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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  June 22, 2016 10:00pm-1:01am PDT

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>> the house republicans, who, again, are in the majority, and control, technically control of the house of representatives, they're trying to move on with some business, and have some votes. what's next on their agenda. and the democrats are continuing to protest. >> by the way, it is the top of the hour here on the east coast, 1:00 a.m. you're watching our special live coverage here on cnn. this is "cnn tonight." democrats are holding an extraordinary sit-in tonight. the house is back in session. and here we go. >> i just explained what happened. the republicans just tried to adjourn. to be finished for the night. and generally this is, you know, a noncontroversial voice vote where they say okay, and they're done. the democrats -- jim mcgovern there, of massachusetts, just said that he asked for the
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reported yeas and nays. they're having a vote if they will adjourn. >> they will if there are enough republicans on the floor to record their votes. >> why that's important, too, what they will do now, democrats will take that vote and use that against the republicans to say that they chose to adjourn instead of dealing with what we consider a major issue that the american people want to see passed. this is now a strong political ploy by the democrats against the republicans. >> do we still have audio of this? can we still hear? >> now they're voting. it's just milling around. >> got you. >> it's hard to see how many people are there. >> the question is, we've been talking about how, you know, wouldn't it be interesting if donald trump is the one who could broker a deal, considering his stance on this particular issue. where does that leave your candidate, christine quinn? >> look, i think that's a fair question. could donald broker this. we've seen no evidence that he's willing to put his political
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capital on the line tonight. has he called speaker ryan? has he called the nra into a meeting tomorrow at trump tower with the speaker's representative and senate republicans who would support something like this? it's all great to say he could, and kind of conjecture. but we see no evidence that he's willing to risk any of his politics to move this important measure forward at a time when the country desperately needs it moved forward. >> david chalian, i want to talk to you about this. as you look at the optics, sometimes, many times the optics are -- sometimes more important than the politics and the outcome when it comes to the hearts and minds of the american people. can you say who's winning? is there a winner here? >> well, i am a little confounded by the strategy at play here on the republican
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side, because i feel that a lot of turf has been seeded to the democrats to have their moment in the sun today. you have been talking about that moment where louie gomert came to the floor. i thought we would see a little bit more engagement like that. but this really has been the democrats' day on this. they have successfully mounted a protest that got a ton of attention, dominated the news cycle. on an issue where they clearly have real passion from their base. listen, this -- if you were watching the democratic base progressive groups in the days after orlando, they were really phone banking members of congress, social media taking over. this was something that these members were hearing from their core supporters, that this moment in time, that they wanted to see some action. and this is the action they came up with. what you're saying, the optics,
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i think the democrats win the day. i think that whether or not in the days to come they're able to maintain that position is an open question. >> let's stand by, everyone. because we have congressman marlin stutzman, a republican from indiana. we're going to talk to him now about this. we're talking about who actually wins when it comes to the optics here. do you think there is a winner in this particular situation, congressman. >> good evening. you know, i don't know that there's necessarily a winner in the sense that, you know, from the optics of it. it's obviously a publicity stunt to try to draw attention to the issue. but this is not the way to bring an issue to the floor. you know, we have rules in the house that need to be followed. and there's been discussion about putting together a task force, a committee, to deal with this. there's a lot of concern about what's happened in orlando, in other shootings around the
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country. but to take over the floor like this, i think is the wrong way for the democrats to do it. there's going to be further discussion about it. amongst republicans, we've had a lot of discussions on the floor today. i don't think this is the appropriate way to do it. it's looking very unorganized, and not necessarily respectful of the house rules. >> our political panel is here. dana bash among them. she has a question for you. >> congressman, first of all, thank you very much for coming on. i appreciate that. >> sure. >> obviously you don't agree with the tactics, and i'm guessing you don't agree with the issue. or am i wrong? just looking at the fundamental substance of what democrats are pushing here, do you think, like the republican nominee for president, or presumptive nominee for president, does that people who are on a terror watch list, no-fly list in particular, should be banned from getting a gun? >> i think that's the discussion
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we need to have further. i'm actually the chair of the second amendment task force with the rsc. >> right. >> we need to make sure we understand how the terror watch list actually works. is there due process. how do people -- how are they selected to be on the list. we don't want the government having secret lists of americans that people don't even realize that they're on, or once they do realize they're on, wanting to get off the list. how do they get off the list and how do they appeal that process. i think that's where we could have a legitimate conversation about that. and i know that i'm open to it. many of the other members of the republican conferences are open to that as well. tonight and today is not going to further the conversation here in the near term. >> that's a question that we have been having, all of us, on every single show here on cnn, in our private lives. you mean to tell me you guys in congress are not having that conversation right now? isn't that the conversation that's being had right now? isn't that the reason that we
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are here, and watching the democrats take over the house floor? >> well, sure. it's on the floor because the democrats have taken over the house floor. which, you know, i disagree with how this is being handled. i think that we should be following the rules. we have rules to protect the minority when we are in session to make sure that members of congress that are representing their constituents all across the country have their opportunity to have their say. you know, we have different committees that are looking at this. i'm encouraging our own leadership to actually take this head-on. you look at where most mass shootings take place. they're in gun-free zones. we need to make sure there is strong security in places that may potentially be targets. orlando, this is, you know, a huge event for us in modern times. and i think it's important for us as republicans to realize
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what's happening, to realize what it is. but i also think democrats need to be realistic, and the president needs to be realistic, and realize this is not just a crazy person that's walked in as, you know, an american that's shooting at a bar. this is a person who has identified with a terrorist organization, isis, that is -- we have a transcript that has shown what he's willing -- what he was willing to do, who he was willing to identify with, and why he was doing this. so we have to have that part of this whole conversation as well. i think the democrats today are trying to separate the two, the terrorist issue from the -- >> that may be the impetus of what started this particular one. but there are other incidents. by the way, this man was an american as well. there are other instances that this -- the legislation that is being proposed now, it would have helped prevent that. maybe not this particular one. but there are other incidences
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that it would have helped. is this not a good starting point to have that conversation, or at least to have that vote? >> i think it's really important that we talk about -- i mean, this man was an american. and he did buy his gun apparently legally, because he did go through a background check and was not stopped from purchasing a weapon. there are further conversations we can have about that. but i think we really need to have a conversation about terrorism that is being grown right here in america. i mean, in my own state, brownsberg, indiana, there was a young man just arrested because he's identifying with isis. >> can't we do all of that? one doesn't preclude the other one. >> no, absolutely not. that's why i think we should be taking this head-on, looking at the facts, and the statistics about the -- where shootings take place. look at the mass shootings that have taken place. they're happening in gun-free
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zones. we need to make sure there is security there. the only way we're going to stop a shooter is to have a person, a law-abiding citizen that either has a weapon them that can stop them or security, or law enforcement to be -- >> there was security there with a gun. >> you're right. but again, i mean, this man had a plan, that we had no idea if law enforcement had any information on. they would have stopped him. but that wasn't the case. i think that there's going to be in some instances where unfortunately people are going to be shot. because we don't have enough people there to help out in a situation quick enough. >> congressman, it's dana bash. i know you have to go soon to vote. but one other question. you are the chair of the second amendment caucus. so given that, and given the conversation you say that needs to happen, do you think that the house speaker should make a promise that there will be a vote, or a series of votes on
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this issue soon? i mean, if you did that, then perhaps it would take the wind out of the sails of the democrats who are waging this protest, making the argument that they don't have any vote in sight. >> well, you know what, whether he's promising votes or whether he's -- i think the discussion needs to happen. it is happening. i don't think it's happening in the way through an orderly process that the house typically goes through, through committees. in this case, i think that we should have, you know, an orlando commission, similar to the 9/11 commission. because we know more about isis, we know more about home-grown terrorism -- >> congressman, just -- >> here in the country. >> people out there are looking at congress in general thinking, okay, you know, things aren't working. and hearing that they want to talk more. they're probably going to say, really? let's get things done instead of just talking. and maybe you can find consensus between you, somebody who is a
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proud supporter and defender of the second amendment, and -- but also wants to make sure that these guns don't get into the hands of potential terrorists. >> i think the issue, though, more importantly than anything, is that it's terrorism. this is not an issue where law-abiding citizens -- we don't have a problem with law-abiding citizens. it is the person who has taken advantage of our laws and then, of course, going out and killing 50 people on a saturday night in a bar in florida. this person, this monster identified with an ideology more. >> we get the point on that. so then what about what happened in charleston? what about what happened in colorado? what about what happened in newtown? what about those instances? you're talking about this one particular issue, which, yes, it is, as we've been saying, the
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impetus for this legislation. but there were others that came before it, that this would have had a meaningful effect on that. >> sure. in the situation in charleston, i mean, again, this monster walks into a church, sits there, and decides to go ahead and kill the people that he had been worshipping with for some time. >> i'm told you have to go vote. >> i believe so. >> go vote. get off television. thank you. we'll continue this discussion. get out of here. so anyway, let's talk about this. you know, one question i did want to ask him, by the way, dana, thank you. i think you helped facilitate getting him and a whole bunch of our guests here. dana working her sources while we're on television, with her phone plugged into the charger. we'll get this correspondent here a charger. he said the -- this is outside the normal process. >> it is. >> most americans -- is the normal process working, though? >> no, the normal process is not
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working. but this was a takeover of the house. and because clearly democrats were frustrated that they knew that they weren't even going to get a vote on the bill, which by the way deals with getting guns -- not getting guns into the hands of terrorists. which is what the congressman was talking about. and i think that the question is, every time the democrats bring up the gun issue, they bring up isis and terrorism regarding orlando. there has to be a conversation that includes both. >> we did a town hall earlier this year with president obama, and we brought in advocates and opponents of stronger gun laws. i've got to tell you, it's almost worth going back and watching that again. because you really do get an understanding of where both sides are coming from. on the gun issue. as we sit here and we say, you know, i think we're of the belief that the system is broken, and this should be a vote and what have you, we have
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to acknowledge the country is very much divided on the issue of firearms, and your ability to own one and what have you. while we've seen polling go up and down on it, depending what year it is -- >> we're not that divided on background checks. i think that -- i don't have the numbers, even with restrictions on certain guns, like assault weapons, i think most americans, even nra members, members of the military, stanley mcchrystal -- >> not an ar-15, but the ability to have a gun, and what have you -- >> we've been asking why not, where there's overwhelming support, is it just political talking points? why not start with this? because the democrats want it to be their legislation and the
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republicans want it to be their legislation? or they don't want to sign on to it because a democrat sponsored it? >> i think some issues, but not this issue. >> but i think there are some very strong second amendment supporters who believe that this is a slippery slope. and that the minute you start passing legislation like this, you're going to start invading the second amendment. and it's chipping away at it. it's a strong argument. >> the slices are, they do have a majority of support. but it masks what i think mark is getting at and gloria is getting at is the cultural divide, one that is fervently felt by each side of the divide. even if these individual slices of proposed legislation -- >> what are the sources telling you about what's going to happen next? >> i think republicans are going to have to play offense just like the congressman was just saying.
