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tv   New Day  CNN  July 14, 2016 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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who won't is starting to emerge. it is looking like anything but your average convention. we have it covered with phil mattingly in cleveland. now details, according to "the new york times" and >> well, we know the speaker list as it currently stands, which was promised a week ago yesterday, as you noted, is available in draft form. this hasn't officially been released by the trump campaign yet. "the new york times" got ahold of a draft last night. i've talked to a trump adviser who confirmed the basic contents of it. it is going to be anything but your average campaign, not your traditional set of republican speakers, not even your traditional set of republican rising stars. that's exactly what trump promised. one thing he's promised that he hasn't delivered on yet, who his vice presidential candidate will be. that is still up in the air and sources say it might even still be up in the air in trump's mind. >> my hunch is he's flying to
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california thinking about, you know, gingrich, pence. >> reporter: former house speaker newt gingrich predicting trump's choice for vice president is between him and indiana governor mike pence. >> do you really want a two-pirate ticket or a solid guy? >> reporter: trump himself says he's whittled down the field. >> i'm at three, potentially four. in my own mind, i'm probably thinking about two. >> reporter: sources tell cnn that new jersey governor chris christie remains a finalist with trump looking for a fighter, even though he's now hinting at quite the opposite. >> i'm not looking for an attack dog. frankly, i'm looking for somebody that really understands what we're talking about because i'd rather have the whole thing be on policy. >> reporter: trump's search for a vp entering a frenzied phase in the final round, and it's playing out like a reality show in indiana. first meeting privately with pence and the trump children at the governor's mansion. >> nothing was offered, nothing was accepted.
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>> reporter: then with gingrich, who flew out on a private plane owned by fox news host sean hannity to meet with trump. trump also speaking on the phone with his former rival, christie, about the vp role. they are known to talk daily. >> can you tell us where you think you stand? >> i can't, but it's good to see you. >> reporter: a source familiar with the process telling cnn trump's influential older children are worried their father will make a decision they don't like. >> this as hillary clinton intensifies her attacks against the new york billionaire, all ahead of his big announcement. >> his campaign is as divisive as any we have seen in our lifetime. >> reporter: deriding the gop for turning to trump. >> this man is the nominee of the party of lincoln. we are watching it become the party of trump. and that's not just a huge loss for our democracy.
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it is a threat to it. >> reporter: the clock is also ticking on who will speak at next week's republican convention. the trump campaign is yet to publicly release a list of speakers, but we already know the party's past nominees and living former presidents will not be there. guy, obviously 2012 nominee mitt romney, not going to be there. george w. bush, not going to be there. george h.w. bush, not going to be there. we have seen in this draft list, which was confirmed by advisers to trump that there will be a number of celebrities both sports and of film. you're thinking tim tebow, a number of different people. trump promised a show biz, very different convention. he appears that he's on his way to delivering that. aides advise this is all subject to change, but we do know it's going to be an interesting spectacle. one of the interesting elements, mike pence is listed to speak, which might tip the hand a
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little bit on who that vp pick will be. guys, very up in the air right now as we all kind of await with baited breath what's going to happen tomorrow in new york. pop tpy and chris? >> it's kind of a curveball. pence is scheduled to speak. does that mean he's the guy and they're giving him a slot? or he's not the guy? who knows. so it's gingrich who's going to speak. he's the one with the slot. we'll see. the same analysis. different name. so let's discuss. we have washington bureau chief for "the daily beast," jackie kucinich. we have errol louis. do you feel had a little bit by this process of who trump's vp is going to be? sam clovis was on the show with us yesterday, as he often is. he basically conceded that, yeah, we got you going. >> he threw it out there. >> we extended this whole news cycle. why not? why get it done simply when we can just talk about this, which is all good for us. >> sure, it's all good for them.
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frankly, i don't feel had, but i partly suspect that there's going to be some fifth candidate that nobody has mentioned who's going to be pulled out of a hat at the end of the process. that's not only possible, but i think it would actually sort of be to the advantage of the candidate. one thing about airing a lot of these names is we got a lot of commentary over the last few days. in addition to building up the suspense, you get a lot of analysis. people have really poked some holes in these candidates, as well as pointed out some of their strengths. chris christie, for example, we've covered so much about bridgegate that people start to write him off. you start to look at his record really closely, even before he was a governor, he actually is a very plausible choice. >> do you think it's him? >> i think he's the dark horse candidate that probably needs a little more attention, yeah. >> jackie, to you, you've said you think that he will choose, trump will choose whomever his children like best. the issue is if errol, that smile i just saw, that says he
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thinks it might be christie. if it is, he's got a problem with his kids on that one. >> he does. you're absolutely right. that's why you heard phil say there's a concern among the children that he's going to pick someone that they don't like. but he does listen to them. i still think it might be mike pence. he has the broadest resume. he gives trump things that trump has said that he needs. that foothold in congress, someone who's an executive, someone who appeals to the conservative base. the interesting thing is both of the governors that are in the mix are deeply unpopular in their own states, which go into the negative column for them. basically, i think we're all just stuck in this who wants to run with a billionaire reality show until trump decides to make up his mind. >> although, to redeem a little bit of our credibility, one of the reasons that this demands more attention is because trump has been discussed in terms of what he isn't so often. what his liabilities are and what the concerns are with him,
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the incompleteness of him. so who he partners with may arguably be more important than a hillary clinton. fair analysis? >> absolutely. talking to delegates here in cleveland over the last couple days, there's a lot of the anxiety about this pick. a lot of people really want someone like mike pence who is a strong conservative and who would be a good balance, a very calm balance to trump. if you think about newt gingrich, who as jackie mentioned, you know, the kids obviously have a very close relationship now, those two would just reinforce each other's worst instincts potentially on the campaign trail. there's a lot of people in the republican party that are worried about that, hoping that trump will start to act more presidential, but i think both, because of the kids' influence, both pence and gingrich are still very much in the running. from we've heard from trump advisers is trump feels very tortured over this decision, still thinking about christie very much in the mix. we'll see. >> so why, errol, was gingrich
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in that fox news interview last night issuing such effusive praise of mike pence? he could not have been nicer to the guy that he thinks is the only other one in contention. >> you mean when gingrich was talking about gingrich and pence, not himself in the third person? >> you know what he said about pence. he said pence would bring to trump what george h.w. bush brought to reagan. >> he also mentioned that pence was fourth in the house leadership as opposed to gingrich, who was first. the two of them frankly, even visually, present the same way. gingrich, i think, sees himself as a better legislator than pence so that he's got ideas and a record and pence has ideas and a record, but he just thinks his are superior. that's a natural way to try and puff himself up. on the other hand, there's a lot of baggage there. he's a known quantity, but he takes us right back into the clinton wars. he didn't come out of it unscathed. in fact, lost the house leadership as a result of it.
