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tv   The Seventies  CNN  May 27, 2016 11:00pm-12:01am PDT

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confronting violence, forces us to look this is happening now if you can possibly believe that. >> the terrorists are saying they'll blow up the school, killing all the children inside. >> the german police have been waging a relentless war against the terrorists, capturing some, killing some. >> the finnish army are the terrorists. >> no one, even the most powerful, has immunity from these urban guerrillas. >> there are 298 people held hostage. >> those people, they have good ideals. they're just going about them the wrong way. >> we are ready to go on into martyrdom. >> the communique ended with the appeal, revolutionaries of the world, unite. ♪ ♪
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>> terrorist attacks, especially where hostages are taken, have become increasingly common. >> there have been bombings, shootings, and strikes in northern ireland. >> guerrillas fired at an
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israeli school bus near the lebanese border. >> the 1970s saw the development of the terrorist repertoire. >> gangs of young people, products of the riotous 1960s, prefer terror, kidnapping, bombing, arson, machine guns, death and destruction. >> it was a global thing. in the '70s, those who wanted change faster than was going to come resorted to violence. >> japan has had its first plane hijacking. >> the chronicle of terrorism which took them as far as athens, greece. >> most americans thought of terrorism as a problem that happens a world or half a world away. throughout the 1970s, terrorism began to hit home. >> an elegant townhouse in new york's greenwich village was destroyed by a series of dynamite explosions. >> authorities first assumed an accidental detonation in a gas line had been responsible, except that the blast had been just too powerful, destroying the 100 thousands house and
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badly damaging the two neighboring homes, one belonging to actor dustin hoffman. and as firemen picked their way through the rubble, they found a basement workshop with sticks of dynamite and the materials needed to make bombs. three bodies were found in the rubble. >> the new york cell of the weather underground was beginning to build bombs that were to be placed that night at an officers' dance at ft. dix, new jersey. however, something went badly, and three of them ended up dead. >> the daughter of the building's owner and another girl fled right after the blast. >> i just went into survival mode, both to get out of the house and then to get away from the police. at that point, i was a combatant. >> the student protesters of the '60s have turned into more serious revolutionaries using far more lethal weapons. >> the '60s, we were all about changing hearts and minds. the '70s was more just about expressing anger. international politics and domestic politics seemed to be
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decided by violence. and violence only begets violence. >> from the underground, that radical left wing group, the weathermen promises more attacks on the establishment around the entire country starting next week. the medium for this message was a tape recording reputedly by the fugitive weatherman leader bernadine dorn. >> sisters and brothers, we are not just attacking targets. we are bringing a pitiful, helpless giant to their knees. guard your children, guard your doors. >> at one minute before 1:00 this morning, the switchboard at the capitol received a phone call. a man's voice said a bomb would go off in the building in half an hour. at 1:30 in the morning it did. credit for the bombing was claimed by the weather underground. >> in 1971, it appears that weather is really aiming even higher. and at that point, their idea was fewer bombs, higher profile targets.
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>> weather underground bomb the capitol to bring joy, to bring joy to america, to bring a smile and a wink to all the kids who hate the american government. >> when the police killed young black people, we bombed the police headquarters. when washington escalated the war into cambodia, we bombed the capitol. >> a bomb exploded early this morning in the pentagon. >> it was trying to exact a small price for these policy decisions that were so unjust. >> much of the pentagon is a public area with visitors and tourists roaming through the halls, but security was tighter today than yesterday. >> the '70s is a first great era of mass air travel. at this time, there was virtually no security at airports. you could literally walk through the terminal, sometimes even onto the plane, without anyone checking your bags or your person. >> one of the reasons for the
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rise of contemporary international terrorism was the development of modern jet air transportation. these were nationally labeled containers of potential hostages at 35,000 feet. >> good evening. the middle east conflict boiled over today with four airplane hijackings, including one that was aborted at london's heathrow airport. >> today palestinian commandos took over a british airliner, the fourth successful hijacking in as many days. the jetliner was forced to land at the jordanian desert airfield, already occupied by two other big planes, twa and a swiss airliner. >> now there are 298 people held hostage on a bleak, hot, dusty airstrip out in the desert, and they are surrounded by arabs who say they will kill them all if there's any attempt at rescue.
