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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  July 10, 2016 11:00pm-1:01am PDT

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cities across the u.s. erupt in protest over alleged racial injustice as president obama cuts short a trip to europe in an effort to confront the problem head-on. plus, portugal shocked host nation france to claim the euro 2016 trophy. and without the team's star captain for most of the match. and the japanese people put their faith in prime minister abe at the polls. we will tell you why their choice could fundamentally impact japan's future role in the global community. hello and welcome to our viewers in the united states and all around the world. i'm rosemary church at cnn
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global headquarters in atlanta. and this is "cnn newsroom." portugal have defied the odds and the experts. they stunned host france to win the european football championship. the final was decided in the second period of extra time. teammates mobbed portugal's adair after he scored the only goal. we'll have all the details and reaction in just a few minutes. we want to turn to our top story here in america. hundreds of people have been arrested over the weekend in cities across the united states during protests against the police shootings of two men. baton rouge police say they detained four dozen people sunday during rallies for alton sterling who was killed early last week. more than 100 people were arrested saturday. here in atlanta, georgia, cnn
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affiliate wsb reports that several hundred protesters marched downtown. police have arrested three people and a large group of demonstrators in washington were mostly peaceful as they marched toward the capital. the protests have also inspired rallies overseas. in london, hundreds marched to the embassy in solidarity. the survivor of a deadly ambush is sharing details of the attack. she is one of two civilians hit by sniper fire thursday night. five officers were killed and seven colleagues wounded. taylor described the moment an officer fell to the ground right in front of her. >> he said he has a gun, run. and my kids started running. and i started -- i wanted to make sure that they were all in front of me, so they started running up the block.
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and i was running behind them. and i felt the bullet. i don't know if it bounced off the ground or what, but i felt it when it hit me. i turned around to grab me because -- i guess he turned around and went to grab me, but i had already been shot. police officers started coming up the block. n one of them, i heard him when he said, is anybody hit? my son said, no, because he didn't know i was shot. and i was saying, yes. and the officer said it again and i said, yes, sir, i'm hit in the leg. and the other officer jumped on top of me and covered me and my son. and there was another one at our feet. and there was another one over our head. and it was several of them lying against the wall over there, and they just -- they stayed there
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with us. >> terrifying moments for that mother who protected her sons there. and the ambush happened as protesters were marching against the police killings of black men. the dallas police chief says the gunmen clearly practiced a military style plan of attack and used tactics you don't normally see. >> what we know now is that this suspect was in a vehicle, what is a black tahoe, and was leapfrogging the intersections in that vehicle and stopped well ahead of the march. you could easily see the march coming down the street they were walking and saw an opportunity with some high perched positions, a couple of buildings in the pathway of the marchers. and decided to take the high ground and start shooting right away. >> cnn's ed lavandera has more on the gunman's final moments as
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described by the dallas police chief. >> reporter: in the cnn interview with the dallas police chief, david brown provided some of the most chilling and descriptive details of the standoff in the tragic shooting from last thursday night. the chief says that after the shooting erupted, his officers started following micah johnson inside the el centro college building. at one point following him through a stairwell before he was cornered inside the second floor of a building there leading to the multi-hour standoff. the chief says that johnson wrote on the ground or on the wall with his own blood the initials r.b. investigators are still trying to figure out what that is a reference to. they haven't figured that out yet. also some other writing left in his own blood as well. and then the police chief also says that johnson who requested that he would only speak with a black negotiator there at the scene. all of this while micah johnson continued to fire rounds of shots at the officers who were
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there inside the scene. the police chief describes micah johnson as someone who is very much under control yet delusional, at times singing and laughing at the officers, asking about how many of the officers he had been able to kill throughout all of that scene. the police chief also says there's clear evidence that micah johnson was mounting an arsenal and perhaps had a bigger planned attack. but for some reason switched and decided to make his attack last thursday night. those are some of the details revealed by the police chief in an extraordinary interview with cnn. u.s. president barack obama will speak at a memorial for the fallen officers on tuesday and meet with their families. he flew back to washington sunday cutting short his european trip so he can go to dallas. mr. obama spoke about the shooting while he was in spain saying that citizens who attack police are doing a disservice to the cause of criminal justice
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reform. >> first of all, any -- any violence directed at police officers is a reprehensible crime and needs to be prosecuted. but even rhetorically, if we paint police in broad brush, without recognizing that the vast majority of police officers are doing a really good job, and are trying to protect people and do so fairly and without racial bias, if our rhetoric does not recognize that, then we're going to lose allies in the reform cause. >> and the president says a truthful and peaceful tone is needed to mobilize real change in america. more on those remarks later this hour. i want to go back to our big
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sporting story and portugal have shocked the football world. they've won the european championship for the first time ever. the final against france went to the second period of extra time. substitute adair delivered a dagger. he scored the only goal of the match in the 109th minute. it was just his fourth goal in 2 29 international ashlgs peeran e an appearances but all his team needed. almost no one believed in portugal but the fans. we look at how they did it. >> reporter: portuguese fans were saying it was their turn to finally win their first major piece of international silverware. the victory didn't exactly come in the manner we were expecting. cnn's football analyst owen har
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d hargreaves was in the stade de france. rinaldo went off injured yet portugal managed to prevail. >> the best player in the world, one of the greatest we've ever seen, all the goals he scores for club and country went off. and a player that didn't score a goal for his club in swansea this season gets the winner. i thought portugal did enough. the game plan was to be defensive and play on the counterattack. it worked. i think france for the first 20 minutes were the best team but then folded. i thought portugal deserved the win. they were the better team. >> this was the one trophy or a major piece of international silv areware. does this mean that he is now up there with the greatest of all time? >> i think he was before the
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game. i don't think it changes anything. maybe changed it for him. he went off in tears, devastated. probably thought that chance had gone for him to lead the country. his teammates rallied around him. made some changes tactically and were able to do enough. he was the best player on the field. eder came in and scored a crucial goal. he was on the side being a manager, being a coach. telling his players to get back and defend. he played his part. in the end, portugal did just enough to win this tournament. >> we've seen what the defeat means to france and the french fans. we've seen a french flag dumped in a dust bin as we were walking back here. where do you think they went wrong because everybody was absolutely talking about them as the favorites. >> for 20 minutes, they looked like favorites. probably should have been one or two goals up, and they stopped
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playing. played too slowly. i thought tactically made some changes that impacted the game poorly. piatt went off. giroux, nothing to see. talking about all that $100 million price tag. really disappointed today. the balance of the team wasn't as good as in the quarterfinal and semifinal. they got punished against a portuguese team that played on the counterattack. it always looked like it was going to suit portugal. >> and portugal heading home victorious. portugal, you may remember, suffered defeat on their home soil back in 2004 when they were beaten by greece. the european championships once again showing that the underdogs can prevail, although that won't make it hurt any less for france this evening. from owen hargreaves and myself, amanda davies, in paris, it's back to you.