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so i'm not so sure that that would be the smart political play. >> not just that, but there's this very long history of gingrich's time in the private sector, and there apparently have been a lot of vetting things for the campaign to go through. gingrich could be a potentially dangerous choice if you think about relitigating all of that history in addition to everything that errol just said. >> they've handled it pretty well with trump. he has so many years of intrigue, to put it politely. >> but his books are never hope. >> by the way, we do keep asking the campaign for the tax returns. they keep saying the audit is going on. a lot of people ask us that question. the only thing i can say is i don't know who it's going to be. i do think he knows who it's going to be. i think chris christie, this idea that the kids want him boxed out completely, is just
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not true. if they didn't want him around, he wouldn't be around that much. but the conventions, what are we expecting? this one is expected to be -- they have to achieve different purposes, we keep being told. how so? >> well, this is about -- i mean, everyone knows who donald trump is, but this is about introducing donald trump as someone who could actually lead the nation. that's been sort of an open question in terms of -- he's been sort of all over the place. so -- and we're also seeing a piece of this is delegitimizing hillary clinton. that's why you see the benghazi focus on the first night. this really is going to be a show. it's one of the things trump's advisers are saying that they're taking their time to roll out the list to build the suspense, which is great spin. it's probably somewhere in the middle in terms of organization versus the greatest show on earth. this is certainly the least predictable convention that i've
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covered. usually the speeches are vetted three weeks ago, and we already know the list. >> so as the focus is on donald trump and the republican convention, hillary clinton's camp really wanting to make a splash today with an ad that they are releasing. we're going to play you the ad in full and then let's discuss it. ♪ >> i love the old days. you know what they used to do to guys like that when they were at a place like this? they'd be carried out on a stretcher, folks. and you can tell them to go [ bleep ] themselves. i could stand in the middle of fifth avenue and shoot somebody, and i wouldn't lose any voters, okay. it's like incredible. when mexico sends its people, they're bringing drugs, they're bringing crime, they're rapists. you could see there was blood coming out of her eyes, blood coming out of her, wherever. i don't know what i said, ah, i don't remember. he's going like, i don't
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remember. >> our children and grandchildren will look back at this time at the choices we are about to make, the goals we will strive for, the principles we will live by, and we need to make sure that they can be proud of us. [ cheers and applause ] i'm hillary clinton, and i approved this message. >> just released today. errol, i thought of 2008 and the 3:00 a.m. phone call ad from the clinton camp as sort of who's better prepared. what do you make of this? >> it's in the same vein. in some ways, it strikes me as overkill. we're all parents. parents don't need to be reminded that the kids are important and what they hear and what they see and what they're thinking about is also important. so it strikes me just on first impression as sort of overkill. frankly, there are clips that i think would have been a little more jarring to make the point that they were making. then also it is striking and somewhat risky to sort of take
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your opponent and put them in the ad in that way. that's just normally not something you would do. >> interesting. no mention of muslims as one of the points of potential -- >> much more incendiary stuff out there. >> and also, you got to remember, kids aren't voting. adults are voting. there are a lot of things about clinton that peeve a lot of people on the same level of, is this a good example. we have to see how it plays. so we've been talking about the conventions. our thanks to errol, jackie k and meave. we will be there for you live all week in cleveland starting 5:00 a.m., yes an hour early. that's how excited we are. monday morning for the republican national convention. be sure to join the best political team in the business for cnn's primetime coverage beginning at 4:00 p.m. eastern every day. thousands of mourners attending the first funerals for the dallas police officers killed in that sniper attack one week ago today. the victims remembered as loving
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fathers, selfless protectors of their communities. this comes as president obama sat down at the white house yesterday with law enforcement officers and black lives matter activists, looking for a way to try to come together. our sara sidner this morning is live in dallas with more. sara, we spoke yesterday ahead of the funerals, the anticipation, what was it like? >> reporter: well, let's talk about the fact that the family of michael smith actually ended up mourning privately. they wanted to have their time to say good-bye on a private level. but then you had hundreds of people coming out for two other police officers who lost their lives back on thursday. police officer lorne aherns' family saw the support from the community, as did dallas area rapid transit officer brent thompson. we heard a moving speech from his wife, knowing that his wife is also a fellow officer. the two were married less than a
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month ago. >> though i'm heartbroken and hurt, i'm going to put on my badge and my uniform and return to the street, along with all of my brothers and sisters in blue. to the coward that tried to break me and my brothers and sisters, know your hate made us stronger. >> reporter: now, after taking a part in a moving memorial that honored all five of the officers, president obama returning home. he then had a four-hour meeting with officers and members of black lives matter and other activist groups, trying to figure out how to bridge the gap between race and policing. chris? >> the question has become so painfully obvious. the solution still seemingly in rare supply. there are more meetings, there's talking, there's dialogue. what's next? thank you very much for the reporting. we'll check back in a little
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bit. there is no question race relations in the u.s. seem to be sinking to their lowest level in decades. the raw anger and emotion out there was revealed last night in a riveting town hall. can we heal this divided nation? we learned some things last night. we'll tell them to you next. brace yourself... the first ever gsf is here. with a 467 horse power v8 engine... torque vectoring differential... and brembo brakes. it's the next expression of f performance, from lexus.
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race relations in this country right now at the lowest level since 1992. that this morning from a new "new york times"/cbs poll. consider this. the last time that americans thought that race relations were this bad, people were rioting in the streets of los angeles after a jury acquitted officers in the beating of rodney king. so with tensions so high across this country, cnn hosted a very powerful town hall last night on the racial divide and on how to come together. the emotions of the last week run deep and very raw. watch. >> he'd want peace. he'd want good to come out of all of this. >> two families impacted by last week's violence coming together,
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stressing the need for unity. >> this has to stop. taking another person's life, it won't make the other person's life come back. >> violence is never going to be the answer to nothing. i think we all come together to say that we want peace. we want peace for both families. >> activists and law enforcement all joining a candid conversation about whether policing in america is inherently biased against blacks. >> i have spoken to police officers who have told me that they believe that black people are genetically predisposed to be criminals, and it is their obligation to control these people by whatever means are necessary. >> the history of african-americans in this country started with slavery. then it moved to segregation. who was it who was enforcing those racist policies? it was the white police officer. so that narrative exists in the community based on the history, and it's factual.
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>> questions over how to comply with police dominating the cnn town hall, many fearful and distrusting. >> instructing our young people day in and day out that there's something in their behavior that brings on the abuse is tantamount to telling women that there's something we do that caused street harassment and rape. we have to change that. >> we should not have a racial divide in this country anymore, but we do. so i say to him, you do put your hands on the wheel. you do be careful. maybe you do still have to be extra careful because you're black. >> can we just take a moment as america and register how profound and immoral it is to say, this is the only thing that will keep you safe, is that if you pack this tool box and you take it with you everywhere you go and this is not the way that everybody has to behave. it is only the way that you have to behave.
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and it is no the your fault, and you have not done anything wrong. but it is because you are who you are and they do not see you as the person that i love, but they see you as a person they should fear. >> a heart wrenching moment as one mother shares her fear for her son. >> every moment he's not with me, i fear for his life. i keep hearing, you tell me to tell my son what to do. my 14-year-old is sitting right there, so you tell him he needs to be more respectful. you tell him he needs to be more compliant to your rules and your laws. because i've told him, and obviously it doesn't matter because you're telling me i'm not telling him enough. >> then this officer comforts her. >> i'm sorry that we have not fulfilled our civil duty and our responsibility to you and this community and your children, and i'm sorry. i just want to take a moment and say to you, i'm sorry.
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>> a lot of emotion last night. also a lot of ideas on the table. there's going to be a lot of controversy coming out of it. let's discuss some of this. we have cnn political commentator marc lamont hill. and joe jack, a former law enforcement officer and professor. we're trying to make progress with these conversations. we know what the problem is. what are the solutions? how, how, how. we saw a little taste of how actually at the espys last night. a little odd for people to hear that. this is cultural. sports, entertainment, big part of our culture. look what happened last night. >> the events of the past week have put a spotlight on the injustice, distrust, and anger that plague so many of us. the system is broken. the problems are not new. the violence is not new. and the racial divide definitely
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is not new. >> as athletes, it's on us to challenge each other to do even more than what we already do in our own communities. and the conversation cannot, it cannot stop as our schedules get busy again. >> let's use this moment as a call to action for all professional athletes to educate ourselves, explore these issues, speak up, use our influence, and renounce all violence. >> now, some will say, joe, this is sports. there's no place for this. this is a distraction. i've never believed that. some of the greatest minority athletes were guys bigger than just their sport. you think this is helpful? >> absolutely helpful. you have people that everyone looks up to. it breaks racial divides too. blacks, whites, asians. you look up to these guys. we watch them. we have to understand that they come from a position where they
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can reach masses unlike a lot of other people in the community. >> and very often they come out of socioeconomic situations where a lot of these problems and issues that we're talking about play out, right, marc? >> absolutely. that's why they have such credibility with their audience. that's why they can feel this on a visceral level. when they see trayvon martin or sandra bland, they say, this could have been me, this could have been my mother, this could have been my own experience, this could be my children. so it makes it more compelling to them. i applaud them for taking the time to do this. >> so last night i thought was very helpful because it allowed for a lot of the emotion and venting about the fear, danger, and frustration you see in the african-american community. there were points of pushback that didn't come up as much, and that's okay. everything is a step. here's what i keep hearing. let's try and unpack these. one, this does not happen as often as you and the media want to make it sound like. we're talking about a small fraction of under 3% of all interactions that police have. tens and tens of thousands of
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actions depending on how you want to calculate it. only this little itty bitty slice winds up being even claims of excessive force. is that a legitimate point of pushback? >> it's worth analysis. it's similar to sexual violence. most don't get reported. second thing s 3% is still a very, very, very large number. if you think of 3 out of every 100 interactions with police, that's a big deal. the other thing is black people are disproportionately policed. even at 3% is a lot in black neighborhoods. so all this stuff matters. >> agree, disagree? >> no, i agree. there were some things brought up last night, things have to be addressed. the stop and frisk issue. when you overuse it as a tool and you're using it in communities that are black, white, hispanic, whatever, and you're using it as a numbers game, you're going to end up getting people disproportionately stopped that shouldn't have been stopped in the first place.
