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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  May 26, 2016 10:00pm-1:01am PDT

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♪ a political udser runs for the highest office in the land and programs a new day in america. sound familiar. this is cnn tonight. i'm don lemon and i'm talking about donald trump. he says this on the day he gets the delegates he needs to clench the gop nomination. >> we had a big day today. today was the day where we hit the 1,237, right? 1,237. hillary clinton itching to turn her tension to the general takes aim at trump. >> there is absolutely no way that we can let donald trump get anywhere near the white house.
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meanwhile bernie sanders promises this. >> if i am the democratic nominee, donald trump is toast. so let's begin with donald trump celebrating as he reaches his magic number to clench the republican nomination. >> we had a big day today. today was a day where we hit the 1,237, right. 1,237. and you know you had our president saying he will not be the nominee of his party. oh, really? he's been right about that like he's right about everything else which is never. yet a lot of pundits, you see the guys back here, the people back here, some of the most dishonest people in the world but most of them said and they
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said very strongly he will never be the nominee. i can name them but i don't want to embarrass them. they're actually nice people. i don't want to embarrass them. he will never ever be the nominee. in fact they used to say worse. ten months ago they'd say he's not going to run. no, he's just having a good time. i am having a good time. >> hillary clinton who has of course not yet sealed the deal for the democrats made a point of calling in to wolf blitzer. >> i know donald trump says outrageous things all the time, but today he officially clenched the republican nomination so this is now as real as it gets. and this man who is an nonqualified lose cannon is within reach of the most important job in the world and it should concern every american and president obama came out of a meeting and said the leaders
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are rattled by donald trump. he's talking about breaking up our alliances and letting countries get more weapons and banning oul muslim from coming to america. that's a recipe for fewer friends and that will make america less safe. i know trump thinks it's a point of pride that people like me and president obama raise questions and criticize him but it's not. this is not a reality show. it's really serious. the entire world looks at the president of the united states for leadership and stability and that is the kind of leadership i would provide if elected. >> here to discuss all of this michael reagan son of ronald reag reagan. there's a lot to discuss. thank you for joining us. all that back and forth. >> i'm going to start with you. trump clenched the nomination today. he has been dominate from the
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day he entered this race. what has he figured out. >> what we've figured out is he's been listening to talk radio and all he did was take what talk radio has been talking about and expand on that and take to the presidential level and what you see behind him is the programs that get together and people that support him have been in talk radio for the last 20 years. they have a hero now in him but to win the presidency you have to expand past the talk radio group and get a whole other bunch of people your team if you're going win in november. >> you think he can do that? you don't believe he can do it, he's got to change his ways. >> you don't start the week by stomping on the governor of new mexi mexico, the only female republican hispanic that's been elected and then go after marco rubio and jeb bush. these are people that are you going to need.
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>> someone who is well liked within the republican party with conservatives. >> absolutely right. i agree with you on that. i know the governor and i've known her for quite a long time. for him to do what he did the other night in new mexico was unconsciousable. i'm not bothered so much by what donald trump says, i'm bothered by the applause he gets after he says it. >> what's your assessment of him clenching and do you agree with michael about he's been listening to talk radio for 20 years? >> i think that's a big part of it but also he's a great mark marketeer and a againous. he make jokes about him about being on tv but he knows how to get in people's living rooms. he almost wins the media game every day. twitter has been a big part of that. i think today is significant for
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trump. nobody even a month ago didn't believe there would be a brokered convention and trump seems to be having a lot of momentum and i thought it was important that you heard hillary clinton calling in and starting to sound more fiery she can't lay low anymore. there is going to be a fight between the two of them and es escalating today and it's going go more and more in that direction. >> she called into our wolf blitzer today and she doesn't usually do call ins. that's a recent. maybe she's getting the message that he's a master at owning the media. douglas i want to ask you about these comments from donald trump today. listen to this. >> in the history of the republican party, this is a history, you talk about eisenhower and nixon and reagan,
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you talk about names going back in the history of the republican party to me this means so much i've gotten more votes than anybody has ever gotten and -- look think of that. we have ten states left. >> so what do you think of those comparisons? >> we also have a lot more americans alive today. just so many more americans alive today. i don't think that's his best line when he says that. it sounds to braggish to compare himself to those people. donald trump has done very well and he's done it by the style that michael was talking about that many people are shocked at but that's a demolition derby style and anybody who pops in his scope he seems to want to be
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off with their heads. that's worked in this environment after eight years with barack obama but it's yet to be seen whether this can play out in the fall and be the movement that he thinks he is at this juncture. >> in that response talk to me about this. he's invoking your father. can he unify republicans in a way that your father didn't. >> there's no ronald reagan out there. i said a long time ago this is not the party of reagan any longer. it's the party of trump. good luck. he's going to have to figure out what do with it. i write in my book lessons i learned from my father. my father is one of these people who didn't mind giving credit to others. you'll never hear the word i in any of his speeches. he made friends of enemies. he didn't make enemies of friends and you brought the party together. you unified the party because he found the good in people and i
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write about that in my book and i show the other side of ronald reagan, not the political side but the father side and the father side carried on to the political side. that's why people i think trusted him even people who disagreed with him trusted him, liked him and voted for him. >> donald trump is not necessarily a big tent. >> i agree with that. we also have to keep in mind many people say reagan was a movie star and celebrity and trump's a celebrity candidate but ronald reagan was a two term governor of california that had one of the most important economies in the world that he oversaw so he lerarned the art f negotiation. trump comes like somebody who is his own boss and likes to give direct orders and that's a tough propositi proposition. i agree with michael that ronald reagan tried to give a helping hand and lift people up and make people feel better. donald trump likes to put people
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down and insult them. their styles are different. >> you said coo. here is what paul manafort said today. he said how trump is going to approach the presidency. he said he sees himself more as the chairman of the board than a ceo. >> that's exactly what i'm saying. we don't have a lot of american history of business people succeeding. wilkey was the republican nominee and he didn't go anywhere. the question about donald trump is is he a movement and can he win in the midwest. we know the blue and red states already. he gets back to ohio, michigan and pennsylvania and whether that trump message of being anti-nafta it's tough to see how donald trump brings any latinos into
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his tent and also we haven't seen barack obama hit the campaign trail yet and try to generate excellently campuses in the african-american votes. so we have a lot of acts ahead of us but today was a big day for trump. he hit his 1237 delegate number. >> plus one. stay with me. when we come back the wall is just beginning. the wall is just the beginning. wait until you hear what else donald trump wants to build in washington. new bikes aren't selling guys... what are we gonna do? how about we pump more into promotions? ♪ nah. what else? what if we hire more sales reps? ♪ nah. what else? what if we digitize the whole supply chain? so people can customize their bike before they buy it. that worked better than expected. i'll dial it back. yeah, dial it back. just a little. live business, powered by sap.
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that's not all he wants to build. listen to what he said in montana. >> build a wall. it's going to be a big wall. it's going to be a beautiful wall. someday when i'm gonzo maybe they'll name it after trump. i'd much rather have a statute in washington, d.c. i don't want a wall named after me but that's okay. i want a statute in washington, d.c. maybe share it with jefferson or something. >> back with me now is michael reagan and douglas brinkley. there are statutes of i don'tyo in washington. do you see parallels between
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your father's candidacy and donald trump's candidacy. >> no. did you ever here ronald reagan say i want a statute of myself in washington, d.c., i want a building named after me in washington, d.c. he was surprised when he had a library named after him in california because it never about him, it was about the united states of america and i talk about that in my book about lessons my father taught me. i learned about him and i learned about the fact that he was a pragmatic kweft. in order to get the taxes lowered in the united states he had to work with the democrats and in order to get the start agreement he had to work with gorbachev. ronald reagan didn't look for credit. he looked to get the job done. he didn't care who got the credit for the berlin wall coming down, the fact is it came down. this is about trump.
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i think of him as the first social media nominee but it's going to take more than soocial media and angry people to elect him as president of the united states. >> i want to you to listen to this. the man who joked when we begin bombing russia in five minutes went on to preside over the end of the cold war. >> general secretary gorbachev if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the soviet union, came here to this gate. open this gate. mr. gorbachev, tear down this wall. >> could you see donald trump stepping up the way ronald reagan did? >> well, in a different way.
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we've got to understand ronald reagan knew his audience. his audience in front of him were free. he was speaking to the other side of the gate who were not free just like the evil empire speech. it wasn't the people in front much him he was talking to, it was half a world away to let them know there was a president who was standing strong for them and wanted them to go free. that's who his audience was and i think donald trump's got to expand his audience past the talk radio group and past those other people to hispanics and women and others in order to really move forward in this campaign for the presidency of the united states. >> hasn't everybody including you been saying the exact same thing on this program but donald trump. douglas i'll ask you considering what michael said do you see donald trump stepping up that way that ronald reagan did in that speech, tear down this wall and building coalitions. >> ronald reagan there is
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talking about tearing down the wall and talking about freedom of boarders and free trade. what's donald trump doing? he's talking about building a wall with mexico. it's the complete opposite of that regan message there. ronald reagan believed that democracy was going to spread around the world and he did everything he could to do it. that speech seems like strong language. there was great diplomacy going on and reagan chose george schultz to be secretary of state. schultz did a remarkable job of working with nato and margaret thacher. it's not clear who the world is going to want to do any kind of business with donald trump at this point because he seems to belittle all the nations of the world. >> michael, the president was in japan today and he said that world leaders are rattled by
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donald trump saying trump displays an ignorance of world affairs. here is trump's response to that. >> i love that word. he used a bad word because he knows nothing about business. when you rattle someone that's good because many of the world as you know many of the countries in our world have been absolutely abusing us and taking advantage of us. so if they're rattled in a friendly way we're going to have great relationships with these countries. if they're rattled in a friendly way is a good thing, not a bad thing. >> is that good. >> i don't know about world leaders but i travel quite a back and the people are rattled. there's people around the globe that are rattled. i was in asia. people are rattled. they don't know what to expect from a donald trump. when you don't know what to expect you do get rattled and he's got to answer that question to a lot of people because the
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president can play pretty much by himself on international levels where on the domestic side he has to work with the congress of the united states. so he's got to leave those fears. it's in his best interests to aleve those fears. how does he do it and keep the audience. >> we've been talking about the '80s on cnn and talking about reagan in the '80s. look at this artifact. >> i know people have talked to you about whether or not you want to run. would you ever? >> probably not but i do get tired of seeing the country ripped off. >> why would you not? >> i think i have the inclination to do it. >> it doesn't pay as well. >> no, it doesn't. i just probably wouldn't do it. i probably wouldn't but i do get tired of seeing what's happening with this country. >> what do you think has changed douglas. >> i think he may be being disingenuous there because if
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you read the book on walker bush in 1988 trump was begging to be considered to be vice president for bush and he scoffed, can you believe how he is, kind of self promoting himself in that fashion. but trump is part of the '80s history and i think the fact of the matter is he's been able to have staying power. he's been part of our public discourse year after year. he hasn't gone away. that is a tribute to his i think business acumen and his read on american popular culture. part of it is running casinos and learning the aspirations of americans and another part of him is somebody who plays on fear and that's the part that i worry about. ronald reagan believed that oxygen was optimism and that's how the country lived to be optimistic and trump seems to me to be pedaling fear.