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maybe the football analysts weren't so savvy after all. they didn't see this one coming. as you can see, this elephant in thailand predicted a portugal victory. and that was on friday. the elephant wasn't the only animal seer. appears they knew something the rest of us didn't. and that's just a little taste of the euphoria in lisbon after their team's triumph. it's a nonstop party. we'll be live in lisbon and in paris next hour to see how people are reacting on the morning after this football classic. portugal is not the only country celebrating a major sporting victory. find out who else went home with a coveted trophy in a huge grand slam win. here's a little hint there. plus, baghdad is still haunted by one of the city's worst ever terror attacks.
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how its residents are coping. and a u.n. peacekeeper has been killed in south sudan. more on the renewed conflict there when we come back. the gillette mach 3 turbo still feels better after 10 shaves than a disposable on it's first mach 3 blades have twice the coatings. for a closer shave with zero redness shave after shave after shave gillette. the best a man can get. when you cook with incredible tokyo-stingredients...les. you make incredible meals.
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welcome back, everyone. the u.n. security council is condemning fresh violence in south sudan. there has been fighting since thursday between rival political factions prompting the u.s. to evacuate its nonemergency staff from its embassy there. a chinese u.n. peacekeeper has been killed in the unrest. the u.n. mission has reported heavy weapons fire in the capital. this despite claims by a south sudanese minister that the fighting has subsided. >> the fighting erupted. the forces attacked the checkpoint. the forces which are usually there, those who are there to regulate the movement of the traffic and so forth. tay had to move in to address
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that situation. that situation was addressed, and at present, the situation is calm. the situation is normal. the town is under full control of the government. >> for more on the situation in south sudan, david mckenzie joins us from johannesburg in south africa. david, what are you hearing, the latest developments on the ground in south sudan? >> rosemary, on sunday, there was very fierce fighting through much of the day starting in the early morning, around the u.n. compound near the airport and also around the u.n. compound and idp, displaced people's camps in another part of the capital. this was small arms and heavy artillery fire. those within juba unclear exactly what was going on but it appears it's factional fighting between forces loyal to the
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president and those loyal to the vice president. the fighting has gone from thursday through friday. there was a lull on saturday. very heavy fighting on sunday. terrified citizens taking shelter in u.n. compounds. people unable to move on the street help helicopter gunships involved. and there does seem to be this kind of unraveling of the very tentative peace agreement between those two protagonists and, at this stage, flights in and out of juba are suspended. sort of lifeline through nairobi kenya, calls from all sides in the international community to suspend the fighting immediately. but it does seem to be on some level there's a lack of command and control of these troops. so even if they would want them to stop, it's unclear they would. relative calm overnight. but at this stage, too early to
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say whether this has died down. >> we appear to be getting a very different story from government officials, don't we? what is the background of this violence, and why does it keep recurring? >> well, the background is complex and rooted in both the history of south sudan, the world's youngest country and et ethnic tensions within the country. mostly the dinke tribal group is supporting the president. and the other side supporting the vice president. both fought against the northern sudan for several decades. once south sudan gains its independence, there has been this factional fighting within the south sudanese that really kicked off in december 2013 leading to a bloody civil war
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which was largely came to some level of peace in late 2015, but since the vice president returned to south sudan with a large contingent of troops, heavily armed troops, there has been this worry that any kind of incident which appeared to happen on thursday at a checkpoint could kick off large-scale fighting. and while there have been calls for peace from both leaders, it's unclear who is in control and there's a great deal of worry the civilian community, the civilians in the juba are getting heavily hurt by this, as well as a large ngon embassy contingent. >> just after 8:20 there in the morning in johannesburg, south africa. david mckenzie keeping an eye on the developments in south sudan. many thanks to you. we'll talk again soon. turkish officials announced seven new arrests in connection to the terror attack at istanbul's ataturk airport.
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turkey's state-run news agency says the suspects are charged with belonging to an armed terrorist group and assisting in homicide. three suicide bombers killed 44 people and wounded hundreds last month. isis is believed to have carried out the attack but never claimed responsibility. some 30 suspects have been held before these latest arrests. gutted buildings, posters memorializing the dead. these are the images of the blast site in baghdad a week after hundreds were killed in the worst ever terror attack in iraq's capital. ben wedeman reports how against the odds the people of the city refuse to surrender. >> reporter: as if baghdad didn't have enough already, there's another shrine to the dead. the buildings gutted by fire from the worst ever terrorist attack in this city now festooned with posters of the
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more than 300 that died that bloody night. few cities have been bruised and battered by war like baghdad. but despite it all and against all the odds, the residents of this city refuse to surrender. baghdad's pet market has seen its fair share of attacks. the worst in 2008 left more than 100 dead. yet it's still in business. only god knows why. we just put up with it says this man, showing the scars from that attack. faez has been making bird cages since he was a teenager. he takes the long view. and in iraq, the long view goes back thousands of years. the cycle of life must continue, he tells me. iraqis don't know the meaning of defeat. we've been carrying on since the days of the assyrians.