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>> i'll tell you one thing the situation in minnesota did pick out. revenue generating through stops is something that exists without regard to color in a lot of communities. cops often make money from municipalities over stopping people. this guy was stopped dozens of times, paid thousands of dollars in fines on petty stuff. that's an example. forget about the use of force. >> it's immoral. >> and that's something that can affect you as much as it can affect me. people will get you with the cell phones and everything else. there are a lot of issues that deal with the system that don't have to do with race. second point of pushback, the reason there are more interactions is because the black population is accountable for much of the crime, much more than the white population. is that true, and does that help explain why there's so much interaction? >> that's a great question. let's look at drugs, for example. a lot of people point to violent crime first. if people are getting locked up for drugs, cocaine use among
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white people and black people is essentially the same. type of cocaine is different, but cocaine use is the same among black populations and white populations. black people get arrested for it more. we get longer sentences for it more, historically and currently. the question becomes, are black people really bad and not getting caught, or is it something structural that allows them to get caught up in this web more easily? >> so the statistics are like -- whether it's new york city or any other big city, they'll say close to 80% of all the violent crime comes out of that african-american community. that's why the cops are dealing with them most, accept that reality. >> yes there, is a higher amount of violent crime in certain areas. i think there are a range of factors we can attribute to that. there is a piece of responsibility there. we shouldn't shoot each other. i'm not disputing that. but there are other factors that reduce violent crime, like investing in communities, like afterschool program, like higher education, like housing, health
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care, et cetera. if we don't invest in those things and only police people, we also end up there. there's a whole systemic change we need that does include personal responsibility but can't be exhausted at the level of personal responsibility. >> the last issue that's going to take more time to unpack, but just a quick taste, the idea there does need to be a culture shift and not just on the police side. people are rude. they're disrespectful. young people, especially from minority populations, feel it's okay to get in my face and provoke me now and that has to change as well. is that true? >> to a degree. that's on both sides too. you have cops that don't know how to talk to people either. you have a situation where -- listen, you could do as much training as you want, but the people you already have, you're stuck with, so to speak. some people will never be able to change no matter what you do to them, no matter how much training you put them through. we've all been there with people from all walks of life. let me tell you something, common sense is the biggest thing you have to have. >> i appreciate the perspective on these. i'm out of time right now. i'm going to keep presenting to
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you guys and our expert what is i hear in response. that'll help answer people's questions. marc, thank you. jack, always great. coming up on "new day, we're going to talk with three people who shared a powerful moment at that town hall last night. you'll get to see what they're living and their reality. >> what a night it was. also, this across the pond. britain's new prime minister theresa may hitting the ground running after she met with the queen yesterday. one of her first cabinet appointments an absolute stunner because of what he has said about president obama and hillary clinton among others. a live report from london next. s pretty much over. (friend) wish we could start it from the beginning. (jon bon jovi) with directv, you can. you see, we've got the power to turn back time let's start over, let's rewind and let's go back and not quit the gym and have a chance to say goodbye to grampy tim oh, that's the power to turn back time. (vo) get the ultimate all-included bundle.
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call 1-800-directv. ii've been a republican to my all my life. i get party loyalty. but there's loyalty to your country... and the things donald trump says... about immigrants and women... veterans... i mean, how can we put up with that? how can republican members of congress support that? if he's our standard-bearer, what the heck happened to our standards?
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and catch every live event on your tv with nbc sports live extra. i'm getting ready. are you? x1 will change the way you experience nbcuniversal's coverage of the rio olympic games. call or go online today to switch to x1. police in fresno, california, releasing body cam video of a deadly officer-involved shooting last month. we want to warn you before we play it, this is very graphic. >> if you step forward, you're going to get shot, man. get down on the ground now! [ bleep ] [ gunfire ] >> shots fired. suspect down. >> the victim, 19-year-old dylan noble, shot four times and
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killed. the officers had pulled him over responding to a report of a man with a rifle. the police chief says the officers thought that noble was reaching for a weapon. he turned out to be unarmed. u.s. officials are trying to confirm if it took out a top isis leader again. isis leaders are already saying that commander known as omar the chechen was killed in iraq. the u.s.-led coalition thought it had killed him four months ago in syria. in a separate action, the pentagon confirmed it took out a commander of the pakistani taliban responsible for the deaths of more than 130 children. britain's new prime minister theresa may becoming the uk's second female prime minister. she is already make manager some key appointments and major moves. one of her first appointments really sending shock waves. london's former mayor, boris johnson, now being named foreign
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secretary. cnn international diplomatic editor nic robertson joins us now. she's the second woman, following margaret thatcher, known as the iron lady. some are making comparisons. she has a huge, huge job. >> reporter: yeah, and certainly the fact she's in office, she's begun appointing cabinet ministers is sort of steadying the country to a degree, if you will. she's come in unlike margaret thatcher be whom all those comparisons have been made promising more of a compassionate type of conservativism. looking after the poor, helping the less well off get better educated, better jobs, all of those sorts of things. now, at the same time, she's trying to heal a rift in her party and the country. all those who voted to leave, all those who voted to remain. so she's given the top job to one of those people. her allies, if you will, who are part of the remain campaign, into the treasury at number 11 here at downing street. the surprise pick and part of her balancing act with all those
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leave campaigners, high-profile leave campaigners, boris johnson, the flamboyant former mayor of johnson picked to lead the foreign office. this is a man who just a few months ago wrote in a british newspaper just ahead of president obama's visit here to see david cameron late in april who said he was accused of being part kenyan. he also said of hillary clinton back in 2007 that she was a statistic nurse in a mental hospital. so the special relationship between britain and the united states, you might wonder what's going on with that. but boris johnson is known also for being affable and amiable. chris? >> nic, it's going to be very interesting to see when, in terms of timing, and what the approach will be when may reaches out to the u.s. to see what that relationship will be going forward. nic robertson, thank you very
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much for keeping us in the loop. when we come back, i want to show you one of the moments from cnn's live town hall last night. this dallas mom, she's got a 14-year-old kid and literally was that moment that's so important in this dialogue. what do we do with african-american kids and police? how do we make this situation better? here's a little look. >> my 14-year-old is sitting right there, so you tell him he needs to be more respectful. you tell him he needs to be more compliant to your rules and your laws. because i've told him and obviously it doesn't matter because you're telling me i'm not telling him enough. >> there are a lot of mothers in this woman's position. she's going to join us with two former police officers. let's continue the conversation. think fixing your windshield is a big hassle?