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that they need to have their own proposals. republicans have said, mitch mcconnell being one of them, they don't want terrorists to have guns. they will have to have their own proposals. peter king is a moderate republican, so they need to come up with something. i think donald trump can play a role here and actually help the party. you think that senate and house republicans want to be talking about this in the fall? donald trump has had a rough three weeks, maybe he could strike a deal. he's already got the nra's endorsement. he wants to take this issue off the table. it's a real test of leadership from congressional leaders' standpoint. i think the bottom line is house republicans are going to have to come up with their own proposal if they don't like the peter king bill, okay. let's have a paul ryan bill. let's have some type of bill so they're not playing defense. >> much more ahead in the breaking news. the democrats' sit-in on the house floor. live coverage continues.
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live pictures now from the house floor. our breaking news, the democrats have a sit-in going on in the house. demanding action on guns.
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mark, gloria, dana, and david, also with me andy dean. christine quinn, bob cusack, editor in chief of the hill. spending my wednesday night and thursday morning with you guys. as you guys watch this, christine, as we talked about, what does this mean for your candidate, hillary clinton, since the democrats are leading this particular sit-in? what does it mean for hillary clinton? >> i think this speaks to a core issue. of secretary clinton's. which is controlling gun violence in america. getting guns off of our streets, preventing these mass murders. and also, preventing the murders that will happen on the streets in cities all across america tonight. many of them of young children. so i think this speaks to the passion within the democratic party. the commitment in the democratic party to take care of the issue of gun violence. and i think, i don't want to make this about a presidential
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campaign or politics, but since you've asked, i do think it will boost the democrats moving forward in her campaign, and in this year's elections. >> andy dean, do you agree with that? >> well, don, i'll say this, this has to relate back to what you said before the commercial break, with all these mass shootings. i think what conservatives get angry about, and i do especially, when they get lumped in together, as if they're the same, they're not. newtown, with lanza, or colorado, those are raving psychopath lunatics. they're not espousing a belief system. they're just flat-out -- >> i have to push back on you. not all of them are lunatics. >> the three shooters were. >> to the point of the president and the point of other people, the mechanism by which people died are similar. and that is the connection here,
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which we're talking about. in which democrats are talking about guns. go on. >> don, this is where we disagree. the newtown and colorado shootings, and charleston, right, in my opinion, those are raving lunatics, right? with orlando, you have something that involves geopolitics, involves immigration. but also he used a gun. it involves the gun debate as well. but the issue is conflating orlando with the others when actually it's very different. because the philosophy that's being espoused is one that oversees, there's a group that holds territory in northern syria, in northern iraq, they're making gains in libya. it's much larger. orlando is much bigger than the other shootings. not to diminish of the victims of newtown or whatever it may be. but when it involves isis and geopolitics, that makes it a much bigger story. and we can't lose sight it's not just guns that are involved here. it's terrorism and radical islam. and that's what conservatives don't want the american public
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to forget. >> i think a lot of the republicans and the comments about orlando are forgetting, and purposely leaving out it wasn't just a bar, it was an lgbt bar. and homophobia was one of the things that has to be, and we have to stop leaving it out, listed as a factor in that shoorting. i think that obviously these are complicated incidents. with a lot of factors involved in them. but what we're seeing in congress, and why the democrats are doing what they're doing, which i'm so proud of, is saying we're not doing anything about any of it. and we have to start doing something about it. because people have died and will die. and we had the abili t and we're not even trying. and that's the frustration. >> bob cusack, do we have the ability to walk and chew gum at the same time where it's not just an issue of terrorism? not just an issue of guns? not just an issue of mental health? all of it is involved. so why, you know, can those other things be put on the table
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but not necessarily guns? >> i think it's the big issue that there is a real distaste for gridlock. and sweeping legislation just hasn't been done since obama had large democratic majority. i think there is a frustration. i think donald trump is tapping into that. you hear hillary clinton saying, we're going to make washington work again. it's ta tall order. but without a doubt i think there's a lot of frustration in the middle, not so much on the extreme left and extreme right, but hey, we need to get some stuff done. that's why i think we've seen some movement in the senate on this bipartisan bill. and republicans taking on the nra. where it goes from here, who knows. >> thank you, bob. thank you, andy, christine, dana, dave, mark, gloria. got a lot of names here. we appreciate it. thank you so much. that's it for us tonight. thanks so much for watching. our live coverage continues in just a few minutes with john vause and amara walker in los angeles. i'm don lemon.
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this is cnn breaking news. hello, everyone. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm amara walker. >> i'm john vause. our breaking news this hour, standoff happening in the u.s. capitol. >> no bill, no break! no bill, no break! >> the house floor a scene of chaos. democrats are demanding a vote on gun control legislation. but republicans say a sit-in, the democrats have been staging all day, is a publicity stunt. republican leaders now plan a series of votes in the coming
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hour. but not on the gun bill. >> again, let's go to eric live in washington this hour. this has been going on, for, what, 14 hours now? 1:30 local time there. the republicans want to adjourn the session through july 4. >> that's still an option. the republicans are moving in the wee hours in washington. adjourn the house for a couple of weeks. basically leaving democrats with no audience here. democrats, just a few minutes ago, were huddling on the house floor, very animated, having a strategy session with top leaders in the party. nancy pelosi, steny hoyer, key figures, discussing what they would do if republicans actually went with that option. both sides are trying to figure out exactly what to do here. republicans are not willing to give democrats the gun votes they wanted. democrats are looking for ways
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to sort of keep the audience they've built up over the 14 or so hours this has been going on, john. >> just take us through how tense it's been getting in there. there were also concerns about possibly a fight breaking out between lawmakers. >> that's right. representative louie gomert of texas, a republican, hard line conservative, was really animated, and sort of got in democrats' face and say they should be talking about radical islam rather than gun control. and that irritated some democrats, especially representative brown of florida. and we saw a confrontation on the house floor. we're also seeing republicans sort of urging capitol police to quiet the members of the gallery. people who are supportive of the democratic protest, supportive of gun control measures and have been very loud. while democrats are fighting to keep the protesters in the house
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gallery and allow them to sort of keep offering their animated support. a lot of clash, not just about the substance of gun control, but just about procedure, about what can happen on the house floor, about what democrats can really do as they're launching this sit-in, this protest. >> eric, very quickly. i read some reports that the democrats have brought sleeping bags, pillows, blankets, snacks, they're planning to be there for quite a while. >> right. we've seen some young staffers carrying pillows toward the house floor. democrats are just trying to figure out right now what to do next. if the house was going to be back in session, then actually sleeping here tonight did seem to be an option, at least for some of the members. but if republicans go with this potential plan to adjourn the house for a couple of weeks, then democrats would have to reassess. they would have to determine whether they try to continue
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this tomorrow, knowing that the house is not going to convene for votes. or whether they just go ahead and disband tonight. that's the big question here in the next hour or two on capitol hill. >> extraordinary. the lawmakers, sleeping bags and blankies on the floor of the house. >> let's bring in ron brownstein. ron, you covered politics for a long time. there have been sit-ins before. nothing like this. >> the story is really, all the geneva conventions in american politics are disintegrating. a couple of years ago, you lie, during the president's state of the union. democrats voting when they were ending the filibuster in the senate except for the supreme court appointment. what's happening in american politics, it is becoming so tribal, the base on each side,
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any tool that you can use, you must use. and what you're seeing is a steady escalation of the combat. really the elimination of any guardrails. >> let's not forget what this is about, gun control. democrats are demanding they can vote on a bill. take us through what led to this. on monday, there were several measures that were put forth to be voted on. the senate voted all of them down. >> i think we've seen increasing level of frustration after each event, after san bernardino, after paris. it seems like orlando for some democrats has become a tipping point. so when these measures were voted down in the senate, we've seen frustration, i don't think we've seen this level of frustration. what's interesting is the republicans also seem to be walking a line where they're saying, this is a publicity stunt, whatever. they could be taking stronger actions. they haven't turned the lights off, haven't ordered the house police to take the democrats off the floor. they're aware of the imagery and walk a fine line here. >> it is inconceivable the democrats would pick a fight on
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this issue ten years ago. after al gore lost in 2000, and one of the conclusions at that time gun control, strong advocacy of gun control, principle reason he lost that raise thin loss to george bush. hillary clinton has embraced it. it's reflecting the democratic coalition. less dependent on the blue collar that they worried by stressing this issue. they realized that in their modern coalition, millennials, college educated, secular whites, gun control isn't the issue. the willingness of so many democrats to draw a line on this is striking. >> look at the makeup of the distribute party over the last ten years, after a lot of people got purged in the midterm -- >> they're gone. >> you've got a situation now where there are more representatives from urban areas. >> totally. >> this is a real change. not just within the party, but
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for the representatives on the floor. >> two-thirds of the house democrats represent districts that are more nonwhite. more diverse than the national average. democrats have basically lost all of the seats that initially gun control could cost them. an enormous shift in the party back willing to press this position. for the democrats hoping to regain some of that turf, this adds to the list of gay marriage and free contraception and climate change, but as our politics sort of resorts along cultural lines, it is inevitable you see democrats reengaging that republicans were only willing to talk about for 15 years. >> if you look at the 2008 campaign, in 2008 she was talking about guns in a way where barack obama joked she was trying to be annie oakley. and she went after bernie sanders during the democratic primary on his past opposition to -- >> the republicans are comfortable, defending the other
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side. basically what this does, as the gun control issue becomes more prominent, it reinforces the divides shaping american politics today. >> is anybody holding their breath this will bring forth meaningful change to gun laws? >> no. >> but for no other reason than the small state bias of the senate, when they voted after newtown, if you assign -- when they had the universal background check, that was the real moment. if you assign half of each state's population, each senator, the senators voted for it represent 190 million people. senators voted against it represent about 120 million people. the combination of the filibuster and the two-senator per state rule, magnifying the small rural states are going to control it makes it very hard to see how you get through this. >> incredible. >> checks and balances. >> we've got to leave it there. thank you so much for coming in. we'll take a short break here. after months of bitterly divisive campaigning, the polls will open at the top of the hour
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you're hearing u.s. house democrats chanting, no bill, no break, on the house floor. this is what the fight over gun control has looked like for hours on capitol hill. democrats are demanding a vote on a bill. the republicans are determined to deny them that vote. they planned a series of votes in the coming hour but not on the gun bill. the house is adjourned for almost an hour now. polls in the united kingdom are set to open at the top of the hour for a referendum to
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decide whether to leave or remain part of the european union. their choice will shake the direction of the country, and its future as a world power for decades. >> let's bring in ryan from london on the latest on the brexit vote. good to have you on the program, ryan. obviously it's hard to tell right now which way this referendum is going to go. we know turnout is going to be extremely crucial. as i understand it, there's been a surge of young voters who have been registering. what could that mean for the referendum? >> well, the young voters have tended to favor the remain, the stay, the status quo quite strongly. the big question is whether they turn out. around 1.5 million were added to the roles in the last three or four weeks before the electoral register to close. that can only be good for remain. now those come painers have to hope they turn out. it's the older voters who have tended to be more passionate in their views to the leave
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campaign. the young people will have to show their stuff. otherwise they will be living with a legacy they don't want to be stuck with. >> the implications of this vote will be huge. this is about the economy, about sovereignty, about immigration. those in favor of the leave campaign have been saying they believe a brexit would boost the uk's economy. we've been hearing from really influential entities like the imf, the u.s. federal reserve, basically saying a brexit would be detrimental to the markets, and to the economy. what's the argument been on the leave side about how a brexit would help the uk's economy? >> essentially they're betting on the fact that the uk is the sixth largest economy in the world. and that they tend to be more flexible in how they regulate the economy where they have the power to still do that. they want the uk to essentially leave behind the more regulated european continental economies, and just run out there and grab share in the financial services
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sector, to run out there and do deals with their former empire. there is an attractiveness around that sort of argument. it's possible the uk can really capitalize on its tech skills and what it's been building around cambridge, around its silicon round about area in london. it's all possible. but there's going to be a big short-term shock if they ever get to that point. i think the leave campaign underestimates how complicated it will be to get all the eu laws off the books. it might do an interesting deal with eu in three, four, five years' time. it can't erase all of those 40 years of regulations that it's been adding to its books. they're going to have to factor that in on friday morning, whatever happens. >> and ryan, you know, what will happen to david cameron, the prime minister, in either case, in the event of a brexit or a remain? >> it's not looking great for him either way. i think a lot of observers are
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underestimating that fact. if britain votes to leave today, you might see cameron resigning on friday. he might stay in a caretaker capacity. it will be tough for him to stay off if he loses this vote. if he does stay on, he might find there's a civil war, one that's waging in his conservative party for months and years now. that he might not be able to control it. he said he'll stay on. it might not be his choice to make. it will be a difficult weekend, whichever way britain votes today. >> the vote seen as a referendum on the prime minister as well. ryan, i appreciate your time. thank you for that. >> thank you. >> when we come back, two democrats in california fighting for the same seat in the u.s. senate. esurance does insurance a smarter way, which saves money.