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for 40 years, he's been selling tea. he lived through the iran/iraq war, the iraqi invasion of kuwait, the u.s.-led invasion and ocitation, civil war and now the war with isis. it's all starting to weigh on him. these are bitter days, he says. explosions. there's no security. you leave home and you don't know if you'll return. yet he carries on. perhaps it's resignation. perhaps fatalism. or perhaps muhammad puts it best. we have the patience of job, she says. in this city, patience is not so much a virtue as it is a necessity. ben wedeman, cnn, baghdad. japan's prime minister has won a big victory in the country's election. it appears shinzo abe's ruling coalition will capture a
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majority in the upper house. but concerns remain over his economic policies and his bid to revise the country's pacifist constitution. so let's bring in andrew stevens live from hong kong to talk more about this. it does appear to be a big win for prime minister shinzo abe. what changes might we see to japan's involvement in global conflicts? >> that is the question and that was at the heart of all the campaigning leading up to this vote in the upper house. be anomics was most talked about, it's this change to the constitution, moving away from the pacifist constitution that japan has had since the americans drafted it going back to the end of the second world war. mr. abe has got now what is known as a super majority. he has two-thirds of the upper house. he already controls two-thirds of the lower house. and having that sort of control allows him to start changing the
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constitution if he so chooses. and he's made no secret of the fact that he does want to move away from japan's passivispassi. he wants japan to be more involved and more able to defend itself. and this is no coincidence that this has happened along with the rise of china militarily and also of north korea. now what will change, rosemary, i mean, eventually it could lead to japan turning its back on the article 9. and article 9 says that japan basically bans war as a way of settling international conflicts. but to get there it would be a long process as he, himself, admits. he wants to deepen the conversation about changing the conversation. that's his first step. and if the ruling power does want to go ahead with getting rid of article 9, he'd actually have to take a referendum, a
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nationwide referendum on that. and it's still an immensely divisive issue. so many japanese have fresh memories of what happened in the second world war. it's certainly not -- it's going to take some effort to take the country with him on this. >> so we won't see any changes on that front any time soon. what about economic policies? there's a lot of concern there. what changes might we see in japan economically? >> well, this is -- let's just say this is much more current in you like. when elected in 2012, abe came in on the back of his abenomics which was three arrows to lift japan out of its lost almost generation of economic growth. and he said that he would ease interest rates and flood the economy with money through the central bank, offer stimulus packages and reform the labor force, make it much easier for japan incorporated to operate. on the first two, the monetary
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easing and fiscal stimulus as they're known. he's received okay marks. he's made efforts to really try to pump things up for the japanese economy. on the reforms, much less successful. so now he has this majority, this mandate, if you like. he is now talking about pumping things up further, pushing for reforms. he's talking about drastic changes. so this is where we will see the action happening. so far, abenomics has failed to reach the sort of targets that abe had been promising, an inflation rate of 2%, economic growth pretty steady. he hasn't achieved either of those. the international monetary fund has said these airows of abenomics should be reloaded. what we'd like to see is a reloading of these economic arrows if you like, to really push hard, drastically as he said, to get the economy where he has promised it should be. he made that promise in 2012. certainly not yet there.
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>> nearly 2:30 in the afternoon in hong kong where our andrews stevens keeping us up to date on politics in japan. let's talk again about this next hour. appreciate it andrew. hundreds of thousands people are forced from their homes across southern china. we'll look at the torrential rain and flooding that's going on for weeks and has only gotten worse. as dallas reels from a devastating week, a local church is calling for change as it moves toward healing. that story just ahead. ♪ is it a force of nature? or a sales event? the summer of audi sales event is here. get up to a $5,000 bonus on select audi models.
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a warm welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and all around the world. this is "cnn newsroom." i'm rosemary church. i to bring you up to date on the main stories. in south sudan, the u.s. is evacuating nonemergency staff from its embassy. this after an escalation of
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fighting in the capital has killed more than 150 people, including a chinese u.n. peacekeep purpose the u.n. says 1,000 internally displaces people have fled its protection in south sudan due to violence near their camps. portugal's football team are the champions of europe for the first time ever. the final against france was scoreless until the second period of extra time. substitute eder scored the only goal. it was just his fourth goal in 29 international appearances. in the u.s., at least 300 people have been arrested nationwide during protests against police shootings of two black men. on sunday, police in baton rouge, louisiana, detained four dozen people during rallies for sterling. he was killed there early last week. u.s. president barack obama spoke about the black lives
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matter movement while he was in europe. he cut his trip short after thursday's deadly ambush of five police officers in dallas, texas. cnn white house correspondent michelle kosinski has more on his remarks. >> reporter: president obama has now ended his trip abroad, cutting it a day short because of events in the united states. he's also leaving with some news that he'll now travel to dallas on tuesday and deliver remarks at a memorial service for the police officers who were killed there. this will be by our count the 17th mass shooting that the president has spoke publicly about since he's been in office. that's not even all the mass shootings that have happened in america in that time period. this is a subject we've seen him cry about publicly. that we've heard him say is the most frustrating issue of his presidency. he's spoken about it several times while he's been on this trip abroad. and now we'll hear more from him. today in madrid he was asked about the group black lives
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matter that's been organizing many of these protests. whether the president agrees with their tactics or what they've been saying. the way the president described it is when you look at other divisive issues in the past, whether it was the civil rights movement or the anti-vietnam war demonstrations or women earning the right to vote, he said all of those were contentious. what we're seeing isn't mass rioting in the united states. he says it's different than that. much of this is just a matter of free speech. he did say, though, that's attacking police officers does a disservice to the cause and having a respectful tone is what wins supporters. here's some of his remarks from madrid. >> in a movement like black lives matter, there's always going to be some folks who say things that's are stupid or imprudent or overgeneralized or
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harsh. and i don't think that you can hold well-meaning activists who are doing the right thinged in peacefully protesting responsible for everything that is uttered at a protest site. but i would just say to everybody who is concerned about the issue of police shootings or racial bias in the criminal justice system, that maintaining a truthful and serious and respectful tone is going to help mobile i mobilize american society to bring about real change. and that is our ultimate
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objective. >> several times now we've heard the president mention these events in the united states while he's been traveling abroad. he's made the point that, yes, there are racial divisions in america. there's much more work to be done. but he disputes that those divisions are as deep or as broad as some would characterize them. he focused on the unity in america, that's americans are unified in their outrage toward these incidents that have happened so recently. another thing he kept saying was you can't paint a person with a broad brush. that this shooter in dallas is no more representative of most black people's views in america than the charleston shooter who shot black people in a church would be representative of white people's views or the orlando shooter who targeted gays would be representative of muslims. michelle kosinski, cnn, madrid. a dallas church is praying for healing and looking for solutions in the aftermath of the city's devastating loss.