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>> my dad once told me and we sat down and talked about this on one of the rides out to the ranch he said there's a big difference between running for president and becoming the president of the united states of america and there's a huge difference in what you might say and the rhetoric that goes into a campaign but what you have to do when in fact you are in that oval office and you have to make decisions and every decision you make has somebody in the world on the other side of it. >> thank you. i appreciate it. have a good weekend. >> thank you. >> thank you. trump is loving it. he posted a photo on instagram showing how he celebrated his big delegate victory. we have that next. think fixing your windshield is a big hassle?
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donald trump scoring enough delegates to clench the republican nomination becomes official at the gop convention in july. here to discuss is andy donald trump, a trump supporter and van jones and michael, the chief investigative correspondent of yahoo news and author of
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"uncovering clinton "and maria who is a super delegate committed to clinton, isn't that special, and matt lewis. she's super. she's a super delegate. that's like a -- >> i need a cake or something. >> andy let's start with you. 1,237. he got it today. here is donald trump how he celebrated with mcdonald's. did he really eat that burger do you think. >> he does like mcdonald's and we're at 1,238. >> 1,237 plus one. >> correct. that was the number we needed to get to and ten months ago when this began there were two or three people on television, i think there was jeffry lord, myself and donald trump who thought this was possible and ten months later because of his hard work we are where we are
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right now which this is history in the making and it's exciting. it's a massive day. the fact he did it before the convention nobody expected so it's exciting. >> so while trump was loving it -- see what i did there -- hillary clinton was talking -- talking with wolf blitzer. here's what she said. >> i know that trump thinks this is a point of pride that people like me or president obama raise questions and criticize him but it's not. this is not a reality show. it's not just politics. it's really serious. the entire world looks at the president of the united states for leadership and stability and that is the kind of leadership i would provide if elected. >> what do you think andy? >> well, the idea of leadership coming from hillary clinton is bizarre. i mean this is somebody when benghazi was under attack was sleeping and then the next morning she concocted some
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bizarre story with susan rice blaming a youtube video. the american people are looking for leadership on the economy. they're looking for jobs and wage increases and we're going to ask tough questions when trump becomes president, questions like why in china has the middle class income risen by over 80% in the past 15 years whereas in america it's risen by less than 2%. >> i have four other people i need to get on. >> don't worry about them. >> first of all, him asking questions, that's all you can do because he doesn't have any answers. he's a master, the master of giving you an explanation that there is a problem without telling you how he can possibly solve it. if he tells you how he's going to solve it he'll change it the next day. i think it's a very sad day in america. andy is 100% right. nobody thought this was possible
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because nobody believed that someone with this little of experience and this sort of temperament and tone would be able to secure the nomination for a major party. i hope that this fact will sober up americans. a lot of people have thought this is a joke and it's sending a good signal but i tell you what the president of the united states being this erratic on so many different issues is a dangerous -- economist magazine says trump would be a threat to the global -- >> you say that president obama is partially to blame for the rise of trump. >> i think that's true. i don't want to ab solve the right of their sins and their part to play in this but i think it's true. i mean for one thing these two guys barack obama and mr. trump have some things in common. i think both are pretty big on the eggo and both are thin
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skinned and both seem to have ana authorize tarrin streak and not a huge respect for separation of powers. >> please matt. >> i think that barack obama in two ways sort of paved the path to this. in one way i think he greeced the skins to accept somebody like a donald trump -- president obama the first thing he does when he gets elected he hasn't quit blaming president bush for mistakes that were made and then he tells -- he pushes through this obamacare doesn't get a single republican -- >> a majority of the vote. >> do you agree with that? >> i make of the fact that it's an unbelievable achievement that trump is where he is today but he's still got quite a few hurdles to pass here. for one thing he still doesn't have the endorsement of the speaker of the house paul ryan
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who is going to be chairman of the republican convention and that tells you a lot about the unease that's still out there about donald trump. ryan in particular is the guy to watch here. there's a lot of expectation that he would come around and endorse but i'm told that by senior aides that he's not there yet. he still has real problems with trump's positions on entitled reform, religious freedom, immigration and this is a really interesting test of politics versus principal because the politics would clearly dictate him and others in the house coming aboard the trump train now that he's the clearly going to be the nominee but for some people and ryan is a good example principal does count and they're having a hard time
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coming around. >> here's what michael says. he says that trump is winging it through the entire process. listen to this. >> they don't want to say how -- how smart he is, what he will do, what he can accomplish. they don't want to give him cred credit. >> why? why do you think that? >> maybe because he's outsider. he's not part of washington. he speaks his mind. he doesn't sweep under the rug. he says as he thinks and what needs to be say because he's not the politician. he's not into just talking. he's a doer. he gets the thing done. >> obviously that was not donald trump.
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that was his wife. maybe she was answering the question. let's play what donald trump said and then we'll discuss. >> i don't know if you heard but i have won of the highest poll numbers ever recorded with men and i would swap it for the women right now. i want the women. to hell with the men. to hell with the men. right men? >> okay. so as i said michael said that he's winging it but my question is does this winging appear to be helping him more than hurting him or vice versa? i'm sure here. >> so i think one of the things that we need to clarify here is that donald trump is a republican monster of their own making. he is not the problem. he is a sim tom of something that's been going on in the republican party followed by suppression of the voting rights
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act, voter id laws, the awful rhetoric that started years ago on immigration and on how they treat immigrants in this country and that has given rise to somebody like donald trump because republicans have made it okay to talk about these issues in this inflammatory manner. the way that he talks right now has been the way that he go the the republican nomination. but i think what is going to slap him in the face is that he is now going to be facing a very different electorate with women, with minorities, with young people, with progressives and independents who are appalled that this is somebody we are actually considering even in terms of being our next chief. >> hold your thoughts. we're going to discuss what mar ea said plus we're going to talk about donald trump and bernie sanders. they said they want to debate
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a big day for donald trump. he has the delegates he needs to clench the gop nomination. back with me our panel. matt, what's the deal with all of this talk about a possible debate between donald trump and bernie sanders. >> i guess it came up last night and it's probably not going to happen. i think donald trump wants $10 million to charity to do it but the interesting question is how would it effect hillary clinton and i think it could go
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either way and i think it depends on whether or not donald trump and bernie sanders have a sparing -- sort of a fun sparing match for charity or a knockout punchout because think of it this way, if they kind of have this light banter and have fun hillary clinton's left in the dark. she's not getting attention. bernie's getting attention not good for hillary. on the other hand what if bernie sanders and donald trump start duking it out and it turns ugly. now all of a sudden this is a problem for trump, right, because the hope i think for donald trump hopes that some of the bernie sanders supporters might end up -- it's not likely many of them will but some of them in november might end up voting for trump instead of hillary and that's not going to happen if donald trump and bernie mix it up too much. fascinating possibilities here. >> i wonder if bernie would say i'm sick of hearing about your
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damn taxes. donald trump continues to say he's going to release his tax forms when his audit is over. do you believe he will? does it look like he has something to hide. >> i don't think he will and he does have something to hide. i think he has decided that whatever is in there he's willing to take the beating of not -- of being the first nominee in 40 years not to let the american people know where his bread is buttered. something is in there that's pretty shocking to break with tradition. he probably has not given a penny to charity. you have a problem right now he made a big stink about he's going to give this money to veterans and the veteran have not received a penny. >> probably the most news worth part of that fascinating interview that paul manafort gave to hufington post this week -- >> let me read a part of it.