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anger and a standoff on the floor of the u.s. house of representatives. 10:50 here in los angeles, 1:50 in the morning in the u.s. capitol. and democrats calling out the republican counterparts, the democrats demanding a vote on gun control legislation. republicans not giving in.
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the house is being adjourned in 40 minutes or so. the republicans are planning a series of votes at the top of the hour. but not on the gun bills. >> and here in california, voters are set for an historic election in november. >> the first time ever, the race to one of the state's seats in the u.s. senate is down to two democrats. california's attorney general, harris, and facing off u.s. house of representatives loretta sanchez. >> for more on this, we're joined by sarah sidener. >> it's not looking good for republicans. they're not going to be involved in this race. you'll not see a bunch of yelling like you've seen on the floor of the house tonight. and you will not be seeing what we're seeing in the presidential race. we're talking about a political race that could make history twice. not once, but twice, depending on the outcome of the race. it does not involve a republican.
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democrat versus democrat. no, not these two. but these two. embroiled in a political battle that is happening for the first time ever in california history. >> i want to come home. i want to come home to the state that i love so much, california. >> the fight is for california senator barbara boxer's seat, when she stepped down after nearly a quarter century, there was a deluge of candidates scrambling to fill her seat. 34 candidates to be exact. >> tonight california spoke. >> including california attorney general pamela harris. >> i know you are some of our strongest supporters. >> and california congresswoman loretta sanchez. and the party chairman, along with 11 other republicans. but not one republican ended up on the november ballot, leaving two democrats to duke it out. how did that happen? republicans have themselves to thank for a 2010 proposition authored by a republican state
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senator, and backed by republican governor arnold schwarzenegger. it calls for the top two primary vote getters to advance to the general election. regardless of party. >> and so if there are two candidates from the same party, the idea is that at least one of them, if not both, will make some effort to reach out to align voters, and voters from the other party. >> the bill was about getting moderates in place. >> absolutely. >> in this race, attorney general harris received more than 40% of the primary vote. sanchez pulled in 18%. the race giving her new life. and a chance to tout her 20 years of service as a u.s. represent. but that comes with a caveat. most analysts agree she will need support from across the table to catch up with harris. and that's where the republicans just might have their say. >> there have been some indications that a lot of prominent republicans and other pro-business interests in california may decide to support sanchez in the fall.
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not because they think she's wonderful, not because they think she's perfect, because they think she's better. >> so you have the first time that two democrats are going for the senate seat here in california. that is a historic moment. and then if sanchez ends up being the winner in the race, you'll have the very first latina senator in the united states. >> you have a situation where the republican -- the republicans, the best they can do is -- what does it say about the republicans right now in california. >> that's a really good question. i've been talking to political operatives, that i asked the same question to. i said is the party dying in california? she wouldn't go that far, but they said it sure is in big trouble. they've gone down about 3% since the voting in 2012, the big election then. and that makes them about 28% of the electorate. republicans, 28%, democrats around 43%. but there's another number
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that's really important. that's independents. their numbers are growing. so it gives you ab idea that people aren't that happy with both parties. but certainly the democrats far outweigh the republicans, which means we will likely be seeing the scenario again in other races. >> it will be interesting to see how she broadens out, sanchez, her appeal to the republicans, independents, and democrats without losing her base support of the democrats. >> that's exactly right. she is going to have to get the republicans to come out to vote. they may decide with two democrats there -- >> what's the point. >> guess what might be the clincher here. >> do tell. >> donald trump. >> how so? >> the trump effect. because pundits are looking at this saying, you know, the latino vote, they may come out because they don't want donald trump to be in the presidential seat. so she may get a boost, because so many latinos may come out to vote to keep him from office and
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may end up putting her in office. >> wow. >> it's complicated. >> the last straw. >> we'll have to discuss that again. thank you so much, sarah. live from los angeles. we're back with a lot more news, breaking news out of the u.s. house of representatives. live pictures right now coming to us from periscope. exactly what's happening in washington. it is four minutes before 2:00 a.m. on thursday morning. back in a moment. tokyo. live in tokyo. when you airbnb, you have your own home. so, live there. even if it's just for a night. sorry, just getting a quote on motorcycle insurance from progressive. yeah? yeah, they have safe rider discounts, and with total loss coverage, i get a new bike if mine's totaled.
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>> announcer: this is cnn breaking news. > this is cnn newsroom live from los angeles. i'm john vause. >> and i'm amara walker. chaos on capitol hill. democrats are demanding a vote on gun control legislation in the wake of the orlando mass shooting, and they are in a standoff with republicans. right now, republicans say the democratic sit-in is a publicity stunt and they will not give in. >> it's time for a real debate on these issues.
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>> radical islam. >> the republics are planning a series of votes this hour, but not on the gun bill. democrats are furious. >> no break, no bill. no break, no bill. no break, no bill. >> the democrats' sit-in started wednesday morning. shortly after it began, the house speaker declared the chamber in recess and cameras were turned off. but members of the house used their smartphones to stream their protest live, of course. >> let's turn to washington following all of this. it's just gone 2:00 a.m. there in the capital. eric, we understand the house has been adjourned for another 30 minutes. what happens at 2:30? >> reporter: so it sounds like republicans are going to move
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toward a series of votes that would likely pass a zika funding measure and then adjourn for nearly two weeks. basically taking the audience away from democrats, telling democrats that, you know, you can sit here if you want, but there will be no vote. there will be no action to try to influence. sort of attempting to undercut this democratic protest that way. that seems like the direction republicans are moving although there's not been a final decision from house speaker paul ryan on that. democrats meanwhile have been trying to figure out what they would do if republicans went that direction. would they stay and keep going for the rest of the night and keep this up tomorrow? would they pack it in and try again in a couple of weeks when republicans come back to town? that's all up in the air, and we will see as the house comes in for some wee morning hour votes here in the next half hour. >> the scenes, eric, have been just so extraordinary.
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tell us what you've been witnessing there. i mean democrats -- the house democrats threatening to stay overnight. i would imagine some have their blankies with them. what's been happen something i know there's been moments where it's gotten really intense as well. >> reporter: absolutely. this is chaos compared to what the house is normally like. some democratic, staffers for some democrats, have been bringing pillows, blankets toward the house floor. democrats have really been threatening to actually stay in the chamber all night, even if the lights are turned off. but there have been tense moments. representative louie gohmert of texas got in some democrats' faces and shouted at them that they should be talking about radical islam, not about gun control. that really angered some democrats. so there was nearly a clash on the house floor about that. there have been a lot of arguments sort of between protesters in the house gallery and members of the house with
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republicans hoping to sort of shush these gallery members while democrats were really egging them on to keep up their vocal calls for gun control. so this is a scene that is really unusual here at the capitol. and there's no real indication of where it's going to go next. we don't know how democrats are going to react if republicans try to adjourn. >> really unusual would have to be the understatement of the night. we will check in with you again in about 25 minutes from now to find out where all of this is heading. for now, thank you. house democrat john lewis is leading the sit-in which started wednesday morning. lewis is a civil rights icon. in the 1960s, he led sit-ins demanding an end to segregation. lewis said this sit-in reminded him of his early days advocating for civil rights for african-americans. >> deadly, mass shootings are becoming more and more frequent.
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mr. speaker, this is a fight. it is not an opinion. we must remove the blinders. the time for silence and patience is long gone. we're calling on the leadership of the house to bring common sense gun control legislation to the house floor. give us a vote! let us vote! we came here to do our job. we came here to work. the american people demand an action. do we have the courage? do we have raw courage to make at least a down payment on ending gun violence in america? >> the top republican house speaker paul ryan is standing firm. this is what he told wolf blitzer earlier. >> this is nothing more than a publicity stunt. that's point number one.
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point number two is this bill was already defeated in the united states senate. number three, we are not going to take away a citizen's due process rights. we're not going to take away a citizen's constitutional rights without due process. that was already defeated in the senate, and this is not a way to try and bring up legislation. now, let's focus on the issue at hand here, terrorism, and let's find out what we need to do to prevent future terrorist attacks. and if a person is on a terror watch list and they go try to buy a gun, we have procedures in place to deal with that. we want to make sure that those procedures are done correctly, and that's something we should be able to do in a calm and cool manner without these sort of dilatory publicity stunt tactics to try and bring a bill that already died over in the senate to the house floor. >> john lewis and these other democrats on the floor, it was really not televised by c span cameras, controlled by you because you called a recess which shuts off those cameras. some are suggesting you're trying to censor this protest.