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kyung lah has the details. ♪ >> reporter: church opened asking for sanctuary from a city's pain. >> we have been wounded as a city. we have been shocked as a city. ♪ >> reporter: the potter's hour, a predominantly african-american church honoring the five fallen dallas police officers. >> we appreciate the sacrifice of the dallas police department. we want the world to know it. >> reporter: foregoing sermon for stories. first from the police. officer steve gentry knew dallas area rapid transit officer brent thompson. >> in the last two years there's been a lot of blame on both sides, and i hate it. it disturbs me.
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it keeps me awake at night. i woke up this morning, and i felt lost. >> every one of those men and women that lose their lives in the line of duty, they are fathers. they are mothers. they are husbands. they are grandpas. you know, we're the same. we're not different. everybody is the same. we have the same feelings as anybody else. i have to come to a funeral and see five of my brothers get buried at one time. >> reporter: this is also a community reeling after two african-american men were gunned down by law enforcement last week. sonja sterling raised alton sterling. he was shot in front of a baton rouge store. >> when i saw the second tape, he suffered. >> reporter: diamond reynolds recorded this after an officer shot and killed philando castile. >> the officers are the ones hurting us. who do we call? so i posted that video so everyone across the world can know that we don't do these
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things to ourselves. these things are done to us. >> who do you call in the middle of the night if you need help? so we can't get rid of cops. and cops can't get rid of the community. >> reporter: church is meant to heal and comfort. in this community, it's also to call for change. dallas' mayor underscored how much needs to be done. >> do we want to change? do we really want to change? okay? that's a personal question. we can't take a vote on that and we all change. every person has to decide that. most people want the other guy to change -- >> right. right. >> i want you to change, but not me. the question is, do we want to change? and if so, we've got to get the right medicine. >> reporter: kyung lah, cnn, dallas. >> if it's too heal there. we'll take a very short break
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here. when we come back, the remnants of a typhoon are slamming southern china adding to the worst flooding the country has seen in almost two decades. and the big day in men's tennis as andy murray claims a mate for his other wimbledon trophy. back in a moment.
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china is struggle with its worst flooding since 1998. many areas are being inundated with rain for weeks and now the remnants of typhoon nepartak are making things worse. there are reports of hundreds of
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thousands of people evacuated in southern china because of this latest flooding. the government says at least 188 people have died or gone missing in heavy flooding across 11 provinces since june 30th. more rain and flooding are expected as the remnants of nepartak combine with the monsoon rains of southeast asia. meteorologist derek van dam joins us with the latest. what is troubling here is there is no end in sight in the short term here. >> that's right. it's more rain on top of an already saturated environment. just when we thought typhoon nepartak had its final say, we say that it's now combining with the monsoonal rains and it's just going to really stick around for a bit and create more heavy rainfall potential from southeast asia through the korean peninsula and into japan. this is the track of the typhoon as it reached taiwan early
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friday morning local time. that produced over 800 millimeters of rainfall in a three-day period. once it reached the fujian province in southeast china, it was much in a much-weakened state but still produced significant rainfall totals. over 120 millimeters in a few locations. that's roughly five inches of rainfall. it is also producing rainfall or has at least into the hong kong region. some of the outer bands of what was typhoon nepartak. they also saw minor street flooding across that area. the remnants of what was a typhoon is combining with the monsoonal rains. that's going to bring heavy rainfall potentials for the eastern portions of china in to the korean peninsula and mainland of japan. this is significant as well. i want to show you the topography across this area in the hunan province.
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we zoom in to that region on google earth. you can see how steep and mountainous the terrain is. the majority of the people that live within the base of this area build their homes right at the river's edge. this is unfortunate because what does water do? as we all know, it seeks its own level. when we get heavy rainfall from monsoon rains or perhaps from a pre-existing typhoon, that rain reaches the mountains, it runs down the mountainsides and collects in these river basins. they build dikes and dams to try to dam up the water but sometimes those can break their barriers and flooding ensues across many of those river basins. we want to get back to my graphics. this is talking more about the east asia rainy season. it's right on target where it should be this time of year. doesn't make it any easier to get through. more rain in this forecast. this is called the plum rains. it's coinciding with the plums
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that start to ripen this time of year in this part of the world. back to you. >> appreciate it, derek. we'll talk again next hour. another emotional victory for andy murray. why he says his second wimbledon title is extra special. securing a ticket to the broadway hit "hamilton" is proving virtually impossible. we'll show you the lengths some fans go to to see the hottest show in the city that never sleeps.
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welcome back. andy murray is celebrating his second wimbledon title. this is his third grand slam title overall. and james blake talked to murray about the significance of his big win. >> congratulations, andy. and want to know if this feels any different than the first win in 2013. >> yeah, i feel very different. last time i didn't really know what was going on and i couldn't process everything. i didn't enjoy it as much as i
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wish i had. i felt so relieved to have done it and i feel a lot calmer, more content, happier than i did and i'll try to enjoy this one for the next few days for sure. >> want to ask you about your mom, someone who shaped you and brought you along. venus has her older brother and you have your older brother, jaime. how much for your mom? >> both of my parents when they were younger made a lot of sacrifices. my mom had the tennis knowledge, so she could actually help us. help wus the technique. but both our parents from a young age would travel with us to tournaments, six, seven hours to play in competition, when
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they really didn't have to do that. they let me and my brother both leave home to spain when i was 15 to play and my brother moved to france and i know being a parent myself how difficult that must be at that age to have allowed us to do that and made financial sacrifices for us as well. i'm very appreciative for everything they've done for us. and it was great that we were both here today to watch. >> i'm sure you're much more appreciative as a father yourself. congrats. >> thank you. >> and james blake joins us live next hour to talk more about that. in new york, on broadway, the musical, "hamilton." has been the hottest ticket in town. not only are tickets hard to come by but prices are sky rocketing for tickets you can come by.