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>> the popular front for the liberation of palestine, the pflp, proudly claimed credit for the coordinated actions. >> the arabs, not just palestinians, look at israel as an occupying force. it's occupying arab land. and they don't believe that israel should be there. that's the basis of the conflict. >> there is a group from pflp on every plane to explain our problem, the palestinian problem, and to justify the way we are doing things to convince the world. >> to the palestinians, they thought they had no choice but to turn to violence because no one is listening to them. >> the american girl here, can she tell us how the passengers are. >> we're very crowded. and i think the women and especially the children are very restless. >> the terrorists certainly used the media. this was an event that was maximized for its global
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attention. and it provided an opportunity to really illuminate the terrorist cause. >> you rolling? what the palestinians say is why do americans have so much pity for these people in the desert when for so many years they had no pity for our 2.5 million in the desert. >> the hijackers have placed dynamite aboard the planes and a red cross official said today the planes can now be blown up at the push of a button. [ explosions ] >> arab guerrillas today blew up three jets worth 25 million dollars. all the passengers had been taken off before the dynamiting, some at the last moment. >> the black clouds could be seen for miles, and a new stage in the darkening political situation had begun. >> they don't call it terrorism. we call it terrorism. they call it national resistance. for us with dawson's field, it was clear that the palestinian problem was not going away. if you're going to make a statement... make sure it's an intelligent one.
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there was more violence in northern ireland today. the worst outbreak of street fighting to hit belfast in several months. >> the battle has been transformed. instead of acting as referee between warring communities, the army is now fighting britain's first urban guerrilla war. the enemy is the outlawed irish republican army. >> the provisional i.r.a., the i.r.a. of the 1970s, used violence that many of us would consider to be terroristic.
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and they used that violence to put pressure on the british to withdraw from northern island and to bring about an independent sovereign country free from british rule. >> this was a sunday the people of northern island will not forget. it all started when catholics organized a demonstration to protest the continued internment of suspected terrorists. the demonstration, as all demonstrations, was banned by the government. >> it was intended to be a protest which was not about using violence, but when some of the marchers stopped and threw stones at the soldiers, it led to a dramatic and awful overreaction. [ gunshots ] >> at least 13 people, civilians, were killed, shot to death by british soldiers. >> bloody sunday was the breaking point where from then on, it was a war between the british army and the i.r.a.
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>> the british army are the terrorists. they introduced a terrorist situation, not us. >> the army will stay in northern ireland as long as any faction seeks to terrorize or intimidate ordinary people. [ sirens ] >> there was bad trouble in belfast, northern ireland, today, and the only word to describe it is ghastly. the irish republican army set off more than 20 explosions for an hour and a half, creating a scene of bloody carnage without parallel in the long history of northern irish violence. 13 people are known dead, more than 120 injured. >> that day became known as bloody friday. it was part of their campaign to try and undermine british rule in northern ireland and to make northern ireland effectively ungovernable. >> no warnings were given, and the targets seem to have been chosen precisely because they would be crowded with people at that time of day.
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>> what they managed to do was make the percussive regularity of bombs going off the norm in northern ireland during the 1970s. >> what do you think will happen? >> i think they'll just keep bombing going on. >> it's got to end sometime. >> aye, sometime but i don't know when. nobody knows. >> i'm jim mckay speaking to you live at this moment from abc headquarters just outside the olympic village in munich, west germany. the olympics of serenity have become the one thing the germans didn't want them to be, the olympics of terror. >> i was in my bed at the hotel. and the phone rang, and they said, you better get in here. some terrorists have taken over the apartments of the israeli team. and i said, they did what? >> at about 5:00 this morning,
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before dawn, arab guerrillas, believed now to be five in number, got over the fence into the headquarters of the israeli team. >> this was the first olympics that was going to have unprecedented live television coverage. >> this is happening now if you can possibly believe that. arab guerrillas are still holding inside the rooms of the israeli olympic team, nine people, one of them believed dead. this is a live picture you're looking at right now. there again is the head of one of the guerrillas. >> part of terrorism is theater. munich was so shocking because we televised it. >> the terrorists have now tossed a paper out of a window of the israeli quarters. it bore the title "communique" and lists five points of their ultimatum. >> the first purpose was to seize the israeli athletes as hostages and then to barter them for the release of imprisoned palestinians. but the wider, more strategic