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are you? >> no. look, this is the way the rules work in the house and they have ever since we've had tv. we had a similar protest when we the minority in 2008. not only did the cameras not go on, they turned the lights off on us. this is what you do when you go into recess subject to the call of the chair. these are the house rules, and they've been this way for years. >> all right. joining us here in l.a. are ron brownstein, cnn senior political analyst and the senior id tore for the at lan tack, and see ma meta, ron, i want to start with you. you've been covering politics for a while. what has been going through your mind as you've been watching these scenes play out. clearly the democrats are at a breaking point. >> both the cause and the tactics are striking. i mean the tactics, disrupting the house floor in this way is just a continuing of the trend we have been on where essentially all of the rules of the geneva convention of american politics are being shredded and really both sides feel enormous pressure to use any means available to advance
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their agenda against the other. and it is just kind of this inexorable increase in kind of the tension and the confrontation. and the second thing that is equally striking is that they are drawing this line over gun control, an issue that for really over a dozen years democrats viewed as highly toxic following, you know -- when al gore lost in 2000 and george bush, the conclusion among many including bill clinton that gun control was a critical part of why he lost. democrats have concluded that in their modern coalition, they've essentially lost the voters. the blue collar and non-urban white voters, they feared losing by emphasizing gun control. and the people who actually do vote for them which are essentially minorities, minute lennials, that this is, again, a winning issue for them. so it is just enormously striking to see not only the way they're fighting but the cause they're fighting over. >> i just want to ask you a procedural question because this is what we're being told. the republicans plan to adjourn
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through july 4. they're going to have a vote on the zika virus, and then it's all done. the democrats are saying even if the republicans do that, they plan to come in next week during a pro forma session. just explain to us what that is. they maintain a sit-in with some presence throughout the week. >> i mean it seems like what's interesting is that the republicans have, while we just saw paul ryan call this a publicity stunt, say this is not the way we do things, they haven't taken all the actions that they could take. they could have had the house police take these democrats off the floor. they could have turned out the lights and they haven't done that yet. i think there is a measure of caution. with the democrats, it's clear they're going to continue to press on in coming days to try to keep this in the headlines. the other thing i think was remarkable is even though the cameras were turned off, because of social media, because of periscope and facebook live and all that, we were able to see these images that ten years ago we never would have been able to see. >> even if the vote was called t would be rejected, right? i mean the attempts happened on monday, so what can this accomplish? >> yeah, no. what it can do is kind of just sharpen and crystallize the
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debate. look, the democrats have -- gun control advocates in general have a fundamental problem in that in rural america, gun control is deeply unpopular, and the way the senate works, with two senators for every state regardless of population, magnifies the influence of small rural states when combined with the filibuster, it makes it very hard for gun control to win. the only way that gun control wins is when democrats are able -- because they always lose some of their red state democrats. the only way it wins is when they're able to build enough pressure on blue state republicans. you see someone like pat toomey who represents pennsylvania, and the senate has been trying to author a compromise on this. really what they're trying to do is kind of force this issue. it's a long term, very uphill fight, particularly in the senate. also in the house wes have a republican party that is almost completely absent from urban america in the house. very few of these members feel a lot of pressure. >> this did not come out of the blue because last week there was a 15-hour filibuster in the senate just to get a vote on these gun control measures, which then got voted down. so there is this es allocation
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in the tactics. >> the level of frustration, there's columbine how many years ago, then every year it seems like there's another shooting. newtown was one that caused a deep reaction across the country. and then orlando seems to have resonated. if you look at the polling, there is support for some of these measures, including the republicans. the idea if you're on the no fly list, you shouldn't be able to buy guns. i think democrats are counting on trying to make this a moment that is just like a catalyst for change. >> for most americans, the idea that you have to choose between gun control and focusing on terrorists is like insane. i mean why can't you do both? and yet you hear democrats, you know, chanting gun control and republicans saying, no, no, new york islamic terrorism is the issue. it's possible that both could be the issue, and -- >> absolutely. >> ron and sima, thank you for sticking around. it's a late night. we appreciate you being with us. thank you.
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and the polls are open. voting is under way in the uk. the question on the ballot reads, should the united kingdom remain a member of the european union or leave the european union? pretty simple. >> a record 46.5 million people have registered to vote in the referendum. british citizens aged 18 and up are eligible to vote. >> senior international correspondent nem ma elbagir joins us from a polling station in north london. we are now in that period of time when a whole lot of election laws come into play, and because we are seen across the united kingdom, we are limited as to what we can and cannot report. >> reporter: absolutely. some pretty stringent electoral guidelines acro. and given the strength of sentiment, given the strength of feeling in the run-up to this referendum, they're going to be very closely monitored by the broadcast regulator here.
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record number of voters, whether that will translate into record turnout, you can see the weather behind me here isn't particularly playing along. we've seen the first few voters come in this morning, braving the rain. but it is a concern for both sides of this question. how much the weather -- the weather in the uk always upper most on people's mind. never more so than on this polling day. and today both sides are going to be biting their fingernails, looking at their maps and wondering how much is this going to hit me and how much is this going to hit the other side of this? we're hoping that by the early hours of tomorrow morning, this is going to be done very similarly to how a regular election is run. when it becomes mathematically impossible for the other side to make up the momentum, then we're going to start seeing a lot of these places called. it always feels for a lot of people this morning, waking up,
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anticlimactic, this has been a question that has dominated british political discourse for so long, especially under the auspices of a conservative government that finally that the day is here, so many people just want to get to the other side of this, john. >> well, since we can't talk brexit, so family is good? everything is okay with you? we'll leave it at that. thanks, nima. >> thank you, nima. ing sure to stay tuned to cnn all day for special coverage of this referendum. we will have key interviews and the very latest on the results from christiane amanpour and the rest of our london-based reporters. we have a lot of correspondents reporting on reaction from across europe and beyond. we'll also have extensive coverage online at cnn.com/referendum.
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well, donald trump is on the offensive attacking hillary clinton during his latest speech. trump questioned clinton's character, her qualifications, calling her a world-class liar with a deadly foreign policy. >> the hillary clinton foreign policy has cost america thousands of lives and trillions and trillions of dollars and unleashed isis across the world. no secretary of state has been more wrong more often and in more places than hillary clinton. she believes she's entitled to the office. her campaign slogan is "i'm with her." you know what my response is to that? i'm with you, the american people. >> clinton used her own campaign speech to go after trump, saying criticisms of his economic failures in a speech a day earlier must have got under his skin. >> i think it's an understatement to say that
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americans face a choice in november. as i said yesterday in ohio, donald trump offers no real solutions for the economic challenges we face. he just continues to spout reckless ideas that will run up our debt and cause another economic crash. i'm here today to offer an alternative. >> and cnn has a reality check team dedicated to separating political speech facts from fiction. on wednesday, trump said clinton accepted $58,000 in jewelry from the government of brunei plus millions more for her foundation. we'll find out if it's true or false at cnn.com/realitycheck.
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just about everything. but even long time washington observers are surprised at this. as i speak, there are protests taking place on the floor of the u.s. house of representatives. straight out of the american civil rights era. here's how it all began. >> deadly, mass shootings are becoming more and more frequent. mr. speaker, this is a fight. it is not an opinion. we must remove the blinders. the time for silence and patience is long gone. we're calling on the leadership of the house to bring common sense gun control legislation to the house floor. give us a vote! >> that's representative john lewis. he was a prominent figure in the 1960s civil rights movement. and just like the '60s, the democratic law makers staged a sit-in. >> speaker paul ryan tried his
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best to bring a degree of order on a procedural vote on an unrelated matter. you can hear the chaos in the background. >> -- of the veto message of the president on house joint resolution 88. the clerk will report the title of joint resolution. >> joint resolution 88. >> republicans are in the majority, which means they can decide when to turn off the cameras that were transmitting many of these images live whenever they want. they eventually did that. but democrats kept streaming live pictures over their smartphones. >> no bill, no break. no bill, no break. no bill, no break. >> all right. so recap what's been going on, we're following the sit-in protest taking place right now. it's still going on on the floor of the u.s. house of representatives. right now the house is adjourned for the next few minutes. and still democrats are demanding a vote on a package of gun reforms that would almost certainly fail if put to a vote
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in the republican led house. but they are insisting on it all the same. we continue to bring you any updates as we follow this story. let's go to north korea now. they say they're conducted a successful test of a missile that traveled 400 kilometers before it fell into the sea of japan. >> the state run news agency didn't specify when the missile was fired. south korean and u.s. officials reported that pyongyang fired two intermediate range missiles on wednesday. the first one flew only about 150 kilometers, about 90 miles. less than seven weeks away for the rio olympics and golfer rory mcilroy says he will not compete in the games because of the zika virus. >> the golf champion from northern ireland says, quote, even the risk of an infection from zika virus is considered low, it is a risk i'm unwilling to take. >> meanwhile the fight against zika may be get something financial help. congressional republicans in the u.s. have reportedly agreed on a $1.1 billion grant to combat the
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virus. the bill is about $800 million less than what president barack obama had requested. >> democrats are threatening to block that bill. they don't like that the legislation calls for spending cuts on other health initiatives to offset the funding. a jury in los angeles is now deliberating in a copyright infringement suit against the rock band led zeppelin. >> stephanie elam was in the courtroom for the closing arguments and filed this report. >> reporter: john and amara, we're talking about music that was written some 45 years ago. the issue here that the jury is now tasked with deciding on is whether or not the intro to led zeppelin's "stairway to heaven," about the first two minutes or so of that song, whether or not they actually stole that music from a group called spirit that wrote a song called "taurus" in 1968. that group spirit went on to really find more fame in the '60s with their second album. but still this instrumental version of this song is what is at issue here.
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now, what the jury is looking at is whether or not jimmy page and robert plant actually interacted with the band and took the music, something that's hard to prove in this era when it was not social media, when you can't prove that a group was at the same concert venue. but that's what they're looking to do. now, the song spirit was written by a man named randy wolf. he passed away in 1997. so it's actually his estate that is suing led zeppelin about the song. of course it's been about five days now. it's a jury made up of four men and four women, and they will continue deliberating on thursday. john and amara. >> stephanie elam, thank you for that. former u.s. house speaker dennis hastert has started serving a 15-month sentence in federal prison. hastert entered the facility in minnesota on wednesday. >> he pleaded guilty to hiding money used to silence victims he allegedly sexually abused in the 1960s and '70s.
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affiliate wgn reports that the judge who sentenced hastert called him a serial child molester. after a short break, we're going to take you back to capitol hill in washington, where democrats are staging a sit-in, demanding action on gun control still. and for the first time ever, the race for one of california's seats in the senate being fought over by two democrats. we'll tell you how this could have happened. man 1: i came as fast as i could. what's up?
