborhood. but believe it or not, the military commander for this district says it could have been even worse. they wouldn't have had the reconciliation program and if the fighting would have gone on even longer. but the united states and the u.n. are skeptical of programs like this one. instead of local projects, they want to strengthen a nationwide cease-fire in syria and jump start the political reconciliation process for the whole country. many rebel factions also don't trust the syrian government, believing they'll be locked up or worse if they lay down their guns. but this member of the kadam reconciliation council shows me
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lists of names he claims proves that many rebels are taking up the government's offer. the names in green are the ones who have been accepted into national reconciliation, he says. so they are now free to go anywhere without fearing punishment. while this project may have yielded some results in this neighborhood of syria's capital, the u.n. believes or nationwide reconciliation backed and supervised by powerful nations like the u.s. and russia can overcome the distrust between the warring factions and move the effort to end syria's civil war forward. >> fred will join us live next hour from damascus to discuss his report. gay activists in bangladesh already operate underground. we'll see how they're responding to a series of brutal murders. more on that coming up after this. there's no one road out there. no one surface... no one speed...
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we are half an hour into our two-hour block. a warm welcome back to those of you watching here in the states and everyone tuned in around the world. i'm errol barnett. >> and i'm rosemary church. we want to update you on the top stories we've been watching this hour. hillary clinton is fighting hard for votes in kentucky ahead of tuesday's primary. she's battling democratic rival bernie sanders there and in oregon. the only republican left, donald trump, will likely win most of the delegates in oregon. kentucky's republican caucuses were back in march. another mexican federal judge has granted a request to move drug kingpin joaquin el chapo guzman to the u.s. federal courts in texas and california have requested guzman's extradition. mexico's foreign ministry will ultimately decide whether el chapo stays or goes. doctors have performed the first successful penis transplant in the united states. 64-year-old thomas manning's penis was amputated four years
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ago due to cancer. the operation took 15 hours and a team of more than 50 surgeons, doctors and nurses. apple shares rose more than 3% in trading on monday. revered investor warren buffett may deserve the credit. his conglom rate disclosed monday it bought more than 9.8 million shares in apple earlier this year. that's a $1 billion investment. apple shares are still down 14% this year as investors worry about slowing iphone demand. the underground gay community in bangladesh has been living in fear after several brutal murders there. >> cnn's alexandra field visited and spoke with members of the lgbt community who say they feel they're being hunted. >> reporter: your friends have
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disappeared. ? >> yet, the big shots have disappeared. >> reporter: because they're afrayed? >> that's normal. they should be afraid. i don't know if they should be, but this is the situation is right now. >> reporter: in bangladesh, a country of 160 million people, lgbt activists are living in the shadows. >> before it was just, know, not accepting people. now it's killing people. >> reporter: how many of your friends have just left, left the country? >> one girl, she left the country. i know another girl, she left the country, and they're not going to come back. why they should come back actually? to die? >> reporter: bangladesh's lgbt community and their supporters say they've been forced into hiding, in fear for their lives following the murder of two lgbt leade leaders, killings claimed by isis militants who call homosexuality unislamic. >> this is where the victims
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died, right inside this building. both men were gay rights activists, and they had been threatened before. police say that a group of five or six men posing as couriers burst into the building armed with machetes and hacked the men to death. one's mom and another woman were both inside. gay sex is outlawed in bangladesh where the victims were pushing boundaries by publishing the first lgbt magazine. those connected to the publication say it was risky from the start. even the printers received threats. but it was bringing hope to people who had little. >> we are treated like we are born in wrong way. we have no rights to stay in this world, and we have no right to love someone. >> reporter: we're protecting the identity of two secular bloggers and this university student, who said he's routinely teased and taunted for his sexuality. now the threat is getting worse.
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when you started posting and writing in support of marriage equality, did you realize you were putting yourself in danger? >> i'm just feeling like i'm writing for the truth. i'm writing for my right. but when i have written this, i have a feeling i'm in grave danger, and now i'm feeling like this. i'm really in danger, and i can be murdered at anywhere and at any time. >> reporter: manon's death leaves the future of his magazine unclear. that symbol of hope people are even now more desperate for. >> someone's alexandra field joins us now live from hong kong. alexandra, the details are horrifying, and the fear of persecution very real here. only one arrest at this point? what do authorities say about the possibility of tracking down all those involved in these crimes? >> reporter: right. there's the fear of persecution. obviously the concerns about prosecuting in these cases because as you point out, there has been just that one arrest related to the deaths of these two lgbt activists.