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it is time for cnn money now. cnn money correspondent alison kosik in the money center. >> the stock market is on quite the impressive record run. the dow and s&p 500 setting all-time highs at yesterday's
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close. both are now on four-day win streaks since the lows in february. the dow is up an astonishing 2700 points. looking like more gains today. futures are pointing higher. the biggest tech ipo of the year happening today at the new york stock exchange. you've probably never heard about it, so i'll tell you. the company is called line. it operates a messaging app with 218 million active users, mostly in asia. line is known for its big, bold emojis, which users consider buy or earn from playing games. the app also streams music, plays videos, and has news and entertainment. just one more distraction for you. >> just one more distraction. amazing that's the biggest one of the year. all right. thank you so much. turning to other news. a mother's fear, the question for police that had officers offering her comfort at cnn's town hall last night. we will discuss it all straight ahead on "new day." when it comes to healthcare,
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really raised a lot of questions, and there was a lot of emotion about what's happening with policing and black communities. but there was a standout moment that was also like a metaphor for so many situations. here it is. >> my 14-year-old is sitting right there. so you tell him he needs to be more respectful. you tell him he needs to be more compliant to your rules and your laws. because i've told him, and obviously it doesn't matter because you're telling me i'm not telling him enough. >> i will not sit here as a leader who took an oath and let this young lady behind me cry because she and her family and her children don't feel protected. as a leader and as somebody who took that oath, i'm sorry that we have not fulfilled our civil duty and our responsibility to you and this community and your children, and i'm sorry. i just want to take a moment and say to you i'm sorry.
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[ applause ] >> joining us now, the mother you just saw, who witnessed the dallas ambush. and we have former chicago police officer demetri roberts and superintendent gary mccar y mccarthy. it took a lot for you to reach out and express the fear and the concern that you have. how surprised were you by the response from the former officer? >> i wasn't expecting it. i was already trying to stay in a place where people could hear me and i wasn't being whining about it, i wasn't being a cry baby about it. i wasn't playing the victim about it. and for someone in his position, i felt like he heard me and he understood me and he recognized the apology that i needed so
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that we could start moving forward. >> so much of the fear in that situation is being judged for what you say, right. what prompted your response to it? you could have gone a lot of different ways. >> sure, chris, but i treated her like i wanted to be treated. if i was in fear for anything, i would want somebody to come to me and say, for whatever reason that may be, i'm sorry. what can i do to help? that further tells me where we have a solution here. that is, especially as a former law enforcement officer, instead of me first thinking about putting on a hat of enforcement, i want to think first about putting on a hat of service and saying, how can i serve you here, what can i do to better where we are and where you are from the current situation that's brought us together. >> protect and serve. so gary, as a former superintendent, you understand these issues so well. they're presented to you in so many different ways when you're
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running, when you're a superintendent. the data, the political, the personal, the realities. last night in a situation like this, do you think it was helpful in as much as it allowed people to display what the emotion is involved here, which is often the precursor to the reasoning behind the problems, but first they have to feel. do you think that was present and helpful? >> yes, i do. i do. the point is, we have to do something from here. i came away last night with another conversation about law enforcement, not really a conversation with law enforcement. >> i heard you say that last night. >> i think there's an opportunity here. the question is, are we going to do it? i don't mean to sound callous, but i didn't learn so much last night because i knew this. i knew everything that i already heard. it was reinforced. so where do we go from here is the question. >> let's talk about this moment that we had and how it was
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differently understood. there are two takes on it. one is the emotionally honest and obvious one, which is wow, this mother is really worried about her kid, there's real concerns, they're realized by so many people in this country. what an unusual thing for the officer to do. there was another reaction. why is he apologizing? this guy has a job to do. these african-american communities are committing the crime and these kids are a problem and they don't treat police officers with respect anymore. what do you think is going to happen? when you hear those notions, how do you feel that they do or do not apply to you and your life? >> i feel like they don't apply at all. i was raised in the country. i was raised, yes, sir, no, sir. no matter who you are, no matter what walk of life, i don't know you. out of respect, i'm going to address you as if you were someone who deserved to be respected. >> and you said last night, when it comes to your son, you know, yes, whether it's fair or unfair, you have conversations with him about what to do when
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somebody from law enforcement or an official capacity comes into his life. what do you tell him? >> i tell him be respectful. if nothing else, when someone approaches you, sometimes you just have to be quiet and listen, see what they're saying to you, and you might not agree with it, but you still have to be respectful. >> to your former fellow brothers and sisters of the blue who will say, you know, when you do that, when you embrace and say i'm sorry, you're admitting that we're the problem and you can't do that. we're not the problem. we're doing our job. what do you say? >> not by any means. nobody is the problem here. what we have to do is find some common ground that we can move forward from. by simply saying i'm sorry doesn't take away from me being a professional, but insinuates a level of humility. whether i'm in uniform as a police officer, in a uniform as a military member, or wearing a suit as a civilian. what i say to my fellow brothers and sisters in uniform is let's
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not further divide this situation. there is huge disparities and differences between the police culture and the community culture. from what we saw tonight, we have an opportunity to bridge that divide between those two cultures and maybe as far as by shaking a hand, maybe as far as by saying i'm sorry, but it has to start somewhere. this is where it starts, right here, chris. >> you're nodding your head, gary. from all of you who know about this, we're talking about it, we're allowing people to say what they say and trying to be respectful about it on both sides. where does it usually peter out, and what do you hope can be different in this phase of our society? >> well, not even going to where it peters out. i don't think we're achieving anything. there's marches. there's rhetoric. there's speeches. there's unfortunately funerals. we're not getting anywhere. we need a plan. a plan comes from sitting down, having a conversation, having that exposure, and having frank
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conversations, talking about what's wrong, making admissions about what we did wrong, what has happened that's been wrong, and then moving forward. until that conversation is had -- that's why i made the offer. i think can i bring the leaders of law enforcement nationally to a conversation with black lives matter. i made that offer last night. i gave out my card. i'm going to be in touch with your producers and push that issue. >> we'll stay on it. >> here's my solution, chris. how we bridge the divide between both cultures is to be more diverse, to be more inclusive, and to allow both cultures respectively to be immersed in the other. and that's where we can find a common ground of understanding. once you take a citizen and you put them in a seat of a law enforcement officer or you take a law enforcement and put them in the shoes of a citizen in the community that that officer is going to serve in, you're going to get a different perspective on either side. so what i'm doing from my company, seven star consulting,
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we've put together an impact initiative. i am putting together a seven-star leadership coalition to include garry, to include the members of the panels last night, and to include you, chris. what we all can agree on, regardless of what side of a hashtag we promote or what side of politics we come from, is we can agree we don't want to see anymore killing. at the end of the day, we all bleed the same color. >> true, true. thank you so much for making it so real for so many last night. appreciate it. we'll be right back.