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man 2: this isn't public yet. man 1: what isn't? man 2: we've been attacked. man 1: the network? man 2: shhhh. man 1: when did this happen? man 2: over the last six months. man 1: how did we miss it? man 2: we caught it, just not in time. man 1: who? how? man 2: not sure, probably off-shore, foreign, pros. man 1: what did they get? man 2: what didn't they get. man 1: i need to call mike... man 2: don't use your phone. it's not just security, it's defense.
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bae systems. welcome, everyone. you are watching "cnn newsroom" live from los angeles. i'm amara walker. >> and i'm john vause. welcome back, everybody. the u.s. house is expected to reconvene any moment. it's just gone 2:30 thursday morning in d.c. democrats are demanding a vote on gun control legislation in the wake of the orlando mass shooting. they've been staging a sit-in for 15 hours now. republicans, though, standing firm. they're playing a series of
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votes this hour, but not on the gun bill. >> let's turn to cnn's eric bradener. the last time we spoke with you, you said house democrats were huddling, trying to figure out what their next steps might be with their blankies and pillows in hand. >> reporter: that's right. it now looks like republicans definitely will vote to approve a zika funding bill and then adjourn the house for a period of nearly two weeks. that means democrats are not going to have the audience that they were hoping for. they're not going to have republicans here in washington casting votes that they could try to interrupt. so what will democrats do? right now it looks like they will at least keep some presence here at the capitol. some members talking about gun control on the house floor even though the house will not be in session. but it's a move by republicans to sort of take some of the drama out of this and really
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sort of lessen the impact of this democratic move if democrats were to continue on into another day or another week. >> so, eric, what is the end game, though, here for the democrats? apart from publicity right now, what are they hoping to achieve? how do they hope to move the needle on this issue by doing this? >> reporter: democrats are hoping to make a public show of their position on gun control. they're advocating restrictions on suspected terrorists buying firearms and an expansion of background checks. but they have no way to get that done. republicans control the house and the senate and have defeated similar measures in the past. there's no real clear path forward right now for these measures the democrats are talking about. so they're hoping to draw a lot of attention to these issues. if they can't force republicans into a vote on the record, that they could use against them in
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november's elections, then at least they can point to this sort of chaotic episode and say, look what we did. we made an issue of this. we tried everything to get republicans to vote, and they wouldn't do it. so this is obviously a move that we will see sort of replayed in november's elections, not just the presidential election but down-ballot races for the house seats and senate seats that democrats are hoping to retake from republicans. >> and, eric, it was quite interesting to see you have the house speaker, republican paul ryan, calling this a publicity stunt. and on the flip side, you have president obama chiming in, basically praising john lewis' efforts and leading this sit-in. again this just underscores the really bitter, bitter, partisan divide when it comes to any kind of meaningful gun control measures. >> reporter: that's right. absolutely. we saw a clash on the house floor earlier a couple of hours ago. representative louie gohmert of texas, a hard line republican, was sort of shouting at
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democrats. they should be talking about radical islam rather than gun control, and democrats got agitated when that happened, and we nearly saw them clash. so here's a fun one for you. thursday evening is the annual congressional baseball game. the democrats are going to be playing the republicans. we could see that a bit more heated than usual. >> we should also mention, eric, while you've been speaking, these are live pictures of what's happening right now. this is the official television feed of the floor of the house. when they went into recess, the television cameras were cut. the democrats used their cell phones to stream images. we have the official feedback because the house is being called back to order. we'll find out what happens in the next hour or so. eric, we appreciate you being with us. it is 2:33 in the morning in
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washington. it is a late night. it is almost unprecedented. we'll continue to follow what's happening there. in the meantime, a short break. you're watching cnn. there are two billion people who don't have access to basic banking, but that is changing. at temenos, with the microsoft cloud, we can enable a banker to travel to the most remote locations with nothing but a phone and a tablet. everywhere where there's a phone, you have a bank. now a person is able to start a business, and employ somebody for the first time. the microsoft cloud helped us to bring banking to ten million people in just two years. it's transforming our world. weinto a new american century. born with a hunger to fly and a passion to build something better. and what an amazing time it's been, decade after decade of innovation, inspiration and wonder. so, we say thank you america for a century of trust,
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welcome back, everybody. just gone 11:37 here in los angeles. 2:37 in washington. our breaking news this hour, the u.s. house back in session, but they will not be voting on gun control even though democrats have been staging a sit-in to push for that vote. >> the republicans digging in as well. we've now learned that house republicans plan to leave for the july 4th recess after voting on these unrelated bills. democrats say they still plan to
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come next week and continue the sit-in, though the house will not be in session. just a few days from now, the lgbt community in the u.s. will mark the first anniversary of the supreme court's historic decision to legalize same-sex marriage in all 50 states. but it comes in the wake of the worst mass shooting in u.s. history, which targeted the gay community in orlando. jim obergefell was the plaintiff at the center of the case for marriage equality. he's also co-author of "love wins, the story of the legal battle to marry who was dying of lou gehrig's disease. jim joins us now. thanks for being wus. there's been a lot of talk, a lot of speculation about the gunman's motive in orlando. it is enough just to focus on his role, or should there be a bigger discussion taking place right now about what has happened?
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>> i absolutely believe it should be a larger discussion. you know, his actions did not occur in a vacuum. his actions occurred in an environment that's been created and perpetuated by leaders across the country, whether they be elected officials, politicians, religious leaders, people across the country who have helped create an environment in which the lgbtq community is treated as less than, as less than human, and that has contributed to this feeling of encouragement to commit acts against our community. >> now, a year ago the lgbt community was celebrating the right to marriage. since the supreme court made that decision, what sort of backlash has there been? >> well, we all expected some backlash, but i have to be honest. i'm surprised at how vicious that backlash is. and unfortunately that backlash has really concentrated on the most vulnerable part of our community, our transgender siblings. i think in a lot of ways, the
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opponents of equality for the lgbtq community realize that they are losing. we won marriage equality. there's greater acceptance of our community, especially the lgb part of our community. so the opponents of equality have latched onto the most vulnerable part, our transgender siblings, and they're taking out their disappointment, their hatred against that community. >> "the new york times" reported some data from the fbi which shows that lgbt people are the one minority which is most likely to be targeted in hate crimes, but yet this seems to go sort of unnoticed, unreported. why is that? >> well, i think a big part of that is in so many places, there aren't protections for the lgbtq community. there aren't those employment protections. there aren't anti-discrimination protections. so when there's violence against our community, it just falls within that -- that gray area kind of between the cracks where
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we aren't noticed. we aren't talked about. so i think that's part of it. and it could also be, you know, some of the victims aren't willing to be public about it because they might not be out in their -- in their life, and they're afraid to come out and report this. >> there has been, though, so much support since the shooting in orlando for the gay community there. do you see this maybe that that's one good thing which has come out of this, that this could be some kind of tipping point? >> i hope so, john. that is my greatest hope and wish is that this atrocity, this hate crime galvanizes people across the country, not just members of the community, but our allies to realize just what danger we're in. you know, this was the first time in my adult gay life where i suddenly felt afraid. i felt fear for my safety, and i realized that fear that i felt
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is what our transgender family feels every single day. and i hope this will cause people to understand and realize what danger our community is in. so i do look at this horrible attack as something that might move us forward no matter horrible this was, some good could come out of it. >> well, from your lips to god's ear. jim, thanks for being with us. >> absolutely, john. thanks for having me. and we'll take a short break. we'll be right back.
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don't tour tokyo.. and please, don't "do" tokyo. live in tokyo. airbnb a place in shinagawa, or a loft in ebisu. try toro. try this. be polite and slurp. have yoshi tell you about the time he rode an ostrich. act like you've done this before. wherever you go... ...don't go there. live there. even if it's just for a night.
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welcome back, everybody. just gone 2:46 on a thursday morning in washington, and the u.s. house back in session. but they will not be voting on a gun control bill even though democrats have been staging a sit-in, about 15 hours to push for that vote. >> no bill, no break. no bill, no break. no bill, no break. >> just moments ago, house members started voting on another unrelated bill. republicans plan to leave for the july 4th recess after all the votes are finished. democrats say they will still come in next week and continue
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the sit-in though the house will not be in session. we're joined by cnn's sara sidner. we're talking about democrat versus democrat. what went so rong for the republicans? >> it's not looking good for them, and they're not going to be involved in this race. you will not see a whole bunch of yelling like you've been seeing on the floor of the house tonight. and you will not see what we've been seeing in the presidential race. we're talking about a political race that could make history twice, not once, but twice depending on the outcome of the race. and it does not involve a republican. >> you know, wait a minute. wait a minute. >> democrat versus democrat. no, not these two but these two, embroiled in a political battle that is happening for the first time ever in california history. >> i want to come home. i want to come home to the state that i love so much, california. >> reporter: the fight is for california senator barbara boxer's seat. when she stepped down after nearly a quarter century, there
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was a deluge of candidates scrambling to fill her seat. 34 candidates to be exact. >> tonight california spoke. >> reporter: including california attorney general kamala harris. >> i know you are some of our strongest supporters. >> reporter: and california congresswoman loretta sanchez. and duf sundheim along with 11 other republicans. but not one republican ended up on the november ballot, leaving two democrats to duke it out. how did that happen? republicans have themselves to thank for a 2010 proposition authored by a republican state senator and backed by republican governor arnold schwarzenegger. it calls for the top two primary vote getters to advance to the general election regardless of party. >> and so if there are two candidates from the same party, the idea is that at least one of them, if not both, will make some effort to reach out to non-aligned voters and to voters from the other party.
