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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  June 26, 2016 1:00am-3:01am PDT

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-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com . we welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world as we continue our special coverage of britain's decision to leave the eu. from london, i'm max foster. >> and i'm clarissa ward. >> we're closely following fall-out from the vote. the secretary of health has just resigned in the last half hour. the labor party needs a new leader.
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alexander says that labor leader jeremy corbin does not have what is needed. >> he was planning a coupe from corbyn. >> who says there's no resignation of a democratically leader. hillary ben is a crucial player in his cabinet. >> labor leaders have criticized corbyn for not campaigning hard enough to remain in the eu. some labor politicians are calling for his resignation. corbyn says he's not gog any -- going anywhere and he will seek re-election. >> our policies on trade,
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economy, and migration will have to change in light of the referendum vote. labor will fight that our ensure our agenda is at the heart of the negoations or withdraw from the european union that lie ahead. including the freedom to reform the economy to work for all and whoever leads the government is held to account -- to democratic account throughout the whole process. >> for more on this possible development, our diana magnay joins us. the hits keep on coming. what can we expect to see next? >> reporter: you won have thought that british politics could get more dramatic and yet this sunday morning it keeps on going. it's really extraordinary. we had this midnight telephone call between jeremy corbyn and
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hillary ben where she says him he doesn't have any more confidence on him. he's appearing on a very important talk show right now. you can expect he will have some forth right things to say about the labor leader. and we had heidi alexander resigned already and there are expectations that will be more of her fellow cabinet members following suit. most people, in fact all the shadow cabinet backed remain and jeremy corbyn asked the country to follow him on the remain side but the fact is the labor heartlands did not. even if the entire shadow cabinet does resign, if that's what it comes to, it doesn't mean that jeremy corbyn will have to go. as a his spokesman said in that
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statement, he is elected democratically with a very pawf -- powerful mandate. the tory party is behind him. it does look like his position becomes increasingly untenable if more and more cabinet members resign. >> illustrating what you are saying, as you say when he was elected, he didn't have a huge amount of support in the parliamentary party. it was in the grassroots. he's going to change the party. but at the same time he is adding to instability in the country, isn't he? we've had another key member in the shadow cabinet saying he's going to to back benn. at what point does he say he's going to go for the stability of the party, rather than saying he represents the grassroots?
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>> reporter: why does his fighting spirit suddenly come out now whereas throughout the actual referendum campaign he was pretty lack luster. he's never been particularly convinced about europe, but now all of a sudden he's going all guns blazing with the possibility of a general election coming up, depending on what happens with the tory leadership. it's an incredibly confusing situation within the conservative party and the labor party. the shadow business secretary saying in a tweet just a few minutes ago, either you look your flaws in the face and address them or you stick your head in the sand, destroy the labor party and the country suffers. these are very, very harsh critiques coming from very key members of the labor parliamentary party and it remains to see how long jeremy corbyn can stick it out in the face of that kind of criticism and what that will do for the
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already very, very divided labor party. >> thank you, diana. it's really difficult, isn't it? for the british public right now. they have lost their prime minister. >> it feels like there's a vacuum. >> and the markets opening up and sense of fear. >> a lot of uncertainty. >> in berlin, the six eu ministers, brexit isn't an amicable divorce. we're in berlin first now. what they are looking for now is clarity. they want to speed this whole thing up. london can't provide it. no one knows who is in charge. >> reporter: well, no, and this is exactly the situation that the eu did not want to see, but basically the stand that many countries here are sake -- taking is if you want out, then leave, out is out and let's make it as quick and painless as possible.
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at the same time however, we've also seen german chancellor angela americale take a more practical stand. let's take the time to calm down as she said yesterday, let's not get nasty about negotiations but we can't let negotiations last forever either. we're pound to see this in the coming days and weeks, good cop, bad cop as eu wrestles with how to deal with britain leaving the eu, which is a process that will take months, even years. >> and obviously there's been some discussion about possible referendum taking place in france, in the netherlands. you know, what do you think when you look at the broader european landscape? is there a sense of potential danger that this so-called contagion will spread that many other countries will want to follow the british example?
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>> there is definitely that sense and the biggest challenge and this was said by germany yesterday, the biggest challenge is to hold the european union together. it falls upon germany most of all as the eu's largest member, but also france. for these reasons, they need to make an example of great britain, to show there's absolutely no benefit to leaving. we heard that there was a referendum has been wanted to be held, a frexit, if you will. but the french president says not. they are closing ranks and saying, fine, great britain, you want out, leave now, leave quickly. we're going to make sure this doesn't happen in any other countries here in the eu.
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>> thank you very much. a lot of uncertainty in the weeks and months ahead for europe. now, poll sters are saying that people under the age of 30 voted overwhelmingly to remain in the eu in thursday's referendum while those over 65 voted to leave by a wide margin. that has led to an eruption of anger on social social media. >> referendum nobody called for decided by a generation whose future it won't affect. fantastic. many shared this quote from the comment section of the financial times website. the younger generation has lost the right to live and work in 27 other countries. we will never know the full extent of the lost opportunities, friendships, marriages and experiences will be denied. >> one teenage user wrote i don't agree with the result of the referendum but a lot of
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people slagging off the older generation are forgetting that these people fought for our country. for more on how the decision will affect the country's youth, we're joined by felix marqar, he is the executive director. what difference is there from the older generation? >> young people's allegiances are no longer strictly national or mostly national. i call them the "star wars" generation. they are a bit like, you know, in "star wars" characters don't really care what planet you are from, they don't care what color your skin is, they don't care whether you are a wookie, a droid, a human or a big fat slimy creature. the only thing that counts is what side of the force you are.
