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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  June 5, 2016 11:00pm-1:01am PDT

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♪ >> this is nicer than my hotel room. ♪ on the cusp, hillary clinton moves closer to the democratic presidential nomination with a win in puerto rico. but bernie sanders remains defiant. ramping up. a firsthand look at the u.s. carrier group that is infencifying the attack in syria and iraq. also ahead, sharing the meals. the new mobile app that connects arabic speakers in need just in time for ram adawn. imam ra walker, and this is "cnn newsroom." a warm welcome, everyone. hillary clinton is closing in on
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her party's presidential nomination with another big victory. cnn projects the front-runner will win puerto rico's democratic primary, and that puts clinton just 29 delegates from the number she needs to clinch the nomination. now, clinton and rival bernie sanders are now looking ahead to the final round of primary contests. and california is the biggest of the six races on tuesday. clinton and sanders are in a dead heat among the state's eligible voters according to a recent poll. but clinton holds a ten-point lead over sanders in a survey of likely voters. despite the odds and delegate math, bernie sanders says he's not leaving the race. chief washington correspondent jake tapper spoke with the candidate in california. >> reporter: bernie sanders is barnstorming california where polls are very tight ahead of tuesday's primary here. hillary clinton holds a
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significant lead in delegates, but sanders says he's not concerned and that he will end up the democratic party's nominee next month at the convention in philadelphia. he shows no evidence that he's going to back down or that he's preparing to bow out. >> in all likelihood, even if you do win in california, which is certainly possible according to the latest polling, secretary clinton on tuesday night will declare victory in the nomination race. she'll say that she has enough delegates and will be the nominee. >> i think that's kind of not quite accurate, and i think the democratic national committee has made that clear, that what she would be doing is combining pledged delegates. those are the real delegates that people vote for. with super delegates, people who are appointed by the committee. and what the dnc has made it very clear is that the media should not lump those two together because pledged delegates are pledged to the candidates. super delegates may change their mind. >> will your strategy be
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different if after all the contests are over, she has more pledged delegates than you do, or are you taking this to the convention no matter what? >> look, again, i don't want to speculate about who will end up having more pledged delegates. she is ahead of us right now, no question. but california is coming up. they've got 475 pledged delegates here. you don't know what the world is going to be like four weeks from now, five weeks. let's not forget. democratic convention is july. >> clinton told me she will secure enough delegates on tuesday to win the nomination. of course that's only if you include super delegates. as for sanders, well, we'll have to see what his next move will be. >> for more on the state of the democratic race, we're joined now by cnn political commentator sally cohn. she's also a columnist for the dailey beast. good to have you on the program, sally. >> great to be on with you. >> so hillary clinton getting very close to clinching the democratic nomination, but we know it's california that is the biggest prize. that race is coming up on
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tuesday. how important is california? is it a must win for clinton considering that polls have shown her and bernie sanders in a statistical dead heat for the past several weeks and we know this is a very large and very diverse state? >> yeah, i mean california is going to be very important for both sanders and clinton, and it's in part for the reasons you just mentioned. that on the one hand, if sanders wants to say he's still in the game at this point, he's still a contender, he's got a shot, he has to still be putting a lot of numerical pressure on california. clinton's claim all along was sanders was only doing well in white working class states and not states that have large latino and african-american population. you have a sort of large populist white working class left, and you have a sizeable percentage of voters of color. so it is going to be very telling to both campaigns who
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comes out on top. whether it actually affects who wins is another story. >> absolutely. you know, but sanders has remained defiant, and he's been continually saying, i'm taking this to the democratic national convention. if he loses in california, do you see him conceding and dropping out, or do you see him taking this and trying to woo super delegates to vote for him? >> well, i mean this all depends on what your definition of "this" is. he's going to take something to the convention, i think. look, i'm a sanders supporter. i support his mission statement both for this campaign, what he's done to shape the discussion in this primary as well as what he's done to push hillary clinton to be more accountable to the populist base of the democratic party and frankly the entire country. and i support what bernie sanders represents for the party and for the country going forward. the question is, you know, if -- and it's still an if. but if hillary clinches the
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numbers she needs by the end of the night tuesday to be the official nominee, you know, does bernie bow out at that point? does he continue to go forward as he's pledged? but maybe forward in a different kind of way. forward to shape the future of the party, to shape the platform, to continue to push hillary as a candidate but not sort of challenging her head on. it remains to be seen. i certainly hope we see a shift going forward. >> and he's already helped shape the platform and also pushed clinton more to the left. let me ske you about unity because it's been such an extraordinary primary season. we saw the republican party essentially imploding with, you know, the way that trump has been forging forward. but we've also seen a lot of schisms kind of happening in the democratic party. you have hillary clinton now calling for unity and saying, listen, i want to start courting bernie sanders' supporters. but do you see bernie sanders' supporters eventually getting behind hillary clinton? i mean there's such a huge difference between, you know, the supporters of sanders and
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clinton. at least when you go to their rallies and see just the enthusiasm and the numbers of people who turn out on the sanders side. >> there is a set of bernie supporters, without question, who are vitriolicly anti-hillary. whether that's because of gender, whether that's because of substance remains to be seen. but, you know, if the republicans could unify behind trump -- and they hate trump -- you know, hillary supporters in 2008, 28% of them said they weren't going to support obama if he was the nominee, and they did. it's going to be fine. we'll all come together because we have something truly awful to defeat. >> sally cohn. it's going to have you. cnn political commentator and daily beast columnist. thank you. >> great to be on with you. >> and make sure to stick with us. next hour we will be speaking with a donald trump supporter. so stick around for that. california, new jersey, new mexico, south dakota, and montana all hold primaries on tuesday. we will have all-day coverage right here on cnn.
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be sure to tune in june 7th for the final batches of the state primaries of the election season. in the meantime, voters in peru are anxiously awaiting the results of a very tight presidential runoff election. keiko fujimori, the daughter of alberto fujimori, is facing off against former world bank economist pedro kuczynski. unofficial exit polls show the two candidates neck and neck as voting wrapped up sunday. the winner will lead peru for the next five years. isis is coming under fierce attacks on multiple fronts, including a push to its de facto capital in syria. after three days of intense fighting, russian warplanes backed the syrian army as it entered raqqah province. regime forces haven't been in that area in two years. also u.s.-backed kurdish and arab militias cut off a key supply route between raqqah and
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mom beesh, another isis held city. and the first city to fall to isis may soon be retaken. militias stormed a neighborhood in southern fallujah saturday. at the same time, u.s. and coalition forces are stepping up their aerial assaults against isis. 23 new air strikes were launched against isis targets on saturday. in syria, most of the strikes took place near mambij. warplanes also targeted six cities in iraq including fallujah and mosul. the accelerated bombing campaign has prompted a u.s. carrier to move closer to targets in syria and iraq. syria was one of the few teams taken on board to see the operations in action. frederick pleitgen spoke to the pilots conducting the strike missions. >> reporter: high intensity operations on the uss harry
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truman. jets taking off every few minutes to hit isis. now from a better position than before. the truman just moved from the persian gulf to the mediterranean sea, much closer to syria. we spoke to pilots flying one of the first strike missions. >> it was a close air support mission, so we don't know the targets prior to taking off. there did happen to be a few targets. we struck those targets. >> reporter: the u.s. says its air strikes are having a major effect as allied forces on the ground continue to win back territory from the extremists in places like fallujah and iraq and in northern syria. american jets not only hitting isis positions on the front lines, but also supply lines and cash warehouses. the u.s. has drastically stepped up its bombing of isis targets both in iraq and syria, and the harry truman plays an important role in that stepped-up campaign. now that it's here in the mediterranean, its jets are even
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closer to many of the targets they need to hit. the increased operational tempo and the move from the gulf to the mediterranean put a strain on the truman's crew. the carrier's tour extended by a full month. but the admiral tells me his men and women are still going strong. >> it's a graphic illustration of the flexibility that's inherent with enabled forces. we can operate anywhere we want to in the world as it happens on this deployment, our priority has been the support of operation inher resolve in iraq and syria. >> reporter: u.s. commanders believe the coming weeks will be critical in the fight against isis now that the group seems to be losing its grip on some of its major strongholds. gains the truman's pilots helped pave the way for. >> we have definitely degraded them, and we have destroyed them in many different places all throughout iraq and syria. so i feel like we've made a large impact. >> reporter: isis may be weakened but some of the most intense fighting against the group probably still lies ahead.