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he says i will be surprised if he puts them out. i wouldn't necessarily advise him to. it's not an issue for the people we're appealing to. his tax returns are complicated. how are the american people going to understand them. the financial disclosure he put out gives the point. the only people that want the tax returns are the people that want to defeat him. >> going back to richard nixon every presidential candidate has released his tax returns and that signal from manafort saying this is the people we are appealing to don't care about this is just a crystal clear example of how much he deviates from the normal of presidential candidates and it's hard to imagine this is going to go away. all you have to do is think about to 2012 and how much the democrats hammered romney until he released his taxes and how
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big of an issue that became. there's no way that the clinton campaign, clinton super pacs are not going to be hammering this every right up to election day and there is -- there are real issues here. how much did he pay in taxes. real estate developers are clever at avoiding paying taxes and remember that exchange when he asked him what's your tax rate and he said none of your business, that was a stunning remark. >> andy why the diskrepsy between what trump and manafort says? are they on the same page. >> donald trump has a lot of people out there speaking. to van jones saying maybe trump hae hasn't given anything to charity, donald gave over 10s of millions of dollars to charities
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of so this idea that he hasn't given any money to charity is offensive and it's not accurate. some of these tax returns are done in productions and partnerships. celebrity apprentice is done with another person. in certain years -- >> you can shut people up if you said the tax returns would say -- he gave -- >> please shut me up. >> two quick things. he's under audit so any person with half a brain doesn't release the returns. >> that's not true. we've gone through this before. >> it's totally true. we're repeating the same thing. >> yeah. what's your other point. >> the other point is donald trump's investments like i remember when i first joined him we warorked on the las vegas tor that takes three years to build
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so you can't look at one year of tax returns and say he made this or lost that donald trump's taxes, there's a gigantic -- >> that's explainable. on the other side -- hold on. what about the other years. >> yeah. >> okay. what will happen is if he releases one year or three years you'll say why isn't he releasing five or ten years. the media will take three pages and won't paint the whole picture. >> so what? so what? that's why -- that's why we have andy dean on this show at least two or three times a week to explain to us what is going on with donald trump. so if you -- hang on. let me make a point and then i'll let you finish. hang on. if he releases his tax returns and you said he ran his business for five years, what better
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person to have on cnn tonight than andy dean to explain trump's financials to the american people and to all the other countries in the world. you would be the perfect person. i do not understand your point. it does nodded make sense. >> we sold the apprentice in over 100 countries around the world. donald has tax profession als in new york city that do complex tax transactions. our tax code is so messed up that even i the head of the production company when you take hundreds of companies and one return i couldn't understand it. there are very few tax professionals on earth that understand this stuff. >> andy, hold your thought. >> that's a perfect argument for donald trump. that's why i want to change the tax code because it's so complicated. you're not making sense here. i have to be honest. we'll be right back. the big hilton
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click or call. life feels a little lighter, potency probiotic, livelier, a little more you. ultimate flora probiotics. it's a short segment. i'm back with my panel now. andy i want you to respond about the income taxes.
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this is paul manafort. his statement says the only people who want the tax returns are the people who want to defeat him. is there something in there that would allow him to be defeated if it was release. >> no i think it's a misquote. i think he's saying the only people who care about this issue is people who don't like donald trump anyway. >> i read his exact words. >> was there a dot dot dot. i can't see. >> the only people who want the tax returns are the people who want to defeat him. >> exactly. the only people who care about this stuff, the american people care about jobs and they want a business -- one thing, this is the success. any time you have a gigantic businessman -- >> how is releasing tax returns -- >> you've never had a billionaire running for office. >> i want to move on because i want to talk about something that you think is probably more
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important and that is we're going to talk about the e-mails. i'm sure you would like to hear about that more. i want to play more on wolf blitzer's interview with hillary clinton. >> this report makes clear that personal e-mail use was the practice under other secretaries of state and the rules were not clarified until after i had left. but as i said many times it was still a mistake. if i could go back i'd do it t differently and i understand people have concerns about this but i hope voters look at the full picture of what i've done and the full threat posed by a donald trump presidency and i have faith in the american people. >> she's saying that the threat posed by trump is bigger than the concern over her e-mails. >> there's no question that was a devastating report from the state department inspector
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general. the inspector general made it clear this was an obama appointee by the way that the rules did not permit what she said they permitted and she never asked for permission and never got advice from the stapt department lawyers and there are some really startling influencing it's in that report one that hasn't got enough attention is two staffers in her office raised questions about this and said they had concerned that federal records weren't being preserved and the top information officer in her inner office said don't talk about this ever again, we're here to support the secretary, basically shut up. that is in the report. it's a startling passage and i think we're going to be hearing more about it. her former chief of staff is going to be deposed tomorrow in the lawsuit brought by judicial watch. that's going to be released next week. she's going to be hammered with questions from this report. there's a lot of ammunition for
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hillary clinton's critics to continue to bring this up and of course we're all waiting for what the fbi concludes. >> you got to be quick. >> first of all, there's nothing new in the report. secondly she apologized and said it was not a good idea. >> there was a lot new in the report. there's nothing that we didn't already know. number two she already apologized and number three this ask like a political test which is people that support hillary clinton are not going to be change their vote. people who oppose her absolutely are going to use this as fodder. she wakz up in the morning and she use that as fodder. the people looking for solutions are going to look at the contest between hillary clinton who has spent 30 years of her public life focussed on trying to solve those problems versus donald trump who the only thing he can talk about is building walls and
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building a statute to himself. who is this guy? >> i've got to go. i've give you the last word if you can give me an answer, what's a bigger issue taxes or e-mails. >> i think e-mails are a way bigger issue. not even close. >> good answer. >> listen, i think the e-mails are going to be a problem for her going forward but i think the tax issue is also very serious. >> thank you. appreciate it. we'll be right back. rough night?
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that's it for us. thanks for watching. our live coverage continues now with natalie allen at the cnn center in atlanta. the numbers finally add up for donald trump. he has enough delegates for the republican presidential nomination. a historic moment in the making. barack obama heads to hiroshima. and doctors scramble for solutions as a drug-resistant superbug is found in an american patient. it's all next here. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. this is "cnn newsroom." we're live in atlanta. i'm natalie allen.
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and thank you for joining us. for months, people called his presidential bid a joke, but donald trump is having the last laugh. now, with more than enough delegates to clench the republican nomination, a group of previously uncommitted delegates pledged their support on thursday, edging him over the magic number. trump celebrated in north dakota and montana, promising to break the country's independence on foreign energy. >> america's incredible energy potential remains untapped. it's totally self-inflicted. it's a wound, and it's a wound that we have to heal. under my presidency, we'll accomplish a complete american energy independence. complete. complete. [cheers and applause] and lots of jobs. lots of jobs.
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imagine a world in which our foes and the oil cartels can no longer use energy as a weapon. >> trump says he's thrilled he was able to clench his nomination before hillary clinton. cnn's sun orwhite house correspondent jim acosta is traveling with donald trump. >> reporter: after shaking hands with some of the delegates in north dakota who helped him clench the gop nomination, donald trump took note of who hasn't reached the finish line yet, hillary clinton. >> here i am watching hillary fight, and she can't close the deal, and that should be such an easy deal to close. >> reporter: but he still has one other democrat on his mind, massachusetts senator elizabeth warren. >> she seems to have made it her job -- >> who, pocahontas? pocahontas? >> should you use that? >> very offensive! sorry! >> i'm sorry about that. pocahontas? is that what you said?
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i think she's as native-american as i am, okay? that i will tell you. but she's a woman that's been very infective other than she's got a big mouth. >> reporter: president obama says world leaders are alarmed. >> they're rattled. and for good reasons. because a lot of the proposals that he's made display either graens of world affairs or a cavalier attitude. >> reporter: trump jabbed right back. >> he's a president who's allowed many of these countries to totally take advantage of him and us, unfortunately. and he's got to say something. and it's unfortunate that every time he's making a press conference he's making statements about me. >> reporter: paul manafort said the billionaire likely won't select a woman or minority as a running mate because he doesn't want to be seen as pandering.
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not so said the candidate. >> we're looking at absolute competence. we're going to have many women involved. you're going to see that, you're going to see that very strongly. >> reporter: and trump is serious about winning over house speaker paul ryan hoo still hasn't endorsed him. the two spoke by phone overnight and are keeping the door open. >> we've had these conversations. >> we'll see ha happens. we've had great conversations, and we'll see ha happens. >> reporter: and even after all that news donald trump plans to hold another press conference on tuesday to lay out details about all the money that he and his supporters have donated to veterans groups. jim acosta, cnn, bismarck, north dakota. joining us is matt lewis, a contributor at the daily caller and conservative writer. other writers have referred to him as staunchly conservative and a sassy dude. i don't think i've ever introduced anyone like that.
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let's talk about the back and forth there. donald trump apparently received the number of delegates needed to clench the republican nomination. north dakota in play bringing him across the finish line. that's kind of nice to see them in the hunt there. what does that mean for him at this point? >> it is amazing that he is now clearly the presumptive nominee. he's got 1237 delegates. that in and of itself is astonishing, that donald trump is basically going to be the republican nominee in july at the convention. and, also, that he is beating hillary to the punch. hillary clinton can't close the deal as donald trump says, she's fighting for her political life to fend off bernie sanders. i mean, i think everyone thinks she'll be able to do it, but it's not been easy, and it probably won't be concluded until their convention in july in philadelphia. >> yeah, what would it look like if bernie sanders and donald trump debate on a national stage?
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she's just not there? >> right, well, this possibly could happen. there's talk about it. i guess donald trump brought it up on jimmy kimmel, doing it for charity. and it would be interesting in a way. it reminds me of european politics. you would have a socialist, bernie sanders, against a nationalist, donald trump. so that is pretty remarkable. turn of events in american politics. you wouldn't have seen that coming a few years ago. and it's unclear whether or not it would help or hurt hillary clinton. on one hand, you would have, you know, hillary clinton basically out of the limelight. bernie sanders and donald trump would be getting the attention. i think the question is, do they fight each other if they debate? is it, is it fun? or do they actually go against each other? and i think that's really important, because if bernie sanders and donald trump were to attack each other, that means that some of bernie, you know, the hope for donald trump is that some of bernie's fans will
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end up voting for donald trump in november. obviously, that's less likely to happen if they end up fighting. >> president obama, in that report, made a statement about what world leaders have been saying about trump. how much do friends of the u.s., allies of the u.s., thoughts on trump matter to this campaign? >> well, i don't think they really matter that much to american voters, to be honest with you. you know, america, for better or worse, has always been very self-focussed, most americans, i think compared to other people around the world don't pay that much attention to international news, for example. having said that, i really think that president obama, in my opinion, crossed the line there. that seemed to be not, not a prudent thing for the president of the united states to do. even though obviously, he has concerns about donald trump and a lot of these concerns are well-founded. to be abroad, publicly making a
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statement like that just struck me as, as not, you know, not the most prudent thing that you would expect from the commander in chief. >> maybe a little too sassy or something. >> exactly. >> i want to ask you one more question, all right. so trump clenches the nomination. are we going to get the same old fiery trump, say whatever's on his mind, don't give us any details? or is he going to restructure his playbook? >> no. we've been talking about donald trump restructuring his playbook for months and months and months. the so-called pivot. is donald trump going to pivot now and become more presidential? and sometimes he has advisers who tell people, okay, get ready. now he's going to become more presidential. the truth is, that donald trump is donald trump. and he's not going to change. and i think, you know, there's a rationale behind it as well. you can say, look, this is what got us to the, you know, the nomination. i mean, and sort of sports
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parlance, it's, you know, you don't go to the super bowl and play a different game plan. you do what got you there. so donald trump has gotten this far by being spontaneous and authentic and crude and rude and generally socially unacceptable. i don't think he can change. and i don't even know if he should change if he could. >> yeah, exactly. well, we'll wait and see, all those crude and rude got him here. we'll see if his tactics bring over any other voters who may be a little cool on hillary or bernie. we'll wait and see. thanks for joining us. political commentator matt lewis. the democratic front runner, hfk is reacting to president obama's comments that world leaders are rattled by donald trump. here it is. >> of course they're rattled. he's talking about breaking up our alliances, letting more countries get nuclear weapons. banning all muslims from coming to america. that is a recipe for fewer friends and more enemies, and it will make us less safe.