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purpose was to shower unprecedented attention on the palestinian cause. >> it does appear to be confirmed, though anything confirmed today is difficult, that these guerrillas are from the very extreme left-wing group called black september. >> the communique ended with the appeal, revolutionaries of the world unite. >> black september actually came out of fattah. fattah was yasser arafat. he had been involved in the palestinian cause since the 1960s. >> arafat thought he was the leader of the palestinians, and he was, in effect. i mean, he couldn't control all of them, but inasmuch as they had an elected representative, it was yasser, arafat. >> more than five minutes past the deadline, and the arab guerrillas said they would execute their hostages, it appears that the conference is still on. >> an estimated 900 million people that had tuned in to
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watch the olympic games around the world were now transfixed watching this grisly terrorist drama play out in front of them. >> the israeli hostages and the arab commandos who have held them hostage for this entire day have now left to a makeshift helicopter pad at the back of the olympic village. >> the israelis wanted to come in and try and rescue them, and the germans said no. you know, when a bad number comes up, it comes up very bad. >> we find that this drama has not ended. >> the german police were set up at the nearby air base to neutralize the terrorists and thereby rescue the hostages. [ gun fire ] >> the latest word we get from the airport is that, quote, all hell has broken loose out there, that there is still shooting going on. there is a report of a burning helicopter. >> police forces had no training in this area. they didn't expect people who heavily armed, that were willing to sacrifice their lives for a cause. >> they have now said that there
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were 11 hostages. two were killed in their rooms yesterday morning. nine were killed at the airport tonight. they're all gone. >> this stunned the world. hundreds of millions were appalled by this event, and it galvanized the number of nations to begin to take the problem of terrorism more seriously. >> a lot of study and hard thought has to be given to how we got into a situation in which tiny bands of ruthless terrorists can disrupt whole nations. it's going to be unpleasant, but civilized people are going to have to accept much more police security action and put up much tougher resistance, israeli like, until the fashion dies out or is discredited by defeat. what if we designed a stain for your deck...
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man 1: what did they get? man 2: what didn't they get. man 1: i need to call mike... man 2: don't use your phone. it's not just security, it's defense. bae systems. there's been a big kidnapping on the west coast. the victim is patricia hearst, the daughter of newspaper executive randolph hearst and the granddaughter of legendary william randolph hearst. >> patricia hearst is 19. she and her fiance were in her apartment last night when a woman and two armed men burst
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in, dragged practice trisha down the stairs, threw her into the trunk of a car and drove off. >> the kidnapping may be part of a nationwide campaign of terrorism. >> it had been three days of false alarms until news came this this berkeley radio station had received what looks to be the first real message from the kidnappers. >> the overwhelming irony of the patty hearst kidnapping is that the most marginal of groups manages to pull off what is, after watergate, the biggest media spectacle of the decade. >> the kidnappers are members of a terrorist group that calls themselves the symbionese liberation army. >> the sla is seeking the alliance of all groups in this country who oppose the present system and its government. it calls on them to unite into a fighting force. with the demands of the sla, death to the fascist insect that preys on the life of the people. >> we love you, patty, and we're all praying for you. i know those people.
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they have good ideals. they're just going about them the wrong way. >> initially, patty's kidnapping progresses exactly like you would expect, but then things start to get seriously weird. >> patty hearst claims now she has become tania x, newest recruit in the symbionese liberation army. >> i've changed. i've become conscious and can never go back to the life i led before. >> at least initially there's widespread skepticism that patty hearst would join this group. it wasn't until she actually showed up in the middle of an sla bank robbery with a machine gun that suddenly all the country and all the world realize that this heiress was now part of an underground terrorist group. >> she held that weapon like she would use it? >> yes, absolutely. i thought she would any minute. >> people really didn't understand at this time the hostage reaction. the term "stockholm syndrome"