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they want to know where you are going. they are values driven. they want to know if you are a race i have or not or an individualist or if you think that global warm sg a myth. those are the questions they identify with and their allegiances are local and broad. they feel like citizens of the world. they feel much more than their elders. they feel strongly about the very local, their city, their neighborhood, but the thing in the middle, the nation? the island? it's not really, really central to their world view. >> it's going to have lasting damage, isn't this? whatever your view of the referendum or europe or immigration, what we definitely do know is there's been this big divide exposed between young generations and older generations, which was already there because there's massive frustration as well with the amount of debt which has been
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built of. in london they can't afford to buy a house, for example, that's across the uk in fact. what sort of generation is going to come through after the one that's currently in power. >> i think you really have a point. a lot of people have been over the past 25 years talking about a clash of cultures, civilizations, religions. my chairman and i we have a strong feeling that the biggest clashes of all in the coming years might be a clash of generations because as you mentioned what we did over the past ten years is we took a lot of privately accumulated bad debt that was accumulated by baby boomers wrongly because of, i would argue, sort of a sense that, you know, that for very ideological reasons that purported not to be ideological, sort of a modern version of adam smith's invisible hand that was
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actually for the greater benefit for all in the end turned out not to be the benefit of all and all this bad debt that was privately accumulated and was made public. people who were kids are going to have to pay it back, people who were not even born, there's a good chance that they will be pretty upset, and so i think like we need to look at the ways that young people can actually sort of reclaim power in the coming years because basically, as i said, national allegiances don't work for them. essentially i think most of them, they get the fact that the central issues of our time, global warming, nuclear proliferation, the answer to those issues will be trans-national or they won't be
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real solutions. >> those issues also, as people get older, they will take on some of the issues that the older generations do care about now, they are just in a different place in their lifeds. >> yeah, of course. but there's a real evolution there and we need to look at it and one of the ways that young people can reclaim power is by migrating, voting with their et feet, and what's the eu was all about and that's what the young brits are going to miss out on. >> felix thank you very much indeed. a huge issue this has exposed. scotland also considering its future following the brexit vote. scotland is likely to hold its second independence referendum. >> plus, we'll take a look at possible successors to british prime minister david cameron, including the larger than life former mayor of london, boris johnson. that's coming up. "why are you checking your credit score?"
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who could have imagined this last week, scotland's first minister saying the country will likely seek independence from the uk again. >> the government considers its
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next move following the brexit vote. david mckenzie is in edinboro, scotland. will there be another referendum? >> it's too soon to tell. it's very much on the table. we enter a very different scenario politically this week after that shock vote in the uk. 59% yes. this is what the sunday post says and that's an online poll of scotts. certainly not necessarily scientific but that 59% yes is what they would vote if there was another independence referendum. scotland tried it in 2014. it was defeated. and one of the main platforms saying that scotland should stay within the united kingdom would be if they went independent they would not necessarily get back
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into the eu. now the opposite has happened. england voting to leave the european union and the scots seeing this as being dragged with them, the first minister, a popular figure in scotland is seeking any means necessary to stay into the union. >> to actually make it happen is extraordinarily complicated, season it? she's going to be dragged out of the european union with the uk. she has to tee up the referendum. scotland is going to stay within the european union. she has to strike some sort of deal with brussels. they have enough on their plate. >> this is a side issue, maybe, you could say, but a very crucial side issue. it is complex uncharted territory. if they do make some kind of deal, that's certainly some kind deal that some countries in the
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european union like spain dealing with the catalan region trying to form their own nation. people like -- groups like countries will push again like scotland getting a separate deal after the uk leaves the union. if the scott lish national party has made their reason for being as having a scottish statehood tries to push for a drern dumb -- referendum, they have to do it relatively quickly and start that legislative process. westminster is basically in chaos with resignations left and right and a new government forming in potentially okay, that's the window possibly people say that scotland can push through some kind of move toward an independence vote but legal by and diplomatically it doesn't mean they vote for independence here and suddenly they are in the eu. it could be a whole complicated procedure after that and it does
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seem though, max and clarissa, that the sentiment here in scotland is to stay and the scottish government wants that sentiment to be respected. >> david, thank you very much. another major vote happening right now in europe. david was talking about spain there. and they have got an election, haven't they in the new parliament. >> and the country's center right party is expected to be the big winner, but spant -- spain's anti-aw start -- austerity party. voters are hoping to avoid a third round of voting. >> they have got a problem about scotland as well. if scotland goes ahead, you can expect katalan to go back.
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first, we have some of the other news of the day. >> hello, everyone. the death toll has risen in the state of west virginia. president barack obama declaring a major disaster there. at least 24 people have died. that number has risen by one in the past couple of hours. this is the deadliest flash flooding in the united states in six years. you can see what it has left behind. downeds trees, power lines, all kinds of trees and mud. the pga has canceled a major tournament in the area because of all what you are seeing. you can't play golf there or think about it with what all the people that have their lives disrupted. it came on so fast. >> it changed in a moment. it's matter of too much rain within a short period of time. the communities living on the
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hedge of -- edge of rivers at the base of tall mountains. flash flooding leaving scenes like this. we want to replay you what they are having to deal with here. you need to get the scope what these people are dealing with. the lively hoods of people just trying get back to normal. you can see the sun shining there, that doesn't make it any better. this is considered a 1,000-year event by the national weather service. meaning there is a chance of this happening in any given year is 1-in-1,000. it has killed more than tornado fatalities so far in 2016. we zoom into central west virginia. that dark shading of red representing rainfall totals, 8 to 10 inches. 250 millimeters for our
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international viewers or at least the majority of that fell in a very short period of time. what you are looking at behind me is a river gauge. this gives you an idea of how much water was flowing through the elk river by early friday morning, local time, the elk river burst its banks. it's a 125-year record and the majority of rise in the river, well that occurred within that six-hour period of the heavy rainfall. the river actually rose about 17 feet in six hours. unbelievable stuff. now the good news is that the rain has moved away. the sun is shining so the water levels will drop very quickly but as you saw from the video a moment ago, they have got a massive clean-up effort ahead of them. the other side of the united states where they are dealing with flood, not fire. extreme drought in california ongoing for the past five years has left very volatile conditions in the area. it's almost like a tender box --
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tenter box in southern california. other 35,000 acres burnt. this thing is rampant and out of control. the weather conditions fuel the flames. high temperatures, low humidity, strong winds. it's been aa very active year for while fires. over 2 million acres burned so far. the governor, jerry brown, declaring a state of emergency in kern county. >> people killed there in california. that's the latest news we have for you from here. we return now to london for more of our brexit coverage with max foster and clarissa ward. >> british prime minister stepped down of course. we look at some of the candidates who could succeed him and we look at the conservative party as well.