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>> the bill was about getting moderates in place. >> yeah, absolutely. >> reporter: in this race, attorney general harris received more than 40% of the primary vote. sanchez pulled in 18%. the race giving her new life and a chance to tout her 20 years of service as a u.s. representative. but that comes with a caveat. most analysts agree she'll need support from across the table to catch up with harris, and that's where the republicans just might have their say. >> there have been some indications that a lot of prominent republicans and other pro-business interests in california may decide to support sanchez in the fall, not because they think she's wonderful, not because they think she's perfect. because they think she's better. >> reporter: so you have the first time that two democrats are going for the senate seat here in california. that is a historic moment. and then if sanchez ends up being the winner in the race, you'll have the very first
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latina senator in the united states. >> okay. so you have a situation where the republican -- the best the republicans could do is 8% of the vote or something like that? what does that say about the republicans right now in california? >> it's a really good question. i've been talking to some political 0 p ratives who i asked the same question to. i said is the party dying in california? they wouldn't go that far but they said it is in big trouble. if you look at the numbers, they've gone down about 3% since the voting in 2012, since the big election then. that makes them about 28% of the electorate. republicans, 28%. democrats, around 43%. but there's another number that's really important, and that's independents. their numbers are growing. so it gives you an idea that maybe people aren't that happy with both parties, but certainly the democrats far outweigh the republicans, which means we will likely be seeing this scenario again in other races. >> it will be interesting to see how she broadens out -- sanchez -- her appeal to the republicans, the independents,
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and the democrats without losing her base support of the democrats. >> that's exactly right. i mean she is going to have to get the republicans to come out to vote. they may decide with two democrats there -- >> what's the point? >> but guess what might be the clincher here? >> do tell. >> donald trump. >> how so? >> the trump effect. pundits are looking at this saying, you know, the latino vote, they may come out because they don't want donald trump to be in the presidential seat. so she may get a boost because so many latinos may come out to vote to try to keep him from office, and may end up putting her in office. >> wow. >> it's complicated. >> fascinating. >> everything we've done tonight, everything that's been going on, this is just like the last straw. >> take notes. we'll have to discuss that again. thanks so much sara. let's get some sports news. in cleveland, more than a million people turned out for the city's first world
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championship parade in more than 50 years. >> they celebrated the cavaliers with a nearly two-mile parade on wednesday with crowds at some points about 40 or 50 people deep. in ended with a rally where star lebron james spoekt paeshtdke p to the basketball team's fans. >> thank you for all the coming home wishes and all that, but i'm nothing without this group behind me. i'm nothing without the coaching staff. i'm nothing without the city. you guys are unbelievable. these guys told me i got to turn around, so -- [ cheers and applause ] >> i'm nothing without y'all. i love all y'all. i love all y'all and [ bleep ]. get ready for next year. >> lot of love. okay. this is cleveland's first world title since the browns won the
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national football league championship in 1964. a long time between drinks. >> no wonder they are so excited. well the euro 2016 knockout round is days away and teams are taking their place in the final 16. ireland secured its spot after defeating italy 1-0. belgium also qualifies after a 1-0 victory over sweden. here's a look at the teams advancing from the groups stages including rivals northern ireland and wales. they're meeting in paris on saturday. >> and iceland, one of the smallest nations in the tournament, is set to play england on monday. >> good luck, iceland. donald trump is known for his brash, off the cuff comments, especially during his raucous campaign rallies. >> in a bid to look more presidential and stay on message, the white house hopeful is learning a new way of speaking. cnn's jeanne moos has the story. >> reporter: the teleprompter may once have prompted disdain from donald trump. >> we should have a law that when you're running for president, you're not allowed to use a teleprompter.
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>> reporter: the donald would have broken that law a handful of times by now. one critic calls it it the teletrumpter. >> reporter: still a little wooden, he's getting a little bert. when he stumbled, he caught himself with an ad lib. >> a total and -- look, this was one of the beauts. >> reporter: there were lots of li little ad libs. >> god help us, we just can't take it dmemore. >> reporter: and one particularly soulful one. >> americans -- americans, the people that we love, americans. america first. >> reporter: using the teleprompter seemed to have an unusual side effect on the donald. >> she gets rich inside the united states [ sniffs ] >> the bar barians. [ sniffs ] >> reporter: the dontd needs a breathe right strip said one critic. >> another wrote, i got so
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distracted, i started googling nasal disorders. we understand the donald is not suffering from a cold or allergies. call it a sniff, call it a snufl. sometimes he both ad-libbed and inhaled. >> tell me folks, does that work? [ sniffs ] i wonder why. we will lose our country. >> reporter: previously trump's performance tether ed to a teleprompter has been criticized as stiff. >> it was almost like a circus lion who had been tranklized because he had bit too many people. >> reporter: but for a guy used to winging it, reading takes practice. miss one little the on the prompter -- >> this is why steaks in november are so great. >> reporter: steaks are pretty great anytime. jeannie moose [ sniffs ] >> reporter: cnn, new york. >> especially if they're trump steaks. he is getting better although it does seem like he's reading a book and then he'll stop and pause and ad lib something and
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go back to reading a book. but it's a skill. it takes ai while. >> it is, and it was fascinating to see him so disciplined up there. well, that's all we have for you. you are watching "cnn newsroom" live from los angeles. i'm amara walker. >> reading a prompter or not, i'm john vause, the news continues with rosemary church. stay with us. bend me shape me, any way you want me
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>> announcer: this is cnn breaking news. hello and welcome to cnn breaking news. i'm rosemary church at cnn center, bringing you all the day's stop stories, beginning with some dramatic developments on capitol hill in washington. the u.s. house is back in session, but they are not going to vote on a gun control bill even though democrats have been staging a sit-in to push for that vote for almost 16 hours now. instead, lawmakers are voting on other unrelated bills. republicans plan to leave for the july 4th recess after all the votes are finished. democrats say they will still come in next week and continue the sit-in though the house won't be in session.
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i want to turn now to cnn's eric bradner in washington. eric, it's just after 3:00 in the morning, and as we said, this sit-in has been going on for nearly 16 hours. what's been happening on the house chamber floor? bring us up to date on that, just how long this might last as well, and what they hope to achieve here and what they can achieve. >> reporter: right. so democrats are in hour 16 of the sit-in, this protest, and they're demanding votes on gun control measures that just aren't going to happen. they are not going to get those votes. right now what we're seeing on the house floor is republicans maneuvering to adjourn, to leave town for almost two weeks without voting on those gun control measures. they're trying to basically clear the deck in these early morning hours. they're going to vote on a zika funding bill, basically be able to say after that, we've taken care of what we need to achieve, and we can leave town. so republicans are maneuvering to deny democrats the vote that
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they've been sitting in, protesting for. democrats meanwhile are trying to figure out what they will do next, how they can keep the spotlight without the house actually in session and voting on legislation, for them to basically interrupt and commandeer proceedings here. so that's what's going on on the house floor right now. and we'll learn more about whether republicans will be able to sort of end this sit-in and what democrats will do next here in the coming hours as the house votes. >> and, eric, of course it's worth pointing out that during the course of this standoff, e motions have been intense, even confrontations reported. and some democrats are threatening to stay in the chamber all night long. that seems to have already happened pretty much. >> reporter: that's right. >> what have you witnessed so far? >> reporter: we've seen some clashes. representative louie gohmert at one point confronted democrats,
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shouting, that rather than talking about gun control, they should be denouncing radical islam and figuring out how to deal with that. that led to a clash with some democrats that got a bit angry, a bit heated for a moment. we've also seen republicans sort of directing capitol police to usher out pro-gun control protesters who are in the house gallery and making much more noise than their typically allowed while democrats have been advocating keeping those people here. so it's quite a chaotic seen here at the capitol. it's much more raucous than typical in the capitol. but it looks like this series of votes that we're in the middle of right now could sort of bring this to an end or at least move it to a new phase where democrats, rather than having pillows and blankets and staying on the house floor all night, will have to sort of recalibrate their strategy and figure out what to do for the rest of the
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morning and for the day tomorrow with republicans gone and the lights potentially turned off in the house chamber. >> indeed. and certainly compelling images coming out there via periscope. talking with eric bradner in washington. eric, we'll talk to you again at the half hour. bye-bye. well, house democrat john lewis is leading that sit-in, which started wednesday morning. lewis is a civil rights icon in the 1960s he led sit-ins dema demanding an end to segregation. lewis said this sit-in reminded him of his early days advocating for civil rights for african-americans. >> deadly mass shootings are becoming more and more frequent. mr. speaker, this is the fight. it is not an opinion. we must remove the blinders. the time for silence and patience is long gone.
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we are calling on the leadership of the house to bring common sense gun control legislation to the house floor. give us a vote! let us vote! we came here to do our job. we came here to work. the american people demand an action. do we have the courage? do we have raw courage to make at least a down payment on ending gun violence in america? >> as this plays out, the top republican in the house, paul ryan, is not caving in. here's what he told our wolf blitzer earlier. >> this is nothing more than a publicity stunt. that's point number one. point number two is this bill was already defeated in the united states senate. number three, we are not going to take away a citizen's due process rights. we're not going to take away a
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citizen's constitutional rights without due process. that was already defeated in the senate, and this is not a way to try and bring up legislation. now, let's focus on the issue at hand here, terrorism, and let's find out what we need to do to prevent future terrorist attacks. and if a person is on a terror watch list and they go try to buy a gun, we have procedures in place to deal with that. we want to make sure those procedures are done correctly, and that's something we should be able to do in a calm and cool manner without these sort of dilatory publicity stunt tactics to try to bring a bill that already died over in the senate to the house floor. >> john lewis and these other democrats on the floor, it was really not televised by c span cameras controlled by you because you called a recess, which shuts off those cameras. some are suggesting you're trying to censor this protest. are you? >> no. look, this is the way the rules work in the house, and they have ever since we've had tv. we had a similar protest when we the minority in 2008.
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not only did the cameras not go on, they turned the lights off on us. this is what do you when you go into recess subject to the call of the chair. these are the house rules, and they've been this way for years. voting is under way in the uk on the question of membership in the european union. the polls opened about an hour ago and will stay open until 10:00 p.m. local time. a record 46.5 million people registered to vote on this question. nearly 84% of the electorate is in england. the rest are in scotland, wales, northern ireland, and gibraltar. nima elbagir joins us now live from a polling station in north london. so, nima, it is 8:00 in the morning where you are. and as we mentioned, the polls have been open for about an hour now. it's a critical vote. explain to us what's at stake
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here. >> reporter: well, in essence, it is about whether the uk continues to be a part of the european union. but really it is also a vote on modern britain, on britain's place in the world. and this is a vote that has dominated the political discourse in this country for the last decade and a half. in fact, since britain voted to join the european union in 1973, there has been heart-rending and so much internal strife within the conservative party and beyond across the two major opposition parties about whether britain is better within europe. and finally a day that many had thought would never come, the decision will be taken by the british electorate and those who have residency in the uk, not from the european union, though. others from aworld the world who have residency in the uk, get to decide britain's political future and britain's place in the world. this has been a very emotive lead-up to this campaign. this really has even if you
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compare it with actual democratic process, the actual elections to vote in new governments, even by those standards, this has been a very fraught debate. and now for a lot of people, this day couldn't come soon enough. a record number of voters registered, but whether that's going to result in a record turnout, the weather doesn't exactly seem to be playing along, rosemary. but we're expecting to see numbers pick up throughout the day. >> all right. nima elbagir there in north london, just after 8:00 in the morning. as we mentioned, we'll keep a very close eye on this. many thanks to you. of course cnn anchors and correspondents will be covering developments from london and across the uk throughout the day. we'll have interviews and reaction from around the world as the votes come in. and you'll also find extensive coverage online at cnn.com/referendum.