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>> the professional company here in new york. the majority of our clients, especially for hamilton, seem to be out of town clients who have lot of money but not a lot of time. whereas my line sitters have a lot of time but not a lot of money. and the most has been closest to $5 thousand and that's for hamilton of course because it takes three days in the show. >> usualpart of the reason i ha gotten in is because it's difficult. >> you meet everyone else around you and you become your own little family and know about each other. so, it's been a lot of fun. >> the top three things to be a
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successful line sitter, is be nice, don't smoke in the line and bring something to keep you occupied. >> good advice there. dedicated people. and thanks for joining us. i'm rosemary church. i'll be right back with another hour of cnn newsroom right after this break. don't go anywhere. (vo) stank face.
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trying to make their voices matter. u.s. president obama flies home early from europe as protests over police violence continue nation wide. and they lost their leader after only 24 minutes, but portugal still found a way to defeat favorites france. we have the view. andand andy murray tells cn what inspired his wimbledon triumph. i'm rosemary church at cnn world headquarters in atlanta and this is cnn newsroom. ♪
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authorities are calling for calm after hundreds of arrests and protests across the u.s. over the weekend. demonstrators have been rallying against the police shootings of philando castile in minnesota and alton sterling in louisiana. these show tense confrontations between protesters and police. sterling died there last tuesday. here in atlanta, georgia, cnn affiliate reports that several hundred protesters marched downtown. police have arrested three people. the protests have inspired rallies overseas. in london hundreds marched to the u.s. embassy in solidarity. president obama will go to dallas, texas to speak at a memorial for the five officers
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killed in an ambush. he cut short his european trip. he spoke about the shooting while in spain, saying that citizens who attack police are doing a disservice to the cause of criminal justice reform. >> first of all, any violence directed at police officers is a reprehensible crime and needs to be prosecuted. but even rhetorically if we paint police in broad brush, without recognizing that the vast majority of police officers are doing a really good job, and are trying to protect people and do so fairly and without racial bias, if our rhetoric does not recognize that, then we're going to lose allies in the reform
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cause. >> and the president says a truthful and peaceful tone is needed to mobilize real change in america. we'll of course have more on those remarks later this hour. the dallas police chief told cnn's jake tapper how the gunman carried out the ambush and how officers eventually took him down. here with the story. >> reporter: mica johnson improvised his way through th thursday's attack with precision. he drove a truck through downtown streets and quickly found a way to shoot at officers from inside el sent rocollege. the unsuspecting officers on the ground were caught in the cross hairs. >> they were in a funnel and it ended up being a fatal funnel and the suspect continued to
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move and shoot from different angles and back up to the high perch positions at really diagonally, almost triangulating officers with the rapid fire. >> reporter: brown says the killer used a shoot and move tacting, changing locations and shooting from different locations in rapid succession. perhaps what he learned during his time in the army. >> we don't normally see this type of moving and shooting from criminal suspects. we're convinced that the military style was a plan and that he had practiced this. >> reporter: in a revealing interview with cnn's jake tapper, chief brown also provided chilling details as dallas officers cornered the killer in a second row building of the college. officers were exchanging gun fire with him. >> at the scene he was killed,
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he wrote lettering in blood on the walls. which leads us to believe he was wounded on the way up the stair well on the second floor of the el centro building where we detonated the device to end the stand off. there was more lettering written in his own blood. >> what did he write? >> we are trying to desiefer that. but he wrote the letters, rb. >> rb? >> "rb." yes. so, we're trying to figure out through looking at things in his home what those initials mean. but we haven't determined that yet. >> at this point, he's engaged in a two-hour stand off. chief brown says the negotiat n negotiations were going nowhere and he told police he would only speak with a black negotiator and remained in control yet delusional at the same time.