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and so do many more combat missions for this carrier's jets. fred pleitgen, cnn, aboard the uss harry truman in the mediterranean sea. activists say the syrian city of aleppo is coming under heavy bombardment by the country's regime. the syrian observatory for human rights says at least 40 air strikes pounded the city followed by barrel bombs and shelling from helicopter gun ships. at least 19 people were killed in the past day. also these images on social media purportedly showing rescuers pulling two children out alive from the rubble in aleppo. just incredible pictures there. an air strike hit the rebel-held neighborhood on thursday. well, two npr news crew members documenting the war in afghanistan have been killed. they were traveling with an afghan army unit sunday when the convoy was attacked and their vehicle came under fire.
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npr or national public radio is a nonprofit membership media organization in the u.s. cnn's asia pacific editor andrew stevens is covering this story from hong kong. first off, what do we know about how these journalists were killed? >> reporter: well, they were traveling in a convoy, a five-vehicle convoy towards helmand province and helmand has long been one of the most dangerous provinces in afghanistan. in recent years, it has been slipping more and more into taliban control or at least under taliban influence. so driving along key roads there has always been dangerous. they were in a five-vehicle convoy when they came under attack, and the two npr journalists were in a vehicle that was hit. they both died, and also the driver of that vehicle died. they now bring the number of
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deaths in afghanistan since the u.s. increased hostilities after 9/11, the number of deaths now stands at 27. so a tragic event in afghanistan, but something which has certainly been repeated many times before. >> you're taking a look at a photo of the two who were killed, david gilkey, an award winning staff photographer, and also zabihullah tamanna, who was an afghan freelance journalist and a translator. tell us a little bit more about gilkey. i mean he was a veteran journalist, and he traveled to several conflict zones before. >> reporter: that's right. he was 50 years old. he was regarded as one of the best in the business as a photo journalist. as you say, he had traveled to many conflict zones. it wasn't just afghanistan. he had also been in iraq. he'd been in gaza. he had also been to humanitarian disasters like the haiti earthquake, like the famine in somalia. he was deeply, deeply committed
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to his craft. those words coming from our own ivan wattson, who was also at npr. he described david gilkey as virtually a mentor to ivan, and ivan had worked with him in iraq. he said that gilkey was a man who realized that many of the images he took were disturbing and would be uncomfortable to see back home. but that's what he wanted. that's the effect he wanted. he wanted people to realize what happened in these zones. in fact, he was interviewed by npr after the haiti earthquake, and he was asked about photography in zones like that and how he managed to do it. just listen to what he said. >> you know, when you're taking pictures, it's easier, and that doesn't make it okay. it's not like you put the camera to your face, and therefore it makes what you're seeing okay. but certainly you can put yourself in a zone. it's, i am doing this, and what i'm doing is not pleasant, but
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you just -- you march through it. i mean it's hard, but you can't get caught up in it and become part of it. you still need to maintain your state of mind that you are helping tell this story. >> reporter: it's perhaps, amara, but gilkey was a man who really did believe and really did want his images, his confronting images to actually lead to action for change. certainly he was recognized by his peers. as you say, award-winning. he won an emmy for his work in 2007. he won very privilege george polk award and several other white house news correspondents awards. so he was, as i say, considered to be one of the very best and an enormous loss for npr. >> andrew stevens, appreciate that. live for us there in hong kong. let's check now on some other news in the headlines. in eastern belgium, at least three people are dead after two
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trains collided. officials say a passenger train slammed into the back of a freight train on the same track at high speed late sunday. authorities say nine people were injured. several of them critically. the crash is under investigation. pope francis has clarified the roman catholic church's position on sexual abuse cases involving children and adults. he has announced that bishops who fail to report sexual abuse cases can be removed from office for negligence. the catholic church has been criticized for not holding bishops accountable for failing to act. and investigators in bangladesh believe islamic militants are responsible for killing the wife of an anti-terror police superintendent. police say three men stabbed, then shot the woman. her husband has worked to arrest violent religious extremists in southern bangladesh. u.s. secretary of state john kerry is in beijing for talks
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with chinese officials, and it's expected his visit will be dominated by tensions over the south china sea. beijing has sought to strengthen its claims in the region by building and fortifying islands there. u.s. defense secretary ash carter on friday warned china against, quote, erecting a great wall of self-isolation. on sunday, china reacted as a top admiral said beijing will not be intimidated. >> translator: we do not make trouble. but we have no fear of trouble. china will not bear with the arbitration award, nor will it allow any infringement on his sovereignty and security interest. or stay indifferent to the irresponsible behavior of some countries in and around the south china sea. >> we'll take a short break here. when we come back, louisville,
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kentucky, is celebrating the life of its hometown hero. we'll show you how the city is remembering muhammad ali. plus france is preparing for the euro 2016 football championship, but some countries warn it could be a target for terrorists. stay with us.
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louisville, kentucky, is welcoming back its hometown hero, muhammad ali. his body arrived in the city on sunday. preparations are under way for a public memorial this friday. thousands are expected to pay their respects. the legendary boxer died in arizona just a few days ago. he was 74 years old. the entire city of louisville is rallying around a celebration of ali's life. our martin savage has the details. >> reporter: muhammad alie has finally come back home. and the efforts to memorialize his life are fully under way. there was, last night, an interfaith service organized by the islamic community. there are other services being talked about today.
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but of course the big events are for the latter part of the week. thursday is set aside primarily for the family of muhammad ali. but friday, that is the day where the world can celebrate his life. and, in fact, louisville, kentucky, has put out the welcome mat for the entire world to come because they know that their hometown son is one who has been shared by so many people in so many other places. it will begin 9:00 in the morning with a motorcade, a procession. it will actually wind through the streets of louisville, sometimes on highways, sometimes on side streets. that's designed to allow as many people as possible to give their final fair well. 2:00 there is going to be an interfaith service. among those who will you'll low apologize, former president bill clinton will be on hand. about 20,000 people may be able to squeeze into that facility. it is going to be quite remarkable. these plans have been years in the making, and we're told that it's not just from the family and not just from the city, but also one of those who helped make the plans was muhammad alie
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himself. >> and as the world mourns ali's death, his daughter, hana spoke to cnn earlier about her father's passing. >> naturally, it's difficult. you know, i think we're all in shock still. we just can't believe it. i mean i know it sounds crazy, but we sort of thought that daddy would just defy the odds of even death, i think. you know, he just seemed to always fight through everything and, you know, like people know he's been in the hospital on and off, and he always comes out of it. so we all expected that to be the same, and so did lonnie. so it was sort of a surprise to us too. >> were you all with him during those last few days? can you talk us through what those final moments were like? >> well, yes. our father -- our stepmother called us all right away and told us she was taking him to the hospital. and right away my sister maryum and myself were like, we'll be writhe there. then she let us know when we were making plans that we should actually get there as soon as
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possible. so we hopped on a plane, and we just stayed at the hospital 24/7. you know, we went home to sleep of course and got back in the morning and all hung out with him in the room. and his friends and family, you know, people were gathering and coming into the waiting rooms, and lonnie just kept it private so that the kids and grandkids could spend time with our fathers. we were laughing and crying and telling stories and crying and laughing and kissing him. >> and what were those last few moments like? >> i'm sorry. >> i think -- are you okay? >> i'm sorry. okay. yeah. it was really beautiful. he was very -- he was at peace and we were all taking turns speaking with him and whispering and telling him we love him.