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we are welcoming our viewers here and in the united states, around the world, you are watching special coverage of the brexit. i'm max foster. >> and i'm clarissa ward. the head liends this hour. >> here in britain, the brexit has created sharp divisions in the labor division last night. heidi alexander has posted her resignation on twitter, this after reports that jeremy corbyn fired his labor secretary. he backed the remain camp.
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>> more than 2.9 million people have signed a petition on the uk parliament's website demanding a new eu referendum. just 60,000 signatures are needed for parliament to debate the issue. >> now, the u.s. president barack obama is declaring a major disaster as well in the west virginia. 24 people have died there. it's the deadliest flash flooding in six years. there's a one in a thousand chance of this much rainfall in that area in any given area and pope francis is wrapping up a three-day trip in armenia. he will visit a holy site where saint gregory was imprisoned. turkey's prime minister called the pope's words of genocide unfortunate and says it reflects a crusader mentality.
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moving very quickly. following developments of the political repercussions of the uk vote to leave the eu. we're seeing sharp internal divisions. the local media are saying as much as half the cabinet may quit. >> we have gotten a statement from a spokesman for labor leader jeremy corbyn who says there will be no resignation of a democratically elected leader with a strong mandate from the membership. >> corbyn says he will seek re-election. we'll stay on top of that. with david cameron stepping down, here's a look at the suckers who may be -- successors who may be chosen. >> if more than two candidates are nominated, a conservative vote will be held. then the entire party, about 150,000 members votes in a
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postal ballot to make the final decision. >> since the conservatives hold the majority of the uk parliament, that becomes the prime minister. who could be the next prime minister, who could be the next labor party leader? so much to talk about. we have an expert. we need to talk about corbyn that's the breaking story that we've got right now. how does it work with the labor party? how does the next leader get installed, we've got half the cabinet about to come out. he's staying put. how does it work? >> we're in completely uncharted waters here. the labor party changed its election schedule last year. we know that particularly constituency adores jeremy corbyn. the problem is while the
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membership thinks he's the messiah, others think he's driving the party off the cliff. there's no route to removing corbyn. >> why is he staying put? what's he trying to put in this time of massive political instability? >> he feels very powerfully that he has a mandate from the party membership and he believes there is that he speaks for a much wider constituency in great britain. he feels that the parliamentary party lost the election heavily and they are continuing a path that will not allow labor back in office. >> you've got prime minister david cameron announcing he's stepping down. you've got the labor party in complete disarray. is this unprecedented? this sort of political vacuum. >> it's partly because it's
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exposed an absolute chasm between the views of the those in the country and the views of those in parliament. the voters didn't simply reject the judgment of david cameron, they rejected the leader of t, major trade union in the country. >> head of every security service. >> absolutely. so this was a massive nationwide vote of no confidence. >> against? >> against really the political establishment in general. >> that's the point, though, isn't it? they weren't voting on europe. >> that's right. >> that's frightening. >> one of the ironies of a referendum it's supposed to be an a single issue campaign, it actually grows into something much bigger. >> we're already seeing the leave campaign backtracking on some of the central platforms that won this referendum. do you think that they can deliver on those promises and
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steer britain out of a possible recession? >> i think this is the big question of british politics for the next five to ten years. some very powerful promises were made to the british public during this campaign and 17 million people voted for them. now this campaign has exposed an enormous crisis of trust in british politics. where the political anger goes next potentially take us to some very dangerous places. >> back to the labor party, hillary benn, a hugely respected figure in particle men. he had a fantastic speech. that about became an international story. he's lining up now to take over from jeremy corbyn.
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will hilary benn becoming the leader? >> i see no part of him being becoming a leader of the party. they will not accept someone who voted for the bombing of syria and someone in the process of removing jeremy corbyn from power. i see no possible route to a hilary benn leadership. what we're looking for and if jeremy corbyn goes, what we're looking for is someone younger in the party who is not associated with either of the factions. i think it has to be someone as being on the soft left of the party. someone that the membership can live with. >> give us some names. >> one name thrown around is owen smith. >> doesn't have a profile, does he? >> he doesn't. >> maybe that's for the best in this environment. >> everyone who has a profile in labor politics other than jeremy
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corbyn is associated -- >> thank you very much. meanwhile, the pope is ending his trip to armenia, very historic. his remarks on aamericanian -- armenians have upset turkey. dozens wounded at a hotel in somali. who is claiming responsibility? that is coming up. be the you who shows up in that dress. who hugs a friend. who is done with treatments that don't give you clearer skin. be the you who controls your psoriasis with stelara® just 4 doses a year after 2 starter doses. stelara® may lower your ability to fight infections and may increase your risk of infections and cancer. some serious infections require hospitalization. before treatment, get tested for tuberculosis. before starting stelara® tell your doctor if you think you have an infection or have symptoms such as: fever, sweats, chills, muscle aches or cough.