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presidential spot comes down to a personal decision. >> he's thinking about gingrich, pence. pence, gingrich. >> it is not blacks against whites or whites against blacks. >> every day when he put on the badge, he went out to help somebody. >> maybe you do still have to be
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extra careful because you're black. >> what is going on right now in america is not right. >> to the coward that tried to break me and my brothers and sisters, know your hate made us stronger. >> this is "new day" with chris cuomo and alisyn camerota. >> good morning. welcome to your "new day." alisyn is off. poppy harlow joins me this morning. good to have you. the wait almost over. donald trump says he's going to announce his choice for vp tomorrow morning. who's it going to be? there's a lot of talk about indiana governor mike pence, new jersey governor chris christie, or former house speaker newt gingrich. >> the big announcement will be just a few days before the official start of the republican convention on monday. we have just learned in the past few minutes who will speak and who won't. let's begin our coverage this morning with phil mattingly live from cleveland. we finally have the list. it's a long one. >> reporter: yeah, that's right,
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poppy. a long list of speakers and an unorthodox list of speakers. if you compare it to past conventions. that's exactly what donald trump said was going to happen. you don't have former presidents or former republican nominees. you have a lot of outsiders, a lot of political supporters of donald trump who might be considered out of the republican mainstream. as one trump adviser said, this is an unconventional list for an unconventional convention. the big question still remains, guys. who will be joining donald trump on that stage as his running mate? >> my hunch is he's flying to california thinking about, you know, gingrich, pence. >> reporter: former house speaker newt gingrich predicting trump's choice for vice president is between him and indiana governor mike pence. >> do you really want a two-pirate ticket, or do you want to take a very solid guy -- >> reporter: trump himself says he's whittled down the field. >> i'm at three, potentially
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four. in my own mind, i'm probably thinking about two. >> reporter: sources tell cnn that new jersey governor chris christie remains a finalist with trump looking for a fighter, even though he's now hinting at quite the opposite. >> i'm not looking for an attack dog. frankly, i'm looking for somebody that really understands what we're talking about because i'd rather have the whole thing be on policy. >> reporter: trump's search for a vp entering a frenzied phase in the final round, and it's playing out like a reality show in indiana. first meeting privately with pence and the trump children at the governor's mansion. >> nothing was offered, nothing was accepted. >> reporter: then with gingrich, who flew out on a private plane owned by fox news host sean hannity to meet with trump. trump also speaking on the phone with his former rival, christie, about the vp role. they are known to talk daily. >> can you tell us where you think you stand? >> i can't, but it's good to see you. >> reporter: a source familiar with the process telling cnn trump's influential older
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children are worried their father will make a decision they don't like. >> this as hillary clinton intensifies her attacks against the new york billionaire, all ahead of his big announcement. >> his campaign is as divisive as any we have seen in our lifetime. >> reporter: deriding the gop for turning to trump. >> this man is the nominee of the party of lincoln. we are watching it become the party of trump. and that's not just a huge loss for our democracy. it is a threat to it. >> reporter: the clock is also ticking on who will speak at next week's republican convention. the trump campaign is yet to publicly release a list of speakers, but we already know the party's past nominees and living former presidents will not be there. guy, the trump campaign still silent on that list of speakers.
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the list we've gotten coming from the republican national committee. one aide making clear this is still a partial list. there could be more people added. most notably, who's the vice presidential candidate going to be? because that person is obviously going to have a very prominent speaking position. a couple other names you would recognize and trump advisers say this is a cross section you have people like senate majority leader mitch mcconnell and rising senate star joni ernst speaking. also, tim tebow. when you talk about cross section, they're not kidding, guys. it will just add an element of surprise and pageantry to what we're going to see here in cleveland next week. >> phil threw us a little curveball before. gingrich has a spot on the slate. he's going to speak. does that make it more likely he's the vp pick? i'm looking for a solution here. >> he wants me to know everything this morning. >> i feel like you know. >> i had a private call with them last night. >> let's discuss it.
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do you feel that we're getting played by trump here, that he has dominated a news cycle with the who it will be, who it will be, when nobody really cares who clinton is picking at this point? do you think he's playing the system, or is this a reflection of his imperfection as a candidate and the need for a partner? >> it's the most dramatic rose ceremony ever. so get ready. i think it's a little bit of both. i think he's a showman. no one should be surprised that keeping people in suspense about this pick is perhaps what he's best at. so i was anticipating that. i do think there's a little bit of push and pull here where his kids, i'm not very surprised, may be backing the pence pick, which is a more safe, conventional one. i think gingrich offers some
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pushback on trump and has criticized him in the past, offers policy knowledge. what christie brings to the table is mostly loyalty. as we've seen through donald's entire career, loyalty is very important to him. i wonder if that's a clue. >> it is, but it isn't everything. he stood by corey lewandowski after the issues with the reporter, et cetera. then he let him go. >> but then not. >> but then not. jackie, to you, it's interesting because he said in his fox interview yesterday, trump basically no longer needs an attack dog, and that's what christie is. >> kayleigh? >> that's my fault. sorry. >> so i think newt gingrich kind of brings both of the components we like so much, or i like so much, in chris christie and also in mike pence. he brings in the conservative base, but he also is kind of an attack dog. whether trump thinks he needs an
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attack dog or not, it is helpful to have someone who can really prosecute the case against hillary clinton effectively. so it's kind of, you know, a double edge there. i think newt gingrich brings in both components. it would be my big because he brings in the base, but he can also be effective on a debate stage. we've seen him dismantle people in the media before during the primaries last time. i really think he can bring in both things that i'm looking for in a vp. >> i've said all my reporting suggests this idea that christie is on the outs with the kids is just defied by the daily reality. he's the head of the transition. he wouldn't have been in that position. he's meeting with trump all the time. he's dealing with kushner all the time. he wouldn't be doing that if there were hard feelings. so here's a good way for you to help in this conversation. whom scares you the most in terms of being a partner with newt gingrich? newt gingrich, that's who i think it's going to be. with donald trump.
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which pairing is the most worrisome to you? >> i'm going to try to answer this honestly, as i always do. i actually think that the best pick for trump is christie. and i think it will be christie. i think that he's been tested by this process. nobody understands what running on a national ticket is like unless you've done it. gingrich has got way too much baggage. we would love to run against somebody included in the ticket who prosecuted our former president for having an affair while at the same time was having a secret affair. i think pence is untested. he reminds me a little of admiral stockdale. i can see pence having a stockdale moment on the debate stage. i think it will be christie. i think he would be have very good pick. >> do you believe him, poppy, or do you think he wants christie because he believes the opposite? >> i take him at his word this morning. >> thank you. >> mary katherine, to you, if it is christie, you've got very low
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approval ratings in his home state. on top of that, you also have, you know, i don't know how much words matter in a lasting sense in this election, but an extremely vitriolic back and forth between trump and christie for a matter of months during the early stages of the campaign. >> the thing about christie is that much of the conservative base has been mad at christie for many years. i'm not sure how much you bring in that way. geographically, you don't bring in a ton because new jersey is basically somewhere that trump will do well anyway. but trump values loyalty. christie was one of the first people on the trump train. and he dealt a blow to marco rubio that it turned out he couldn't recover from back in new hampshire. that may be something that's part of the calculation as well. i don't think it's a great strategic pick, but frankly, there aren't that many people who want the job. it's a tough job where you have to stand beside him and then on sunday explain what he was trying to say every week. so it's going to be a tough job. there's not that many candidates. and there's not that many people that donald trump, i think,
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works well with potentially. so here we are. >> those are really important points. i do think that loyalty is very important to mr. trump. i do also think that -- i think it's a myth now that trump has to do something for the conservative base. those conservatives are not going to go anywhere. they have a clear choice. >> here's the virtue in what you're saying on that score. look at the list of people speaking at the convention. we just got it. it's a very unconventional list. the only former opponents of his on here, cruz, carson, and huckabee, who are all, you know, pretty nice. cruz went bad on him at the end. but that's when it got competitive. if you've had a chance to eyeball this, no former presidents, no mitt romney. what's going on here? >> yeah, it's interesting because trump promised us a mixed bag, a convention like
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we've never seen before. we're certainly getting that when you see tim tebow on the list, who's a hero among conservatives, certainly in the south. you also see some real people that i think will be interesting. so marcus latrell. maybe sean smith's mother, a fallen victim in benghazi. you're going to see some really powerful moments with real people, with sports figures, a very interesting convention like i really think we've never seen before. >> mary katherine, to you. one of the key things for donald trump is to get more women to like him and to vote for him. he has a very powerful tool in that in ivanka trump, his daughter. an incredibly successful businesswoman. i've interviewed her. i'm sure you have interviewed her in the past. a lot of people say she's a force behind him, even more melt
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lady. what can ivanka trump say on stage when she speaks? >> first, i want to say on the convention speaking list, i'm a georgia bulldog. even i like tim tebow. he may be the most unifying figure there. but for ivanka, her brand is amazing that she has sort of floated above her father. it never seems to rub off on her. she does carry a lot of weight with women. they respond to her. she has this sort of classiness about her and not in the boasting donald trump classy kind of way. look, i think that keeping the tone nice as she always does and being fairly subtle is what she brings to the table. she can speak about him in such a way, in that tone, that can bring some women to the table possibly. we also know about ivanka trump. she didn't vote for him in the primary. this is the weirdness of this election. she was in charge of getting people registered to vote for her dad in the primary, but she's a democrat, so she didn't
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vote for him. >> she didn't register for the other side. that was an interesting twist. you know who else is on this list that speaks to trump? unless i have it wrong, which dana white this is -- >> no, it's the ufc guy. >> he runs it. the show biz factor, and also this is a man's man. this guy, dana white, he's the head of the ufc, which is all about just bashing heads. that speaks to a little of this cultivated mystique of what trump wants to be. he wants to get back to the strong american motif. >> i heard peter thiel was on the list this morning, who is a san francisco based technology billionaire, but who is also gay and a very prominent gay rights advocate. that really surprised me on the list this morning. >> something for everyone. >> something for everyone. that's what people try to do at conventions. i actually think that people will not be fooled.