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this is not a reality show. it's not just politics. it's really serious. the entire world looks to the president of the united states for leadership and stability. and that is the kind of leadership i would provide if elected. >> clinton's comments came there during an interview with cnn's wolf blitzer. g7 leaders say a british exit from the european union would be a global economic risk. that's just one of the issue they're tackling at their summit this year in japan. a communique says economic growth is an urgent priority and the group is committed to free trade. the leaders of the worlds' richest economies are also pledging to do more to fight terrorism. >> translator: when it comes to violent extremism, it is a serious challenge to all of man kind. we should have no places where terrorists can hide. we should eradicate the flow of money that finances terrorism. the new action plan is going to be a major step forward in order to fight against terrorism with
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good cooperation and collaboration of the international community. >> here's what the british prime minister had to say. >> britain, together with the eu, has been helping to drive this process, specifically, on the eu/japan deal, something that's worth 89 billion pounds to both sides. i met yesterday with other eu leaders and the prime minister abe in the margins of the summit where we committed to accelerating negotiations and getting this deal completed. if we were outside the eu, it would be far more difficult to achieve anything like this, anything on this scale, anything as comprehensive. it's yet another example of the way the eu makes us better off, better off in terming of jobs. better off in terms of growth. better off in terms of investment by other countries to create the jobs and livelihoods that we need. >> the u.s. president is now on his way to hiroshima, japan, more than 70 years after the
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u.s. dropped an atomic bomb on the city during world war ii. mr. obama will be the first sitting u.s. president ever to visit hiroshima. crowds have been gathering to protest his visit. mr. obama is expected to lay a wreath at the peace memorial park. but u.s. officials say he will not apologize for the bombing. let's bring in cnn's will ripley, because he is there live for us in hiroshima. hello to you, will, and can you tell us more about the protests that have surrounded this visit. certainly, it's a sensitive visit by the president. >> reporter: hi, natalie. absolutely. those protesters, and i would guess maybe a few hundred of them are being kept pretty far away from here. they won't actually be able to see the president, as you might imagine the security perimeter around the peace park is quite extensive as the secret service is making sure that the president and japanese president shinzo abe are kept safe. he's scheduled to be here for less than an hour, and the people who were protesting or holding up signs, talking about
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the need to rid the world of nuclear weapons. some of the signs say that they protest president obama's visit. i would venture to say, though, natalie, they are in the minority here in hiroshima. i spoke with a former mayor, several survivors, all of whom welcome this. city officials have been asking for this since 1980. they've written to every president since ronald reagan, asking for this visit. and after 71 years and 11 presidents elected since the a-bomb was dropped, obama will be the first to come here, a symbolic moment, but as you mentioned, no apology expected. >> and you've been there for a while in the run-up to this. what's it like there right now, will? >> reporter: well, it's, first of all, it's an incredibly vibrant city. and as an american visiting here, this is my first time since moving to japan. i think perhaps i expected more of a sad place. and in fact hiroshima has really been trying to change its image. they want this city to symbolize
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peace. they want to be defined as a place that pushes the world to rid itself of these nuclear weapons. so that is, when you speak with survivors or most people who live in the city or have relatives who survived the attack, and you heyou hear some really, really incredible statements from people who say they don't hang onto anger. they simply want the world to learn from the suffering of the people here. >> thank you so much. will ripley covering president obama's visit to hiroshima. we'll see you in a bit. the u.s. has a superbug on its hand, and it's said to be invulnerable to the weapons of medical science. we'll tell you if the bacteria could spread. plus, egypt's reporting a possible break through in the search for egypt air flight 804. we'll tell you why the search may have narrowed right after this. you have your own home. so, live there. even if it's just for a night.
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u.s. center for disease control and prevention warned more must be done to develop more drugs. >> we know now that the more we look the more we're going to find. and the more we look at drug resistance the more concerned we are. we need to do a very comprehensive job protecting antibiotics. we will lose these miracle drugs. the metd sin cabinet is empty for some patients. it is the end of the road for antibiotics. >> it is a rare strain of e. coli. it's been identified in europe, canadian and china. u.s. authorities are scrambling to investigate and ensure it doesn't spread. we learn more from sanjay gupta. >> all we know is that this woman is 49 years old, from
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pennsylvania. she was seen in a clinic and found to have this e. coli bacteria that does not get killed by any existing antibiotic. now the focus for researchers is going to be what do we do about this? how do we prevent this particular bacteria which is resistant resistant to antibiotics. medical officials have been an anticipating a day like this, so there are been very strategies in the works. but as things stand, there is a bacteria that doesn't respond. we have to make sure that it doesn't spread and that we have more tools in the toolbox as soon as possible. back to you. >> sanjay gupta on that story for us. in other news, u.s.-backed kurdish and syrian democratic forces are reporting progress in
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their battle against isis in syria the coalition militia says it has now forced isis out of some ten villages north of raqqah, isis's self-proclaimed capital. 23 isis fiertss were killed. u.s. special operation forces are assisting. these photographs show them operating north of raqqah. the pentagon says they're advising only and are not engaged in combat. in the search for lost egypt air flight 804, state media reports airbus has detected pings from the area. 66 people were on board the flight that disappeared. for more, here's cnn's nic robertson. >> reporter: this is going to speed up the search for the missing plane right now. going from an area we were told two days ago by an egyptair
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official, this narrow it is down to a radius of about 3 miles, 5 kilometers. what the head of the investigation told state media is that airbus contacted him. they picked up a transmission from the elt emergency locating transmitter on board the aircraft, which had transmitted a signal via satellite which gave the location or a more precise location where it impacted the water. on board an airbus a achchl -32e are normally three of these devices, and normally the batteries last for 48 hours. we're getting the information more than seven days after the crash took place. not clear why there's been a delay. however, it will speed up the investigation. now the acoustic detection device can be much more precisely lowered into the mediterranean sea and will be
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listening for the beacons. the beacons transmit for about a month. so this is, should very much speed up the investigation from here. nic robertson, cnn, cairo, egypt. thousands of university students marched through the streets of ca raucous, venezuela thursday. [ shouting ] they want increase the government funding for struggling schools. just one item on a long list of the country's problems. >> translator: all the universities, like the central university of venezuela are always on strike, because the employees are not getting paid. >> translator: this is a peaceful march. we just want to pass and continue our protest so that the governor realizes what they are doing to us with these long lines, no food and insecurity in venezuela. >> people are fed up with
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president nicolas maduro. and they want him out. they have the highest inflation rate, expected to hit 481% this year. protests are happening every day as the government rations food and other basic necessities. nanother demonstration, thi one in pairs. the demonstrators are angry about a bill that gives employers more flexibility to hire and fire and weakens unions. here's more from cnn's kelly morgan from london. >> reporter: scenes that are becoming all-too familiar in paris. angry demonstrators clashing with riot police. tear gas fills the air, so, too, projectiles. the violence comes after a second day of nationwide strikes and protests. but this is just the latest wave of anger. french demonstrators have been up in arms for months now, over proposed reforms to labor laws
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which will make it easier for employers to hire and fire staff. [ shouting ] >> reporter: the government says the plans are vital in tackling the country's 10% unemployment rate. unions and workers, though, describe it as an attack on democracy. this anger is largely over the prime minister's decision to invoke a rarely-used constitutional clause to bypass parliament, forcing the bill through. demonstrators have mobilized around the country with transport strikes and blockades at oil refineries and nuclear power stations, triggering fuel shortages and bringing much of france to a stand still. >> translator: we do not want to paralyze france. that's not the primary objective. we have demands, and we want to be heard. there an is a government who wants to pass a law by force, giving the impression that this is no longer a democracy. >> reporter: neither side is budging in what has become a standoff. >> translator: the bill is still
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going ahead. they haven't changed their minds, and neither have we. >> translator: i know that if everyone goes home, it means we will have lost. so we just have to hold out. >> reporter: endless general strike, it reads, not a good sign, as france prepares to host the european championships in just two weeks. kellie morgan, cnn, london. in the race for the white house, hillary clinton under fire again for her e-mails. we'll have more on the trust issues she faces when we come back here. plus, donald trump says he'll put america first. we'll see why his clothing line isn't exactly fitting that bill.