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hadn't yet become current. >> it was a fascinating case in stockholm last year, you recall it, there was a bank robbery in stockholm. one of the women who was held hostage is waiting for the robber to get out of jail to marry him. >> what? >> just this traumatic experience in which the individual is reduced to total helplessness and begins to identify in a human sense with the captor. >> good evening. patty hearst has been taken into custody. the fbi says patty hearst was picked up today in san francisco. the hearst newspaper heiress has been missing for 19 months. >> by the time patty is finally apprehended, it's almost anticlimactic. patty's famous line when she's taken to the courthouse and asked her occupation, she repli
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replies, urban guerrilla. >> miss hearst was brought into a group of young people who saw themselves as political idealists. their story seems to say something about the futility of terrorism as a shortcut for persuasion. but somehow the message doesn't seem to be reaching the weather underground or northern ireland or the middle east. >> good evening. for the second time in a month, arab terrorists have staged a bloody attack inside israel. >> it happened in a small settlement called ma'oalt, five miles from the border of lebanon. it began when the terrorists seized the high school. >> in the aftermath of the munich olympic attack, governments finally realized that terrorism was both evolving and becoming worse, and that therefore they had to confront the terrorists head-on. >> the terrorists are saying that unless their demands are met, they'll blow up the school, killing themselves and all the children inside. as they negotiated, a special israeli anti-terrorist unit moved alongside the school. >> ma'alt i think was an
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exemplar of counterterrorism's evolution. the israelis attempted to break the siege, and, unfortunately, it was an unsuccessful operation. >> 30 dead, nearly all of them high school children, while the number of injured stands now at 87. >> sometimes the results were, unfortunately, tragic. but at least they were confronting the terrorists. at least they were making terrorists understand that they wouldn't have an open field to carry out their operations. >> were the israelis right to storm the school where the palestinian terrorists held the children hostage? and should there be equal condemnation of the slaughter in lebanon caused by israeli action? in the latest reprisal raids there, 50 lebanese are reported killed. >> yasser arafat continued his trip from egypt to new york today in great secrecy as he prepared to talk for the
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palestinian liberation organization before the united nations tomorrow. >> we have people who have been trained and who are out now who intend to make sure that arafat and his lieutenants do not leave this country alive. >> a united states army helicopter brought yasser arafat to the united nations, flying him in from the airport because of threats against his life. >> arafat's coming to the u.n. was huge because he was a terrorist. i mean, he was behind munich. so for somebody that would kidnap and murder israeli athletes, coming to the u.n., it was a surprise to us. >> to many people in that room, he was a terrorist. but to an equal number of people, he was a freedom fighter. >> in the 1970s, this kind of rhetoric made perfect sense.
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people could identify with arafat, and they could see israel as the oppressor. >> while the palestinians hadn't by 1974 got the palestinian liberation that they were seeking, they'd certainly put themselves on the agenda at a very high level indeed, and this had happened fast. >> in a historic vote today, the united nations general assembly supported the palestinian claim to statehood. and a second resolution also passed that would give the palestine liberation organization a formal place at the u.n. as an observer. >> when the plo were given observer status, that seemed to encourage the idea that violence would get your grievance haance
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in a way that would get you respected. >> israel will pursue the plo murderers until justice is meted out to them. the blood of jewish children will not be shed with impunity. (engine winding up) (pilot talking to tower on radio) once you get out here... there's just one direction... forward. one time: now. and there's just one sound. you and us... together. telling the world... we're coming for you.
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shoshow me more like this.e. show me "previously watched." what's recommended for me. x1 makes it easy to find what you love. call or go online and switch to x1. only with xfinity. in the united states, terrorism takes the form of bombings.
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the fbi records more than a thousand terrorist bombings every year. >> it is just startling how widespread bombings, especially these types of protest bombings, were in the 1970s. they happened by the hundreds. >> the weather underground put bombs in the state department and in a military induction center in oakland, california. >> it was not, to me, a weapon that you use to kill people. it was something you use to disrupt things. somebody called them exploding press releases. >> both the washington and oakland bombs were set to protest against american involvement in indochina. >> the problem with lots of little bombs is the first bomb gets page one news. when you're up to the 30th bomb, it's on page six. >> a bomb exploded today at los angeles international airport. >> some groups said, only by being more ruthless can we achieve our goals. >> at least two people were killed and more than 30 injured.