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it was very peaceful and beautiful. he would have been proud. >> he would have been proud. >> yeah, because our father is such a spiritual man, and he's always been -- he loves his religion, and it literally broke his heart to see, you know, i think the way the world is viewing islam now because of the actions of a few people. and he -- islam means peace and love, and he's all about peace and love. and he's always tried to spread that and share that. and to see him go and have an imam there and reading the quran to him in arabic and english, it was just beautiful and spiritual and overwhelming. like i said, we went through a whole bunch of different emotions. but we had each other, and we were all strong, and we were just there. literally, we, like i said, had times of sharing stories. we were talking to him like he could hear us and laughing and
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just, you know, crying and hugging and kissing him and hugging him. it was just beautiful. even the nurses that were helping him were in tears. they love him. the world loves him. he belongs to the world. >> very touching to hear from hana ali. she added that her father once told her about a recurring dream that he had about a parade in the streets of louisville in his honor. and now she says that turned out to be more like a premonition. we're going to take a short break. stay with us. it's really fine. you don't want to be seen with your dad? no, it's..no.. this about a boy? dad! stop, please. oh, there's tracy. what! [ horn honking ] [ forward collision warning ] [ car braking ] bye dad! it brakes when you don't. forward collision warning and autonomous emergency braking.
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welcome back to the viewers here in the united states and around the world. i'm amara walker. time now to update you on our top stories this hour. cnn projects hillary clinton will win puerto rico's democratic primary. she holds a strong lead over
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rival bernie sanders. as of now, clinton is just 29 delegates short of the number needed to win her party's nomination. one of syria's largest cities is facing a fierce bombardment as fighting rages between rebel groups and regime forces. activists say at least 40 air strikes hit aleppo sunday. there was also shelling from helicopter gun ships and barrel bombs. we are also awaiting final results in peru's very tight presidential runoff election between keiko fujimori and pedro pablo kuczynski. according to peru's state news agent, unofficial exit polls show the two candidates neck and neck as voting wrapped up sunday. the winner will lead peru for the next five years. and in india, five people are under arrest in connection with a suspected organ harvesting scheme at one of new delhi's most privilege private hospitals. police also conducted raids in other indian cities, searching for the alleged ringleader.
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cnn's sameena udas joins us from new delhi with the latest. what can you tell us about this investigation and what the hospital is saying about all of this? >> reporter: yeah, amara, these kinds of kidney trafficking is certainly nothing new in this country. but what a lot of people are shocked by is the fact that one of the most prominent, certainly one of the most privilege hospitals could be involved in this case. the investigators have arrested five people so far. two of them directly associated with the hospital. the hospital says that these two people used to work as secretarial staff for certain doctors in that hospital. they say they're not directly employed, but the police seem to say that they were employed. at least that's according to their press statement. they were basically helping and forging documents to enable these kinds of operations to take place. now, what investigators are now looking into is back in 1994
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actually, in this country, organ trafficking was banned. and every single hospital, every single, you know, kidney transplant required a committee of government officials and doctors to look into whether the person donating that kidney was doing it for all truistic reasons, or whether they were doing it for money. so this is a very high-level committee, and now what investigators are looking into is whether anyone higher up, anyone more than just middlemen and these secretarial staff were involved in this case. amara. >> as you say organ trafficking is an issue in indian and parts of southeast asia. tell us a little more about how these scams work and how the poor are exploited. i mean we know that they will actually be willing to undergo a surgery to give up a kidney for a little bit of money. >> reporter: that's right. in india, there are two ways of getting a kidney. one through a family member.
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that's usually the easier way to get it. two, through someone who is brain-dead. that is a much more complicated lengthy process because there's so much demand for these kidneys. according to many organizations, there's some 200,000 people in india who need a kidney every single year, and only 3% of that demand is actually met through these official means. so what happens is middlemen go to lower sections of society, poor sections of society, to villages, to lure people, the poor, with money. in this case, according to police, they were offered around 4,500, $5,000. sometimes they're even duped. they're told that the kidney will grow up. many are uneducated so they can be duped. we made a documentary about two years ago and we found many of these people had no idea what was going on. they were drugged in some way and woke up to find that their
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abdomen had been operated on and that they were missing a kidney. there's all these ways of going about it. there are laws in place to stop the poor from being exploited but as we can see in this case, there are still many loopholes in the system. >> disturbing and horrific to say the least. sum nina ud as. good to have you there for us in new delhi. a 60-year-old woman has died after being attacked by a shark off the coast of western australia. she was diving in a popular area near perth when this happened. now, this is the second fatal shark attack in the area in the past week. a surfer died friday after losing his leg to a shark a few days earlier. a massive great white was caught at the same beach where the surfer was attacked. authorities are not sure if it's the same shark, but they found it to be threatening and had it killed. there have been 11 reported shark attacks in australia so far this year. and in the u.s., a stretch of california's huntington beach
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was closed sunday after people spotted several sharks. you can see the images of it right there. the great white sharks were said to be more than 2 meters in size, over 6 feet. the beach is expected to reopen on monday. now, the number of shark attacks has been increasing in recent years. at least it feels like it across the u.s. meteorology pedram javaheri is here with more on how weather could be playing a role in all this. just hearing about australia, it seems rare that diverers are attacked by sharks. it's usually when they're on the surface. >> true. it is frightening nonetheless. when you think about how this is all playing out, it kind of makes sense because in the u.s. in particular, we've talked about drought, mainly in california in recent years. and the way it works is with drought, you get the salinity of the water that changes, and that displaces the sharks within where they want to go to. we know overfishing has caused a lot of sharks to look for food sources elsewhere. so this is bringing them closer to people and of course when it's hot out and the water begins to warm, all of these
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play into increasing the number of sightings as well. we'll break it down here, amara. great to work with you. >> good to see you. >> on cnn after dark here with amara walker. we'll take it. you talked about the possible causes here, the warmer than normal ocean temperatures increase water salinity. a lot of it having to do with drought as well. look at the numbers in particular for the united states. readily available as far as shark attacks every sing many year going back as far as 2005. since 2012 you see the numbers getting around to 50 or so attacks every single year. we know the drought in recent years across parts of the u.s. could exacerbate the situation. of course the temperatures have been scorching. seattle, record high on sunday of 93 degrees. portland shot up to 100 degrees. vegas, 109. death valley, almost 1 2k0. phoenix at almost 113 degrees there on sunday afternoon. again, among the hottest temperatures so far in 2016. a couple weeks before the summer season begins. the season that has already
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started is the tropical storm season, the hurricane season, and certainly it is flourishing across portions of the gulf of mexico. this is the third storm of the season, the earliest third storm dating back to the 1880s when records began for tracking tropical cyclones. but this storm system poised to move over northwestern florida. we think landfall sometime in the next several hours as it moves in towards the northwestern corner of florida. in germany, lightning strikes injuring 82 people just south of colon there. there was a concert, a rock concert in place, the red hot chili peppers. the video showed what occurred. 90,000 spectators, 82 of them injured, some severely. the same concert, amara, last year had 33 lightning strike injuries. so it kind of makes you think. >> that's a bad coincidence. >> absolutely. stormy time of year. >> it is so nice to be back with you. the last time pedram and i worked together, you had one son. now you have two children. it's been that long. good reunion, pedram.
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good to see you. we're going to take a short break here. when we come back, june 5th marks the start of the holy month of ramadan, we'll explain how an awarding-winning app is marking the occasion and trying to help end world hunger. also the euro 2016 football championship starts this friday, but security in host nation france is being criticized before the big event. we'll tell you why when we return. evlexus comes with ae-owned 161 point inspection. 24/7 roadside assistance plan. ♪ 2 years or 20,000 miles of complimentary maintenance. ♪ an unlimited-mileage warranty up to six years. ♪ and the confidence of being awarded the best luxury certified pre-owned program. get 1.9% apr financing on rx, is and es l/certified models. exclusively at your lexus dealer.