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of course police are hopeful that this arrest could lead them to track down some of the other five or six suspects who may have been involved in the killings that happened in that apartment. but frankly that hasn't been the case in a lot of these cases. we've seen a number of these machete murders across the country, targeting religious leaders, secular bloggers, religious minorities rather, academics, all manner of people now. and what we're seeing in each of these cases is there has been a real difficulty in identifying the suspects who are carrying out these attacks. there have been almost 50 arrests in total, but that doesn't mean that there are always convictions. in fact, there have only been a handful of convictions relate the to any of these cases, which is why you're hearing so many people that are demanding justice. they believe if more of these attackers can be found and prosecuted and convicted, that this could potentially begin to put a stop to some of these attacks which have intensified so much over the last weeks aina matter of months, rosemary. >> in the meantime, can we expect to see more people
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leaving the country as a result of this and the fear? >> reporter: you know, when you talk to these young people who are on the ground, who are living in this reality, a lot of them say that it's perhaps their only option. of course it isn't an option for everyone because these are people with connections to bangladesh. a lot of them are saying they cannot carry on this their normal day to day lives living this way. they talk about the fear of leaving the house and of returning to the house. a number of people we spoke to say they were not very public to start with. these weren't some of the most noted or well known secular and atheist bloggers. we're talking about regular people now who were posting things on facebook, which they believe could now put them in harm's way, rosemary. >> all right. alexandra field, just recently back from bangladesh with those disturbing reports there. appreciate that for talking with us. not all of the recent murder victims have openly criticized islam. in the second part of
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alexandra's series, you'll meet a young girl whose father was brutally hacked to death for seemingly no reason at all. >> why would someone like him be targeted? >> my father was a believer. there is no doubt. >> he wasn't an atheist? >> yes, he wasn't atheist. but he was interested in music, and a concept is bangladesh is growing nowadays that those people who are interested in music, culture, they are not believing in religion or something like that. >> hear her story and what she plans to do about it tuesday here on cnn. another story we're watching very closely, the u.s. is warning americans not to go to north korea. the state department is urging would-be travelers to reconsider for safety reasons. >> again, i think that's reflective of the increased tensions that we're seeing there on the peninsula and certainly the way -- manner in which the regime has acted out against foreigners on travel to north
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korea. so we take our responsibilities very seriously to travelers so that we give them as much information as we can before they travel, before they go overseas. and this is, i think, very much in keeping with our responsibilities to do that. >> north korea has been ramping up its weapons tests recently, which many western powers see as a provocation. on top of that, many analysts believe that they've been detaining american citizens for political leverage. hundreds of people rallied near north carolina's legislative building on monday to protest the state's transgender bathroom law. the law requires people to use facilities that match their gender at birth. >> the u.s. justice department and north carolina have sued each other over this measure. in a buzzfeed interview, u.s. president barack obama defended his administration's recent directive on school bathroom use. listen. >> we're talking about kids, and anybody who has been in school,
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in a high school, who's been a parent, i think should realize that kids who are sometimes in the minority, kids who, you know, have a different sexual orientation or are transgender are subject to a lot of bullying potentially. you know, they are vulnerable. and i think that it is part of our obligation as a society to make sure that everybody is treated fairly and our kids are all loved, and that they're protected and that their dignity is affirmed. >> north carolina governor pat mccrory disagrees. he slammed mr. obama's guidance and is calling on congress to address the issue. again a very short break here. still to come, thousands of manchester united fans were sent home on sunday after a bomb
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scare. we will introduce you to one fan who has found a silver lining to his initial disappointment. we're back with that. statement. make sure it's an intelligent one. ♪ the all-new audi a4, with available virtual cockpit. ♪ every ingredient is the main ingredient. whether it's big... or small.
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welcome back. the world wildlife fund is asking the mexican government to extend a ban on the net fishing in the waters of baja, california, to protect the world's smallest porpoise. >> the group says the vakita is nearing extinction there with reportedly only 60 left. the wwf says vaquitas are being caught in nets used illegally to
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catch fish which are a delicacy in china. >> translator: the chinese government and authorities have the responsibility of stopping the consumption of the air bladder of the fish. this demand is spurring this fishing in mexico. >> conservationists say the vaquita deaths is a warning for other fish species in the region. the month of april was the warmest april observed here on earth since record keeping back in 1880. our meteorologist joins us now to discuss what this means. i feel like we always report on there having been a warmest month ever. it's a continuing trend. >> we said the same thing in march, in february, and also january. in fact, since may of 2015, this pral being april 2016, 12 consecutive months where every single hottest month has occurred in the last tweleve months. it's an incredible pattern. not only are we getting to the
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hottest months on record, we're breaking them by an incredible margin. so we'll show you exactly what it means because here is the breakdown as far as the calendar outlook again going back to may of 2015, every single one of them circled. now hottest respective months going back to the year 1880. an incredible pattern breaking down across this region. this is a global average when you take in the sea surface temperatures, also the air temperatures in place. in fact, april at 1.11 degrees celsius above what is considered normal, among the highest departures from normal there with seven consecutive months now having the temperatures be one degree celsius above the previous record. three consecutive months also seen records with the largest margin. the basic gist of the story is they're breaking by a significant margin, not just a slight margin. notice the past five years, look at 2016, run ago way from the previous record holder of 2015 for the hottest year on our
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planet. i want to show you really a fascinating spiral graph here of what it looks like over the past 100-plus years. notice the red, the 1.5 degree celsius, the threshold you want to remain below and certainly b h below the 2 degrees celsius. as we go into the 80s, 90s, and 2000s. the graphic disappears upon us b you the temperature trend really expands out to getting closer to that 1.5 degree threshold which is of serious concern. in recent days, excessive heats across parts of india, where temperatures about 120 fahrenheit. in fact the hottest april temperature ever observed in baghdad occurred just a few weeks ago. they got up to 42 selszious. previous record was into the upper 30s. notice in the last 24 hours, parts of iraq, baghdad and also bass ra in iraq there, 47 celsius, guys, is 117 fine height. normally in the middle east in
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may, it's hot. it's 117 in the month of may. >> that's crazy. >> that's precisely what's happening. when you see this, i know you lived in parts of the middle east, errol, so you felt extreme heat. but we're seeing july/august temperatures in the month of may now. >> and it's frightening because it's going to be a very scorching hot summer for a lot of places and it's the young and elderly who really suffer from this. if there's a power outage, there's an emergency. >> and there's no relief a lot of the time. it you so much. south africa's first gay rugby club is shattering the sport's sfartereotypes. >> the great thing about this team is whether you're straight, gay or bisexual, you can be your self and play oven our rugby. >> what they're doing to break down barriers and recruit new players. back in a moment. i think it's important for everyone to know that there is so much more to memory support than the stigmas you hearabout.