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>> in lower manhattan, an explosion this afternoon left at least three dead. >> the explosion took 11 lives in a baggage claim area. >> terrorists felt they had to innovate either in the direction of higher profile targets or higher body counts. >> in birmingham, england, several bombs blew up in the center of the city tonight. at least 17 people are dead. at least 70 more are injured. >> the first bomb went off in a crowded pub near the birmingham city center. minutes later and less than a hundred yards away, a second bomb exploded in another pub. there had been 200 people inside. police said they were still searching for bodies in the rubble. >> terrorism only works when it shocks people. in the mid-1970s, the i.r.a. attempts an entirely new tactic, to bring the conflict to the british mainland. >> the british homefront has itself become a battlefield in the raging guerrilla war over
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northern ireland. >> there have been many bombings in england in recent months as the terrorism of northern ireland has spread, but tonight was the worst. >> for sheer audacity, it was unrivaled. arab terrorists attacking opec, the headquarters of oil power. three men were killed and three wounded. >> there is no certainty, but there is plenty of speculation, that one of those terrorists who raided the opec meeting in vienna be europe's most wanted fugitive, carlos sanchez martinez, also known as the jackal. >> this is the clearest news film of carlos that so far exists. that's him breaking away, answering a call from near the plane. >> carlos the jackal i think had an enormous flair for publicity. becoming arguably the best known terrorist of that era. >> but who is this man known to police as carlos ramirez sanchez? who is paying him?
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what is he after? and how many members in his group of terror? >> carlos is thought to be a venezuelan in his late 20s, moscow trained, politically motivated, and wanted by france, holland, britain, and now austria. >> he crossed frontiers on six forged passports, used ten different names, spoke spanish, english, russian, french, and arabic. >> this is a face for international terrorism. here is a venezuelan working with the palestinians, allied with the germans. >> he was a gun for hire in the service of global revolution, and that gave him a very wide canvas on which to play on. >> he's supposed to have masterminded the takeover of the french embassy in the hague, exchanging the french ambassador for an imprisoned japanese red army terrorist and $300,000. >> when you speak with him, he claim only, you know, political and ideological positions, but in fact he likes money, lots. >> carlos is also sought in the
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bombing of a crowded paris drugstore and a bazooka attack at orly airport last january. >> carlos maintained his cover as a playboy. he had learned to use women for safe shelter, to store weapons. >> he was a womanizer. he wanted to stay in the nicest hotels, have caviar and champagne. that was part of the romanticism of being a terrorist during that era. >> he wants to be loved. but if he's confront, he doesn't hesitate to kill. he was very violent. and everybody knows that. >> when paris police moved in on carlos last july, he killed two of them and then disappeared. >> the plastic smiles on the face of this new police unit in bavaria protect the anonymity of the first squad to be specifically trained to fight terror groups. >> what happened between '72 and '76 in germany and in other parts of the world is a complete revolution of the military and much more emphasis on counterterrorism.
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>> don't miss! don't miss! >> here's the situation in what's turning out to be the year's most spectacular hijack story. 101 hostages released today were flown to paris, but another 110 are still being held at the airport in uganda. about 85 of them israeli nationals. >> relatives of the israeli hostages held an emotional meeting with government representatives this morning. they didn't care that israel has a basic policy of not dealing with terrorists. they wanted action from their government. >> israel set the example for many countries. they told the terrorists point-blank, we are not going to negotiate with you. we do not recognize your legitimacy. >> if you're going to be hardline in your response, how do you end the episode? do you just stand by while all the hostages are killed? it's true what they say. technology moves faster than ever.
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some details of the long-range rescue operation are still unclear tonight, but here is what is known. hand-picked commando rescuers made the five-hour flight to uganda in three planes. >> the raid on entebbe is one of the perfect operations of the modern era defined by surprise, speed, success. but mostly surprise.
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>> the israelis are familiar with the airport at entebbe because they built sections of it and had an active advisory force in uganda until 1973 when idi amin kicked the israelis out. >> no one thought anyone would fly from israeli to uganda to rescue the hostages. that was surprise number one. when they landed at the airport, all the commandos were wearing ugandan military uniforms and were driving the same kind of vehicles that a ugandan general would drive. >> the hijackers didn't know what was going on, and, by the time they figured it out, it was too late for them. >> it took just 52 minutes from the time the first plane landed until it took off with the hostages. that was three minutes less than the rehearsal the night before. >> the rescue seemed pretty much like a modern miracle. for relatives, who for days on end were unsure whether they would ever see their loved ones again, it was a time for joy and
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jubilation. >> what made you think that israel could pull off an operation like this? >> the alternative. >> the entebbe rescue was one of the few bits of good news we had regarding counterterrorism. it was followed a year later by the daring rescue of german passengers that had been aboard a hijacked lufthansa aircraft. >> it was over in minutes. a binding flash, a deafening explosion, and gunfire. >> the passengers and crew were freed in a pre-dawn raid at somalia's mogadishu airport. >> there was a sense that the pendulum was swinging away from terrorist efficacy. in other words, if you hijacked a plane, you didn't necessarily get a free run to the press conference. >> once again, we see terrorism's evolution in the sense that the terrorists themselves often have to change up their tactics if they're going to stay one step ahead of the government. >> west german industrialist hans martin schrier, a key government adviser, was kidnapped in cologne today. >> the terrorists riddled the cars carrying schrier and his police bodyguards with machine
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gun fire. the bodyguards were killed. >> this is the third terrorist incident in germany in the past six months. all involve death, and all involve the badder mine off group. >> the red army faction in west germany was part of a 1970s marxist vanguard groups. the red brigade against the japanese red army, the weathermen in the united states. these were people who felt that the capitalist structures were unjust and needed to be destroyed and the only effective way of doing that was through violence. >> the german police have been waging a relentless war against the terrorists, capturing some, killing some. but the leaders of the group have often had more influence from inside prison than outside. authorities claim this man, andreas batr, continued to mastermind terrorist operations from inside prison, passing instructions from his attorneys.