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welcome back, everyone. u.s. president barack obama is marking the start of the holy month of ramadan. millions of muslims celebrate ramadan around the world, and mr. obama is using the occasion to take a subtle jab at
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presumptive republican presidential nominee donald trump. part of his statement read, i stand firmly with muslim-american communities in rejection of the voices that seek to divide us or limit our religious freedoms or civil rights. an award-winning app is making it easier to join the fight against world hunger right from your smartphone. and now it's launching in arabic just in time for the start of ramadan. now, the world food program's sharethemeal initiative has helped millions of refugees, and it is doing it just a few cents at a time. here's how it works. >> the sharethemeal app enables you to share your meal with children in need. all it takes is 50 cents and a tap on your smartphone whenever you want, wherever you are. the united nations world food program provides the meals. we show you where the children are and how we are progressing. >> and tu nearbien actress is a
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wfp ambassador against hunger. she visited lebanon to support the roll out of the app's arabic version. she's urging people to use the app to share with syrian refugees over the holiday. >> mothers watching me now care about children nutrition as much as i do, as a mother of two, and i would like to make a pifrp, and let's try this whole holy month to share a meal every day, at every meal that we're having and or that we should be having. let's share a meal with a syrian refugee, wherever they are in the world. >> for more on what sharethemeal is doing around the world, i'm joined now by the head of the initiative se bass chan tricker. thank you very much for your time. >> thank you. >> tell me about first off how you came up with this app. i understand there was a gap if
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your work and you were kind of hanging out and a light bulb just went on. >> well, i think the starting point was that we realized a group of people at wfp, we understood that it costs 50 u.s. cents to feed a child for one full day. and we thought people want to help. when they see these pictures also on cnn of people -- of children starving, they want to help, but maybe they're lacking that easy way to do so. so we thought an app could help here, and then we also understood that there are 20 times as many people that have a smartphone than hungry children. so the idea came along that we build an app now called sharethemeal to try to fight global hunger. >> it's so true, though. people want to help but they want an easy way to do it. i downloaded the app a couple hours ago and it really is that easy. just a few taps on your phone and you can donate as little as
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50 cents or as much as you want. but you launched the sharethemeal app for users in the arabic-speaking world, and you kind of timed it just right with ramadan. tell us the significance of that, and why you decided to launch around this time. >> yeah. well, sharethemeal, the behind behind it is really to make it as easy as possible for people to help. and one and a half weeks ago, we launched the arabic version to allow arabic speakers to also use the sharethemeal app, to download it in the app store and google play store and start feeding children. i think what makes this happy, this happened one and a half weeks ago and about every nine seconds, we see that someone somewhere in the world shares a meal with a child that is suffering from hunger. that immensely motivates us and we are very happy. obviously there's the coincidence now with the start of the arabic version coincides
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with the start of ramadan, and for those that observe ramadan, if they may feel hunger pangs through the day, throughout the day, they can use the app and press the button and feed a child that is suffering from chronic hunger not only now or when they break the fast of the sunset and sharethemeal with their family and friends. >> great way to remember the children. are you focusing on one country at a time, several countries because i know for one you can help syrian refugee children in lebanon if you download this app now and start to donate. >> yeah, exactly. we do focus on very specific programs at a time, and we select them, i think, very carefully. it has to be situations where the political environment and the security situation allows us to work effectively. right now we think that this
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program that you're referring to, syrian refugee children that have fled to lebanon, is the right place to be. and to my understanding, we're already standing at 50% to provide them with food support for a full year. >> good to hear. sebastian, we wish you all the best. really important to focus on some of the refugees in lebanon. we know that lebanon has been struggling for a few years now, coping with the number of refugees coming in. over 1 million syrian refugees into that country. we applaud the work you do and all the best to you. thank you, sebastian. >> thank you very much. thank you. we're going to take a short break here. stay with us. trucks today. which truck brand offers engines with best in class v8 towing or fuel economy? are we moving? where we going? it's the answer to the question baby! silverado. oooh that's cool. it's truck month. qualified buyers get 0% financing for 60 months. plus, find your tag and get $8,250 total value
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on this silverado all star. find new roads at your local chevy dealer we're here with bud light party super delegate michael pena to talk about diversity. america is a nation of immigrants. we're a schmorgasbord of cultures. a korean taco of togetherness. an everything bagel of unity, each one of us a different seed. that was beautiful, amy. i thought it was also nice, yeah. yeah. we're a poutine of harmony. a gumbo of coexistance. we're a never ending, bottomless, all inclusive, super... buffet of... i can't do any more metaphors. ya know, alright. cheers cheers. i'm full.
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france's president says an attack during the euro 2016 football championship is a real threat. but in a sunday radio interview, francois hollande also said his country must not be intimidated. the tournament is set to begin on friday, and the u.s. state department is also warning about the risk of potential terrorist attacks during the month-long event. cnn's jim bittermann has more now from paris. >> reporter: for months now, with more than 70 realistic mock terrorist attacks and security drills, the security forces here
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have been training to handle just about any threat to the euro 2016 soccer championship. but just in the past two weeks, french confidence in their security for the tournament took two major hits. this was the first one. a football match at the staud due france. the same stadium attacked by terrorists last november. it was supposed to be real-time practice for the eurocup, but fans overran the security, smuggled in fireworks and incendiary devices, supposedly not allowed. within hours, the interior minister called together everyone involved with security to see what happened. the head of an association which represents most of the private security companies involved in eurocup safety says it wasn't their fault. >> translator: the security units were confronted with filtering and frisking people on the outside of the game premises. we never do that this way. moreover, out of the 26 stadium doors, only four of them were opened. it was impossible to properly ensure the security of the
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event. >> reporter: and this was the second hit. a warning from the u.s. state department advising americans to avoid crowds like those during the euro cup. the french response was that all possible security measures are being taken. but are they? the authorities here say 90,000 military police and private security personnel will make sure nothing happens during the tournament here. but there are stadiums in ten different cities to protect, fan zones which will welcome millions of fans, training grounds and team hotel which have to be protected for a month. the 90,000 number might not seem so large in view of the task. in fact, more important than the security measures you can see are the ones you can't see. with the state of emergency extended by two months, the government continues to have sweeping powers to tap telephones, monitor internet conversations, and put people under house arrest. officials here know well how much is riding on having a safe and successful tournament.
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>> translator: this is the image of france. the french product. and if i may say, the french brand that will be in better shape if the euro cup is held in peace and tranquillity. >> reporter: in the end, there won't really be a good answer to how secure the games are until they're over on july 10th. they're been too much terror in france and neighboring belgium in the past year and a half to say that the games will be totally secure even with all the good intentions. it's like the interior minister spokesman put it. 100% precaution does not mean zero risk. jim bittermann, cnn, paris. all right. that does it for this hour. i'm amara walker. i'll be back after the break with another hour of "cnn newsroom." see you then. be good.
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announcer: every day across america, excess food is gathered by a network of good people at local food banks, giving hope to millions of children who struggle with hunger. they've earned their wings. and you can, too. together we can solve child hunger. support feeding america and your local food bank at feedingamerica.org.
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shoshow me more like this.e.