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welcome back, everyone. thousands of fans were devastated. of course you'd remember after manchester united's match was canceled sunday by a bomb scare. later, police realized it was just a harmless training device. >> but the game had already been postponed until tuesday. well, one man who traveled all the way from sierra leone would
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have left empty handed if not for the generosity of others. earlier our christina macfarlane spoke to the lucky fan. >> reporter: the past 24 hours has seen an enormous amount of disruption here at old trafford for the security forces, for the police forces that turned out here, and for the bomb squad that was called to old trafford on sunday. but none more so than the fans. 75,000 of them who turned up here in expectation of seeing manchester united play bournemouth only to be turned away. and perhaps none more so than those who traveled a long distance to be here, like the gentleman standing alongside me, who has come all the way from sierra leone to be here. moses, tell me, why was it so important for you to come to this particular game? >> to be a manchester fan for 25 years and that's my dream to come here to watch the game, you know. i don't want just tv all the time. i just want to watch it myself in real life. that's my dream.
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i've been saving for a year now, and then i come here and it doesn't happen. >> reporter: how much did it cost you? >> $1,800, you know? >> reporter: what was your reaction when you heard the news on sunday that the match had been canceled for this device? >> to be honest, i was heartbroken. i was sad and cried. but to be a security officer, i understand the safety of the people comes number one. you know what i mean? i mean it's the right thing to do yesterday. safety. >> reporter: so you, yourself, are a security officer back home? >> back home at the art. so it mean a lot to mean when this happened and i cried because i want my dream to come to pass. but if there's a danger there, safety of the people comes number one. >> reporter: so tell us what's happening to you now because the supporters group have stepped in to help you. you're still here. there's a match to be played tomorrow. >> yeah. >> reporter: tell us what they've done. >> they help me, give me hugs, say, moses, don't worry, we'll take care of you. they give me accommodation to sleep, food to eat, and trade my
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ticket back home. then guess what, i'm going to watch two matches. i can't believe that. tomorrow and the final at wembley. that's the biggest -- >> reporter: you're off to wembley? >> yeah. >> reporter: what has the reaction been to the news you're now going to two matches, including wembley? i know they're huge manchester united supporters as well? >> they want pictures from me like to give them pictures to see what happens here, you know? i'm so excited to go share that with them definitely. >> reporter: it's going to be a high point. >> yeah, big thing. it's a big history in my life. i will never forget this. it's a big deal. >> reporter: thank you so much for speaking with us. enjoy the game. >> okay. i will. >> reporter: huge disruption, but as you can see, a silver lining for one fan in par tick lar. christina macfarlane, cnn, manchester. well in sports-crazed south africa, rugby equals manliness, but now the country's first gay
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rugby club is challenging stereotypes with a new campaign. >> here's david mckenzie. >> reporter: in south africa, rugby has always been for manner. rough translation, for real men. >> a lot of our rugby players are gay. to be openly gay in the environment could have been something akin to a hospital till environment. >> reporter: the jersey cats is africa's first gay rugby club, and they've put on a provocative campaign. posing for the camera. and using the very slurs they've heard on the playing field. to break down barriers and to recruit new players. it gets down right cheeky. >> the great thing about this rugby team is whether you're straight, gay, or bisexual, you can be just yourself and play on our rugby team. >> reporter: gay rugby is big with the world cup and more than 70 teams globally, but not here
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in rugby powerhouse south africa. >> why are we still having conversations 22 years into our democracy where we're still talking about inclusion in sports? >> reporter: even after tonight's loss, still reason to celebrate. >> this is the roughest, toughest looking fairy i've seen in a while. >> reporter: they say it's high time for african rugby's coming out party. david mckenzie, johannesburg, south africa. >> thanks for watching "cnn newsroom." i'm rosemary church. >> and i'm errol barnett. more news after the break. real is touching a ray. amazing is moving like one. real is making new friends.
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it's on. donald trump fights "the new york times". hillary clinton and trump fight each other, while bernie sanders and his supporters fight to stay in the race. long lines, missed flights. the security backlog that's stranding hundreds of airline customers at some of america's biggest airports. also ahead, the report-breaking athlete who is using her painful past to inspire others in the present. a very warm welcome to those of you watching here in the states and our viewers tuned in around the world. i'm errol barnett. >> and i'm rosemary church.
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thanks for joining us. this is "cnn newsroom." it is primary day once again in the u.s. and in just a few hours, voters at opposite ends of the country will cast their ballots. >> republicans and democrats are voting in oregon. kentucky already held its republican caucus, so it's just the democrats this time. and that's where hillary clinton is trying to get back on the winning track after losing to bernie sanders in west virginia. >> but the republican side of the race is drawing many of the headlines. specifically "the new york times" look at donald trump's past behavior toward women. and as jim acosta reports, that's put trump on the offensive. >> he was very genuine. he was very gentlemanly. >> reporter: she was a key subject in what looked like a blockbuster "new york times" article depicting donald trump as a playboy who objectifies women. but she tells cnn her views on
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trump were misrepresented. >> i don't like anything about the story. i'm very upset with "the new york times" article because it was completely misleading. they misled me. >> reporter: that was more than enough for trump, who routinely slams the media at his rallies. >> the world's most dishonest people. see that? that's the press. >> reporter: to blast away at "the new york times," tweeting with the coming forward today with the woman central to "the new york times" hit piece on me, we've exposed the article as a fraud. trump, who's been laying low since his trip to washington last week, is now being subjected to the kind of scrutiny that comes with being a party nominee. take "the washington post" story claiming trump once pretended to be his own p.r. agent. featuring bizarre 25-year-old audio recordings. >> well, i'm sort of handling p.r. because he gets so much of it. >> reporter: top trump aide paul manafort has his doubts. >> i could barely understand it. i couldn't tell who is. >> reporter: trump is also taking hits from british prime minister david cameron, who