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live in atlanta, we'll return to lon do -- done in a moment, and our coverage of the brexit. we want to bring you other stories we're following. in the the state of california, a fast-moving wildfire has scored 35,000 acres of land. fire has killed at least two people and destroyed 150 homes. hundreds of people have evacuated, but there are fears
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some were not able to get out in time. we just don't know at this moment. the fire was about 5% contained on saturday, just 5%, but it grew overnight. drought conditions, high winds, and all the heat in california are making battling this one more challenging for these very skilled fire crews. pope francis is wrapping up a three-day visit to armenia, his trip has been marked by significant moments and also controversy. let's bring in john allen that covers the vatican. we're looking at video. this was a couple of hours ago of an orthodox service that the pope attended. talk to us about the significance of it. >> reporter: this was the sunday divine liturgy of the main branch of or doxy here in
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armenia. one of the main thrufts of the pope's visit is to promote closer ties. yesterday, the head of the armenia orthodox church attended a papal mass. it's a remarkable show of unity. it's not unprecedented. we've seen this sort of thing before, but it is exceedingly rare, and certainly here in armenia, where orthodoxy is a tradition, i think this day will be seen as highly symbolic, a milestone on the path to full christian unity. >> we also mention the controversy associated with this trip. the pope using the word genocide to describe a massacre of
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armenians by turkey and turkey has never agreed it was a ge genoci genocide. >> it's ironic that he came here to promote unity in one sense, but stepped right into division in another way that is the very bitter and long zang disagreement between turkey and armenia over how to describe those massacres in 1915 as things were falling apart. he used the word genocide last year. in the run-up to this trip, the vatican had played down expectations that he was going to do it again and in fact in his prepared speeches the word never appeared. but friday night, in a major address to politicians and diplomats, he went ahead and used it. obviously it was important to him to do so. we've already seen some blowback from the turkish side including
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comments by the deputy prime minister saying that the pope's language is baseless and reflects what he called a crusader mentality. meaning a kind of christian assault on muslims, so quite clearly, while the pope's language has played extraordinarily well here in armenia, he got a standing ovation at the end of that talk, it has also sort of stirred the waters one more time with ankara. >> john allen covering the pope trip for us. thank you, john. the islamist mill tan group al that bob is -- al shabaab is claiming responsibility for a hotel attack in mogadishu. authorities say gunmen stormed the hotel after detonating a car backed with explosives. a suicide bomber also blew himself up inside the hotel. police spent hours in a gun
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battle with the attackers. the somalia news agency reports the siege is over. the brexit triggered a sharp drop in world markets. some investors are in crisis mode. the uk sees some of of the aftermath of its brexit decision. stay with us.
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france, football fans across europe are cheering for their teams, of course. >> of course. the euro 2016 tournament is a great place to find what people think about the uk vote to leave the eu. our will ripley talked to fans in paris. >> reporter: politics and football, few things have such power to unite and divide. flags zp jerseys, colors of national pride, competitors fighting to win or lose. >> we leaf, relief. >> even before kick-off, these welsh fans felt like winners. >> we got our country back.
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>> fans from northern ireland. >> we voted that we stay in. >> worry what the united kingdom's departure will mean. >> we do understand and worry when we come home. >> outside of france, we find fans from three of four countries within the uk. >> the welsh fans backed the brexit whereas northern ireland voted largely to remain. this fans from west yorkshire and birmingham backed the leave. >> i think getting out of the eu is the best thing that could happen. >> terrorism, that's the fear. >> they admit much of that fear fueled by a lack of knowledge about what leaving the eu really means. >> you've got to research itself. >> this story from northwest
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england voted to remain. >> do you think people were aware of the consequences when they voted to leave? >> i've seen many videos of people on facebook if they realized what would be happen overnight, they wouldn't have voted to leave. >> no matter who they root for or how they voted. all these fans share the challenge of what lies ahead no matter what brexit leaves behind. will ripfully, cnn, paris. the brexit vote is the biggest decision that's been made in decades. >> we look at what we can expect from the markets come monday. >> over the course of the week, it's not sure whether markets will rise or fall. what is sure is they are going to be listening out for every single twist and turn of the diplomatic process. the prime minister says he's going to be stepping down over the next three months. there's questions hanging over the leadership of this country
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and also this week on wednesday, markets will be very finely listening out to what's said in brussels we've got big eu heads of state meeting that will be happening there. as one ceo of a bank put it to me over the course of a weekend, friday was tough, but at least that was just buying and selling the news. the news being the decision in favor of a brexit was much harder he said is to buy and sell the rumor that will come over the next few weeks to come. the uk has now become the first country to vote to leave the eu and there remains a lot of questions about what exactly what will happen next. how does the process work? >> from the early ballot results to the bomb shell resignation of prime minister david cameron, let's give you a walk through of how it all has unfolded so as far. [ bells tolling ]
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>> it's 10:00 in the united kingdom and polling stations are closed across the country. >> the british prime minister called the referendum the future of the country on its outcome. >> here in france, the president has said the outcome of this referendum across the channel could affect the entire future of the european union. >> the total number of 78325, the number of votes in favor of remain was 53928. >> 10 to 3:00 in the morning and we bounce backwards and forth toward leave and remain, now you actually have a 50-50 split. it could not be any closer. >> the total number of votes cast in of remain was 51,930. the total number of votes cast in favor of leave was 82,000.
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[ cheers and applause ] >> atv news has conducted a results analysis according to them 75% probability of a leave win in this referendum. >> if this result holds, it's the end of it. simple as that. >> i hope this victory brings down this failed project. let june 23rd go down in the history as our independence day! [ cheers and applause ] >> the people have spoken. the imagine city of the -- majesty of the process, whether or not you like the result, the reality tonight is the british people have voted to leave the european union. >> the british people have made a very clear decision to take a different path and as such i think the country requires fresh
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leadership to take it in this direction. i will do everything i can as prime minister to steady the ship over the coming weeks and months, but i do not think it would be right for me to try to be the captain that steers our country to its next destination. >> the question is who will steer the country to its next destination. we're trying to work that out as well. who is going to lead the opposition? thank you for joining us. i'm maxwell foster. >> i'm clarissa ward. we'll be back after the break with more of our continuing coverage of the decision to leave the european union. stay tuned.