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show me "previously watched." what's recommended for me. x1 makes it easy to find what you love. call or go online and switch to x1. only with xfinity. sanders defiant. the bern vows to press on despite another loss to hillary clinton and daunting odds in the last major primaries of the season. ramping up. a firsthand look at the u.s. carrier group that is intensifying the attack on isis in syria and iraq. and also ahead, sharing the meals. the mobile app that connects arabic speakers in need just in time for ramadan. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the
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world. i'm amara walker. thanks for joining us as we kick off a second hour of "cnn newsroom." hillary clinton is one step closer to beating rival bernie sanders to their party's nomination. clinton is the projected winner of puerto rico's democratic primary. she is expected to pick up more than half of the u.s. territory's delegates. that leaves clinton just 29 shy of the number needed to secure the nomination. now clinton and sanders are looking forward to the final primary contests. california is the biggest of them all with 475 delegates at stake. clinton and sanders are in a dead heat among the state's eligible voters according to a recent usc/los angeles times poll. but in a survey of likely voters, clinton holds a ten-point lead over sanders. both candidates are working down
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to the wire in california, battling to get every single one of the state's delegates. senior washington correspondent jeff zeleny has the latest. >> reporter: the final full day of campaigning today for hillary clinton and bernie sanders here in california, making one last push for those 475 delegates at stake in tuesday's primar hillary clinton making the case again and again about one of her rivals, but it's donald trump she's talking over and over about how he's not qualified to be president. she's barely mentioning bernie sanders on the campaign trail. she had a closing rally in sacramento on sunday night. this was her final message to voters. >> i want to finish strong here in california. it means -- it means the world to me. >> reporter: and bernie sanders making the case to his supporters here in california as well, telling them that they can still change the direction of this democratic race for the presidency. but with puerto rico in the bag, now only six more states to vote on tuesday followed by the district of columbia next week. then this race is over.
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bernie sanders trying to keep this argument alive that he will need super delegates to pull them over to his side. increasingly that is an uphill battle. this is what he told voters last night in san diego. >> any objective analyst of the current campaign understands that the energy and the grassroots act vis many in this campaign is with us, not hillary clinton. >> reporter: the outcome of this democratic presidential nomination does not hinge on california, but a clinton win here in california would certainly cool the argument bernie sanders is trying to make, that he can still take this to the convention. that's why all eyes today still on california as both campaigns, both candidates, fight here until the end for those 475 delegates at stake. >> on the republican side, donald trump is saying it's not only a latino judge who might have a bias against him. the presumptive republican presidential nominee has under
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fire since lashing out at the u.s. district judge who is presiding over fraud lawsuits against trump university. trump said judge gonzalo paul curiel's mexican heritage makes it impossible for him to rule fairly. sunday on cbs's "face the nation kwx he was asked, what if the judge was muslim. >> if it were a muslim judge, would you also feel like they wouldn't be able to treat you fairly because of that policy of yours? >> it's possible, yes. that would be possible, absolutely. >> cnn's jake tapper spoke with trump and challenged him on his comments about that federal judge. >> presumptive republican presidential nominee donald trump is still campaigning hard here in california ahead of the tuesday primary with no major republican candidate still in the race and enough pledged delegates to secure the nomination at the cleveland convention next month. he is rallying the party as the gop establishment is still lining up behind him. but that doesn't mean he's toning it down.
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can i ask you about comments you made about the judge in the trump university case. >> sure. >> you said you thought it was a conflict of interest that he was the judge because he's of mexican heritage, even though he's from indiana. >> yeah. >> hillary clinton said that that is a racist attack on a federal judge. >> she's so wonderful, you know. i mean here's a woman that should be put in jail for what she did with her i'ms, and she's commenting. i'll tell you what it has to do. i've had ruling after ruling after ruling that's been bad rulings, okay? i've been treated very unfairly. beforehand, we had another judge. if that judge was still there, this case would have been over two years ago. i have had horrible rulings. i've been treated unfairly by this judge. this judge is of mexican heritage. i'm building a wall, okay? i'm going to do very well with the hispanics. >> so no mexican judge could ever be involved in a case that involves you? >> he's a member of a society where, very pro-mexico and that's fine. it's all fine. >> it sounds like you're calling into question because he's
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latino. >> does he know the lawyer on the other side? does he know the lawyer? >> i'm not talking about that. >> that's another problem. >> but you're invoking his race when talking about whether or not he can do his job. >> jake, i'm building a wall, okay? i'm building a wall. i'm trying to keep business out of mexico. mexico's fine. >> he's an american. >> he's of mexican heritage, and he's very proud of it, as i am where i come from. >> but he's an american. is it not -- when hillary clinton says this is a racist attack and you reject that. if you are saying he can't do his job because of his race, is that not the definition of racism? >> no, i don't think so at all. >> no? >> no. he's proud of his heritage. i respect him for that. >> you're saying he can't do his job because of it. >> look, he's proud of his heritage, okay? i'm building a wall. >> now, trump is ready to take the fight to hillary clinton, who could secure enough delegates on tuesday to become the democrats' nominee next month at the convention in philadelphia. if you include the super delegates, that's a big if of course, clinton told me this week that she is happy to
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compare her record with donald trump's. >> scotty knell hughes is political editor for right alerts.com. she's joining us from nashville, tennessee. thanks for your time. >> thanks for having me. >> i first have to start with your thoughts on trump's comments about judge curiel, who is of mexican descent, and he's basically claiming that this federal joj, who will be presiding over trump's fraud case will be biased against him because of his race. and even some of trump's staunch supporters are calling this racist in a very big mistake. what are your thoughts? >> well, i think there's a lot more into it. even though mr. trump in his rallies has only been able to cite the race. but he did do a great interview with cnn this past weekend with jake tapper where he went a little more depth. it's not necessarily about his race. it's about the activism and all the groups that he's a part of. plus when you look at it, this judge did a point, a prosecuting
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firm that has been given i think it's $675,000 to both bill and hillary clinton as late as 2014. and so there are some ties. this is a judge that is appointed by barack obama and has opened and closed and opened this case time and time again. so you have to wonder how much of politics is involved. >> donald trump has made some pretty hostile comments against latinos and muslims. how do you think that's going to impact trump's efforts to make inroads with minority groups in the united states? i mean latinos are a very huge voting bloc. >> no, it is a very huge voting bloc. this has been a voting blork that the republicans as a whole, the gop has a whole has always had issues with. it's not something new to mr. trump. i think when you look at his actual organization and the minorities he has hired, you will see there is actually people in there that have quite an affection and quite a respect for mr. trump that are part of these minorities. i think the kwi is mr. trump looks at these not necessarily
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as a hispanic or a woman or an african-american, he looks at them as an american across the board. so his policies appeal to a lot of them even if they don't get the press because he's talking about things they care about the most. education, national security, the economy. those sorts of core issues when he actually sticks to those resonates within all the groups because in the end, we're all the main common theme of being americans. >> where are you seeing that though because a lot of times you're seeing violence breaking out at his rallies and many times we're hearing the protesters saying they're quite angry about trump's propositions, especially some of those insults against mexicans and building walls and calling them rapists and murderers. >> well, there's definitely passion on both sides of the issues. let me say this. you know, when we looked at these riots that have happened, when you see law enforcement that has been assaulted, even equestrian officers that have been assaulted, then you see the trump supporters themselves being bloodied or the woman that was assaulted by the mob this week, that does not bode well for whatever argument these protesters are trying to get across because people outside of
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california see that and go, wait a minute. we obviously do have a problem. >> scottie nell hughes. we're going to have to leave it there. thank you for your time. appreciate your perspective. >> thank you. california, new jersey, new mexico, south dakota, and montana all hold primaries on tuesday. we will have all-day coverage right here on cnn. be sure to tune in on june 7th for the final batch of the state primaries of the election season. we are in the final stretch. well, the attacks on isis are intensifying with fighters closing in on the militants' de facto capital in syria. after three days of fighting, aid groups say the syrian army backed by russian warplanes advanced into raqqah province saturday. in the meantime, u.s.-backed kurdish and arab militias took control of a strategic road connecting raqqah to the isis held city of manbij.