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>> one of the bauder monoff gang said one of the most fantastic thing in the 1970s was not to be a rock star but to be a revolutionary. >> unlike the i.r.a. or other groups, the red army faction kills selectively, prosecutors, bankers, leaders of the society they wish so fervently to destroy. >> they thought the more high profile the assassination or kidnapping, the more likely that this would start the revolution, that the spark of violence would catch on. >> although morrow, 6 is years old, the former premier of italy, kidnapped in a bloody shootout two days ago in rome by a bunch called the red brigades is nowhere to be found. >> moro's kidnapping has hit italians hard. both the man in the street and the government. the attitude that the chaos in italy is somehow the natural state of affairs here is no longer acceptable. >> the whole idea with these attacks is to shake the confidence of the government. and they did. >> italy's police are struggling to maintain law and order, and they appear to be no match for terrorists who, in the last six
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months, have gunned down judges, journalists, business executives, politicians, and policemen. >> alder moro's body was found in downtown rome today. the italian political leader, one of the most respected men in the country, had been brutally murdered by his red brigades kidnappers. >> everyone now realizes that no one, even the most powerful, has immunity from these urban guerrillas. >> political terror in ireland today claimed the first member of the british royal family to be assassinated in modern times. lord mountbatten, cousin of the queen, was killed when a powerful bomb demolished his yacht. a grandson and a boat hand also died. >> the i.r.a. says this. the british army cannot defeat us, yet it continues with the oppression of our people. well, for this, says the i.r.a., we will tear out their sentimental imperialist hearts. >> the i.r.a. were clear that in targeting mountbatten, they were
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targeting the heart of the establishment of their political enemy, the united kingdom. >> it creates total outrage in england, which in some ways the i.r.a. welcomes. it's good that they're outraged. then they're paying more attention. nobody is sacrosanct in this fight. nobody. >> is blowing up a 79-year-old man something the i.r.a. should be proud of? >> he was a person who personified british imperialism, and he implemented the most oppressive and vile legislation which has made for the state of war which exists today. >> the british government fears the brutal violence in ireland could grow worse, possibly even including attacks on the queen. >> queen elizabeth's opening speech to parliament promised to restore peace and security to northern ireland, and the i.r.a. says its response will be simply for shootings, more bombings. i have a blog called "daddy doing work", it's funny that i've been in the news for being a dad. windows 10 is great because i need to keep organized.
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school, grocery shopping. my face can unlock this computer. that's crazy. macbooks are not able to do that. "hey cortana, remind me we have a play date tomorrow at noon" i need that in my world. anything that makes my life easier, i'm using. and windows is doing that. ii wake up and i just. feel like sticky. we have the windows open, the ac on, i'd close it in the middle of the night, he'd open it in the middle of the night, it was a nightmare. my new tempur-breeze stays cool to the touch. not cold, but cool. it naturally adapts to your body and somehow creates the perfect temperature for you. sleep cooler. wake more refreshed. discover the new tempur-breeze. and now thru june 5th, save hundreds on an adjustable base when purchased with a tempur-breeze mattress. are those made with all-beef, karen? yeah, they're hebrew national. but unlike yours, they're also kosher. kosher? yeah, they're really choosy about what goes in. so, only certain cuts of kosher beef meet their strict standards
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the u.s. embassy in tehran has been invaded and occupied by iranian students. the americans inside have been taken prisoner. >> i'll be honest with you. i was scared. who knows what a mob could do? >> the american hostages were blindfolded, handcuffed and marched out on the u.s. embassy's front steps by the revolutionary students.