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donald trump now has more than enough delegates to clench the u.s. republican nomination. a group of previously unpledged delegates pledged their support thursday. trump says he's thrilled that he clenched the nomination before democrat hillary clinton. barack obama heads to hiroshima after he concludes a g7 summit in japan. he is the first sitting u.s. president to visit the site in japan. the bombing effectively ended world war ii. u.s. health officials say we will likely see more outbreaks of a superbug that no exist being aibts can kill. a woman developed a case of the rare kind of e. coli. it's not yet known how she became infected. the u.s. presidential
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democratic primary in california is in a dead heat. a poll by the public policy institute of california shows hillary clinton ahead of bernie sanders by just two percentage points, a staktsal high. that primary now set for june 7th. many political analysts predict clinton is likely to clench her party's nomination in california, but that is not stopping sanders from speaking out against her and the u.s. election system. he appeared on the late night show jimmy kimmel live just a few hours ago. >> there were 400 super delegates who announced their support for secretary clinton before anyone else was in the race. before the first balanlot was cast. and i think that's patently absurd and undemocratic. and kind of dumb, in the sense that when you make that judgment, you want to know how the campaign is going. who is the strongest candidate? turns out that in virtually every single national poll and in every single state poll,
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bernie sanders does often a lot better against donald trump than does hillary clinton. >> hillary clinton has been dogged, of course, by claims of improper e-mail use as secretary of state and as dana bash explains, that's not the only trust issue facing the democratic presidential front runner. >> oh, thank you! >> reporter: should have, would have, could have. sentiments any candidate is loathe to express on the campaign trail. >> as i've said many times, if i could go back, i would do it differently. i now people have concerns about this. i understand that. >> reporter: yet, for hillary clinton, this week's state department inspector general report about how she mishandled e-mails as secretary of state could be especially damaging. beating a central liability with voters. honesty and trustworthiness. would you vote for someone thaw don't trust? >> well, people should and do trust me. >> reporter: all through the democratic primary contest,
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voters who said the most important quality was trustworthiness only vote the for clinton in three states. >> i do question her judgment. >> reporter: it's a vulnerability bernie sanders has worked hard to exploit. maybe not so much about her e-mail issue, but he has spent months accusing clinton of be being in the pocket of big business and wall street. her refusal to release transcripts of paid speeches to goldman sachs hasn't helped. >> there are certain expectations when you run for president. this isn't a new one. >> reporter: the state department's damning report has given donald trump a fresh round of ammunition against her. >> as i say, crooked hillary, crooked hillary. she's as crooked as they come. >> reporter: assuming clinton is the democratic nominee, she already knows trump's playbook. >> bad judgment, skirting on the edge all the time. and you hook back at her
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history, and this is her history. >> reporter: but people's views of trump are exactly the same. 64% say he's not honest and truss worthy either. running against donald trump, will hillary clinton have a big disadvantage if voters don't see her as honest and trustworthy or will it even matter? >> on most polling, the two candidates run evenly. it's a wash. >> reporter: but still the most likely test for november will be which argument wins? this one? >> if crooked hillary clinton is in charge, things will get much worse. >> reporter: or this. >> i think voters are going to be looking at the full picture of what i have to offer, my life and my service. and the full threat that donald trump offers our country. >> reporter: dana bash, cnn, washington. in our next hour, i'll be speaking with a clinton supporter to get her take on the trust issue. that's in about 30 minutes.
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donald trump takes a bold line when it comes to china and trade, but that line of attack hits a snag when it comes to his clothing line. drew griffin has more on the myth fit between the clothes that bear his name and the countries where they're manufactured. >> reporter: the dress shirt is made in bangladesh. the two-piece pinstriped suit, indonesia. the silk tie and cuff links, made in china. what brings this ensemble all together is the name on the label. they are all donald j. trump's signature brand. what can you tell me about where these were made? >> bangladesh has the lowest wages and most unsafe working conditions of any major apparel producing country. >> reporter: he runs a group that conducts investigations on the industry, which he says is an industry ever on the hunt for cheaper labor. and documents confirm trump's
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signature brand is no different. take this shirt. in 2014, it would have been sewn together in honduras where workers make an average $1.30 an hour. it wasn't cheap enough. that same year, the company donald trump hired to make his shirt in honduras ended the hoon duran contract. our donald trump shirt bought recently over the internet, was made in bangladesh where the average garment worker earns 30 cents per hour. what's trump's explanation for manufacturing his clothing overseas? listen to what he told jake tapper. it's a lovely tie, it's made in china. >> right. >> is it hypocritical at all for you to talk about this? no. a lot of my ties are made in china, because they've manipulated their currency to such a point that it's impossible for our companies to compete. >> reporter: why should you care? >> if you want to take a look
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at -- >> reporter: in fall river, massachusetts, bob still makes an american shirt. his new england shirt company employs more than 60 people. he pays them $12 to $13 an hour. he admits it's a barely livable wage. and up a narrow staircase, through a dill and dated section of this huge warehouse, he can show you where workers no longer make any wage. >> now there's nothing, you know, there's nothing left. it's all gone. >> reporter: first it was nafta, he says, then other international trade agreements, and the manufacturers found cheaper labor and left. he survives by producing a high-quality shirt, custom made that sells for a minimum of $125. workers who sew them can't afford to wear them. we showed him a donald trump signature brand shirt, made in bangladesh. we bought for $16.96. this is a product that is made by somebody in bangladesh that sits at a machine for ten, 12
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hours a day and pumps them in, pumps them out and makes 30 cents an hour. how do you talk about this and being made in an american factory versus this being made in a factory in bangladesh? >> that is a kfx that has made this election extremely personal to bob kiter. >> the fact is that our country is being killed on trade by china. by japan. by mexico. >> donald trump, right, is talking in ways that i think would make you feel good. >> the reality is in front of me. you know, the reality is this is the product, he made this shirt in honduras two or three years ago, and now it answering made in bangladesh. maybe next year it's made in vietnam, and maybe the year after yiindochina. it moves to wherever the income becomes higher and higher. >> reporter: we asked which his
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clothing and accessories were made overseas. and we're told donald trump has been very open about the fact that most of these products are unfortunately not manufactured in the united states due to the extreme currency manipulation by countries like china that make it nearly impossible to compete and manufacture these products in america. a cnn reality check found that statement to be false. it is simply not true that china has been manipulating its currency to benefit its own manufacturers. in fact, for the last ten years, china's currency has been strengthening, the exact opposite of what donald trump implies. and if donald trump needs to learn how to manufacture clothing in the united states, bob kiter at the new england shirt company says he can probably show him how. drew griffin, cnn, atlanta. the scripps national spelling bee has a new champion
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or is it champions? plus, whether the u.k. leaves the european union is up to the voters, but we wanted to know what some british lawmakers think. the big hilton
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within the past hour, british prime minister david cameron said he and other g7 leaders think there's a pick economic risk in a so-called brexit. during their summit in japan they said a u.k. exit from the eu would reverse the trend towards global trade and investment and the jobs they create and is serious risk to
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growth. london's new mayor isn't a fan of a possible brexit either. sadiq khan says it isn't just about the economic consequences but about values. khan says a vote to leave would send a message that britain wants to stand alone. >> isolationism isn't the answer to any of the challenges we face. the solution can't be to pull up the draw bridge or to alienate the friends we need to help find a solution. nor will 22 miles of choppy english channel inch late us from the rest of the continent's problems, because they're our problems too. we wouldn't be where we are here in london with an isolationist approach. and we know from our experience that the answer is to get more involved, to for mormform more alliances and to actively shape our future in the world. >> the vote is next month. right now polls are split, and so are at least two british lawmakers.
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erin mclaughlin got their thoughts on this touchy topic. >> reporter: should the u.k. remain a member of the european union or leave the european union. we're here to put it before two lawmakers on opposite sides of the debate. >> i think we should leave to maintain control of our own country. >> i think we should remain, to end war, promote peace and prosperity for our people. >> reporter: this is the european commission, the executive arm of the eu where legislation is proposed and enforced. what does that mean to you? >> to me, this is unaccountable, undemocratic, and this is where the power is. it's not with westminster parliament anymore. it's here. >> they're professional civil servants doing a very important
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job. and the french, the germans, the italians, they control their destinies. they don't think that you can say that building -- >> the european council sets the political direction for the eu, includes heads of state or government from 28 member states. are you concerned about the influence here waning? are you worried about the eu without the u.k.? >> for the united states, it's been very good to have britain on the inside of the european union, because on an issue like the invasion of ukraine we've helped bolster the european position. >> we're not leaving europe. >> do you think this council is important? >> it's important to the european union. friendly relations will continue, but just in a different way. >> the european parliament is one of the largest law-making bodies in the world. how important is europe to the british identity?
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>> i'm english, but i'm also from the united kingdom. i'm a european and a citizen of the world. and i don't see these as competing identities. >> this is all about creating a super state, and i think it's either we say in the super state or relieve and get back our sovereignty over our own country. taking you live to japan where we are seeing president obama with carolyn kennedy stepping off air force one as he arrives. he will be speaking with troops there before he heads on to hiroshima, a symbolic journey, the first sitting president to visit hiroshima since the americans dropped the bomb there during world war ii and ending the war. carolyn kennedy, of course, our
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representative there in japan. so we'll continue to bring you more on the president's visit and hopefully a live look. and we'll hear from the president when he speaks to u.s. troops and take a quick break. ♪ if you have moderate to severe plaque psoriasis isn't it time to let the real you shine through? introducing otezla, apremilast. otezla is not an injection, or a cream. it's a pill that treats plaque psoriasis differently. some people who took otezla saw 75% clearer skin after 4 months. and otezla's prescribing information has no requirement for routine lab monitoring. don't take otezla if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. otezla may increase the risk of depression. tell your doctor if you have a history of depression or suicidal thoughts, or if these feelings develop. some people taking otezla reported weight loss. your doctor should monitor your weight and may stop treatment. side effects may include diarrhea,
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nausea, upper respiratory tract infection, and headache. tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, and if you're pregnant or planning to be. ask your dermatologist about otezla today. otezla. show more of you. who don't have access thto basic banking,on people but that is changing. at temenos, with the microsoft cloud, we can enable a banker to travel to the most remote locations with nothing but a phone and a tablet. everywhere where there's a phone, you have a bank.