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>> that's also not true, richard. look at your guys' list. you're tastocking it with all t tried and true big names from the party. we're not seeing as quasi-marquee people. >> that's because we democrats have a lot of prominent national spokespeople we want to showcase. >> but you run into a problem that you can excite a lot more people, perhaps, at the rnc with such a mixed bag. >> you know something, i think that ultimately the republican party platform that donald trump is going to run on is an ultra far right platform. we saw that yesterday when it came out. they're going to take all kinds of far-right stands. i don't think that people will be fooled by what looks like a rainbow coalition, a new rainbow coalition of the republican party at the convention, if this is what it turns out to be. we'll know a lot by who he picks as vice president because it's his first major decision. it will tell us where he's headed. >> come in tomorrow morning.
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we'll have it live for you tomorrow morning as soon as we find out, unless you get that phone call first. >> some of you may know earlier. >> they're going to call chris. all right. we got to go. thank you, everyone. "new day" will be live in cleveland monday starting 5:00 a.m. eastern for the republican national convention. be sure to join the best political team in the business for cnn's primetime coverage. that beginning at 4:00 p.m. eastern. >> francine are going to take a break right now. >> that's the name you give me? >> i felt it. never been called that before? >> no. >> we're having a very important conversation in this country right now. what do we do about the divide between police and the communities that they police? last night's town hall brought up a lot of emotion and had some big voices. thomas jackson, former police chief of ferguson, missouri, was there. he's going to share his experience, what he took away, next. (vo) maybe it was here,
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welcome back to "new day." racial tension reaching a boiling point in this kwunt ri right now. last night cnn hosted a very powerful town hall on the racial divide and so importantly how we can all come together. the emotions of the last week running deep and very raw. >> he would want peace. he would want good to come out of all of this. >> two families impacted by last week's violence coming together, stressing the need for unity. >> this has to stop. by taking another person's life, it won't make the other person's life come back. >> violence is never going to be the answer to nothing. and i think we all come together to say that we want peace. we want peace for both families. >> activists and law enforcement all joining a candid conversation about whether policing in america is
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inherently biased against pla e blacks. >> i have spoken to police officers who have told me that they believe that black people are genetically predisposed to be criminals, and it is their obligation to control these people by whatever means are necessary. >> the history of african-americans in this country started with slavery. then it moved to black codes, to segregation. who was it who was enforcing those racist policies? it was the white police officer. so that narrative exists in the community based on the history, and it's factual. >> questions over how to comply with police dominating the cnn town hall. many fearful and distrusting. >> instructing our young people day in and day out that there's something in their behavior that brings on the abuse is tantamount to telling women that there's something we do that caused street harassment and rape. we have to change the culture. >> we should not have a racial divide in this country anymore, but we do.
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so i say to him, you do put your hands on the wheel. you do be careful. maybe you do still have to be extra careful because you're black. >> can we just take a moment as america and register how profound and immoral it is to say, this is the only thing that will keep you safe, is that if you pack this tool box and you take it with you everywhere you go and this is not the way that everybody has to behave. it is only the way that you have to behave. and it is no the your fault, and you have not done anything wrong. but it is because you are who you are and they do not see you as the person that i love, but they see you as a person they should fear. >> a heart wrenching moment as one mother shares her fear for her son. >> every moment he's not with me, i fear for his life. i keep hearing, you tell me to tell my son what to do.
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my 14-year-old is sitting right there, so you tell him he needs to be more respectful. you tell him he needs to be more compliant to your rules and your laws. because i've told him, and obviously it doesn't matter because you're telling me i'm not telling him enough. >> then this officer comforts her. >> i'm sorry that we have not fulfilled our civil duty and our responsibility to you and this community and your children, and i'm sorry. i just want to take a moment and say to you, i'm sorry. [ applause ] >> what a night. what a discussion. let's talk more about it. joining me now live is thomas jackson, the former police chief of ferguson, missouri. he was at the town hall last night. you'll remember his face and his name. he resigned from his post after the intense pressure following the death of michael brown.
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thank you for being with me. let's talk about last night. what a night. you were there in person. this coming at the same time as a new cbs/"new york times" poll shows an astonishing number, really, the fact that almost 70% of americans think race relations in the united states are bad right now. that is more than felt that same way after the rodney king beating and acquittal of those officers in los angeles in 1992. what is going on? >> well, i think a big part of it is this narrative that's out there that every time there's an officer-involved shooting, instead of letting the process and the investigation take place, there's an immediate outcry that police officers are bad people, that they're all bad. that foments and goes on through social media, politicians, celebrities. >> but people are seeing it now. they're seeing these videos, the video from louisiana, from minnesota. isn't that part of it too? they're reacting to what they're seeing play out in realtime. >> they're reacting to what they're seeing, but they're blaming all officers.
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we're seeing record numbers of homicides in chicago, for example. mostly committed black on black. but do we blame the black community, the african-american community for that, or do we blame the individual? >> but it's not one or the other. you have to talk about the crisis in chicago. >> yes. >> you have to talk about that. and you also have to talk about what we're sitting here talking about. as that mother just said in the piece, and she was on the show earlier, the talk that she had to have with her child that everybody black parent talks about having with their child. you said you didn't know that black parents for a while had to have that talk. when you found out, it made you sad. >> it did. it was actually at a town hall in ferguson where i heard a mother get up, a couple people get up, and talk about it. kids talking about getting that talk. that's tragic that everything that's gone on has made people
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feel that way. there's a long history of policies in this country, as we know, from slavery on up through jim crow and so forth, that foment that. but on the other hand, we should be telling our kids to be respectful and to obey the law. i got called over a month ago. when the officer came up, i had my hands on the steering wheel. he wrote me a ticket. >> the mother said, you know, i say that to my son, i say that to him every day. i want to get your take on the evolution of the black lives matter movement, from what you saw as police chief in ferguson, to where we stand today with the movement. >> so my first experience with them was one of violent rhetoric toward the police. hostility, anger, this whole narrative that the cops are bad, the whole system is broken, all cops are bad and they're all out to get african-americans. so my experience with them was violent and hostile rhetoric
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towards my guys and towards me. as time has evolved and i've recently, just very recently, looked at some of their standards and some of the philosophy they stand for -- >> they condemn violence against police. >> yeah, it's more in line with a movement that wants change should be. >> so did you ever think in ferguson in the midst of all of that, of pulling aside some of those protesters, to sit down with them and have a conversation? and if not, what about now? >> absolutely. and i did. as a matter of fact, there were several times that happened. groups of protesters popped up. there were thousands of them. one group was out protesting at our farmers' market. my supervisor on duty called me and said, you know, this is what's going on, and i said, well, whether the leader of that protest group talk to me? he said, yeah. we went over to the fire house.