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slammed the real estate tycoon's proposal for a temporary ban on muslims coming into the u.s. as stupid. >> it's like we're not going to have a very good relationship. who knows? i hope to have a good relationship with him. but it sounds like he's not willing to address the problem either. >> reporter: president obama was piling on over the weekend in a commencement address at rutgers. >> it's not cool to not know what you're talking about. [ laughter ] that's not keepin' it real or tellin' it like it is. that's just not knowing what you're talking about. >> reporter: much of which is why there's still an effort inside the gop to find somebody to run as a third-party candidate. cnn has confirmed mitt romney has asked nebraska senator and never-trump leader ben sasse to consider it. also fielding calls, billionaire mark cuban. >> it's a suicide mission because you're not only changing and throwing out eight years of the white house, but you're also throwing out potentially generations on the supreme court. >> reporter: on the v.p. search, over the weekend, ben carson was quoted as naming chris christie
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as well as sarah palin, marco rubio, and john kasich as being on trump's short list. carson backed away from those comments on cnn, and top trump campaign officials tell me carson was not speaking on behalf of the campaign. jim acosta, cnn, washington. >> joining me now from our new york bureau is republican strategist brian morganstern who was previously supporting marco rubio for the republican nomination. thank you so much for talking with us again. >> my pleasure. >> well, the trump campaign has spent the last few days putting out fires on various issues including his behavior with women. and now a former trump girlfriend is disputing "the new york times" version of her account of events. what impact is all this likely to have on the trump campaign given his negatives with women voters? >> well, time will tell. it's obviously, as you mentioned, it's sort of damage control and trying to change perception. and the way trump, you know, the
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campaign rolls things out like this, it's entertaining. it gets into the nitty-gritty. it involves new characters and personalities in this performance art that has been the campaign thus far. so people will pay attention. so to the extent that it's effective, you know, it's going to reach a wide audience. but in terms of voting, obviously the primaries are largely over on the republican side. so this will be borne out with polling data as we, you know, get closer to the general election and there are more statistics for us to analyze along those lines. >> and then of course one of those other fires, over the weekend, there was a lot made of trump apparently pretending to be his own p.r. guy some years back. is this all just to distract from him failing to release his taxes as some people have suggested, or is this what we're going to see from now right up until november? >> it is sort of classic trump in that it is this, you know,
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weird sort of conspiracy theory where there's like a smidge of deniability but not really. and it captivates people. i mean it's such a bizarre behavior and sort of funny and a little bit harmless. but it's something that is going to be reported on because it is so weird that, to the extent he's trying to distract, if that's the goal, it's certainly working. it also just keeps his name at the top of the headlines and continues to captivate people with, you know, how strange a character donald trump is. >> and then, of course, in an interview on itv's good morning britain, trump responded to british prime minister david cameron calling him divisive, stupid, and wrong in regards to his temporary ban on all muslims. trump said he's not stupid. how does that all play out for republicans? is it embarrassing? is it cringeworthy? >> i think that when a world leader calls out an american, the natural response at least
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oftentimes on the republican side is they want a tough guy. and so trump coming out saying, you know, i'm not stupid, and you're not starting our relationship off very well, you know, basically coming out with that sort of a strong stance is the sort of reaction most republican primary voters would want. >> of course as this all plays out, we are seeing more of how trump and hillary clinton will likely target each other. lots of attacks on character of course and calls for policy details. now the bill clinton factor in regards to the economy. what advice would you give each side if you were in the driver's seat for each campaign right now? >> well, obviously jobs jobs, jobs. but the other side of the coin is that in addition to informing the american people how you're going to get the economy going again, how you're going to protect them from terrorism -- and those are probably the two key issues. in addition to that, it's going to be telling them why your opponent shouldn't win and expect that to be a key focus because negativity drives voter
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turnout often more than positivity. and obviously hillary has already telegraphed she's going to come out and say donald is a loose cannon. he's already telegraphed he's going to come out and call her corrupt because of the foundation issues, the e-mail controversy with classified information being on her own personal e-mail server, and various other lines of attack. i don't expect either one of them to pull any punches. this is going to be a battle royale. and i think everybody is gearing up for it. >> and negativity, as you mentioned, that is all we're seeing right now. we'll see how it all develops. brian morganstern, thank you so much. a pleasure to talk with you. >> my pleasure. john kasich is dashing the hopes of some members of the republican party. in an exclusive cnn interview, the former presidential candidate declined to endorse trump and reiterated he won't be trump's running mate either. >> well, i think that i gave it my best where i am, and i just
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think running third party doesn't feel right. i think it's not constructive. i wanted to win, and i wanted to get to an open convention. my basic deal was not to stop somebody else. it was to be about the ideas i had. >> now, billionaire mark cuban says he was approached to run for president against donald trump. he says he thinks it's too late to enter the race, and he'll probably vote for hillary clinton. >> the dallas mavericks owner says he thinks trump isn't as smart as he thinks he is. >> now, when you have that amount of uncertainty, when, you know, you're flip-flopping, when you're not sure what the candidate is going to say from one thing to other, that uncertainty as the president of the united states, that's the last thing wall street wants to hear. i can say with 100% certainty, there's a chance we could see a huge, huge correction. so all those people who look at
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him and say, you know what, this is the guy to take on the establishment, this is the guy to change the game, something that i hoped would happen. unless he comes up with some concrete examples of what he's going to do, it could really turn wall street up and down and all those 401 ks from all his followers, their net worth could fall farther than donald's would. >> as we mentioned, tuesday's democratic primaries in oregon and kentucky are the next battleground for bernie sanders and hillary clinton. >> clinton is hoping to win her party's nomination with some leveraging of her most loyal ally. senior washington correspondent jeff zeleny has more. >> i'll tell you what the truth is. you know, it's time people stopped listening to republican propaganda about the economy, education, and health care. >> reporter: but before she can take on republicans, hillary clinton had a more urgent task in mind today. >> pledged delegates. >> reporter: her battle with bernie sanders.