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in return for their american hostages' freedom, they're demanding the united states give up the deposed shah of iran from his hospital bed in new york to stand trial before a people's court. >> amidst the iranian revolution, america's closest alley in the region, the shah of iran is basically toppled. both the shah and the united states seemed to be aloof tot revolutionary fervor that was increasingly captivating the thoughts of ordinary iranians. >> the new iranian islamic republic would be inspired by the stern religious principles of islam, nothing else. >> ayatollah khomeini became the enemy of the united states the minute he replaced the shah. he gave a series of sermons that condemned the loss of iranian sovereignty. >> when ayatollah khomeini saw large crowds gathering in pp front of the embassy, he made the decision, i'm not going to stand against this
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wave. i'm going to ride it. >> there has been a persistent belief in many quarters here in iran that the united states government was plotting to restore the shah to power here. >> from the iranian standpoint, it wasn't terrorism. they looked at the embassy as an occupying force. the embassy was actually the agent for controlling iranian politics. >> khomeini issued a new warning. he said if the americans try military force to rescue the hostages, the students will kill them all and blow up the embassy. >> because of the distance from tehran to the arabian sea, a rescue of the american hostages is considered unlikely. >> how much longer can you go on doing this? >> we are ready to go on until martyrdom. martyrs are alive in islam. martyrs do not die. martyrs are not destroyed. >> so the bullets do not really kill? >> the bullets do not kill the rights of the people.
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>> terrorism was suddenly moving from what had once been almost entirely a secular, politically ideological movement to something that now is motivated or fueled by religious fervor. >> in mecca, men described as religious deviants are holding hostages in the sacred grand mosque. >> 15,000 pilgrims were praying at dawn when the 30 giant doors were sealed off by hundreds of members of a muslim sect. they seek to purify the religion from what they say is the corrupt influence of the current saudi arabian government. dozens are said to have died. this group of radical sunni fanatics took over very abruptly, very suddenly, and very quickly, islam's holiest site. >> saudi officials rush tanks and troops to mecca surrounding the shrine. eyewitnesses say as many as
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10,000 pilgrims are still inside the grand mosque, and sniper fire was heard all day in mecca. >> broadcasts from iran today blame the united states for the assault on the grand mosque in mecca, the muslim holy city in saudi arabia. those broadcasts were heard in islamabad, the capital of pakistan, where a mob stormed the american embassy, killed a young marine guard, and trapped about 100 americans inside the embassy. >> the mob was screaming "kill the american dogs" as they stormed. this is the third major event in the muslim world in the last 24 hours. >> in tehran this morning, millions of people are shouting "death to the shah, death to carter." that is followed by the cry "god is great." >> these groups are very hard to dissuade. these people believe that god is on their side. that's a very powerful form of delusion. >> by the end of the year, it was clear that the united states was so ill prepared and failed
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to recognize the extraordinary change that had happened in the '70s. >> new year's eve, end of the decade but not yet of the deadlock. >> in 1979, we take a deep breath and realize we're on the precipice of an entirely new era of terrorism. >> the islam world is in crisis, and the crisis goes well beyond the u.s. embassy walls in tehran. >> rather than catching our breath, we should have been thinking, how can this get worse? >> it sounds like the most futile observation possible, but i'm going to make it anyhow. we have to find a way to stop terrorism. it is growing at a scary rate. terror is a new form of warfare, and history shows that every new form of warfare, like hitler's blitzkrieg, seems indomitable at first, but it soon provokes ingenuity to find ways to overcome it. remember skyjacking seemed insuperable in this country once. we have now stopped it.
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i don't know how terrorism can be stopped, but history's rhythm is on our side. thousands of women gather as a symbolic torch marked the beginning of a national women's conference. >> we think there is going to be a struggle. and we don't think that men are going to give up their power and privilege easily. >> american women are the most privileged group of all time, and they're still not satisfied. >> the equal rights amendment should be ratified. >> i love homosexuals. if you can believe it. i love them enough to tell them the truth. >> approving of sexual perversion, what a disgrace! >> a constitutional amendment appears on the way proclaiming women have all the same rights as that other sex. ♪ ♪

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