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donald trump is on the offensive, attacking hillary clinton during his latest speech. despite his tough talk, trump didn't touch some of his more controversial talking points, and that may be exactly what republican leaders have been waiting for. here is cnn's jim acosta. >> hillary clinton and, as you know, most people know she's a world class liar. >> reporter: with his new team and teleprompters in place, donald trump stayed on script and unleashed his most focused and unrelenting attack to date on hillary clinton that had even skeptics in his party cheering, not cringing. >> hillary clinton may be the most corrupt person ever to seek the presidency of the united states. >> reporter: call it operation pivot as the presumptive gop nominee made his first real attempt at defining the general election for voters. >> her campaign slogan is "i'm with her." you know what my response is to
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that? i'm with you, the american people. >> reporter: it's no secret why trump's assault focused so much on clinton's character. just look at the numbers. a new cnn/orc poll finds more people trust trump than clinton. though americans believe the former secretary of state would make a better commander-in-chief. so trump tried to chip away at her foreign policy credentials. >> her decisions spread death, destruction, and terrorism everywhere she touched. >> reporter: but in doing so, trump made statements that were simply not true, like his claim that he opposed the iraq war. >> i was among the earliest to criticize the rush to war. and, yes, even before the war ever started. >> reporter: even though it's been pointed out repeatedly he's on tape voicing support for the 2003 invasion. >> are you for invading iraq? >> yeah, i guess so. you know, i wish it was -- i wish the first time it was done correctly. >> reporter: and trump also blamed clinton for the american
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deaths at benghazi. >> among the victims of our late ambassador, chris stevens, i mean what she did with him was absolutely horrible. he was left helpless to die as hillary clinton soundly slept in her bed. that's right. when the phone rang, as per the commercial, at 3:00 in the morning, hillary clinton was sleeping. >> reporter: that's also wrong. the siege at benghazi happened at night in libya, but back in the u.s., it was still in the afternoon, when clinton was awake. and there were other whoppers. trump said he started his real estate business with a small loan. that was $1 million from his father. and trump claimed clinton wants to abolish the second amendment, but fact checkers have noted that's just not true. trump accused clinton of doing some fabricating of her own. >> just look at her pathetic e-mail server statements or her phony landing in bosnia where she said she was under attack, and the attack turned out to be
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young girls handing her flowers. >> reporter: trump drilled down on that theme, accusing the clintons of profiting off their ties to the rich and powerful. >> they totally own her, and that will never, ever change, including if she ever became president, god help us. >> i thought trump's speech today was a sure sign that the changes he made on monday are moving this campaign in the right direction. he's on message. >> reporter: former trump aide michael caputo who resigned from the campaign this week after celebrating the firing of campaign manager corey lewandowski on twist, says trump is positioning himself to win. >> i know people are skeptical about whether or not he can stay on message, whether or not he can stay moving in the right direction after his pivot. and i think mr. trump is completely up to the task. >> reporter: trump's speech is certainly receiving positive reviews inside the gop, but one trump source told me there's no way trump would have won the nomination with scripted speeches. translation -- to keep his base fired up for the election, trump will have to lose the
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teleprompters from time to time to give his crowds what they want. jim acosta, cnn, new york. >> and clinton used her own speech wednesday to respond to trump's attack, saying they're personal and a smoke screen. our jeff zeleny has more. ♪ this is my fight song >> reporter: hillary clinton is striking back. >> he's going after me personally because he has no answers on the substance. >> reporter: hours after donald trump's searing attack, clinton offering a pointed rebuttal. she calls trump unfit to lead the u.s. economy. >> he has no real strategy for creating jobs. just a string of empty promises. and maybe we shouldn't expect better from someone whose most famous words are "you're fired." >> reporter: for a second straight day, clinton hammering trump hard. not ignoring him as so many of his gop rivals did. >> donald hates it when anyone
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points out how hollow his sales pitch really is. and i guess my speech yesterday must have gotten under his skin. >> reporter: a discussion that was never high-minded seems to be sinking by the day. as the race boils down to a he said/she said kind of campaign. trump raising questions about her faith in a private meeting with religious leaders. prompting this response. >> as we methodists like to say, do all the good you can to all the people you can in all the ways you can. >> reporter: and clinton offering a rare apply to trump's attacks on her family's foundation. >> the clinton foundation helps poor people around the world get access to life-saving aids medicine. donald trump used poor people around the world to produce his line of suits and ties. >> reporter: amid the crossfire, clinton is bringing in the
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cavalry, inviting elizabeth warren to join her on the campaign trail next week in cincinnati. it's clinton's third trip to ohio in two weeks. but it's her debut with warren. cnn has learned she's among the handful of democrats being eyed as a running mate. despite warren's popularity as a liberal firebrand, democrats aren't sold on the idea. a new cnn/orc poll shows just 34% say warren should be on the ticket. 54% say they'd rather see someone else. bernie sanders won't be on the ticket. and while he hasn't officially dropped out of the race or endorsed her, he conceded reality today in this interview. >> it doesn't appear that i'm going to be the nominee. >> reporter: visiting capitol hill this morning, she praised sanders. >> we are going to win this election. >> reporter: and told house democrats the party must come together. behind closed doors, cnn learned she reminded them of this moment from the 2008 convention. >> i move senator barack obama
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of illinois be selected by this convention by acclimation as the nominee of the democratic party for president of the united states. >> reporter: she's hopeful sanders will do the same for her next month in philadelphia. >> jeff zeleny reporting there. and voters that can't stomach the thought of a clinton or trump presidency have a third option. details on the libertarian party's presidential nominee coming up. and after a short break, we will take you back to capitol hill in washington, where democrats are staging a sit-in demanding action on gun control. wannwith sodastream®er? you turn plain water into sparkling water in seconds. and because it's so delicious,
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eyy. that's pretty different. totally. check out credit karma today. credit karma. give yourself some credit. the fastest delivery guy in chicago. meet maximum strength mylanta®. like owen, it works fast. unlike him, it makes heartburn go away. strong and soothing. new mylanta®. faster than heartburn. and a warm welcome back to all. we want to update you on our breaking news this hour. the u.s. house has just adjourned after a vote, but it wasn't on a gun control bill. democrats have been staging a sit-in to push for that vote, and now the u.s. house speaker says republicans plan to leave for their recess. paul ryan is calling the sit-in a publicity stunt and says democrats do not have an end-game strategy. the democrats are still sitting in and say they will keep it up.
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you can see these live pictures. even though the house won't be in session. joining me now to talk more about u.s. politics and the race for the white house is jonathan swan, national political reporter for the hill. thank you so much for being with us. of course there's a lot to talk about today. so let's start with the democrats staging a sit-in on the house floor in an effort to force a gun vote. it's a dramatic political tactic. what impact is this likely to have, do you think, and how long can these democrats sustain this form of action? >> it is a stunning sight. you have about 40 democrats sitting on the floor of the house of representatives to protest inaction by the republican leadership. they want a bill that bans people on the terrorism no-fly list from buying guns. this is obviously in the wake of the orlando massacre. and it's being led by a civil
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rights icon, john lewis, representative from georgia. that gives it a more heroic image. he is -- i don't know if your viewers are familiar with john lewis, but he is an icon in america. he was a key figure marching alongside martin luther king, and the size of him on the house floor was incredibly stirring for many democrats and barack obama praised it. there's no sign so far that this is going to be broken, and it's a standoff. the republicans don't want to give in because this could become a new tactic every time one side doesn't get what they want, they just sit on the floor. you could imagine it just sort of devolving into almost like a preschool situation. but this is certainly an issue that is felt very deeply in the democratic caucus, and i don't think they're going to give up on this. >> all right. we'll watch very closely to see if they force the hand of republicans. i want to move now to donald
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trump's attack on hillary clinton in response, of course, to her questioning his business prowess and economic policies the day before. some of trump's comments, it has to be said, don't pass the fact check test. but did he score any points in his attack? >> what he's trying to do is actually unprecedented for a republican candidate, which wouldn't surprise your viewers who have followed donald trump, that he's doing something unprecedented. but in many ways, this was a speech that attacked hillary clinton from the left. it was really an argument against globalization and against deals with special interests. so donald trump, the billionaire, who lives in trump tower in new york and has all the hotels with his name on it, is trying to portray hillary clinton as the corrupt pluto crat in this race and himself as the man of the people. it's very unclear whether this will actually work.
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certainly both very unpopular, both deeply distrusted. but that was the whole point of his speech. if you did a word check through his speech, the word you'd fine most used in the speech is the word "rigged." and donald trump's argument effectively is that hillary clinton is part of this cabal in washington where they all do deals in back rooms, and that he's the outsider to clean it all up. >> and what about clinton's response to trump, calling his comments outlandish lies and conspiracy theories? will that be sufficient to counter what trump said about her and, of course, her record as secretary of state? >> this is the most interesting election to cover because it really is who is the least worst option if you look at the public polling. look, if you look at it so far, you would have to say that, yes, hillary clinton is succeeding because she is less unpopular
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than donald trump. her unfavorables are a bit lower. but, you know, the day-to-day combat, it's very hard to gauge because donald trump is so far off the pace of clinton, and his campaign is imploding at the moment at such a rapid rate that it's very hard to sort of score points in the way that you traditionally would in a presidential campaign. >> i guess we're yet to see which of the two candidates won this round of attacks. we'll look out for the opinion polls, jonathan, a pleasure to talk with you. thank you so much. >> you too. thank you. civilians escaping the iraqi city of fallujah are finding little food, water, and shelter. humanitarian groups are overwhelmed, and the battle to liberate fallujah from isis is not over yet. also when we return, you will hear from a third-party candidate in the race for the white house. why he thinks the two-party system is a dinosaur. that's next.