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it was the first iraqi city to fall to isis in january 2014. now, the stepped up campaign, the bombing campaign, i should say, against isis prompted a u.s. carrier to move closer to targets in syria. frederick pleitgen went on board to see the operations in action. he's joining us now with the latest from greece. hi there, fred. >> reporter: hi there, amara. this is the uss harry truman which was stationed in the persian gulf for the last couple of months and its planes had to fly very far away to get into the area of operations both in iraq and syria as well. that aircraft carrier has now moved here to the mediterranean sea, where it's actually very, very close to syrian territory. and of course with that, also very close to some of these key battlefields there in northern syria where pro-u.s. forces are trying to take back territory from isis and, in many cases, doing so. here's what we saw on the harry truman.
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high-intensity operations on the uss harry truman. jets taking off every few minutes to hit isis. now from a better position than before. the truman just moved from the persian gulf to the mediterranean sea, much closer to syria. we spoke to f.a. team pilots flying one of the first strike missions. >> it was a close air support mission, so we don't know the targets prior to taking off. but there did happen to be a few targets we struck those targets. >> reporter: the u.s. says its air strikes are having a major effect as allied forces on the ground continue to win back territory from the extremists in places like fallujah and iraq and in northern syria. american jets not only hitting isis positions on the front lines, but also supply lines and cash ware houses. the u.s. has drastically stepped up its bombings of isis targets both in iraq and syria, and the harry truman plays an important
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role in that stepped-up campaign. now that it's here in the mediterranean, its jets are even closer to many of the targets they need to hit. the increased operational tempo and the move from the gulf to the mediterranean put a strain on the truman's crew. the carrier's tour extended by a full month. but the admiral tells me his men and women are still going strong. >> it's a graphic illustration of the flexibility that's inherent with the naval forces. we can operate anywhere we want to in the world. as it happens on this deployment, hour priority has been the support of operation inherent resolve in iraq and syria. >> reporter: u.s. commanders believe the coming weeks will be critical in the fight against isis now that the group seems to be losing its grip on some of its major strongholds, gains the truman's pilots helped pave the way for. >> we have definitely degraded them, and we've destroyed them in many different places all throughout iraq and syria. so i feel like we've made a large impact.
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>> reporter: isis may be weakened, but some of the most intense fighting against the group probably still lies ahead. and so do many more combat missions for this carrier's jets. and so in that deceasive phase, amara, the crew of the harry truman obviously has better access to many of the battlefields there in iraq and syria, but it does raise new concerns. one of the things about this new position in the mediterranean is that with that, the uss harry truman is also very, very close to the area where the russians operate. they're of course in the west of syria, and we spoke to the pilots and also to the admiral about that as well. he said so far there's been very little interaction with the russians, but they said when they did see russian jets or speak to the russians, it has been quite professional. there is an understanding between the two sides that they would not get in each other's way in that airspace about syria and iraq as well. >> when we talk about syria, how significant is this stepped-up
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campaign against isis considering that the u.s.-led coalition from the ground and on the air have been fighting isis for some time now? >> reporter: well, you know what, it's very significant, and there's two reasons for that. on the one hand, you have those syrian democratic forces which are led by the kurds but also have some air troops in them as well trying to close in on raqqah. probably right now the more significant front in syria is that manbij area. the reason for that is it's right on the border between turkey and syria, and it's been an objective both the u.s. and the russians for a very long time to try and cut isis' access to the turkish border because that's the why isis gets weapons, funding, and also additional fighters into its territory. and so they want to cut isis off from turkish territory to make sure they don't have access to that anymore, make it more difficult for isis to replenish its ranks. therefore that offensive that's going on around the manbij area is something we cannot overstate the importance of trying to seal
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the border between turkey and syria. >> frederick pleitgen live in greece with the latest on the battle against isis. appreciate that, fred. thanks. national public radio news is mourning the death of two journalists of its own. they were killed in an attack while covering the ongoing conflict in afghanistan. we'll have the story just ahead. also swimmers on edge in western australia after two fatal shark attacks. what's going on in the waters? we'll explain next. why do people put milk on cereal? oh, are you reading why people put milk on cereal? why does your tummy go "grumbily, grumbily, grumbily"? why is it all (mimics a stomach grumble) no more questions for you! ooph, that milk in your cereal was messing with you, wasn't it? yeah, happens to more people than you think... try lactaid, it's real milk, without that annoying lactose. good, right? mmm, yeah. i got your back. lactaid. it's the milk that doesn't mess with you.
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wul back, everyone. two npr journalists have been killed while on assignment in southern afghanistan. they were traveling with an afghan army unit near marja sunday when the convoy was attacked and their vehicle came under fire. npr or national public radio is a nonprofit membership media organization in the u.s. cnn's asia pacific editor andrew stevens is covering the story from hong kong. he joins us now live with more on what happened. there were two other journalists who were traveling with the other two who were killed, and they were unharmed. ? >> reporter: that's right. it was a four-person team, amara, and two were unharmed. the attack, as you say, took
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place near a town called marja which is the southern afghanistan province of helmand, which has been a notoriously dangerous place to operate for many, many years. and in recent years, it has been falling more and more under the control, or if not the control, the influence of the taliban. now, the npr reporting team had been in country for about three weeks, doing reports as they went. and the two journalists, david gilkey and zabihullah tamanna, were in a convoy of five vehi e vehicles which was being led by the afghan special forces when it came under attack. some reports are calling it an ambush, and the vehicle in which the two journalists were in was hit by shell fire. the driver also died in that attack. so three dead there. the afghani who is with zabihullah was actually working as a translator for david
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gilkey, but he was also a photo journalist in his own right. >> and more about gilkey. i mean he's someone who was very passionate about his craft, and you did talk about just, you know, the horrors that he's encountered and some of the dangers he's come face to face with as well. >> reporter: that's right. a man described as one of the very best in the field. a man at the top of his game. a photo journalist who displayed a commitment. words you keep hearing, you keep reading when talking about david gilkey. incredibly committed man. our own ivan watson, himself frmerly an npr journalist worked with gilkey in iraq and described his level of commitment. and ivan sort of describing david as almost like a mentor and a man who was very, very aware of security situations, of first aid as well, but also absolutely committed to bringing the story back home, back to
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america. he told ivan that he realized many of the images that he sent back were very confronting, but he wanted america to know the real story of what was actually happening in these areas. it wasn't just war zones. it was also humanitarian disasters. he was in haiti in 2010 for the earthquake there, in gaza, and also in somalia, the famine in somalia. he was actually interviewed by npr a few years ago, and this is what he had to say about what he did. >> you know, when you're taking pictures, it's easier, and that doesn't make it okay. it's not like you put the camera to your face, and therefore it makes what you're seeing okay. but certainly you can put yourself in a zone. it's, i am doing this, and what i'm doing is not pleasant. but you just -- you march through it. i mean it's hard, but you can't get caught up in it and become part of it. you still need to maintain your
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state of mind that you are helping tell this story. >> reporter: just had the secretary of state issue a statement too. john kerry saying, amara, that the attack is a grim reminder of the danger that continues to face the afghan people, the dedication of the afghan national defense and security forces to securing their country, and the courage of intrepid journalists and their interpreters who are trying to convey that important story to the rest of the world. amara. >> a very sad story indeed. andrew stevens covering that for us from hong kong. thanks so much, andrew. we're going to check some other stories we've been following. at laecht three people were killed in a train crash in eastern belgium. officials say a passenger train slammed into the back of a freight train at high speed sunday. police say one of the people who died was the driver of the passenger train. dozens of people were also injur injured, several of them critically. authorities are looking into the cause of the crash. pope francis is clarifying the roman catholic church's