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well, a police cruiser's dash cam video made it into derek's weather cast. >> my repertoire. yeah, you have got to see this, rather, you've got to listen to this. >> okay. >> take a listen. [ blast ] >> this is really amazing to hear just how loud that thunder was from the lightning that struck one of the houses close by as that police cruiser was driving. and in fact, that shock wave from the thunder was actually so intense that it knocked the dash cam off of the windshield. if you didn't get a chance to listen or hear that, take a listen one more time. [ blast ]
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>> all right, so the question is posed, what sa this thunder exa. i'm glad you asked this. basically it is a shock wave, a shock wave strong enough, again, to knock off the guy's dash cam right off of his windshield, but basically, you can't have thunder without lightning, and when we have lightning, that heats a column of air within the atmosphere. there's so much intense pressure and heat there that eventually that column of air can't take that any longer and explodes and reverberates with a shock wave. and what we hear is a resulting thunderclap in the sky. now a little factoid for you. if you want to know how far away a thunderstorm is, you can count the seconds between a lightning strike and clap of thunder, divide that by five and get the number of miles. so let's say you have a ten-second distance between the
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lightning flash and clap of thunder, that means it is roughly two miles away and you want to get to cover. cloud to cloud or cloud-to-ground lightning, this is all part of a major storm that's been impacting the central u.s. there's been 35,000 lightning strikes within the past two hours, believe it or not. and look at the tornado, wind and hail reports, just from this week. over 100 tornados, and remember, we typically see this amount of tornado activity in may and june. one other thing that's been quite astounding is the amount of rain that's fallen in texas. get a load of some of this video coming out of the brenam, washington county, texas region. this is what 16 inches of rain in less than 12 hours looks like. this is one of many dozens of rescues that have taken place in texas. we're going to end on the national spelling bee, because we love it so much.
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11-year-old knee harr jun ga is a co-champion. he correctly spelled the word for method of education known as feldenchrist. check it out. and the competition ended after nihard named a german word meaning a personal relationship. >> g-e-s-l-e-s-l-l-c-h-a-f-t. >> that is correct. >> both winners will each receive a $40,000 cash prize and other gifts. they were both stunned after the big one. >> it was just insane, i mean, i don't even know how to put it in
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words. >> can you take us inside the mental approach and what's going through your mind? >> no. i'm just speechless. i can't say anything. i mean, i'm only in fifth grade. [ laughter ] >> this is the third year in a row the spelling bee has had co-champions. get this, his brother was a co-champ two years ago. during a short break you can figure out how to spell feldenchrist. another hour will be back in just a moment. don't tour tokyo.. and please, don't "do" tokyo. live in tokyo. airbnb a place in shinagawa, or a loft in ebisu. try toro. try this.
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a historic moment in japan. that's president obama arriving with the u.s. ambassador to japan, caroline kennedy schlossberg. this is another step as he heads toward hiroshima. also donald trump hits the magic number. the billionaire gets one step closer to the white house after earning enough delegates to clench the republican nomination. and signals from the sea. searchers may be getting closer to finding the main wreckage of egyptair flight 804. this all ahead this hour, welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. we're live in atlanta, i'm
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natalie allen. "cnn newsroom" starts right now. thank you for being with us. barack obama will make history in the coming hours as the first sitting u.s. president to visit hiroshima, japan. it's been more than 70 years since the u.s. dropped an atomic bomb on the city during world war ii. right now, mr. obama is at a marine corps air station visiting with american forces. and here show -- hiroshima crowds have been gathering to protest. let's bring in athena jones live waiting for the president's arrival. and hello to you. and um awondering. we have seen a few protesters, but what the majority of the people? what do they think about this visit? >> reporter: hi, natalie. the majority of people that we've been hearing from are people who are happy to see the president making this historic
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and symbolic trip here to hiroshima. as you mentioned, the first signature u.s. president to make such a trip. we know he's not going to be apologizing. he's not going to be focussing on the past or revisiting the decision to drop the atomic bomb here in hiroshima and in nagasaki. this is something high on his foreign policy agenda since the beginning of his presidency. he delivered a speech back in 2009, acknowledging then as he continues to do that it could take a long time, maybe something that is not happening in his lifetime, but we expect him to talk about the real risks out there when it comes to securing loose nuclear material, making sure it does not fall into the hands of isis and al qaeda and combatting nuclear proliferation. so a lot of topics today. but he won't focus a lot on what
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the ouu.s. did in 1945, but instead, what needs to be done to achieve a world without nuclear weapons. >> and what happens during the ceremony? >> reporter: we expect him to be on the ground here. he's scheduled to be on the ground for about an hour. so he'll speak to the marines, and he'll come here to the peace memorial park, and we'll see him to lay a wreath here at the site with japanese prime minister shinzo abe. then deliver brief remarks, and then we'll see him leave and head back home. this is something the president has wanted to do since 2009. he said on his first visit here to japan that he hoped to one day have the honor and the opportunity to visit either hiroshima or nagasaki, now with time running out, this being his last g7 summit, likely his last trip to japan, he's taking advantage of that. we'll all be closely watching. something we've been waiting for.
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natalie? >> it will be a symbolic visit for sure, and we'll wait and hear what the president had to say about how he felt during that time. athena jones traveling with him. thank you so much. british leaders say an exit from the european union would be a risk. a joint communique says economic growth is an urgent priority and the group is committed to free trade. >> been helping to drive this process, specific chi on the eu/japan deal, something worth 89 billion pounds to both sides. i met yesterday with other leaders and the prime minister abe in the margins of the summit where we committed to accelerating negotiations and getting this deal completed. if we were outside the eu, it would be far more difficult to achieve anything like this, anything on this scale. anything as comprehensive. it's yet another example of the
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way the eu makes us better off. >> the leaders of the worlds' richest economies also pledged to do more to fight terrorism. on a day without a primary, caucus or single vote cast, donald trump has managed to win the republican presidential nomination. he did it, thanks to a group of previously uncommitted delegates who announced thursday they are in his corner. cnn's senior white house correspondent jim acosta is traveling with the trump campaign. [ applause ] >> reporter: after shaking hands with some of the delegates in north dakota who helped him clench the gop nomination, donald trump took note of who hasn't reached the finish line yet -- hillary clinton. >> and here i am watching hillary fight, and she can't close the deal. and that should be such an easy deal to close. >> reporter: but the presumptive gop nominee still has another person on his mind,
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massachusetts senator elizabeth warren. >> elizabeth warren has made it her job. >> who, pocahontas? >> very offensive, sorry! >> pocahontas? is that what you said? i think she's as native-american as i am, okay? that i will tell you. but she's a woman that's been very infective, other than she's got a pick mouth. >> reporter: he's also taken hits from president obama who's warned world leaders are alarmed. >> they're rattled, and for good reason, because a lot of the proposals that he's made display either ignorance of world affairs or a cavalier attitude. >> reporter: trump jabbed right back. >> he's a president who's allowed many of these countries to take advantage of him and us, unfortunately, and he's got to say something. and it's unusual that every time he has a press conference he's
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talking about me. >> reporter: trump also answered questions about comments made by paul manafort. he said he likely won't select a woman or minority as a running mate because he doesn't want to be soon as pandering. not so, says the candidate. >> we're looking for absolute competence. we're going to have many women involved. and i think you're going to see that and see it strongly. >> reporter: and trump said he is serious whabout winning paul ryan. the two spoke overnight and are working to get together. >> we'll see what happens. we've had great conversations, and we'll see what happens. >> reporter: and even after all that news, donald trump plans to hold another press conference on tuesday to lay out new details about all of the money he and his supporters have donated to veterans groups. jim acosta, bismarck, north dakota. hillary clinton is reacting to trump clenching his party's nomination with more attacks. her comments came during a phone
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interview with cnn's wolf blit blitzer. >> donald trump says outrageous things all the time, but today i officially clenched the republican nomination, so this is as real as it gets. and this man who is an unqualified loose canon is within reach of the most important job in the world. >> joining us now is cnn political commentator and democratic strategist maria cardona, also a hillary clinton supporter and super delegate. thank you for being with us. >> thank you, natalie. >> first up, hillary clinton calls donald trump an unqualified, loose canon. we've heard that before from others this season. she's called him this before. but with all his one-line zingers, what does she need to turn up the heat and go after him with more specifics. what do you expect from her? >> i expect that she's not going to let anything slide. and the big difference between
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donald trump in the republican primary process is that he was facing 16 pretty weak contenders who did not take him seriously at first and then suffered for it. they did not have the guts to go p aft after him from the moment he burst on to the scene, when he announced his candidacy by denigrating and insulting mexican immigrants, calling them rapists and criminals. and not even jeb bush, whose wife is a mexican, said anything about it until like a month later. the first one who said anything about it, natalie, was actually hillary clinton. so that tells me that she is not going to let anything slide. she is going to go at him. she is going to go at his lack of qualifications. his dangerous economic policies, his incredibly dangerous foreign policy and focus on the contrast and the choice that the american people have between him, as she says, an unqualified, loose
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canca cann cannon, and i would add, a 12 year old bully stuck in the body of a republican nominee. she is someone who has 30 years of public service, who has focussed on making people's lives better and trump as focussed on nothing but enriching herself. >> it's going to have to be pretty fantastic, nobody else on the republican side could come up with a playbook to take him down. she still faces a two-front battle with sanders still in the race. could this allow sanders to make up ground against trump nationally? >> i think it's difficult for senator sanders to get to the number of delegates or to essentially catch up with her in any way in the number of pledged delegates, natalie. we've talked about super delegates. but really, the big number that is important here is pledged delegates. and right now, you see hillary clinton, who hwon more contests
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and acquired about 300 more pledged delegates than bernie sanders, which, by the way is three times more than what then senator barack obama had against then senator hillary clinton. and obama, as you know, ended up getting the nomination, because he arrived at the convention with more pledged delegates than hillary clinton. hillary clinton will arrive at the convention with more pledged delegates and 3 million more votes than bernie sanders. and that is what is going to help her clench the nomination with the help of the unpledged delegates or super delegates, as they call it. >> could a sanders/trump debate be a detraction, be a disrupter? that is something they would want to see and she's not there? >> i think we have to look at whether this has a smidgeon of reality in actually happening, and i really don't think that it
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does. this is something that donald trump put out there, because it's what he does, natalie, to distract us from the fact that he has absolutely zero credible or sane ideas on how to deal with america's problems. i think it's interesting fodder to talk about. but, again, it's a huge distraction from the fact that donald trump really has nothing but empty, dangerous rhetoric to offer the american people. >> well, he does have the entertainment factor when he goes on. and we'll see how she stands up against him in that. all right, we thank you so much for joining us, maria cardona. thank you. >> it's been great to be with you. hillary clinton is pushing back against a report saying she did not follow the rules when it comes to using her private e-mail server for government business. clinton told wolf blitzer that she thought she was allowed to use a private server when she was secretary of state. she also said the rules were not clear and that she's not the first one to do it. >> this report makes clear that personal e-mail use was the
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practice under other secretaries of state, and the rules were not clarified until after i had left. but, as i've said many times, it was still a mistake, if i could go back, i'd do it differently, and i understand people have concerns about this, but i hope voters look at the full picture of everything that i've done. >> state department spokesman said on thursday that clinton o. rioters clash with riot police. also no antibiotic will kill it, and now a patient in the u.s. has been diagnosed with the superbug. we'll tell you why doctors fear it could spread. that's coming up.