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she's hoping to interrupt sanders' recent winning streak. campaigning across kentucky on the eve of tuesday's primary. >> i want to help bring back the kind of economy that worked for everybody in the 1990s. >> reporter: and revealing more about bill clinton and his role in her white house. >> i've already told my husband that if i'm so fortunate enough to be president and he will be the first gentleman, i expect him to go to work. >> reporter: it's another way to fire up democrats, offering two clintons for the price of one. >> he's got to get out of retirement. >> reporter: she wants nothing more than to focus exclusively on donald trump. >> here's the question. so what is your plan to create jobs? >> reporter: even envisioning what a debate with him would sound like. >> his answer is i'm going to create 'em. they're going to be great. i know how to do it, but i'm not telling you what it is i'm going
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to do. >> reporter: but sanders isn't going quietly. campaigning today in puerto rico and trying to speak spanish. >> el pueblo de puerto rico -- >> reporter: clinton is only 140 delegate as way from hitting the mark needed to reach the party's nomination. she needs to win only 16% of the remaining delegates. sanders needs 102%, an unreachable goal unless a flood of super delegates suddenly came his way. no matter the size of her lead, some sanders' supporters simply won't accept it. raw tensions on display at the weekend nevada democratic convention. booing, shouting, even a chair being thrown. the fight growing so intense over delegates, authorities shutting down the meeting early. but this democratic family feud may seem polite compared to what's awaiting clinton in her fight with trump. >> this is crooked hillary clinton. >> reporter: he's the one person
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democratic leaders believe can unify their party. >> i've been called nearly everything, but i've never been called a quitter. and i will not quit on you. >> reporter: now, her campaign is trying to clarify some of those remarks she made about exactly what role bill clinton would serve in her administration. she said he would not be in her cabinet at all, and her spokesman said it's a bit premature to offer any formalized role because of course she does not yet have the name nation and certainly has not yet one the election. but there's no doubt that she is looking forward to taking on donald trump, and she will not hit that magic threshold of 2,383 delegates until she reaches the california primary on june 7th. jeff zeleny, cnn, los angeles. >> joining me now is tharon johnson, a former regional director for president obama's 2012 campaign. secretary clinton is working hard to woo those kentucky voters. she's offering bill clinton as an economy czar. she made almost a dozen campaign
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stops in the state over the past week, flooding the airwaves with ads. even though she is well ahead in delegates, how badly does she need the kentucky win for upticks and for her narrative? >> well, i was very happy to see that the campaign is spending time in kentucky because quite frankly, errol, this is what they're really supposed to be doing right now. but the tough position hillary clinton is in right now is at a time where she pretty much has the nomination clinched -- i mean she's only 133 delegates away from basically sealing the nomination. but she's got to spend time in kentucky because bernie sanders has been pretty much on a winning streak and winning some key democratic primary states. now, one of the things that i was very happy to hear was her tone in kentucky. i mean she's talking about again strengthening the middle class. she's talking about making sure that we do everything we can to strengthen the affordable care act. and she also was talking about jobs but particularly around the issues of stagnation with women
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workers. and so at a time where she's in a state that probably is not going to go for her in november, but she was staying on message, which is a general election message so that she'll be prepared to go and beat donald trump in november. >> but she still has this bernie sanders issue. i mean what happened in nevada? you've got bernie sanders supporters there who were essentially ready to throw chairs they were so upset at delegate rules changing in a way that negatively impacted their candidate. could this outrage show itself, you know, again? >> no. i think -- one thing about what's going on on the democratic side right now is that if you talk to most voters, whether they are a bernie sanders supporter or a hillary clinton supporter, they all agree that we've got to be unified to beat donald trump in november. now, bernie sanders i think stopped running for president, errol about a month and a half ago when he figured out it was basically mathematically inconceivable that he could be the nominee for the democratic party. however, with him staying in the race, the clinton campaign has
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got to be a little frustrated because they know that they pretty much have this in the bag. but sri srinivasan, ybernie san cannot ignore his voters. he's racked up a lot of wins in some key primary states. i mean he's got to stay in the race and stay strong. but ultimately what hillary clinton cannot do is allow bernie sanders, with his speech that he's really been giving for the last 30 years, drive her to the left. she's going to stay kind of middle right and remain sort of a centrist candidate that can be able to go up and beat donald trump in november. >> well, i can feel some bernie sanders supporters getting ready to throw their chairs at the tfrn right now when you saying he ended his presidential campaign. clinton, we've also seen she's starting to mock donald trump. this is something he does regularly to his opponents. but will that work for her? will calling him a loose cannon when his unconventional style is part of his appeal really benefit the clinton campaign? >> listen, i think that she's
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basically saying what everyone has seen from donald trump since the day he decided he wanted to run for president in 2016. i mean this is a gentleman who has shown a total disrespect for women. i mean you've seen the polls. he's doing terrible with women voters. i mean he now says that i want to ban all muslims from coming from the u.s. then he comes back last week and says, well, i didn't really mean all muslims. i only mean some muslims and a temporary ban. we all agree on the democratic side that donald trump does not have the temperament nor the experience nor the policy ideas to go and basically lead the united states of america. and so i think what you're going to see from hillary clinton is a stronger approach with stronger language to really remind the american people when the two are facing each other that this is a race about the future. and this guy is clearly promoting hatred, and he's living in the past. and i think that those two visions are going to be front and center, and i think the american people are going to basically make the right choice.
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and that choice is going to be hillary clinton. >> lots of important issues of course, but it's a face-off we all do want to see. fireworks are guaranteed. the former regional director for obama's 2012 presidential campaign, tharon johnson, thanks for your time today. coming up, some syrians are returning to their war-scarred neighborhood in damascus after fighting pushed them out. but how long can a fragile peace there last? we will go live to the syrian capital ahead. plus a human trafficking survivor runs ultra-marathons to cope with trauma. she now holds multiple world records and is using her journey to empower other survivors. that story next.