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welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world as we continue our special coverage of britain's decision to leave the eu. i'm max foster. >> i'm clarissa ward. a lot of news this hour. >> we're seeing some sharp internal divisions particularly in the labor today in terms of the leadership. the labor party shadow house secretary has resign. heidi alexander said that the labor party needs a new leader after the uk voted to leave the eu. the labor leader jeremy corbyn
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has quote does not have what is needed to lead our country. >> hilary benn was fired earlier today after he challenged corbyn's leadership. labor leaders have called on corbyn to resign for not campaigning hard enough for uk to remain in the eu. >> that cannot be left to the likes of johnson, faraj. labor will fight to ensure our agenda is at the heart of the negotiations in the withdrawal of the european union that lie ahead. including the freedom to shape our economy to work for all. maintain social unemployment protections that benefit all and that whoever leads the government is intensely held to account to democratic account throughout the whole process. >> we just had a statement from a spokesman for jeremy corbyn in light of the resignations and
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the firings, it says, there will be no resignation of a democratic elected leader with a strong mandate from the membership. corbyn had previously said he will seek re-election. >> the labor shadow foreign minister has spoken to the bbc after his firing by party leader jeremy corbyn for planning to challenge corbyn's leadership. here's what benn said. >> this has been a very difficult decision for me because i agreed to serve. i didn't vote for him but i thought we had a responsibility to support him as the elected leader of the labor party but it has become increasingly clear that there's growing concern in the shadow cabinet and the parliamentary labor party about his leadership and i said to him that i no longer had confidence in his leadership and he then dismissed me from the shadow cabinet which is understandable
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and i thanked him for having given me the opportunity to serve as shadow foreign secretary. >> literally in the dead of night. >> 1:00 in the morning. >> they haven't slept all night and they had these extra conversations. we hear that others will go as well. the story was all about the prime minister the other day. today, it's about the opposition party. we don't know, though, who is going to be in the running to replace jeremy corbyn. if anyone is. someone needs to stand up front. >> reporter: we do. hillary ben said his decision wasn't about that. he wanted to express the fact that he did not have confidence in jeremy corbyn has leader of the labor party that could unite this very, very divided country and in his words, heal the wounds that brexit has brought about. he said that he would not stand
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as a labor candidate. said that jeremy corbyn was a good and decent man, but he is not a leader, and he felt that he had done his duty to express his lack of confidence informant labor -- in the labor party leader. we don't know if other members of the shadow cabinet all of whom remain and all of whom seem to feel uncertain about jeremy corbyn whether they will follow in the footsteps of heidi alexander who resigned at 8:00 a.m. sunday morning, very deep political instability across all the parliamentary parties in this country. at the moment, this extraordinary time politically and economically. >> it really feels like we're looking at a political vacuum here at such a desperate time of urn certainty for the country. give us a sense, diana,
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obviously you are standing outside number 10. we heard prime minister david cameron on friday announcing his resignation, any idea who is the likely candidate to fill his footsteps? >> well, it would appear that boris johnson the former mayor of london and very prominent in the leave campaign would hope that he would be next prime minister. it's expected that the home secretary, theresa may will contest the leadership. she would be far more of a unifying leader. the but the tory leader conversation is quite a couldn't vole lieutenant -- couldn't volume -- convoluted affair. david cameron will stay on until october to try and maintain some kind of stability in this very
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unstable period in british politics. >> we're hearing from europe they want a quick decision from london how how they want to move ahead. they want to extricate the uk quickly. it's going to be months before they can. we don't know who is running the prime minister's office let alone the labor party. >> that's true, but david cameron should be getting a negotiating team in place. there is somebody running in the leave campaign who will be running those negotiations who said he wants britain to remain within the single market. no continued free movement of people and for britain to contribute to the eu budget. there's conditions that europe is going to find very hard to agree to, but really the question is when britain should invoke this article 50 which will start the process, the two-year process of leaving the european union and david cameron has said he doesn't want to
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invoke that fast and the eu ministers are saying that he should. angela merkel is trying to be couldn't s conciliatory. we need to negotiate in good faith and terms. you hear european leaders saying that britain is holding the eu hoxing by not -- hostage by not precip tating this process as fast as it can. as far as britain is concerned, it wants to negotiate a framework really of trade deals before it implements article 50 so it has the best terms that it can when it leaves. but i think as you say, when you have this political instability in the tory party, in downing street, in the labor party, we certainly won't have our ducks in a row to start that negotiating process any time soon and that negotiation
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process will take a very long time. >> it's not going to start until we have a new prime minister. thank you very much, indeed. with david cameron stepping down, the leader of the conservative party will be selected by this process as we understand it. >> so conservative members of parliamentary who wish to leave the party must be nominated by two fellow members, if more than two are nominated, then the conservative mps hold a series of votes until they select their top choices. then the entire party votes in a postal ballot to make the final decision on who will leave. >> since the conservatives hold the majority of the uk parliament, that person becomes the country's prime minister. the markets were closed when the decision came down in the middle
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east. in terms of the reaction there today, what are we seeing? >> i think, max, you can say it's a shot right across the bow. not one market is in positive territory and with $3 trillion wiped off in friday in global equities, we have a boat load of uncertainty. let's cover the biggest market sir. that is the saudi arabia. there's the biggest loss since january. it's trading down 2.5%. dubai is trading 3% and katar is 1.5%. banking and property stocks are taking a hit. they are seen the most vulnerable going forward. beyond the gulf states, we see the cairo stock exchange is down 5%. and then we have the commodities which are moving, the lifeblood
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of the region in the middle east is oil. it dropped 5% on friday and it will be under further pressure. it's not traded widely over the weekend. they are big buyers of gold and that remains a safe haven. the latest quote we can get that $1322 an-ounce. we see heavy selling across the board, compared to the dow industrials, down 6%, the wider average of european union stocks were down 7% friday. it's not bad, although the selling was quite deep at the opening bell. >> john, london obviously has been a favorite location for emerging market investors. what sense do you get that the impact that brexit will have on future investment? >> it's a big unknown at this stage, clarissa. there's deep concern about a emerging market contagion. it was down 3.5% after the vote and today's sell-off in the
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middle east will only add to those woes. the sovereign funds sit on nearly $3 trillion in wealth. the uk were popular homes for the capital. they were prolific investors in central london real estate. the middle eastern investors have 9 of the top. there's a huge question mark overt property sector. we're getting some comments from regional middle east governments who have stakes in the european bond market. saudi arabia's central bank says it's reviewing its investment policy pertaining to euros and the british pound and making adjustments. that's interesting. turkey noted the country is worried about a political domino effect which could have major economic repercussions as we know. heads of state meeting taking place in the european union they are listening very carefully.
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will this be a domino effect that feeds into the economies going forward? it's a huge concern for turkey of course as an emerging market. we see egypt selling off quite sharply today on this sunday. >> thank you very much indeed. you are watching cnn's special coverage. up next, calls are coming in france for that country to follow suit. could a frexit be next? ma'am. i'm here. i'm live. wait. you're real? yeah. with discover card, you can talk to a real person in the u.s. day or night. plus, we're not going to waste your time trying to sell you a bunch of other products you don't really need. that is really nice of you. i feel really bad about shouting at you. oh, you weren't shouting. you were just speaking in all caps. at discover, we treat you like you'd treat you. 100% u.s.-based customer service. here to help, not to sell.