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>> and he basically lying to us, playing games, laughing at us, singing, asking how many did he get and that he wanted to kill more and there were bombs there. so, there was no progress on the negotiation. and i began to feel that it was only at a split second he would charge us and take out many more before we would kill him. >> reporter: that's when chief brown says he asked the dallas police s.w.a.t. team to come up with a creative and safe way to end the stand off. >> we saw no other option but to use our bomb robot and place a device on its extension for it to detonate where the suspect was. >> reporter: brown says the killer was hidden behind a corner. snipers could not get a clear shot. the decision to use a robot
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armed with c-4 explosives has been criticized. >> you have to trust your people to make the calls necessary to save their lives. it's their lives at stake, not these critics lives who are in the comfort of their homes or offices. that's not worth my time to debate at this point. we believe we saved lives by making this decision and again, i appreciate critics but they're not on the ground and their lives are not being put at risk by debating what tactics to take. >> reporter: this week chief david brown will prepare to attend the funerals of the five police officers. the tur moil he sues brewing is something he desperately wants to see end. >> the law enforcement community is hurting. we're all grieving, not just here in dallas but all over the
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country and words matter and we need to hear that you appreciate what we do for this country. >> ed, cnn, dallas. >> and it was a powerful interview. we will return to this story later this hour. but let's look at the top sporting story. now in portugal, they have won the european championship for the first time ever. the final against france went to the second period of over time and it delivered a dagger. he scored the only goal in the 109th in aminute but it was all teammates needed to claim the silv silverware. hello to you both. alex, let's start with you. it's just after 9:00 in the morning in paris. the morning after, of course. a disappointing loss for host france. how are people there dealing
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with defeat and talk to us about all the highlights of this historic game. >> i think the french economy are doing slightly better than they thought. they're heading off to work like any other normal monday morning. a nice bright sunny summer day. perhaps i can reflect that best by showing you the front pages of some of the national newspapers here. the sporting newspaper says a french word quite hard to translate but basically misery, desilation, calamity. and history wasn't able to repeat itself on home soil and the world cup in 1998, when half a million came to celebrate. there weren't that many last night, even though there's a big portuguese community here. and the man supposedly who was
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supposed to win the match for france, holding his head in his hands and they have at least shown a picture of portugal, the winners, instead of france, the losers. it just wasn't our day is their headline. and that is the feeling that maybe -- well, before hand people thought destiny was in france's hands. and in the end, it didn't turn out like that and portugal absolutely took the honors. >> they certainly did, didn't they. just after 8:00 in the morning after a night of great celebration. what a contrast to what's happening in paris. what is being said about this historic win for portugal. and how have the fans been celebrating? >> i think they're celebrating to the very wee hours in the morning. until 3:00, we could still see
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them celebrating. i want to show you what the papers here are saying. portugal 's day. and they have a picture who scored in the 109th minute. and many are saying the unlikely hero because many people did not expect him to score and some, even when he was called up in the national team, some had reservations as to whether he should make the team but he's the one they're all praising today, as well as the goal keeper, of course. and the biggest sporting newspaper in portugal, pride of portugal. we have heard from the president of portugal who was standing here where he resides. he was obviously in paris with the team. we're expecting to be arriving around 11:00 in the morning. they'll be greeted by the president and then they'll be showing the trophy to the whole of lisbon and portugal who have
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been waiting for more than 40 years before they won against france. but this is a historical moment for many people. and the president congratulated the national team for their fight, for not giving up and for their stamina in the face of so many obstacles and i think he was referring to ronaldo who was leaving in the stretcher in the first 25 minutes. it was ronaldo who inspired a team. once they saw he was so beaten down by it and visibly so upset, really gave the team more strength and stamina to try and beat france, rosy. >> they proved they didn't need ronaldo, not on the field at least. but he certainly forged great leadership and guidance from the sidelines and we all saw that.
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joining us there from lisbon and alex thomas in paris. many thanks to you both. well, last hour we showed you how an elephant in thailand out smarted the football and predicted portugal to win. but the elephant wasn't the only animal seer. it appears the animals knew something the rest of us did not. in men's tennis, andy murray is celebrating a victory. plus japan's prime minister claim as big win. how the latest parliamentary elections could lead to a constitutional change. and the u.n. peace keeper has been killed in south sudan. more on the renewed fighting coming up. "why are you checking your credit score?"
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a spokeswoman for the un mission in south sudan says gun fire and fighting has resumed in the capital after a overnight
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lull. there have been deadly clashes there since thursday. a chinese u.n. peace keeper has been killed in t. and 1,000 internally displaced people have fled protection in the country due to violence near their camps. and for more, david mckenzie from johannesburg, south africa. a government minister suggesting the fighting has calmed down. what are you hearing? >> reporter: what we're hearing is that there's another rezmption in the fighting. small arms fire, heavy artillery. and one near the airport and another near the u.n. house compound, also where there are
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several year iareas of internal displaced people. the fire has been going on heavily sunday and late last week, thursday and friday. it's extremely murky situation but definitely seems like there's fighting between those loyal to the president and those loyal to his rival. there's disturbing ethnic undertone to this conflict. there was outbreak of a very brutal civil war between those loyal to kerr and that seemed to have come to very tentative peace agreement earlier this year. however, with heavily armed military personnel from both sides squeezed into the same capital city, it almost seemed inevitable that there would be some kind of blow out. the situation, very serious indeed.
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at least 1,000 civilians trying to get shelter inside those u.n. compounds and a large contingent of embassy officials, as well as those u.n. forces. one chinese u.n. peace keeper killed and several rowanden peace keepers killed over the weekend. a very serious situation indeed and unfolding as we speak. >> and we keep seeing this reoc. >> reporter: the security counsel saying they must immediately stop the fighting. there's a great deal of worry from international players in south sudan. it has been racked by instability and fighting since it became independent exactly
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five years ago. there was a lull on saturday during that fifth year independence day. but very heavy fighting. the state department in the u.s. says there was a sudden detearieration. the fighting is ongoing right in the center of the city center. the kennian government also, there are many kennian nationals there fearing for their lives. they have asked for an immediate end to the fighting, as has the south african government that was heavily involved in the negotiations for independence those years ago. however, several people saying there seems to be a lack of command and control on the ground there. even if the leaders are calling for calm, it's unclear if the rank and file troops will heed that call and it does appear
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there were concerted attacks according to several sources sunday. meaning it could be reentry into a civil war. the airport is closed. kenya airways and others suspended fights due to the security situation. and it's in that area that there's a large u.n. logistics base and that's where civilians are hunkering down and hoping the fighting stops. but for now, it appears its raging on. >> it is 9:22 in the morning in johannesburg in south africa. watching very closely those developments in south sudan. well, the uncertain following australia's eleksz ct has come to an end. turnbull declared victory after
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the labor party conceded defeat. tom kaunl taconal talked to us about the results. >> reporter: there's no indication it's go being friendly. and there's a slim majority he's going to end up with 77 seats out of 150. so, every vote will count and in the senate, the upper house has several more parties that are going to be difficult to deal with. so, it's not going to be easy. a real test of his leadership. he will at least know he's had he'll be the progressive leader many thought he would be. no one would say he's entirely safe the next two years, one is a slim majority and also fallout from the last change in leaders. that was in september when tony abbott was ousted by turnbull. there are some in the
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conservative party wing that wouldn't mind seeing the back of turnbull. certainly there were anomilous reasons. kevin was seen as someone not suited for prime minister. julia had a minority government to work with. that was never going to end well. and nonetheless, there has been that revolving door. so, there will be plenty of people predicting michael turnbull may struggle to see his full term as well. japan's prime minister has claimed victory in the country's parliamentary election. shinzo abe's coalition regains a 2/3 majority. for more, we are joined by andrew stevens live from hong
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kong. japanese prime minister shinzo abe, appears to have won big. what could this mean in terms of participation in future world conflicts. >> it's a very significant vote and victory. basically it allows the ruling parties, shinzo abe's party to start drafting changes to the constitution. shinzo abe has made no secret of the fact that he doesn't believe japan should be bound by a pasfst approach. he thinks they should be more active in international affairs. at this time it says japan denounces war. he wants that gone. he wants japan to have a much more -- aggressive's not the right word but a much bigger presence, if need on the world stage. this 2/3 majority allows the party to start looking at the constitution.