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the united states and other world powers say they are open to arming libyan troops to fight isis. >> the libyan government is asking to be exempt from a u.n. arms embargo saying weapons are needed to battle mill grant groups gaining strength there. there are an estimated 6,000 isis fighters in libya. >> the international support group backing peace talks on syria is meeting at this hour in vienna. russia and the u.s. will be attending. >> at the same time, the syrian
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government has been pushing its own solution to the ongoing conflict. fred pleitgen is in the syrian capital with more on that. >> reporter: like so many places in syria, the ca qadam neighborhood in damascus is scarred by five years of war. but now some civilians are returning. i was forced out of here three years ago. this is the first time i'm able about go back, this woman says. the syrian army says a local reconciliation project helped silence the guns here. enticing some rebels like this man to lay down their arms. i think reconciliation like this is the only way forward, he says. even though it might take some time for many rebels to latch onto the idea. the syrian military claims between 150 and 200 rebels have defected in qadam, leading to a dramatic drop in violence. as you can see, there's
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widespread disruption here in this front-line neighborhood. but believe it or not, the military commander for this district says it could have been even worse. they wouldn't have had the reconciliation program and if the fighting would have gone on even longer. but the united states and the u.n. are skeptical of programs like this one. instead of local projects, they want to strengthen a nationwide cease-fire in syria and jump start the political reconciliation process for the whole country. many rebel factions also don't trust the syrian government, believing they'll be locked up or worse if they lay down their guns. but this member of the qadam reconciliation council shows me lists of names he claims proves that many rebels are taking up the government's offer. the names in green are the ones who have been accepted into national reconciliation, he says. so they are now free to go anywhere without fearing punishment. while this project may have yielded some results in this
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neighborhood of syria's capital, the u.n. believes only nationwide reconciliation backed and supervised by powerful nations like the u.s. and russia can overcome the distrust between the warring factions and move the effort to end syria's civil war forward. >> fred pleitgen joins us live from damascus this morning. fred, as you watch that, you wonder how viable does the government think this reconciliation is anywhere else in the country, or is it more about diplomatic posturing at these peace talks? >> reporter: yes, certainly. i mean the syrian government says it does believe these local cease-fires, local reconciliation projects are something that can work in the entire country. it can actually lead to a decrease in violence here in this country. it's interesting because the russians are actually going a similar way on top of the fact that they're part of the u.n. process, they also have troops on the ground trying to broker local cease fire in some of the regions where the russians hold
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squ sway. the u.n. says all of this is something that will undermine the greater diplomatic process that is of course in place. they think that all of this needs to be one big reconciliation project that's backed by the u.s., that's backed by russia. that's also quite frankly by turkey, qatar, saudi arabia, and iran as well to make sure that all parties are on board and trying to move this forward. otherwise, they believe that what you're going to see is divisions among the ranks of the opposition. you'll have some trying to latch onto agreements like the one you saw in that report. you'll have others who say absolutely not. at the same time we always have to keep in mind that here in syria, there are bigger political problems at play as well. on top of the fact that you want a cease-fire for the whole country, there also is something called a political transition process where no side at this point in time is clear how exactly that is going to be filled. so the larger political issues are something that the u.n. believes these local cease-fires
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are not going to be able to solve. so they're quite skeptical of all of this even as the syrian government and the russians as well continue to push forward, trying to get these local agreements in place, errol. >> yeah, but still a very interesting angle on this story. fred pleitgen live in damascus, approaching 10:27 in the morning there. fred, thanks. a woman who survived human trafficking is urging others to be relentless. we will tell you about the unique and record-breaking running route she created to raise awareness.
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welcome back to viewers in the u.s. and around the world.
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it's your last 30 minutes of "cnn newsroom" with us. i'm errol barnett. >> i'm rosemary church. we want to check the headlines for you right now. hillary clinton is hoping to put a stop to the recent string of victories by bernie sanders in the u.s. presidential primaries. she has campaigned heavily in kentucky. voters there and in oregon will cast their votes in just a matter of hours. donald trump warns he may not have a good relationship with britain's prime minister if he wins the presidential election. david cameron has called the republican candidate's proposal of a temporary ban on muslims entering the u.s., quote, divisive, stupid, and rong. >> doctors have performed the first successful penis transplatt in the united states. thomas manning's penis was amputated four years ago due to cancer. the operation took 15 hours and a team of more than 50 surgeons, doctors and nurses.