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days after the brexit vote, far right countries across europe are calling for following into brit an's footsteps. >> one of the loudest voices is calling for france to have an exit of its own. the issue was raised with president hollande. >> to the question, he answered no. as as if we used a swear word. >> let me start by asking you, is it possible that we can see a
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frexit? >> it's very unlikely. it's true that there is a lot of love-hate in france regarding the eu at the moment and it's true that the e ux has probably never been as unpopular as today in france, but at the same time the debate has never been very hostile regarding the eu and the french have always had this ambiguous relationship with the eu, loving many things about the eu on the one hand and feeling that the eu is not french enough to a certain extent on the other. it's true that there is call for a referendum and you just had marie le pen on. this is one thing. you can see this growing. i don't think we can expect a frexit any time soon. >> but it does strengthen her cause, doesn't it? she's consistently growing in time and do you think that brexit will ultimately have an
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influence on that movement in france and pushing it toward coming out of the eu? >> france is quite particular because the euro critical movements come from the far right and far left. on both sides you have very critical voices against the eu at the moment but when it comes to the national front in particular, it's true that our independence calls to have a referendum and maybe to leave the e ux has been boosted by brexit and this cause is becoming ever-more popular in france but at the same time i don't think that if the french were put in front of the choice of leaving or remaining in the
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eu, you would have the majority of people saying we want to leave the eu. >> there's a sense of responsibility of ownership in france regarding the eu. it's a little bit of a project to a certain extent. >> do you get the sense amongst most people there are resentment against the uk for opening pandora's box, if you will? >> the french have been -- there have been a few polls and you can hear that as well on the street and in conversations that the french have been the most ambivalent with the uk remaining in the eu, and in the last few weeks you had polls who said the french were among the few europeans saying brexit is a
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good thing. at the same time there is this feeling of not believing that the uk could actually leave the eu and i was in paris on the day of the referendum and the day after and all the conversations i had, all the people that i talked to were quite baffled by the results and they went to bed with the first results or at least the first expectations saying that it it will be remain and they were quite confident and they woke up and it was a leave. a leave vote. and all of the people that i talk to were very surprised because they thought that in the end the british voters would say yes, we want to remain. >> i think a lot of brits felt that way as well. scotland's first minister saying the country will likely seek independence from the uk again. a second referendum is very much an option as the government
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considers its next move following the brexit vote. david mckenzie is in edinboro scotland. you've flown into scotland. people there are very much caught up in independence. they have grown up with that debate. it's grown with them, but you are going in there and getting a taste of what it's like today. how palpable is it? >> it's very palpable, max. here at this shop that sells kilts, scottish wares, and what we have here is really a sense of some of the struggles of scottish and people who live in scotland are having both in a business and personal sense. i'm here with this entrepreneur. david, some of your eu citizens
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who you employ, how are they feeling right now? >> we are a company, we work with locals, people who live here on a freelance basis and they show the tourists around. we have people working for us from the eu and opeople were no expecting it and a bit stress. >> and the people you work with, are they worried that there's an eventuality they might have to leave scotland? >> yes. there's a problem with uncertainty and myself we're not sure it will affect the travel, the airlines or the visas and in this case, there will be less people coming into scotland or the uk and the internal travel within the uk is also quite massive. >> a lot of people are feeling that uncertainty. that's not good for business generally but then also the sentiment from the scotts we talked to, most of them voted to
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remain within the eu. what's the feeling right now? >> it's not good. currently, it's not kicked in yet. as soon as the rules and regulations will kick in, we don't know what's going to happen. we're not sure. everyone is stressed. >> there's a sense of betrayal might be too strong of a word, but the english has made the decision for the scots. >> i'm not sure if that will be strong or not if it will be the correct term but i think obviously no one was expecting and no one in england and a lot of people who want to leave now. that was an expression of themselves but actually not want to leave the uk. >> thank you so much, david. david here who works here on the
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weekends but runs a tourism business. they are both worried both for now for themselves and their kids maybe but also for the future business of travel in and out of scotland. that uncertainty is one of the key factors people are dealing with in scotland and they are trying to politically push through remaining in the eu. >> thank you. having his own agenda, in a matter of hours, he finds his own tartan. >> unbelievable. northern ireland voted to stay in the eu by a wide margin. now there have been calls there to hold a referendum to unite with the republic of ireland to the south. could britain's loss be ireland's gain? >> there has been talk about the possibility of increased foreign
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investment, particularly with parts of the city moving to dublin that kind of thing. overall, it probably would not be that much of a bonus for ireland if you also take into account the trading losses that would occur between britain and ireland, if britain were outside the customs union and suddenly there were tariffs and duties and all those impediments to trade. it's around a billion sterling every week. that's a huge amount of money for both countries. britain is ireland's biggest trading partner. ireland is britain's fifth biggest trading partner. britain exports more stuff to ireland than it does to india, china, brazil combined. >> there has been a precedent made. a lot of technology companies
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keeping the bulk of their stock in the uk and keeping headquarter in dublin. could that be a model for a future set up as britain leaves the european union? >> it possibly could. what makes ireland attractive for american companies is its corporation tax. but if britain were outside the eu they could certainly compete with ireland for that sort of investment. there's nothing to stop them from doing that. for the next couple of years as we go through this article 50 exit process, there's going tieb lot of uncertainty and uncertainty generally in any country is bad for business. it puts off investors. as far as the british ireland chamber of commerce is concerned, we're going to have
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to work our way through that, and that's what the british chamber of commerce is about. the world is coming to terms with this new reality in the uk. it's been rough on the trading floor as we've been hearing. we'll discuss how the u.s. is reacting. >> and the flooding in the u.s. state of west virginia is just coming into view. that and much more when we come back. . dish issues? cascade platinum... powers... through... your toughest stuck-on food. so let your dishwasher be the dishwasher. this turned out great. cascade. hmmmmm....... [ "dreams" by beck ] hmmmmm...
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welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. you are watching cnn's special brexit coverage. i'm max foster. >> and i'm clarissa ward.