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he brought a couple of his lieutenants with him. we sat down and had a conversation. one of his group was somebody i had met when i was going door to door to invite the community to our new community center. the staff was trying to go door to door. now he and i are friends. he actually saw what we had done that didn't get reflected in the doj report. all the positive community policing we were doing in the city. actually, he got ahold of me this week and said, let's do something. >> you and the protester are friends now. >> and he's not the only one. >> i think a lesson to take out of that from this and where we go from here, that the two of you could come together. i appreciate you coming on with me, thomas jackson. thank you very much. >> my pleasure. >> chris? >> all right, poppy. so we got hillary clinton and donald trump neck and neck in some key battleground states. independent senator angus king, he matters, and he's going to join us live with a big announcement about who he thinks the next president of the united
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you know, about 90% of those who say they support trump or clinton say they ain't going to change their minds. so people who are independent, people in the middle, very, very important, especially when we see the polls knotted up in all the key states. whether it's ohio, you have pennsylvania, florida. very tight, very tight numbers. so -- and this is now what we're seeing consistently in polls. it's not just one that's shocking us. so who each gets to support them, especially the big names, the independent names, matters. joining us now, independent senator from maine angus king. senator, i see you have your favorite tie on today with the maine lobsters. that usually means business coming from you. you say you have an announcement, sir. what is that announcement? >> well, first, chris, i want to set up what i want to talk about because a lot of the work i do here, probably 50% or 60%, involves foreign policy. a short while ago, i had an
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experience that really shook me and influenced what i'm about to tell you. i went over to andrews air force base and got on an airplane that i never knew existed called the national airborne operations center, otherwise called the doomsday plane. it's an uparmored 747, and its mission is to provide command and control in the case of a nuclear attack. we went up, took off across the country, and then had a nuclear attack exercise where an air force officer played the president, and the secretary of defense and we heard in our ear, the first thing we noticed there was a big clock showing missiles leaving. the big clock said 28 minutes. that was the time the president had to make a decision. what got me, chris, it was almost physical, was in that situation, there's only one person. there's no checks and balances. there's no congress. there's no supreme court. there's no consultation. there's one person making a
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decision about the future of civilization. when i got off that plane, you know, my knees were a little weak with that realization, how much power is in this one person. then i thought about donald trump. it's a question of judgment and temperament, and this guy has not demonstrated to me the kind of coolness that you need in that situation. the president is probably going to be in a helicopter, being evacuated when having to make that decision. the other thing that i thought about was hillary clinton sitting at the benghazi hearing for something like 11 hours. never lost her temper, never lost her cool, never lost her patience, answered every question, was very solid, and i think most people, even people who were opposed to her, felt that was an amazing performance. that's as good as you're going to get as a photograph of somebody making decisions under pressure. putting those two things
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together and realizing the incredible importance of the presidency, particularly in foreign policy, where as you and i have talked about, congress is largely abdicated. i got to vote for hillary clinton. i just can't in good conscience put somebody in that airplane whose coolness and sort of patience and judgment i have doubts about. >> so senator angus king, the independent from maine, says he will vote for hillary clinton. that will be the headline, but let's test the premise. you just said something that is both very poignant and practical. what was it like for you to think about what would happen in that situation and what is necessary for the survival of the country? >> as i say, it was deep -- these are things you can talk about and think about intellectually, but to be up in that airplane and see that 28-minute clock ticking down and hearing the voices in the headphones talking about what we
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have to do and determining the facts. is it really an attack? is it a flight of geese that are confusing the radar? how do we confirm the information? information is coming in from all over the world. it was a visceral, gut-level experience for me. it was one of the strongest experiences of that nature that i've ever had. it's one thing to think about things. it's another thing to feel them. all i could think about was, man, in this situation, i want somebody who's deliberative and cool, who has been in these kind of decision-making situations. you know, i just don't -- i can't say this guy is somebody that i would be comfortable with. and this is real. the one thing i've learned here, chris, working on intelligence and armed services, the incredible power of the presidency and foreign policy. and presidents, candidates talk
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about domestic issues. immigration and the dead and all of those kinds of things. but you get in office, and at least half of what the president does is dealing with a very dangerous world. there are all kinds of judgment calls. should we -- what do we do in syria? what do we do with isis? how much do we escalate? do we send troops in? what's the level of troops in afghanistan? whether we put nuclear tactical weapons in eastern europe. it's unbelievable the complexity of these decisions and the danger of the world. you know, hillary clinton has been there. she's been in the public eye for 30 years. she's been there as a very active first lady, but also as a senator and in the caldron of being secretary of state during this dangerous time. >> but you're not calling it an endorsement. you're saying you'll vote for her, that's who you support, but you don't endorse. why not use that word? >> i'll use the word endorse. i don't know what that means. i don't think the people of
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maine are holding their breath to see who i'm going to endorse. i've always thought endorsements are kind of artificial. you can call it either way, whatever. >> our lower third, we'll say it. senator angus king, thank you for making this announcement on "new day." thank you for telling us, more so, why you're doing it. that's where the country's head has to be, in figuring out why they want to choose who they want to choose. also, i want to ask you to come back on the show so we can talk about the other issues going on with policing in america and how you see the upcoming conventions. please, come back soon, senator. >> we'll be with you. >> and thank you for the big news. senator angus king from maine says he has to vote for hillary clinton because of this experience that it came down to in his own mind, living through what would happen in that moment of crisis. poppy? >> chris, thank you so much. coming up on "new day," lawmakers, police, black lives matter representatives all coming together, trying to find solutions after the deadly
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police shootings, the protests, and the attack on those dallas police officers. what will a new task force really accomplish? we'll speak to representatives on all sides next. you both have a
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protests over police shootings of black men and the recent horrific attacks against police officers are pushing congress into action. today house representatives from both parties are meeting to find solutions, they say, and address concerns about policing and violence. joining us now live from washington are two members of that task force. democratic congressman hakeem jeffries of new york and
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republican congressman will hurd of texas. gentlemen, thank you for joining us. what is the aspiration here? what do you think you can achieve? >> well, the deaths of alton sterling, philando castile, and those five hero police officers in dallas shocked the nation and once again put front and center the issue of the tense relationship between the police and the community. it's clear that we've got a national problem that requires a national solution. and times like this need leadership. the house is stepping up, democrats, republicans, people on different sides of the ideological divide, to try to find common ground to this problem and propose real, concrete solutions in a dispassionate, evidence-based, intelligent fashion to try to prevent us as america from being in this situation again and again and again. >> will, i hear what hakeem jeffries is saying. we applaud the effort. we here at cnn are calling for congress to do something about
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this situation, but the reality is, this is a state issue. this is a local issue. and we saw that president obama put together a task force, a commission it was called then, after what we saw in ferguson, recommendations came out that were good, logical, practical, and very few have adopted them in localities across the country. so how can you do better? >> well, i think the difference is the commitment from both sides of the aisle on this issue. you know, the first step is to show that despite the circus atmosphere that we see in washington, d.c., despite this being an election time, then we can actually work together and talk about these issues in a dispassionate way. the reality is that it's 2016 in the united states. whether your skin is brown or your uniform is blue, you should feel safe walking the streets of america. we can solve this problem. we have to make sure we don't
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let people soak fear into our hearts and minds. the example the five lawmakers in dallas made, these are men that put them -- that gave the ultimate sacrifice to protect them that were protesting law enforcement. this is -- protesting peacefully is a very american thing. we got to use them as an example. i think the tone is different, and the commitment from both sides is different than it has been in the past. >> so hakeem, how is this going to work? >> well, the task force is going to be led by the chairman of the judiciary committee on the republican side and john conyers, who's the dean of the house of representatives and the lead democrat on the judiciary committee. with members from all across the country who have different perspective but who, as will has indicated, have a commitment to talking about this problem in a manner that doesn't
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automatically lead to people retreating to either of their ideological corners but is directed by a genuine good-faith effort to try to find real solutions to this issue. i think we can start with areas where i think democrats and republicans already agree, such as the need to incentivize local police departments with financial assistance, perhaps, to purchase body cameras. that's something that law enforcement and people on the black lives matter side of things embraced as something that can help bring accountability and a window into what actually happens on the streets from the perspective of both sides. and then to tackle some of these difficult questions we're going to have to tackle. chris, this is a recurring problem. if we're going to solve it, this time has to be different. i think the task force is an effort to make sure that this time is different. >> and this is one of those few situations, will, where talk is not cheap. we need to have a conversation. these issues have to be not just
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felt but spoken about in reason. one of the practicalities that comes out of these, because unfortunately we've had a lot of examples of this problem over the last few years or at least the perception of it, is that when you have an excessive or a questionable use of force, okay, the question being that it might be excessive, an independent review board of those cases so that it's not that local police, it's not that local prosecutor, that it's taking away from what people say they don't have confidence in. that seems to be something that gets a lot of traction but never happens because it's state by state. is that something the federal could have any impact impact on? >> it is important to review all these cases. what were the activity before it happened. are those preconditions happening around the country. can we get ahead of the problem by understanding and reviewing the previous activity. >> no, but will, i mean the actual incident. i'm not saying what the d.o.j.