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i've just arrived in atlanta and i can't wait to start telling people how switching to geico could save them hundreds of dollars on car insurance. but first, my luggage. ahh, there it is. uh, excuse me, sir? i think you've got the wrong bag. sorry, they all look alike, you know? no worries. well, car's here, i can't save people money chatting at the baggage claim all day. geico®. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. this is paris, where police and protesters clash during labor reform rallies thursday. demonstrators threw rocks and bottles at officers, they fired back with tear gas. more than 18 thousand
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demonstrators were at the rallies. the protesters are angry at a reform bill that gives employers more flexibility to hire and fire and weakens the power of unions. here's more from cnn's kellie morgan. >> reporter: scenes that are becoming all-too familiar in paris. angry demonstrators, clashing with riot police. tear gas fills the air, so, too, projectiles. the violence comes after a second day of nationwide strikes and protests. but this is just the latest wave of anger. french demonstrators have been up in arms for months now, over proposed reforms to labor laws which will make it easier for employers to hire and fire staff. [ shouting ] >> reporter: the government says the plans are vital in tackling the country's 10% unemployment rate. unions and workers describe it as an attack over democracy.
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this is over a rarely-used constitutional clause to bypass parliament, forcing the bill through. they have blockades at oil refineries and nuclear power stations, triggering fuel shortages and bringing much of france to a stand still. >> translator: we do not want to paralyze france. that's not the primary objective. we have demands, and we want to be heard. there is a government who wants to pass a law by force, giving an impression that this is no longer a democracy. >> reporter: neither side is budging in what has become a standoff. >> translator: the bill is still going ahead. they haven't changed their minds, and neither have we. >> translator: i know that if everyone goes home, it means we will have lost. so we just have to hold out. >> reporter: endless general strike, it reads, not a good sign, as france prepares to host the european championships in just two weeks.
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kellie morgan, cnn, london. protests are also continuing on the streets of venezuela. [ shouting ] where mainly students, they want increased government funding for struggling school, just one item on a long list of this country's problems. >> translator: all the universities, like the central university of venezuela are always on strike because the employees are not getting paid. >> translator: this is a peaceful march. we want to pass and continue our protests so the government realizes what they're doing to us with these long lines, no food and insecurity in venezuela. >> people are fed up with president nicolas maduro and they want him out. they have the highest inflation rate, expected to hit 481% this year. the government rations food and
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other basic necessities. the united states has discovered its first-known human case of a superbug, one that cannot be killed by known antibiotics. in light of the discovery, the head of the u.s. centers for disease control and prevention warned more must be done to develop new drugs. >> we know now that the more we look the more we're going to find, and the more we look at drug resistance the more concerned we are. we need to do a very comprehensive job protecting antibiotics so that we can have them and our children can have them. we need to make new antibiotics but must have better stewardship and identification of outbreaks. we will lose these miracle drugs. the medicine cabinet is empty for some patients. it is the end of the road for antibiotics unless we act urgently. >> this superbug is a rare kind of e. coli bacteria which typically targets the
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intestines. it's also been identified in europe, china and canada. u.s. authorities are scrambling to investigate and ensure it doesn't spread. cnn's dr. sanjay gupta has more on the bacteria and the patient involved. >> all we know at this point is that this woman is 49 years old, that she's from pennsylvania. she was seen in a clinic. she wasn't in the hospital. she was seen in the clinic. and she was found to have this, this bacteria, an e. coli bacteria that does not get killed by any existing antibiotic. she hasn't traveled from overseas recently, so this does not appear to have come from another country, and now the focus for researchers is what do we do about this? how do we prevent this particular bacteria from spreading, and where are the new antibiotics going to come from? where are they going to come from? when are they going to come? i think medical officials for some time had been anticipating a day like this. so there's been various strategies in the works, but as
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things stand now, there is a bacteria that doesn't spread and that we have more tools in the toolbox as soon as possible. back to you. >> sanjay gupta on top of that story for us. >> well, derek van dam is here because he's on top of the severe weather going across the u.s. central midwest, i guess. >> yes, that's correct. we've had over 100 tornados this week alone. and we came across some incredible dash cam footage from a police officer's vehicle. you have to see, rather hear what i'm talking about. listen. >> well, two reasons. [ blast ] >> wow! now that is some incredible, incredible sound on tape, if you ask me. >> the nice officer offered no expletive. >> that's right. either that or it was bleeped out. that shock wave from the thunder actually knocked the dash cam off the gentleman's windshield. if you didn't get a chance to see it or hear it, take a listen
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one more time. >> well, two reasons. one, it would be -- [ blast ] >> all right, so what exactly is thunder? i'm so glad you asked. let me answer that question for you at home. thunder is a shock wave, just like the shock wave that knocked the dash cam off the police officer's windshield. off his vehicle. basically, you can't have thunder without lightning. and once lightning actually forms, it actually super heats, a column of air, to 50,000 degrees fahrenheit, that's warmer than the surface of the sun. tons of pressure, extremely high temperatures within that column of air and eventually it can't take it anymore. it explodes, reverberates in all directions. and we hear the resulting shock wave, which is thunder. also a tidbit, water cooler knowledge for you. did you now you can calculate the distance between yourself and an approaching thunderstorm by counting the seconds between a lightning flash and the clap of thunder? you divide that by five and that
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equals the number of miles away between you and the thunderstorm. so, for instance, if you count ten seconds between a lightning flash and clap of thunder, divide that by five and you get a thunderstorm two miles away. there's various types of lightning, cloud to cloud or cloud to ground. we've all seen it and heard the thunder. did you know there's been over 35,000 lightning strikes across the central u.s. just within the past two hours? unbelievable stuff. this is all part of a large storm system that has wreaked havoc across the u.s. over 100 tornados. several wind and hail reports. this is fairly common, though, this time of year. the central u.s. also known as tornado alley sees upwards of 276 tornados on average for the month of may. so nothing out of the unusual. it's not only the severe weather threat with tornados and hail that's been the concern, it's been the extreme rainfall. get a load of this, 16 inches for washington county, leaves
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flooding scenes like this. take a look at these visuals coming out of the region. people submerged in vehicles, plenty of swift water rescues taking place. that is unbelievable. and by the way, natalie, that is what 16 inches of rain in less than 12 hours looks like, it completely stalls out people's vehicles and roadways. scary stuff. mother nature giving assault. just really giving it to us. >> and cars shouldn't be driving in that. >> turn around and don't drown. that's the national weather service's nmotto. new developments in the search for lost egyptair flight 804. searchers may be closing in on the airplane. we'll have that in a moment. plus, we'll meet one farm family who relies heavily on the european union but is split on whether to stay or leave.
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thanks for staying with us the this is our last half hour. you're watching "cnn newsroom." thank you for watching from the u.s. and around the world. i'm natalie allen. here are our top stories. president obama will go to hiroshima. his visit is meant to honor those killed in world war ii and a chance to pursue a world where nuclear weapons are no longer necessary. caroline kennedy schlossberg, the ambassador to japan with the press. donald trump now has more than enough delegates to clench the republican nomination. a group of previously uncommitted delegates pledged their support thursday. trump says he's thrilled, that
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he guaranteed the nomination before hillary clinton got there. iraqi forces and allied militias are celebrating their first significant victory as they battle isis around the city of fallujah. they've retaken the nearby town of parma. the victory means most of iraq east of fallujah is now under iraqi government control. a show of support for the taliban's new leader. the taliban commanders pledging their allegiance. this amateur video shows him. a u.s. drone strike killed the previous leader, mullah mansour in pakistan on saturday. we turn now to the search for missing egyptair flight 804. france just announced an underwater search operation for the jet will begin soon. france is also sending a ship
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equipped with devices that can locate the plane's black boxes. meantime, egypt's state media reports signals have been detected from one of the jet's emergency locater transmitters. for more, here's nic robertson in cairo. >> reporter: so this is really going to speed up the search for the missing plane right now. going from an area we were told two days ago by an egyptair official, an area they were searching the size of connecticut. this narrows it down to about 3 miles, about 5 kilometers. what the head of the investigation told state media is that airbus contacted them. they picked up a transmission from the elt emergency locating transmitter on board the aircraft, which had transmitted a signal via satellite which gave the location or more precise location where it impacted the water. on board an airbus a-320 there are normally three of these elts. they are made to trigger a signal once they hit land or
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water. normally the signal lasts for about 48 hours. we're getting the information now more than seven days after the crash took place. not clear why there's been a delay. however, it will speed up the investigation. now the acoustic devices can be more precisely lowered into the mediterranean sea, and they will be listening for the pings from the transmitters, the beacons that are on the black boxes. of course the clock ticking there, those transmit for about a month. so that should much more quickly speed up the search, trying to find the missing aircraft. nic robertson, khai rcairo, egy. hundreds of people gathered outside egypt's upper house to remember victims of the crash. friends and family of passengers held banners and lit candles near the number 66. the french ambassador to cairo offered his condolences.