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now, we showed you the first part of this report yesterday. an ultra-marathon runner said she wanted to break the world record for the longest triathlon to empower human trafficking survivors. norma bass teed as survived trafficking twice. >> the running route she chose was specific and her message to survivors clear. be relentless. cnn's reporter has more on her journey in this cnn freedom project report. >> we don't know what's going to make the final cuts here. >> reporter: hollywood would have a tough time matching the drama of norma bastidas' life. >> we were trying to interweave the triathlon with what's happening in human trafficking. >> reporter: the first woman to run seven of the planet's most unforgiving triathlons on all seven continents received plenty of recognition for the accomplishment. but the world record holder
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didn't quite feel complete until she came forward about her own violent past. >> i remember being drugged and beat up and almost murdered when i was 24. >> reporter: bastidas was actually trafficked twice. once kidnapped and abused in mexico city and several years later, lured to japan by a fake modeling agency. >> what i didn't know is just that i was being sold to the highest bidder. i get bought by a very prominent person and i become his property. it was hell. it was hell. >> reporter: the abuses suffered in her younger years might have broken most people. but it lit a fire inside bastidas to do things others might think impossible. >> the next thing i know she's on the phone with me saying i want to do something big for human trafficking and to face this in my own life and to make it an anthem for other survivors. >> reporter: in 2014, bastidas set out to break the guinness record for world's longest triathlon. over the course of several
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months, she ran, biked, and swam more than 3,700 miles. traveling from cancun, mexico, to washington, d.c., following a known route of human trafficking victims. >> norma is one of the fiercest women i've ever met. >> reporter: together with the anti-trafficking organization i empathize, norma's story is the subject of a documentary called "be relentless." >> all of this from cancun to mexico city to d.c., she did her final leg all through the night, 24 hours straight, almost 100 miles. i think what she was trying to tell everyone was sometimes you have to face new challenges even when you've conquered old ones. >> human trafficking is what happened to you. it's not who you are. every single time we doubt that a victim has potential, we are saying because of what happened, it's your fault. and that's so wrong. we can prove that we can
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overcome anything. we're here. >> reporter: and that may be the greatest ending of all. cnn, los angeles. >> so inspirational. >> she's amazing. >> definitely. in the next part of our series, you'll meet a young woman who fell victim to slavery without even realizing it was happening. >> did you ever think to yourself, this is not normal? they're treating me like a slave? >> no. >> translator: i saw it as i give you work, and you give me a roof over my head. i didn't think of it as slavery. >> as the workload increased, the amount of food she was allowed to eat decreased. finally, she says, when she felt she could no longer take more beatings or humiliation, things got much worse. >> this time tomorrow, her harrowing journey and her brave escape. it's all part of the freedom project series, "surviving to
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thriving" only here on cnn. the u.s. state department has some urgent advice for would-be travelers. don't go to north korea. they've told all americans in unusually blunt terms to avoid the so-called kingdom. >> this comes as the u.s. and its allies further prepare their defenses in case north korea launches an attack. >> chicago's o'hare international airport is also busy, but the lines have never looked quite like this. we will explain what's causing this bottleneck. plus south africa's first gay rugby club is shattering the sport's stereotypes. what they're doing to break down barriers and draw fans to their matches. that's coming up. stay with us.
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unusually long security lines are frustrating airline passengers across the u.s. chicago's o'hare airport is getting some of the worst of it. travelers trying to get through there are waiting for hours in
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the transportation security line. some 450 people missed their flights on sunday alone. employees say that's a high total for an entire week. >> this is scary for those who need to travel or possibly traveling right now. many people have had to sleep on cots. they've got nowhere else to go. for now, passengers have no choice but to tough it out. >> there's not enough lanes open right now obviously if there's people back up to almost the doors here. >> we were just in security for almost two hours and ran to our gate, and it was three minutes shy of the door closing. so we got a hotel and are back and hopefully will make this flight. >> i got here about three, two and a half hours early, and it still wasn't enough time. i had to go back to my friend's place and try it again this morning. >> you'd be pretty angry with
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that, wouldn't you? tsa says it hopes to add nearly 800 new offices by this summer, but the union that represents tsa employees says they need 6,000 new employees to handle the demands. >> that is just incredible. now, may is starting off to a sizzling start across the middle east as summer like heat bakes the region. pedram javaheri joins us now. as we discussed, this can possibly be deadly. before that, it's uncomfortable and a horrible situation. >> it is. it's too early. summer doesn't even start for six weeks. typically it's not the beginning of summer that's the hottest time of the year. it's the middle of july about three, four weeks after that. we're talking the middle of may right now we're seeing mid-summer temperatures. that's a big concern. you get this multiple days, multiple weeks and the longevity of that wears down on the people that are exposed to the elements. of course a lot of these places, air-conditioning is not available, so it makes it very dangerous as well. we'll show you what happened here because these temperatures, we're talking 15 to 20 degrees above what is normal. take you to the middle east.
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errol lived in abu dhabi. i know rosemary has lived in places like australia where temperatures get hot in the off-season. but when you look at what has transpired in southern iraq, the temperatures made it up to 47 degrees celsius. that's 117 fahrenheit on monday afternoon. 37 celsius or 99 fahrenheit is what is normal. so, yes, you sit around at 100 degrees in the month of may, that's normal. but 117 certainly is astonishing. you take a look at places like mecca in saudi arabia, temperatures into the mid-40s. this pattern really an incredible pattern. you notice the forecast. it wants to cool it off, and it goes right back up again to record territory. of course this is not out of the ordinary of what's happened in recent days. the month of april, on the 28th of april actually, baghdad made it up to 42 celsius, 107 fahrenheit. that was the single hottest april temperature they've ever observed. previous record was 39.
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india, because it is widespread out of the middle east, you take a look. this is a roadside pool stand. a gentleman trying to make a living selling what would be a popular item, doing the hard work, pumping them as he's selling them in these extreme temperatures. but on monday, nasa released information saying that now we are going on 12 consecutive months where the month -- respective month is the hottest single month on record. so april 2016, hottest april ever observed. go all the way back towards may of 2015, each one of these months circled, hottest month ever observed since 1880. that's an incredible pattern of course and you take a look at the year 2015, which was easily the hottest year ever observed. look at 2016, and look how it is running away from these numbers. what's really concerning is when you look outside of just the temperatures, we know carbon dioxide levels, of course a greenhouse gas. it traps heat that leads to these warmer temperatures. for the first time ever, they are now sitting above 400 parts per million. that's a number that scientists
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have always said if you get to that level, it is a bad place to be. we never thought we would get above 350 just about a decade ago. now it looks like even when these seasonal variations are in place and that number comes down, it would fail to drop below 400. that's a scary, scary thought to see that in place there. >> that is sobering stuff but important to know. thanks a lot. >> thank you. well, in sports-crazed south africa, rugby equals manliness. but now the country's first gay rugby club is challenging stereotypes with a new campaign. cnn's david mckenzie has the story. >> reporter: in south africa, rugby has always been for manner. rough translation, for real men. >> a lot of our rugby players are gay. to be openly gay could be akin to a hostile environment. >> the jozi cats is africa's first gay rugby club, and they've put on a provocative
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campaign. posing for the camera. and using the very slurs they've heard on the playing field to break down barriers and to recruit new players. it gets down right cheeky. >> the great thing about this rugby team is whether you're straight, gay, or bisexual, you can be just yourself and play on our rugby team. >> reporter: gay rugby is big with a world cup and more than 70 teams globally. but not here in rugby powerhouse south africa. >> why are we still having conversations 22 years into our democracy where we're still talking about inclusion in sports? >> reporter: even after tonight's loss, still reason to celebrate. >> this is the roughest toughest looking fairy i've seen in a while. >> reporter: jozi cats say it's high time for african rugby's coming out party.