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the headlines this hour, the uk vote to leave the eu is shaking up the british labor party. labor leader jeremy corbyn says he's not going anywhere despite calls for his resignation. he says he will actually seek re-election. local media outlets say as much of his half of his shadow cabinet may quit in protest. >> more than 3 million sign a petition demanding a new referendum. just 100,000 signatures are needed for the parliament to discuss the issue. and 24 people have died in the u.s. state of west virginia in flash flooding. there is a one in a thousand chance of this much rainfall in that area in given year. pope francis will visit a holy site in armenia. he again described the deaths of
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armenians in world war i a genocide. the brexit vote has revealed sharp divisions within britain's opposition labor party. heidi alexander has posted her resignation on twitter. she wrote that she respected labor leader jeremy corbyn but new leadership was needed. this followed news that corbyn sacked his foreign second hilary benn. corbyn was in the brexit remain camp, but has received criticism for his weak support of it. >> you can call it a brexit backlash in berlin. representatives from the six founding countries in the european union gathered in the german capital on saturday and presented a united front.
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frms they all demanded britain begin negotiating its exit from the eu immediately. >> london also has a responsibility that is wider than just great britain. this is why we jointlily say that i this process needs to start as soon as possible. > translator: we start now. we must be clear. the british people have decided. >> we need to turn the page. we don't want a vacuum and it's important now that these negotiations which the united kingdom start in good faith but as soon as possible. >> at a separate event, german chancellor angela merkel spoke with a more conciliatory tone. >> we were sad that the vote went that way and that is no reason to be specially nasty during negotiations. >> those negotiations cannot begin until britain stwoeks --
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invokes article 50 of the lisbon treaty. it's not clear when that will happen. >> nobody else in the european union can force article 50 to be invoked. i hope there won't be a game, cat-and-mouse game. >> even if talks begin quickly, under the lisbon treaty, divorce proceedings could last two years or more. the brexit vote is affecting matters well outside the eu's borders. how is the brexit unfolding in the u.s.? >> from the british community in the united states, it seems to be dismay and disbelief. in terms of the wider picture in america, there's worries about the economy in britain and europe having a domino effect,
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an effect over here and it probably will as. but let's take a breath to a moment. let's look to the lessons of history. yes, the economy is going to be on a roller coaster ride but the thing about roller coaster rides is they are eventually over. let's hold on tight and not panic. >> i mean, the view from outside the uk seems to be that britain is now regretting making this decision. you've got these demonstrations taking place and also petitions saying we want a second referendum. is that the view you are getting from there? >> yes, it is. the british community here in america is extremely tight knit and we're not talking to the lower 48. it's about 90-10 seems to be the p reaction of the ex-pats. people here are wondering if they can sign it.
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there are enough signatures for parliament to debate this. but would they really overturn the greatest, giantest referendum in the history of britain and say no you can't do that as the elected representatives? >> i don't think so. but, there is a sense of inkred you'llity here about what's happened and also the effect it might have on the united states as the surge toward the electorate taking back power seems to be surging through not just this nation but many around the world. >> those aren't the only reactions on social media and online petition is gaining traction in the uk calling for a second eu referendum. >> it's now received more than enough signatures to require a debate on the issue in particle men. here's samuel burke. >> reporter: by the time folk in the uk website -- went to sleep two days after voting in favor of a brexit, this online petition calling for a second eu
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referendum on the official uk parliament website had already received more than 2.4 million signatures. that is well beyond the 100,000 signature threshold required to have something like this considered for debate by a committee in particle men. now we have to put that number in context. even though it seems large, it is well below the 16.1 million people who voted to have the uk stay in the eu and also less than 17.4 million people who voted for the uk to leave the eu. david cameron has said from the get-go there will not be a second referendum and since the leader of the opposition, jeremy corbyn has also said there would not be a second referendum, that said, one of the members of parliament who is a member of this committee says that the select committee will be considering this petition on a second eu referendum this tuesday. we have a map here that shows the density of where these petitions are coming from, these signatures are coming from.
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as you can see here, red represents the highest density coming really from london which is of course one of the few places that voted in favor of staying in thursday's election. a lot of people are also dismayed to see that this the second most searched term on google in the uk is what is the eu? one has to hope that those are people searching who didn't vote on thursday and we're also searching the -- seeing the phenomenon of the regrexit. this hash tag being used. people like this woman in england saying i personally voted leave believing these lies. i regret it more than anything. anecdotally, we see people saying i made the biggest mistake in my life voting to leave. now i'm regretting it. cnn new york.
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let's have a look. we've gone over 3 million and that's an incredible amount of signatures in a very short space of time. we were talking earlier about how we need to know who is actually voting, remainders, presumably. >> it's unlikely to have an effect but it says a lot about the move here. coming up, we'll have more from london in just a bit, but first cities around the world with celebrating gay pride this weekend. a look at some of the most vibrant parades coming up next. sfx: climbing sounds duracell quantum lasts longer so kevin jorgeson can power through the night. sfx: duracell slamtones there goes my sensitive bladder. sound familiar? then you'll love this. incredible protection in a pad this thin. i didn't think it would work, but it does. it's called always discreet watch this.
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i'm george howell. in the us state of west
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virginia, the death toll has risen to 24 people now dead. the state hit with devastating floods. the u.s. president barack obama has signed a emergency declaration in the state. the professional golf association is canceling a major tournament in the area because of extensive damage and while the waters are recedinreceding, are leaving behind all kinds of debris and now many people are left homeless. many people looking for homes. a bad situation there. our meteorologist derek van damme is here. >> they can't go home because so many of their houses have been destroyed. the national weather service is describing this as i 1,000 year event. meaning there was a one-in-1,000 chance this would happen in any particular year. the clean-up ensues. take a look at what people in west virginia are dealing with
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right now. the complete mess. this was the deadliest flood event in 2016. 24 fatalities has killed more than all the tornado fatality events in the united states so far this year. that number at 12. come to my graphics. we'll talk about how much rain actually fell across central and southeastern west virginia. this is from thursday night into friday. the majority of the flooding taking place friday morning, but look at this swath of heavy rain. up wards of 10 inches in many locations. over 250 millimeters for our international viewers and the manlt of this was an extremely short period of time. so we had what is known as flash flooding, the rapid rise of water as it bursts over its banks in the riverways and the streams about. take a look at elk river, for instance. this broke a 125-year record. look at that sharp rise in the
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river gauges. temperature crest at 33.37 feet, well above flood stage and by the way it rose 17 feet in a mere 12 hours. that is called flash flooding, folks. unfortunately, it led to so much destruction you saw a moment ago. the good news out of all this, the storm system quickly pulling away from the united states. that's not a problem. the water level should recede by the clean-up effort should continue for days, weeks, if not months. i wish i can bring some of the rainfall to the scorched southwestern united states. look at what they are dealing with. this is one of the many structures that were burnt in kern county, lake isabella region. over 400 homes burnt to the ground. over 75,000 acres burnt at the moment. there was 5% containment. that dropped to zero over night.