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position on sexual abuse cases involving children and adults. he has announced that bishops who fail to report clerical sex abuse cases can be removed from office for negligence. the catholic church has been criticized for not holding bishops accountable for failing to act. and investigators in bangladesh believe islamic militants are responsible for killing the wife of an anti-terror police superintendent. police say three men stabbed and then shot the woman. her husband has worked to arrest violent religious extremists in southern bangladesh. a 60-year-old woman has died after being attacked by a shark off the coast of western australia. she was diving in a popular area near perth when this happened. this is the second fatal shark attack in the area in the past week. a surfer died friday after losing his leg to a shark a few days earlier. a massive great white was caught at the same beach where the surfer was attacked. authorities are not sure if it's the same shark, but they found
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it to be threatening and had it killed. there have been 11 reported shark attacks in australia just this year so far. also in the united states, a stretch of california's huntington beach was closed after this. several people spotting several sharks. the great white sharks were said to be more than two meters in size. the beach is expected to reopen on monday. even if it did, i would not want to go in the water after seeing these images. so the number of shark attacks has been increasing in recent years across the u.s. meteorologist pedram javaheri joining us now with more on that. i've heard warm waters. is that what brings out the sharks? >> warm waters certainly exacerbate the problem. you look at this, the droughts we've seen in recent years and that alters the salinity of the water, so the sharks are displaced for different areas looking for food sources. if you bring people close to them, it's a bad combination. that's what we're seeing in recent years. this graphic does a pretty good job as far as showing you the
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numbers in recent years. shark attacks according to the international shark attack file that keeps track of attacks in the united states in particular, 2005 through 2012, the numbers generally into the 30s. look what's happened in the last years. we know you look at the drought situation in recent years. the focus right there across southwestern corner of california. you look at the temperature trend in recent decades, and in the western united states in particular. since the year 1970, the temperatures have warmed up about two and a half to three and a half degrees fahrenheit or .6 to .8 degrees per decade. so you put this all together, and again you can make a correlation to what's happened as far as seeing the increased number of shark attacks. there's california's temperature trend. a steady incline there going in the last couple of decades. how about the temps we experienced on sunday afternoon. seattle, 93 degrees. only a handful of times per year
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does the northwestern u.s. see temperatures this warm. 100 in portland. las vegas at 109. death valley at 119. phoenix making it up to mid-july like temperatures there with 113 degrees fahrenheit on sunday afternoon. the other big story we're following, of course, it is a tropical storm. this is colin that's formed in the past several hours in portions of the gulf of mexico. this is the earliest storm we've had to have three storms in a season in recorded history. the last time we had this many storms prior to june 12th as back on june 12th, 1887. this particular storm, again, the concern right now is the big bend of florida across southern georgia. tremendous rainfall in the forecast. it is early in the season. we're not going to see much in the way of heavy, heavy winds with this, but the rainfall is going to cause significant flooding in southern georgia, the carolinas and also parts of florida as well. >> it's the season. >> it's the season, absolutely. pedram, thank you so much. good to see you. several people under arrest in india, accused of organ
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trafficking. we're going to tell you who police believe is behind the smuggling scheme. also u.s. president barack obama sending well wishes to muslims at the start of ramadan. we'll tell you how he used the opportunity to slam the man who wants his job. ♪ headache? motrin helps you be an unstoppable "let's rock this" kind of mom. back pain? motrin helps you be a... "side planking, even though you'll feel it later" kind of woman. body pain?
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welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. i'm amara walker. cnn projects hillary clinton will win puerto rico's democratic primary. she holds a strong lead over rievgle bernie sanders. as of now, clinton is just 29
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delegates short of the number needed to win her party's nomination. one of syria's largest cities is facing a fierce bombardment as fighting rages between rebel groups and regime forces. activists say at least 40 air strikes hit aleppo sunday. there is also shelling from helicopter gun ships and barrel bombs. two national public radio journalists have been killed while on assignment in southern afghanistan. david gilkey and zabihullah tamanna were traveling with an afghan unit on sunday when their convoy was attacked. their vehicle was hit by shell fire. and in india, five people are under arrest in connection with a suspected organ harvesting scheme at one of new delhi's most privilege private hospitals. now police are searching for the alleged ringleader. cnn's sum nina udas following the story from new delhi. she has the very latest. what do we know about the people who were arrested?
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>> reporter: yeah, five people have been arrested so far as you mentioned, amara. two of them are associated with one of the most prominent, one of the most privilege hospitals in this country and perhaps that's why this story has become such a big deal in this country. now, the hospital says that these two people were not directly employed by the hospit hospital, that they were secretarial staff of some doctors there and the hospital itself has been a victim of this massive, very well orchestrated kidney trafficking plan. now, police are investigating who else could be involved at the moment because the indian government actually came up with a law to mandate any institution that conducts these sort of transplants to have a committee full of government employees and also doctors so every single kidney transplant has to be overseen by this committee. they look through all the documents to ensure that the donor is not doing it for all
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true -- sorry, is doing it for altruistic reasons and not for money. the investigators say a lot of other people could be involved in this case, not just middlemen. they're looking to see if anyone higher up could have been involved in this case. amara. >> sumnima, some of our viewers may not know that kidney smuggling is a problem in india and other parts of southeast asia. you know this story very well. you've done a documentary on it. just talk to us a little bit about how these smuggling operations work and how they prey on poor people. >> reporter: yeah, there's two ways someone who needs a kidney can get one. the first way is through a family member, a relative. that is the easiest, most efficient way. the other way is to wait for someone who is brain dead, who is going to donate that organ. that is a much more complicated
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process. a lot of people on that waiting list according to a lot of organizations here. there's at least some 200,000 people who are in need of a kidney every single year in this country. but only 3% of that demand is actually met through official means. so what happens is middlemen, traffickers, they go out to the most vulnerable sections of society, to villages, too poorer areas. what they do is they lure these people with money. in this case they lured them with about $4,500, to $6,000 for their kidney. so people who are in debt are willing to forgo their kidney for money. in many cases they're also duped. as you mentioned, we made a documentary on this and we found many people who had no idea what they were going through. they were told that a kidney would grow back and this is nothing serious. so there's this whole system in place. of course there are laws in place to stop the vulnerable from being exploited. but of course as we're seeing in
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this case, there are still a lot of loopholes in the system as well. amara. >> not easy to stop these operations. sum neem na ud as, appreciate that live for us there in new delhi. u.s. secretary of state john kerry is calling on china to find a diplomatic solution to the rising tensions over the south china sea. he's in beijing for talks aimed at expanding cooperation between china and the u.s. the south china sea issue is expected to domination the discussions. beijing has sought to strengthen its claims there by building and fortifying islands. u.s. defense secretary ash carter on friday warned china against, quote, erecting a great wall of self-isolation. on sunday, china reacted as a top admiral said, beijing will not be intimidated. >> translator: we do not make trouble, but we have no fear of trouble. china will not bear with the
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arbitration award, nor will it allow any infringement on its sovereignty and security interest or stay indifferent to the irresponsible behavior of some countries in and around the south china sea. >> we're going to take a short break here. when we return, sharethemeal is aiming to end world hunger from your smartphone. my conversation with the head of the initiative when we come back.
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u.s. president barack obama is marking the start of the holy month of ramadan by extending well wishes to the millions of muslims who celebrate ramadan around the world. he's also taking a subtle jab at presumptive republican presidential nominee donald trump. part of the president's statement read, i stand firmly with muslim-american communities in rejection of the voices that seek to divide us or limit our religious freedoms or civil rights.
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an award-winning app is making it easier to join the fight against world hunger right from your smartphone. now it's launching in arabic, just in time for the start of ramadan. the world food program's sharethemeal initiative has helped millions of refugees and hungry children. it's doing it with just a few cents at a time. here's how it works. >> the sharethemeal app enables you to share your meal with children in need. all it takes is 50 cents and a tap on your smartphone whenever you want, wherever you are. the united nations world food program provides the meals. we show you where the children are and how we are progressing. >> now, tunisian hend sabri is an ambassador against hunger and she visited lebanon to support the roll out of the app's arabic version, and she's using people to use the app.