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>> we are joined by david mckenzie live. give us an idea of how big gay rugby is globally. >> reporter: well, it's become very big, rosemary. gay and inclusive rugby, as i said in that report, there's some 70 teams around the world, particularly in the u.s. and u.k. they even compete at the bingham cup, which is their equivalent of the world cup, which happens in fact next week in the u.s. it's really a way say these players to have a safe, inclusive environment to play the sport that they love because still there is the sense that homophobia is rife within organized sport, both the very sort of dangerous kind and the kind that players i spoke to talk about that kind of jocular humor they find that makes people who might not be secure in their sexual orientation somewhat uncomfortable. rosemary. >> incredible. all right. david mckenzie joining us there from johannesburg. thank you so much for that great report. appreciate it. the international space
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station hits a cosmic milestone. just ahead, we'll talk with an astronaut who's been on the space station about what makes this achievement so remarkable. rough night?
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i wish we had looked for a bigger place before he was born. oh, when we wanted another place, first thing we did was check out credit karma - made things a lot easier. that sounds exhausting. actually, it's really easy. and it's free. that was easy! "check out credit karma today. credit karma. give yourself some credit." (shush, shush, shush)
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you are looking at an historic launch. in november of 1998, a russian rocket took what would become the very first piece of the international space station up into orbit. 17 and a half years later, the space station has hit a cosmic milestone. completing its 100,000th orbit around the earth monday. >> that is over 2.6 billion miles traveled or 4 billion kilometers. what does that mean? that's equal to ten trips between earth and mars. what was initially just a single piece is now bigger than a football field. >> for more on this milestone in space, we are joined by leroy chow. he is a retired astronaut and former commander on the international space station. >> leroy, thanks for being with us down here on earth. it's great to see you. you are one of the more than 200
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astronauts and cosmonauts from 18 nations who have had the privilege of being aboard the international space station. i'm just wondering in what ways did working there -- we know you have to train for such a long time. but once you work there, did it change your world view at all? >> well, absolutely. i mean before my space station flight i had flown three shuttle missions, but shuttle missions were 10 to 14 days in duration. and on my space station i flew six and a half months so it was a totally different experience. it makes you think about what's important. looking down at the earth, it's just a fantastic experience. and 100,000 orbits, that's quite the milestone. >> it certainly is. it's very impressive. and leroy, when you look at that milestone, do you wonder and dream where this all may go? what do you see as the ultimate goal here? >> well, i mean space station is really a stepping stone towards
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our next big goal which is to get human beings on the surface of mars. the reason the space station works like that is because it actually turns out that space is not very friendly to living systems, to biological systems from the earth. the biggest technical challenge is biomedical, how to keep astronauts healthy on the way to and back from mars as well as the stay on the surface. there's a lot of different things that occur to the human body in space, but most importantly once you get beyond the earth, you're exposed to a lot more radiation than here on the earth or even in lower orbit on the space station. so the space station is a key stepping stone, a key proving ground of these biomedical countermeasures that we have to develop before we can safely send astronauts to mars. >> it took billions of dollars and years of research to get to this point. we're seeing some of the nice pictures but there's so much that comes out of missions like this. how do you make the case, though, that it's worth it for countries to fund such an expensive endeavor, not just the space station but a
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controversial mission to mars for example, which some people don't think is what we should be doing? >> well, i mean the bottom line is that we as human beings, as a species, we love to explore. i mean that's what we are as part of the human experience. i mean whether it's to the top of the large mountaintops or down to the depths of the seas or out into space. i mean that's just who we are. and we identify with putting humans out on the end of the sphere and whether that's going to the moon or to mars, i mean we just keep pushing farther and farther. and so, you know, to the people who say it's not worth it, i mean the fact is we spend less than one-half of 1% of the u.s. budget on space exploration on nasa. and, you know, that's such a small amount, and the return we get off of it, not just in technical spinoffs but in things less tangible like national prestige and inspiring the next generation, those are things that are just totally, you know, invaluable. it's worth it.
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>> right. firing back at the critics there, leroy chiao, a retired astronaut and former commander on the international space station. thank you so much for joining us. >> my pleasure. great to be with you. >> thanks, leroy. >> you bet. one more quick story for you all. the berlin wall is usually a shopper's paradise in germany, but it became much more than that monday. ♪ >> a thousand musicians gathered at the mall to play in a symphonic flash mob. many from the german symphonic orchestra, but many other amateur musicians joined in as well. music scores were available for download ahead of the event, and all ages and levels of musicianship were encouraged to participate. >> when i look at the people that came, it's nice that children come and older people
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come, and there are many generations together. i think it's a nice opportunity to make many generations work together on something. >> the musicians played for about 1,500 spectators in what an orchestra spokesperson called an overwhelming success. how cool would it be to stumble on to that? >> so many people. thanks for watching cnn. i'm rosemary church. >> and i'm errol barnett. please connect with us on twitter any time. we have a face swap surprise on for you right now. >> stay tuned for another edition of "cnn newsroom" live from london with our max foster. have a great day. >> see you. ♪
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donald trump's problem with women. his attorney now threatening to sue the new york times for painting the presumptive nominee as miss sage domestic as his reason he will not vote for trump. and bouncing back and a couple of primary losses. two states voting today. so will this be where hillary clinton seals the deal? good morning. welcome to "early start." i'm john berman. >> i'm christine romans. it is tuesday, may

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