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we're losing control over the erskine fire. strong winds, high temperatures, low humidity is going to fuel the fire to continue. we've had over 2 million scorched acres across the united states so far this season. not anywhere near what we experienced last year. take a look at video footage coming from this region and what people are dealing with. governor jerry brown declared a state of emergency in kern county. unfortunately, there were two fail its with this vicious inferno. >> i want to talk a bit more about that fire. a deadly fire that killed two people. let's look at the video so we can get a sense of exactly what's happening in that region. you see so many homes destroyed. you see officials doing the best they can in dealing with the fire. so far it has scorched more than 35,000 acres of land the fire was about 5% contained on
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saturday but it grew overnight. hundreds of people have been evacuated, but officials fear some were not able to get out in time. around the world this weekend, dozens of cities are holding gay pride parades. in mexico city, rainbows are covering the streets there and in major u.s. cities like new york and chicago, they are all set to follow suit on sunday. london got things started saturday. the crowd witnessed this happen as well. look at this. a police officer proposed to his boyfriend in the middle of the parade, a moment that was celebrated there by onlookers. the islamist militant group al shabaab is claiming responsibility for a deadly attack in somalia that happened at a hotel in mogadishu. 15 people were killed there. including a somali cabinet minister. 25 others were wounded.
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authorities say gunmen attacked the hotel after a car bomb was detonated. somalia's national news agency reports the siege is now over. we will go right back to london in just a moment for the very latest open the uk vote to leave the eu. you'll hear what you're yo 2016 fans think about this historic decision. stay with cnn. what are you doing? getting faster. huh? detecting threats faster, responding faster, recovering faster. when your security's built in not just bolted on, and you protect the data and not just the perimeter, you get faster. wow, speed kills. systems open to all, but closed to intruders. trusted by 8 of 10 of the world's largest banks. this is claire in phoenix. yes!i help you? great. correct! ma'am. this isn't an automated computer... operator! ma'am. i'm here. i'm live.
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well, with the british prime minister stepping down, a number of possible successors are being talked about, the former mayor of london is of course one who could be cameron's replacement. boris johnson has been celebrating the leave vote. >> he's had a never a dull moment political career. take a look. >> british, blond mop, and bike riding. prone to bumbling. and bravado. >> success of the olympic and paralnympic game of 2012.
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>> he enjoyed something close to celebrity status. >> thank you so much. >> when all is said and done willing to perform for the cameras, the former london mayor has his own special flare which he's been grooming since his oxford days. his credit ticks called him elitist. there's little doubt he's a divisive character. >> he gets people riled up. >> oafish. >> great chap. >> he spent eight years as mayor in london before stepping down in may. he began his career as a journalist, first writing as "the times" newspaper and then for the brussels newspaper, "the telegraph." >> he's been gracing front pages reaffirmed the skeptic views for
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which he's long courted controversy. to go against the starts has been a big gamble particularly given his political am ambitions. he became the star player of the leave campaign. >> we are a great country. >> born in new york, he has joked that he could be president of the united states, but it's the leadership much closer to home that he's really said to be looking to score. >> well, there's another major vote in europe as well. people in spain are taking part in elections right now to seat a new parliament. >> the country's center right party is expected to be the big winner but spain's anti austeriity aligning is expected to make gains.
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the last election in december was considered inconclusive which led to this new round of voting. >> people are looking around to see if brexit is reflected in that. football fans are there from across europe are cheering on their teams, of course. the euro 2016 tournament is a great place to find what people think about the uk vote to leave the eu. our will ripley spoke with some of them. >> reporter: politics and football, few things have such power to unite and divide. flags and jerseys, colors of national pride, competitors fighting to win or lose. >> we leaf, relief. >> even before kick-off the wales-northern ireland games, these welsh fans fell like winners. >> we got our country back. >> fans from northern ireland. >> we voted that we stay in. >> worry what the united kingdom's from the european
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union will mean for their mobility, their jobs, their future. >> we all do. we may not let on that we do. i'll have the time of my life. i'll worry when i get become home. >> outside of france, we find fans from three of four countries within the uk. >> the fans seem to be divided based on where they live. the welsh fans backed the brexit, whereas northern ireland voted largely to remain. this fans from west yorkshire and birmingham backed the leave. >> i think getting out of the eu is the best thing that could happen at that -- to britain. >> a lot of people voted because of immigration. >> terrorism, that's the fear. >> they admit much of that fear fueled by a lack of knowledge about what leaving the eu really means. >> you've got to research it yourself. >> this student from northwest england voted to remain. >> do you think people were aware of the consequences when they voted to leave? >> i've seen many videos of people on facebook if they
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realized what would be happen overnight, they wouldn't have voted to leave. >> no matter who they root for or how they voted. all these fans share the challenge that lies ahead, pulling off a win for the uk, no matter what brexit leaves behind. will ripley, cnn, paris. >> thank you so much for joining us. i'm max foster. >> i'm clarissa ward. up next for viewers in the u.s., "new day" is just ahead. >> george howell will be right back with more on the uk decision to leave the eu. thank you so much for watching. wopen up a lot of dawn.
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we have structures that are completely demolished, nothing left. just ash. >> it's all gone. >> since thursday, the rise in waters have taken out bridges, dislodged barges and swept away homes. >> we were in extreme danger. >> disaster relief on the way, and residents tell us they need it. >> he spent part of this visit working on his vice-presidential selection process. >> i will tell you one thing, i'm getting it from a lot of people, and they want it. it seems to beis

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