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>> announcer: this is cnn breaking news. and a warm welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and of course all around the world. this is cnn breaking news. i'm rosemary church. and it is early morning in washington. the u.s. house of representatives just adjourned without voting on a gun control bill. looking at these live pictures via periscope. democrats took over the house chamber on wednesday, demanding that vote, and they're still there although their republican counterparts have taken off for the july 4th recess. now, the democrats say they will keep sitting in, and they won't give up the fight for gun control legislation. so let's go back to cnn's eric
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bradner now in washington. eric, it's just after -- it is just actually on 3:30 in the morning right now. the sit-in is in its 16th hour, but even though democrats plan to come back next week, the house won't be in session. so what exactly has been achieved here? >> reporter: right. so democrats did not get the votes they were looking for on gun control. they did draw a lot of attention, get a lot of social media buzz and draw a huge audience on the video streaming app periscope. but they did not force republicans' hand on actual legislation. what republicans just did is they adjourned the house until july 5th. so there will be no votes, no legislative proceedings for this democratic sit-in to actually interrupt. that means democrats have to sort of recalibrate now, decide what they're going to do. they've lost the opportunity to have the kind of audience they would have by grinding actual house floor proceedings to a
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halt. so do they continue throughout the rest of the morning and into thursday and try to have a presence on the house floor all of next week even though the house is not in session? that's what democrats are talking about on the house floor right now. there's a contingency of several dozen that stuck around. they're huddled up. they're talking about what's next, and what we'll be looking for in the coming minutes and hours is what's next for the democrats. now that republicans have sort of pulled the rug out from under this sit-in, what's the next move? >> indeed. and, eric, we know of course that there were some confrontations between democrats and republicans. how bad did it get, and with the optics of this, the confrontations and of course the sit-in, who wins over the voters? the democrats or the republicans? >> reporter: well, democrats are certainly declaring victory, but this is a situation where beauty is obviously in the eye of the beholder. we definitely saw some clashes. representative louie gohmert, a
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republican from texas, angrily confronted some democrats on the house floor. he said that they should be talking about radical islam, not gun control. that angered some democrats, and it got a bit heated for a while. >> all right. eric, i just want to interrupt you. i'm sorry about this. but i do want to go to john lewis. we want to take this live. he is about to speak. certainly that's what we're expecting any minute. he's about to turn to -- let's wait, then. we'll keep his picture going. eric, let's go back to you and just bring you in. so it is now 3:33 in the morning. what can we expect to hear from john lewis as he speaks any minute? >> reporter: right. so we're expecting democrats to sort of lay out what they've gotten from this, what they've demonstrated. and that is that no matter what they will try, republicans are not going to give them the votes on these gun control measures that they're seeking. we're talking about banning
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suspected terrorists from being able to purchase firearms, and we're also talking about expanded background checks. that's what democrats are calling for here. and if they don't get votes on those to sort of use in november's election to really play up the differences between the parties on gun control, then they will be able to point to the sit-in and say, look, we tried everything. we see this as a sort of an issue that's affecting all kinds of americans. they've been pointing to the lgbt aspect of this after the shooting in orlando in a gay nightclub and really drawing attention to that. and so they'll have this sort of unprecedented or at least very unusual protest to point to and say, look, we tried everything. hand us control of the house, and these are the measures that you now know we will be pushing if democrats win the majority in
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november. >> and, eric, of course they do have a -- a lot of the public do want to see some form of gun control. that's the problem, isn't it? trying to find the balance there of what is required. we even heard through the night that some republicans were saying they want to see some form as well. they've got their own bills, some of them. they can't agree on what the democrats want here. is there a sense of inevitability here that something will happen, something will be passed at some point? >> reporter: there really is not to be honest with you. a lot of these measures have come up before in the wake of mass shootings previously, and they've failed. they've been voted down in the house and the senate. they're always talk of compromise, always some republicans willing to work with democratic groups. in fact, this year we saw senator pat toomey of pennsylvania, a republican negotiating with a group led by
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former new york city mayor michael bloomberg. trying to find common ground, but it fell apart at the last minute. there's just not a lot of common ground. both parties say they want to do something, but democrats want to go quite a bit further than republicans. so this is sort of an episode that we've seen several times now. each time there's a mass shooting, democrats make this push for gun control, but republicans view it as infringing upon second amendment constitutional rights and say the focus should be elsewhere on combating terrorism. >> all right. eric, we're going to listen in now as we wait to hear john lewis talk. >> the house did not adjourn without a message being delivered, a very powerful message to the american people that there's been too much carnage in america. that there is an epidemic of gun
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violence in america. and that we need to pass legislation to make america and americans safer. behind me is a giant, a giant in the history of our country, making the case for a more just and safer society. john lewis. john lewis led this effort, joined by two extraordinary members, david cicilline, the former mayor of providence, rhode island, and senator clark, congresswoman clark. these three individuals galvanized our caucus and galvanized the attention of the american public.
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on two bills that are supported by 90% of the american people. john garamendi got on the floor and invited our republican colleagues to come to the well, to debate why they could not support these two simple bills. one, if you've been adjudged a terrorist and are not allowed to fly on airplanes because of safety, why would we have you buy a gun? 85% to 95% of americans think that makes sense. and the other was to make sure that there were no loopholes in our gun check legislation so that everybody would be vetted and that we would give time to vet properly. and if we had done so, neither
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roof nor orlando may have had those guns. i want to yield now to john lewis, who will then yield to his two colleagues. paul ryan talks about bottom up. this was not bottom because none of these folks are bottom. but this came from members animated by the concerns and demands of their constituents and of the constituents in our country. we will be back. we will come back into session july 5th. the republicans have left in the dead of night with business unfinish unfinished. not just these two bills, but puerto rico will be unable to pay its debts just a few days
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from now. flint, michigan, still suffers from iron-laced water. going home without finishing our business. i want to yield now to that iconic figure who has been such a giant in america's history on behalf of justice and equality in our country. john lewis of georgia. >> thank you. thank you very much, mr. hoyer, for your leadership and for your vision, for helping to hold us all together. these two unbelievable young members who have taught me so much, and i've learned so much from the two of you, so come closer. we're like a family. we all live in the same house,
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the american house. today we have come a distance. we made some progress. we crossed one bridge, but we have other bridges to cross. we're not giving up the fight. the fight is an ongoing fight. we will not be happy. we will not be satisfied. we will not be pleased until we do something in a major way. make a major down payment on ending gun violence in america. we've lost too many of our children, our babies. too many of our mothers and fathers, our brothers and sisters. and we will continue to fight. a little more than 50 years ago,
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i crossed a bridge not just one time, but it took us three times to make it all the way from selma to montgomery. we have other bridges to cross, and when we come back in july, we'll start all over again. the american people, they want us to act. they want us to do something. and we promise them that we will act. so let me yield now. congresswoman. >> thank you. thank you. >> all right. listening there to john lewis saying we will not be pleased until we do something on guns in a major way. and we heard earlier from steny hoyer, a u.s. house democrat. he says house democrats say despite no gun vote being taken on this day, a powerful message has been delivered. and he said, we will be back
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july 5th. this despite the optics there of republicans leaving during the night, going home, leaving unfinished business. not just on gun controls, but on other issues like the flint situation and others. but we will continue to follow this story and be back with you in just a moment. stay with us. ere plaque psoriasis. be the you who shows up in that dress. who hugs a friend. who is done with treatments that don't give you clearer skin. be the you who controls your psoriasis with stelara® just 4 doses a year after 2 starter doses. stelara® may lower your ability to fight infections and may increase your risk of infections and cancer. some serious infections require hospitalization. before treatment, get tested for tuberculosis. before starting stelara® tell your doctor if you think you have an infection or have symptoms such as: fever, sweats, chills, muscle aches or cough. always tell your doctor if you have any signs of infection, have had cancer, if you develop any new skin growths or if anyone in your house needs or has recently received a vaccine. alert your doctor of new or worsening problems, including headaches, seizures, confusion and vision problems
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welcome back. all right. we want to update you on our breaking news this hour. democrats refusing to leave after the u.s. house was adjourned. they have staged a sit-in for more than 16 hours, pushing for a vote on gun control. and the house speaker did not allow that vote. let's go back and listen in. we've heard from steny hoyer, u.s. democrat, and also the man who is leading this sit-in, john lewis. let's listen to more of what these u.s. democrats are saying. >> the people are seeing the democratic caucus stand up and
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fight, not just do the regular routine. it's a new day in washington. it's a new way to fight as well. we're not going to sit back and do nothing anymore and take nothing as an answer. they're already shutting the doors already. so as we're speaking, they're shutting the doors. they're ending business as usual so to speak. but it's no longer business as usual here in washington. we demand that these bills be taken up. we demand they be taken up as soon as possible. and if my republican colleagues continue this, they will answer to the american people. and the american people are ready to respond and answer as well. but once again, i want to thank john larson, who as i said is still on the floor. i don't know if he'll be able to come out here between now and the end, but he's done a great job tonight. >> thank you. i want to thank all of these members for the extraordinary effort that they have made. i want to mention one thing more that should not be missed tonight. in many ways, this fight on the floor, the request for these two
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bills is about the public safety. there was another bill that passed this night, not the gun bills that would have made people safer, but a bill that does not adequately or effectively deal with the zika crisis, another public health crisis that confronts our country. and the republicans brought to the floor a partisan bill reported out of conference committee with only republican signatories. reported out in an extraordinarily short period of time, 137-page conference report that nobody had the time to read and digest. and are sending it to a senate that will not pass it. so not only do we leave washington this night having
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failed to pass gun legislation which would make our people safer, but we've also failed to pass effectively a bill which would start protecting them from the zika crisis that confronts them. so on both fronts, our republicans who lead this house, who have the control of this house, have failed to serve the american people. how sad. thank you very much. >> what's your expectation now? will some democrats try to stay? >> we're going to have a web meeting tomorr-- whip meeting tw at 10:00. but i think what john lewis has said is correct. we've crossed one bridge. we have energized our caucus. we've energized the american people. you see the people filling the galleries today, and this fight will continue. >> has there been any discussion about what the sergeant of the
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arms, say this is what we want to do. we understand what the general rules are here, but has that discussion been made between your advocates and the powers that be? >> i haven't had any further discussions. we intend to keep up this fight. >> but what's the expectation? >> they're not going to shut down this building from the house of representatives' members, period. >> will your members stay on the floor, though? >> let me tell you, i think there are going to be some people who will continue to want to make their points tomorrow. we're going to discuss this. but, again, let me repeat what john lewis just said. we've crossed a bridge. we've raised consciousness. we've made a fight. the fight is not over. we will continue to make the fight. [ inaudible ] >> well, you can bet your sweet
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life when the house goes back into session, this fight will be continued. >> will it be a sit-in, though, again? >> we can use many different tactics or techniques. we have not explored all of the necessary ingredients in keeping with the philosophy and the discipline of non-violence. we will not be silent. >> but this action is basically over for now? >> the republicans shut down the people's house. the republicans are leaving town after working here for approximately six hours this week with unfinished business of the american people. the american people should not be happy about that. i don't think they will be happy about that, and the fight will continue. thank you very much. >> all right. you're listening there to u.s. democrats very much pushing the
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optics that we're all seeing here in the united states and all around the world, this sense that republicans are leaving, going home with unfinished business. nothing done as far as gun control and nothing done too as far as protecting people from the zika virus. we're going to take a very short break. back in just a moment.
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welcome back. it is almost 4:00 in the morning in washington, and the house of representatives just adjourned without voting on a gun control bill. democrats took over the house chamber on wednesday demanding that vote. the democrats say the fight will be continued when the house returns july 5th. another big story we are following for you this hour. britons are going to the polls to vote on whether the uk should stay in the european union. a record 46.5 million people registered to vote in the referendum. polls are open until 10:00 p.m. local time. and british prime minister david cameron has just cast his ballot in the uk referendum. thanks so much for your company. i'm rosemary church. the news continues right ahead.
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>> announcer: this is cnn breaking news. >> time for a real debate on these issues. >> radical islam! >> house to be in order. the house wishes to make an announcements. >> breaking news. utter chaos for 16 hours. democrats take over the floor staging a sit-in demanding a vote on gun

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