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although, it is going to take a long time. all he said in his victory speech is he wants to deepen the conversation about changing the constitution and even if they do come up with a plan that gets rid of this article 9, the article that renounces war, they have to take that to people first. there has to be a referendum on it and it's a very divided japan. only a couple of months since president obama was in hiroshima commemorating the atomic attack on hiroshima. many, many japanese do not want to see this constitution changed. >> will be interesting to see how long that process takes and what might prime minister abe's win mean in terms of economic policy. that also an area of concern for many people in japan. >> reporter: this might be more concrete.
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what was aimed by the ruling party at abe-nomics. it's aimed at lifting the economy out of that very weak growth. it's not measured in tufrm terms of years. he launched this policy in 2012. most economists will tell you it has achieved something but not nearly as much as the ruling party wanted it to achieve. inflation is still weak, there's still a real fear that prices will go down which will stop people from spending. he said this mandate gives him the leeway to make more drastic policy moves to get the japanese economy moving. there's been a lot of talk that we could see $250 billion stimulus package fairly quickly if this went in favor of shinzo
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abe. so, his pact with the japanese people is i'm the man who can get the economy moving. i haven't got it moving nearly as strong as i should have done. give me another chance and i will get things moving. >> all right. our andrew stevens in hong kong. it is nearly 3:30 in the afternoon there. many thanks to you for keeping us up to date on the situation in japan. the u.s. president condemned attacks against police after the deadly attacks. and what she wants people to know about the son she lost.
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a warm welcome back to our viewers in the united states and all around the world. i'm rosemary church. time to update you on the main stories we've been following this hour. the mission in south sudan says gun fire has resumed in the nation's capital after an overnight lull. a chinese peace keeper was killed and other peace keepers were injured. there's word of seven new arrests in connection to the istanbul airport attack. turkey's state-run news agency says the suspects are charged with belonging to an armed terrorist group and assisting in homicide. three suicide bombers killed 44
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people and killed more than 200 last month. the final against france was scoreless until the second period of extra time. substitu substitute scored the only goal. well, the in u.s. at least 300 people have been arrested nation wide during protests against police shootings of two black men, alton sterling and philando castile. on sunday, police in baton rouge louisiana detained people in rallies for sterling. he was killed last week. and one of five dallas police and transit officers killed by a sniper thursday night. now his mother and sister are speaking publicly about their loss. here with their story. >> i screamed.
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i said no. no, not my baby. not my patrick. they told me yes, that it was him but it can't be. >> reporter: he was her middle child, her caring and protective son. the boy who always knew what he wanted to be when he grew up. did he always want to be a police officer? >> yes, he did. ever since he was a little boy that was his biggest dream was to become a police officer. >> reporter: her son was one of the five dallas police officers shot and killed thursday boy a sni sniper during the march. and patrick, as he was known by fellow officers would have turned 33 on august 15. he was also a very good dad.
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>> that was had light of his life. >> reporter: he joined the dallas police department seven years ago. he joined the u.s. navy at the age of 17, as soon as he finished high school. he would go on to serve three tours of duty in the persian gulf. he served one tour with his sister laura, who was also in the u.s. navy. >> he served three tours in the middle east, comes back home and this happens. >> my brother loved his country and his community. i guess this is his way of showing -- i just can't wrap my mind around it. it's just so unreal. >> reporter: what do you feel against the men who shot your son? >> his family is also going through a loss and i will deal with that later. right now i have no emotions or
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feelings towards him or the family. because they're also suffering a loss. >> reporter: a loss made especially difficult by the fact that he's not only leaving a daughter behind but his long-time girlfriend, his daughter's mother, crhristy who he was to marry. >> unbearably heart breaking story there. and u.s. president obama cut his trip short. he spoke about the black lives matter movement while he was in spain. white house correspondent has more on his remarks. >> reporter: president obama has now ended his trip abroad, cutting it a day short because of events in the united states and he's also leaving with news that he will now travel to dallas on tuesday and deliver remarks at a memorial service for the police officers that were killed there. this will be by our count the
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17th mass shooting the president has spoken and that's not all the mass shootings that have happened in this time period. this is a subject we've seen him cry about, we've heard him say the most frustrating issue of his presidency. he's spoken about it several times on this trip abroad. and he was asked a tough question about the group, black lives matter, that's been organizing many of these protests. whether the president agrees with their tactics and what they've been saying. he said when you look at other divisive issues in the past, whether it was a anti-vietnam war demonstrations or women earning the right to vote. he said all of those were contentious. we're not seeing mass rioting. he says it's different than that and much of this is a matter of free speech. he did say attacking police officers does a disservice to
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the cause and having a respectful tone is what wins supporters. >> in a movement like "black lives matter" there's always going to be some folks that say things that there stupid or imprudent or over generalized or harsh. and i don't think that you can hold well meaning activists who are doing the right thing and peacefully protesting responsible for everything that is uttered at a protest site. but i would just say everybody who's concerned about the issue of police shootings or racial bias in the criminal justice syst system, that maintaining a tr h
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truthful and serious and respectful tone is going to help mobilize american society to bring about real change and that is our ultimate objective. >> there's several times we've heard the president mention these events in the united states while he's traveling abroad. he's made the point that yes, there's racial divisions in america, there's much more work to be done but he disputes they're as deep or broad as some would characterize them. he focussed on the unity in america that americans are un y unified in their out rage towards these incidents. and you can't paint a person with a broad brush. that this shooter in dallas is no more representative of most
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black people's views in america than the charleston shooter who shot black people in a church would be representative of white people's views or the orlando shooter who targeted gays would be representative of muslims. cnn, madrid. i'm going to take a short break here. but still to come, the rush is on to stop raging wild fires in colorado. plus, a big day in men's tennis as andy murray claims another emotional win at wimbledon. back in a moment. . meet maximum strength mylanta®. like owen, it works fast. unlike him, it makes heartburn go away. strong and soothing. new mylanta®. faster than heartburn. "are you okay?" "yeah, i just got charged for my credit monitoring.