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>> translator: it was necessary for all those lost someone, a friend or a beloved one in the crash to have a moment to share their sorrow and to receive some message of sympathy and compassion. >> we turn now to the search for another lost airliner. cnn has obtained new images of debris being analyzed in connection with missing malaysia airlines flight 370. it was found in mozambique by a south african tourist. mh 370 disappeared in march of 2014 with 239 people on board. it was flying from malaysia's capital to beijing. australia has announced the piece found in mozambique and two from mauritius will be taken to an australian lab for examination. the g7 warns against the
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united kingdom leaving the european union. world leaders say a so-called brexit would be a big problem for global growth. london's new mayor isn't a fan of a possible brexit either. sadiq khan says a vote to leave would send a message that bring the tape wants to stand alone. >> he explains some of his other kearns. >> the national polls are very close. i think they're too close to call. what's clear from polls in london is that the majority of londoners want to remain in european union. i'm worried, though, about low turnout. i'm worried about the campaign being negative, pulling people off of taking part in the referendum vote. so i want a high turnout in london, particularly among young londoners who see the benefi of student exchanges. so between now and june the 23rd, i'll be trying to persuade londoners why it's in our interest to remain in the european union. >> as the mayor said, the vote is next month. and right now polls are split.
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cnn money europe editor, nina del santos meets one family of farmers who are divided on how they'll vote. >> reporter: after ten years of marriage, three kids and a growing family business, carrie and chad cry ar have started to have their differences. their beef? not with each other, but over brussels, which chad believes has sewn the sides of unfair competition. >> i'm going to be opting out, because i think the eu favors large business and big business, and i don't think that is really the way farming in this country should be going. >> reporter: while carrie -- >> i will be thankful for britain to stay in the european union. think farming will be better. there's more support from the
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european government for farming than there is from the u.k. government. >> reporter: across the british isles, it is an emotional issue. about 70% of the land is designated to it. but this is a sector that accounts for 1% of the workforce. and brussels provides a lifeline. for farms like this, this is equivalent to almost half of their yearly income in the form of subsidies. it may sound like a cash cow, but such subsidies don't go far, especially in the dairy sector where a collapse in milk prices have sent nearly half of the farmers out of business since 2000. and to keep the farm going for a fourth generation, the cryars have had to diversify into cheese, yogurt and honey. as irony would have it, it was a trip to the european parliament to receive an award for their wilshire loaf that left chad cheesed off. >> i went there with an open mind, but i made up my mind while i was there, we can never
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vote together as a bloc, as the french and germans do, and it's for that reason that i think we should renegotiate somehow. and the only way we can do that is to come out. >> reporter: whether the u.k. decides to stay the effect will live on in the next wave. what do they make of that? >> do you think we should stay in or go out. mommy's team or daddy's team? >> i guess whichever's best for farmers. >> reporter: nina del santos, cnn money, wilshire, england. >> someone needs to ask the cows as well. iraqi forces celebrate a victory in the fight for fallujah. we'll have that coming up next. and the tide could also be turning against isis in another province. plus, he suffered senseless cruelty, but nine years later, the iraqi boy known as josef considers himself lucky.
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arwa damon has followed this story and will tell us how he's doing next.
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u.s. military denies suspicions that its special forces are in the thick of the fight against isis in syria. these pictures show u.s. forces operating north of raqqah. the pentagon insists they're not engaged in combat. >> they are not on the forward heine. they are providing advice assistance. and, again, i'm not going to get into details, but that mission has not changed. their role has not change the. they are not leading this fight. they are supporting those forces that are at the leading edge. >> questions were also raised, because the u.s. forces appear to be wearing the insignia of the main kurdish force in syria. iraqi forces battling isis around fallujah are celebrating
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their first significant victory. [ shouting and gunfire ] the troops and their militia allies have retaken the town of parma 16 kilometers from fallujah. this map shows how the offensive is unfolding. iraqi forces are pushing toward fallujah from the south, the east and the west. hundreds of family are fleeing and heading to territory controlled by iraqi forces. we want to update you on a boy named youssif. he was doused in gasoline by masked men and set on fire during the iraq war, and he has shown extraordinary courage in the face of senseless cruelty. in this exclusive update, arwa damon continues to follow along and check up on her friend.
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>> reporter: hey, look at you, you got to big! youssif has grown in numerous ways. he has been a hero for many over the years. superman is his. >> i have a project in my english class. and so each person got to choose one super hero. >> reporter: do you identify with him? >> yeah. >> reporter: in what sense? >> i try to fit in for everyone. >> reporter: is that hard for you? >> not really. >> reporter: he was 4 years old when masked men attacked him outside his baghdad home. we reported his story. the outpouring of support came from across the globe. and youssif and his family ended up in los angeles. where his parents heard their son laugh and sh reek for the first time in mondaths, moving s mother to tears.
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he has undergone multiple surgeries. the peopmemory all but erased. >> reporter: you say you don't remember that much about baghdad. >> i don't, only my grandparents. >> reporter:' like any other teen, obsessed with soccer, has loads of friends and still wants to become a doctor to help others. but he knows he may not see his homeland in his lifetime. you've been following the news about what's happening in iraq with isis and -- >> i feel really bad for all the people. and all those kids and stuff. it's like those terrorists aren't muslims. they're just extremists. >> reporter: we still can't disclose his father's identity. for the security of the family back in iraq. >> i'm trying not to read and see what's going on. because whatever i see is sad there. everything is just sad. >> reporter: and life as a refugee is never easy. he has only been able to find a
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part-time job and is looking for more work. >> at the same time, as you see, like so many people looking for job. it's not only me. >> reporter: they're all profoundly aware that they are fortunate to have survived and escaped the war zone, thanks to the kindness of strangers who continue to finance youssif's medical care. >> i am one step closer to the finish line. >> reporter: you're starting high school. >> yeah. i'm really excited, too. >> reporter: arwa damon, los angeles. >> how about youssif. my goodness. if you'd like to help youssif and his family, we have set up a go fund me page. you can find the address on arwa dam damon's twitter page at arwa damon cnn. still have goose bumps from that story.
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well, is it true? some people say couples who sweat together stay together the one american entrepreneur is putting that mantra to the test. he was sick of meeting dates over drinks and coffee, so as samuel burk reports, that led to
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an app to connect fitness buffs. >> reporter: you know that feeling, when you lay eyes on someone for the very first time. but what if it's on a date where you're all sweaty and gross? that's exactly the premise of dating app meet me outside. >> typical dating is nerve-wracking, sitting down face-to-face interview style doesn't alleviate any of that nervousness. we give you potential matches every 24 hours, based on your active interests like running, hiking, biking, weight lifting, rock climbing, and once a couple matches, they can chat. and from there we show you activities that are nearby that you can suggest as date ideas. >> reporter: the co-founder designed the app for people interested in a healthy lifestyle. so we came to meet up with bridget and todd even their first date. >> i'm hoping it will be fun, he will be funny and i'm better at rock climbing than he is.
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>> i'd really like to meet someone that i have an interest in that don't have to require alcohol to get the conversation going. >> reporter: revenue from the mobile dating market is expected to hit $415 million in the u.s. alone by 2017. and plenty of startups want a piece of the action. how much to bepeople have to pa to use the service? >> it's completely free. >> reporter: how do you make money? >> we hope we'll make money off the businesses we're promoting. >> reporter: that's a different approach from tinder which has 1 million paying members. last year it helped match notch a 24% rise in revenue to $260 million. who's your typical user of the app, a hard core outdoor person? >> it's everyone and in between. we have some people that have very earth sen trick and like to be outdoors and be into nature.
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then we have some people that are really into fitness. >> reporter: so how's the date going? >> it's going pretty well. >> reporter: who's the better climber? >> her, for sure. she's been doing it more. >> i can't feel my arms. >> reporter: i'll let you keep on climbing. do you worry that your competitors might be able to copy the same thing you're doing and set people up on dates. >> no, i don't, we're getting that second generation of people moving past tinder, hooking for something that really pertains to their lifestyle. >> reporter: tinder now has 80% of the industry, digging into ok cupid and match.com. >> he was a great guy, really nice, really funny, good time. >> reporter: and a second date? >> umi'm pretty hungry right no. i might ask her to get some food. >> it's worth a shot.
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any way to find love. hopefully there's an app for football fans. many are awaiting this week's champion's league final. it takes place between ath let coe and rial madrid. they are looking to overtake what happened in 2014 when rial won 4-1. did you know this championship game is the most watched annual sporting event on the planet? its global audience even dwarfs the super bowl. oh, say it ain't so. amanda davis runs the numbers. ♪ >> reporter: football versus american football. the champions league against the super bowl. who wins? well, there's only one for global tv audience around 350 million people tune in to the champions league final which is
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150 million for the super bowl. and the champions league reaches more countries. it's beamed to over 200 around the world compared to 180 for its american rival. when money talks, it's the american version of football that's sitting pretty. world broadcasting rights are worth $1.6 million, compared to the $3 billion that u.s. heavy weights, nbc, cbs and fox pay for the super bowl. the nfl can also charge $4.5 million for just 30 seconds of tv commercial time at halftime. but in the world of social media, european football is the big winner. rial madrid's likes on facebook at 10 times greater than the dallas cowboys. and rial madrid star renaldo
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eclipses them both on his own with two champions league titles, he's amassed 112 million facebook likes. tom brady has 1 million likes for each of his rings. and in terms of the halftime entertainment, it's definitely fair to say there's only one winner. >> and that is "cnn newsroom." i'm natalie allen. for viewers in the u.s., "early start" is next. for those around the world, stay with us for another hour of "cnn newsroom." . .
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donald trump now has enough delegates to clinch the republican nomination. celebrating his win with new attacks at hillary clinton and president obama. hillary clinton doubling down. defending her use of e-mail as secretary of state. president obama on a historic visit to hiroshima. happy friday. welcome to "early start." i'm ana cabrera. >> i'm alison kosik. donald trump is the republican ne

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