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>> lots of mothers watch meg now care about children nutrition as i do as a mother of two. and i would like to make a pledge, and let's try this whole holy month to share a meal every day at every meal that we're having or we should be having when fasting. let's share a meal with a syrian refugee wherever they are in the world. >> earlier i spoke to the head of the sharethemeal initiative, and he told me how the app came about. >> it costs 50 u.s. cents to feed a child for one full day, and we thought people want to help. when they see these pictures also on cnn of people, of children starving, they want to help, but maybe they're lacking that easy way to do so. and so we thought an app could help here, and then we also understood that there are 20 times as many people that have a smartphone than hungry children.
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so the idea came along that we build an app now called sharethemeal to try to fight global hunger. >> it's so true. people want to help, but they want an easy way to do it. i just downloaded the app a couple hours ago, and it really is just that easy. just a few taps on your phone, and you can donate as little as 50 cents or as much as you want. but you launched the sharethemeal app for users in the arabic speaking world, and you kind of timed it just right with ramadan. tell us the significance of that and why you decided to launch around this time. >> yeah. well, sharethemeal, the idea behind sharethemeal is to make it as easy as possible for people to help. and one and a half weeks ago we launched the arabic version basically to allow arabic speakers to also use the sharethemeal app, to download it in the apple app store, in the google play store, and then start feeding children. i think what makes us happy, this happens about one and a half weeks ago, and since then about every nine seconds, we see
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that someone somewhere in the world shares his or her meal with a child that is suffering from hunger. that immensely motivates us. yeah, we are very happy. obviously there's the coincidence now with the start of the arabic version coincides with the start of ramadan. and for those that observe ramadan, if they may feel hunger pangs through the day, throughout the day, they can use the app and press the button and feed a child that is suffering from chronic hunger not only now or when they break the fast of the sunset and share the meal with their family and friends, well, they can use the app and also share it with a child that is suffering. >> we're going to take a short break here. when we return, louisville, kentucky, is remembering muhammad ali. you'll see how his hometown is paying tribute. plus how hollywood is remembering the boxing legend.
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muhammad ali's family says he belonged to the world. but it's his hometown of louisville, kentucky, that's pulling out all the stops to celebrate its hero. ali's body arrived in the city he grew up in on sunday.
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there will be a public memorial there this friday for the legendary boxer. his body will be driven through the streets before that ceremony. the tributes have already begun, especially outside the boxing great's childhood home. our ryan young reports from the muhammad ali center. >> reporter: when you talk about the sport of boxing, you can't imagine it without the big figure of muhammad ali and what he did to transform that sport just with the way he talked. a lot of people are focusing now on the way he changed the world, especially here in his hometown. if you look behind me, you can see all the people who showed up to put those flowers down and come out to pay their respects to the great champion. one of the things that caught our eye is the gloves that are right here. one that says, love ali. faith and hope. and you see his pictures here. we're seeing those gloves pop up all aunder roe, not only here in louisville but across the country. people wanting to talk about and pay their respects to muhammad ali. in fact the center's director here talked about his impact across the globe. >> muhammad ali was much more than the boxer.
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by it being here at the center, people can have an understanding of muhammad's six core principles, those things that made him great. more importantly that he was an ambassador of peace, that he was an inspiration for people all around the world. >> we know a memorial service will happen here on friday. they're planning to have former president bill clinton here, comedian billy crystal and also bryant gum bell. then they're going to take his body through the streets of louisville. don't forget. this was a boxer who started fighting because at the age of 12, someone stole his bike. he said he wanted to whoop that person. the cop that he told that to said, hey, i'm going to teach you how to box and the rest is history. people will remember this man for quite some time. >> no doubt muhammad ali left a unique mark on the entire world. but it is his family that feels his absence more than anyone. ali's daughter hana spoke to cnn earlier about her father's final
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moments. >> it was really beautiful. he was very -- he was at peace, and you know we were all taking turns speaking with him and whispering and telling him we love him and it was very peaceful and beautiful. he would have been proud. >> woe have been proud? >> i think, yeah, because our father is such a spiritual man, and he's always been -- he loves his religion, and it literally broke his heart to see, you know, i think the way the world is viewing islam now with the whole -- because of the actions of a few people. and he -- islam means peace and love, and he's all about peace and love. he's always tried to spread that and share that, and to see him go and have an imam there and reading the quran to him in arabic and in english, it was just beautiful and spiritual and overwhelming. >> well, kim serafin joins us now. she's a senior editor for "in
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touch weekly" magazine. kim, good to have you on the program. we of course have to start with muhammad ali. of course the world is mourning his loss. how is hollywood paying tribute to him? >> yeah, i mean looking at the tweets out there, so many people tweeting, tweeting quotes, tweeting about how muhammad ali influenced them. celebrities, so many celebrities making some tweets. you know, everyone from obviously mike tyson and boxers to george foreman and michael moore even, lionel richie, and then even people like billy crystal, obviously who had this relationship with him, this friendship with him after that iconic impression. billy crystal is set to speak at his memorial on friday. so that was another big celebrity. and then even prince, there are these reports that have come out, prince even talked about in an interview about how the reason he stopped cursing in his music is because of muhammad ali's influence. when they met, he called him his personal hero. there's that interesting link there. actually one of his final tweets that muhammad ali sent out was
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about prince when we lost prince. a deep connection there between many people in hollywood were so influenced. >> incredible to hear a superstar like prince could be in awe of someone else. and it was understandabl. "forbes" magazine is out with a list. these are names that we will definitely recognize, right in. >> yes. this is the second annual list of self-made women. america's self-made women. and of course there are many pop stars and celebrities on this list. oprah, of course you have to talk about her. she's number two at $3.1 billion so that makes sense for sure. then you have taylor swift is the youngest woman on this list. she's 26, worth $250 million. of course this is because of her talent and her music. but it's not just because she's won ten grammys. it's also because she is such a great businesswoman and she's really set herself up. she was the one that wrote that
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letter to apple when they weren't paying the artists enough. so she's on that list. beyonce, of course, with $26 $265 million also on that list. jessica alba on that list for her honest company. she's worth i think it's $340 million, around that. i mean jessica alba really has taken her career to a new level in starting that honest company. and of course barbra streisand is on the list, madonna, so many pop stars and celebrities. >> good to hear. speaking of celebrities, zayn malik and gigi hadid. i mean we're hearing rumors about them being on and off again. a lot of people want to know, especially -- well, women and the men, whether or not they are on the market, these really hot two people. >> exactly, you want to know if you might have a chance with one of them. this is one of the breakups we're hearing about this summer. last summer was a big summer of breakups. this summer we're hearing some new breakups. taylor swift and calvin harris. yeah, zayn malik and gigi hadid, superstar pop star, and superstar model seemed like they broke up.
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but then gigi hadid did an interview on friday where she talked about what did she like to do. she liked to stay home rather than go out, cook and paint and hang out with her dog and boyfriend. so now everyone is wondering does that mean that maybe she and zane are not broken up? she did appear at the guys choice award. they taped the awards here in l.a. last night. she was looking fabulous. she certainly, if she and zane are not broken up, she has no -- she won't have to worry about finding someone else. let's just say looking at the way she looked last night, and certainly she is a superstar. you'll hear more and more about her whether or not she and zayn are still together. >> both of them always stunning. so are you, kim serafin. good to have you. thanks so much for your time. >> great. thanks so much. and that is our time. i'm amara walker. "early start" is next for viewers in the u.s. for the rest of you, stay tuned for more news live from london. what're you, what're you, what're you? i probably got that question 3 to 4 times a week.
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breaking overnight. hillary clinton with a new primary win. this as bernie sanders vows to fight all the way to the convention. we're just one day from the final super tuesday election. who will win the most votes? will it matter? donald trump skewered by republicans supporting him. why gop leaders are condemning him for the treatment over a judge with mexican heritage. good morning. welcome to "early start." i'm christine romans. >> i'm john berman

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