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a fast moving wild fire has charred more than 243 hectors or 600 acres in the u.s. state of colorado. according to reports, two men failed to put out a camp fire
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properly, igniting the blaze sunday. they have been arrested and are facing arson charges. 2,000 people have been forced to evacuate their homes because of the flames. another wild fire in the state has consumed more than 5,000 acres. that's more than 2,000 hectors. and several other dangerous wild fires are burning across the western united states. and here now to talk more about that. it is so annoying, it makes people so angry when they hear about people who haven't put out their camp fires. >> an interesting statistic is that 90% of wild fires in the united states are actually caused by humans. >> unbelievable. >> of course there's natural causes like lightning. but take a look at this. not only in colorado, but in southern california. of course, we've been talking about the drought conditions for the last five years and now we
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have this fire in los angeles county. this is the sage fire. there were evacuations around this region early saturday morning. residents have been allowed to return back to their homes. you can see some firefighters trying to put out that fire. there was a dc-10 using fire retardant to help douse the flames. and 200 vehicles actually combatting this blaze. this is the latest. 1,100 acres burned. 49% containment, which is an improvement from seven hours ago when they only had 20% contained. and of course, los angeles, moving up the california coast and inland towards the valley, that's where we have our exceptional to extreme drought conditions that are continuing. and it's not only the southwestern united states, it's the southeastern united states and take it for me, my garden
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isn't growing too nicely. this is our main concern for the potential of wild fire today. we're looking across wyoming and down towards new mexico. now, it isn't the peek season for tornados in the united states. that comes april to may. but we have our own chance of tornados today on average. we see 123 tornados across the contingent united states. and this is interesting. i said upper level energy. think about the jet stream that helps drive storm systems across the united states and look at the thunderstorms that there firing up. all things to that jet stream. the upper level disturbance is going to bring us severe weather today. minneapolis, st. paul. here's the storms firing up. but what i want you to see at home, something rare in the middle of july, middle of summer
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in the northern hemisphere. that's the northern rockies expecting snowfall. what is that? they may be waking up early tuesday morning with a little bit of white stuff. >> that is ridiculous. >> when temperatures are almost 90 degrees to the east of there, it is quite incredible. >> always a plesher to chat with you. well, andy murray is celebrating his latest major victory. we catch up with the champ at wimbledon and ask how it compared to his historic title.
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welcome back everyone. andy murray is celebrating his second wimbledon title. this is murray's third grand slam title overall. his first wimbledon victory was in 2013. cnn tennis analyst talked to murray about the significance of his big win. >> reporter: congratulations, andy and want to know if this
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feels any different than the first win in 2013? >> yeah, i feel very different p. last time i didn't really know what was going on, didn't really process it. i was just so relieved to have done it and this time i feel a lot calmer, more content and happier than i did. and i'll try to enjoy this one for the next few days for sure. >> want to ask you about your mom, someone who shaped you and brought you along. you veserena has her older sist and you have your older brother. >> i think our parents when we were younger made a lot of sacrifice as far as my mom had the tennis knowledge. so, when she took us to play me and my brother, she could actually help us with the
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technique and stuff. but both my parents from a young age would travel with us to tournaments at weekends. drive 6/7 hours to play in competitions. i'm sure sometimes they probably felt like doing something different with their weekends. and they let me and my brother both leave home. i moved to spain at 15 and my brother moved to france. and i know as a parent how difficult that must have been at that age to allow us to do that and made financial sacrifices as well. so, i'm very appreciative for everything they've done for us. and it's great they're both here today to watch. >> reporter: i'm sure you're much more appreciative as a father yourself. congrats. >> thank you. >> so, andy murray was pushed hard but he kaungs conquered ind
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to win his wimbledon crown. how much did it help that he didn't have to face djokovic? >> i don't know if it reduced the pressure but definitely reduced the difficuea difficult. every time faced federer or djokovic who may go down as two of the greatest and to face a mere mortal helped him and gave him a huge opportunity and he stood up and took that. >> let's break down murray's straight sets victory. he really couldn't have played better, could he? >> reporter: no, it was a masterful performance. extremely precise. he did such a good job of returning meilos raonic.
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and i think that's partly experience and how well andy played. >> so, what's next for andy murray? does this perhaps represent a nigh era for him? a turning point of sorts? >> well, i think we're in a stage now where it's not too old to play tennis. so i think he still feels in the prime of his career. but he's right up there getting much closer to novak. he's still the clear number one in the world but andy murray has the confidence to beat him. he beat him in rome. he's been in three grand slam finals in a row. so, there's no question he's number two. and now it's whether or not ease -- he's ready to unseat djokovic.
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>> do you think the struggles behind him? >> reporter: he had a back issue where he had surgery a few years ago and he's much more comfortable physically on the court. he's taken to his success. all three grand slams have come under intutelage of randal. >> and joining us from london just before 9:00 in the morning. many thanks to you. and thanks for joining us. i'm rosemary church. remember to connect with us anytime on twitter. "early start" is coming up for our viewers in the united states and everyone else, stay tuned for more news with max foster in london. you have a great day.
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protests rage across the country. hundreds arrested demonstrating against deadly police shootings. this as we learn about the gunman who killed five police officers in dallas. what else he may have been planning. good morning. welcome to "early start." i'm kosialison kosik. >> i'm john berman. details. the gunman acted alone and he had been practicing for this attack for months. police chief david b

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