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does right now, it has a limited scope, right, so it goes in and reviews what happens at the state level. what they ask for is, no, we don't want it after the fact. we want it in that present sense. we want it investigated initially by an independent body. what do you think of that idea and could congress motivate it? >> well, i think that's already happening in st. paul right now as an example of that. you know, the reality is, we have to look at everything, and we've got to make sure people feel comfortable with law enforcement, and law enforcement feels comfortable with their communities. if there is outside entities that could help in that, if there is a role for federal review, these are some of the conversations that should happen, and do it within the existing framework that are there. i think this is a problem that can be solved. it is not going to be easy or done overnight. this is about making sure that
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we're understanding the problems first, and then articulating some of the solutions. >> will hmeurd, hakeem jefferie we'll keep this conversation going, especially in the interest of progress. gentlemen, thank you. we are just hours away from finding out who will be donald trump's number two. who will be his vice-presidential pick, and how does trump make these big decisions. we're going to get into the brain of the candidate, next, with the key biographer. book. that's awesome! if you could get 20% cash back on this vehicle, buy og fer. i think i'm going to drive it through that wall and take it. find your tag and get cash back for 20% by og fer by og ra fer.
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announcement tomorrow morning could be one of the biggest decisions he makes in his new political career. who will be his number two. frankly, how are you number two to donald trump? that's a tough job, right? what goes in the process. how does his mind work. let's talk about it with someone really well. michael datoni, "the truth about trump." thank you for being with us. >> good morning. >> you spent a lot of time with donald trump writing this, but you spent a lot of time with his
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children, his former wives and current wife. take us into the mind of the man. what he is thinking right now. chris doesn't buy he doesn't know who he is going to pick as vp. but he says i don't know yet. >> well, i think you have to think about this the way you think about a tv show. donald is the producer, director and star of a tv series, and the tv series is the campaign. so he is going to offer us a lot of possible -- >> he is playing us. >> he is playing us. he is always playing us. i think, i agree with chris, he probably knows who it is. but it's too much fun for him to keep the drama going. we're watching. we're talking about it all morning. it's working. >> so if he knows who it is, then, who is it? because for a while, he was saying i want an attack dog, and chris christie was the attack dog who could go after people, and newt gingrich, especially when it comes to hillary clinton. but then on fox news, he says i don't need an attack dog, i am
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an attack dog. >> and then he said there are four possible candidates, but i'm thinking about two. >> that you don't know anything about. >> right. what he's going to do is try to make an unconventional or surprise choice. last night, i think it was mike pence, because i saw the children coalescing. they're pretty influential and they act as a block. that's interesting to consider. >> so who do you think it will be? >> oh, i can't tell you. >> all right. >> i would tell you, if the kids are driving it, i think it's pence. >> you do. let's talk about the kids. the name that gets put out there the most is the most influential on her father is ivanka trump. is that correct? >> she is most influential on matters of style, brand and public perception. if she is really engaged in this, she is thinking about balancing him out. they really do love him. they really do look to protect him, almost from himself. >> no question. when i interviewed ivanka trump, it was right after the megyn
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kelly comments, the heat of the issue stuff, and she was so -- in such staunch defense of her father, that was very clear. what do you see, though, as trump's vulnerabilities, where his children can't help him? >> well, he will go rogue at any moment, because that's the character. >> you can't call that vulnerabili vulnerability, because it got him here. >> absolutely. they've said to me, we'll go in and say we disagree with you on x, y, and z and sit as a group. but they believe he is the home run hitter. they're not going to mess too much with that. he also says my life is a comic book and i'm the leading character. so he is very cued into. >> he made the comment about the fact that maybe i'll become president and then said i don't want the job. maybe he was joking.
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>> it is sort of consistent who he is. he said i might like to run and i might like to win, but maybe not be president. >> how did you read that? was it a total joke. >> i think he meant it at the time. that was late 1980s. >> what about now when he said it last week. >> oh, i think it is half serious. everything is about what suits his brand and his image. so if he is going to make a choice, i would say i'm actually leaning toward pence. i think he is leaning toward something that balances him out. >> we've got to go. the man who knows the mind of the man who is running for the presidency, thank you so much. >> thank you. >> "the truth about trump" is the name of the book. got a lot to get to. let's get to it. >> i'm at three, potentially four. >> the vice-presidential spot, at this point, it is up to him. >> certainly, i'm one of the
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people sitting by the phone waiting. >> it is humbling to be considered. >> i'm confident he will make america great again. >> in my own mind, i am probably thinking about two. >> we will not let the act of a coward break us. >> we want peace. >> it has been a one way conversation about the police, but no the including the police. >> we're not close to be where we want to be. >> what is it about black people that make us seem to police officers more dangerous? >>announcer: this is "new day" with chris cuomo and alisyn camerota. >> heavy conversations going on in this country right now, as we say good morning and welcome to your "new day." it is july 14, it is 8:00 in the east. this show is so long. so poppy is joining me this morning. we have a lot of news for you this morning. america gets to meet donald trump's running mate tomorrow morning.
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who will it be? indiana governor, mike pence, other people say no, it's got to begin glitch. other people say wait, what about christi. >> the big reveal coming days before the kickoff of the republic national convention on monday. who will speak at the rnc and really, who won't. let's begin our coverage with phil mattingly. good morning. >> good morning, poppy. that long awaited list, at least partial list for next week's convention has been released by the republican national committee. a very different, almost cross-section that goes beyond politics. not your traditional convention, where it is just political leaders up and coming rising stars within the party. you have actors, athletes. you have few republican party officials as well. but the big question, as we look at this list, who might be one
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of the keynote speakers at the convention next week, as in who is the vice-presidential nominee going to be. >> my hunch is he is flying to california thinking about, you know, gingrich/pence. >> former house speaker newt gingrich predicting that it is between him and indiana governor mike pence. >> do you want a two pirate ticket? >> i'm at three, potentially four, but in my mind, i'm thinking probably two. >> sources tell cnn that new jersey governor, chris christie, remains a finalist, with trump looking for a fighter, even though he is now hinting at quite the opposite. >> i'm not looking for an attack dog. frankly, i'm looking for somebody that really understands what we're talking about. i would rather have be on policy. >> trump's search for a vp entering a freenzied phase.
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first, meeting with pence and the trump children at the governor's mansion. >> nothing was offered, nothing was accepted. >> and with begin given, who flew out on a private plane to meet with trump. trump also speaking on the phone with his former rival, christi, about the vp role. they are known to talk daily. >> where do you think you stand? >> i can't, it is good to see you. >> a source familiar with the process, telling cnn trump's influential older children are worried their father will make a decision they don't like. this, as hillary clinton intensifies her attacks against the new york billionaire. all ahead of his big announcement. >> his campaign is as divisive as any we've seen in our lifetimes. >> deriding the gop for turning to trump. >> this man is the nominee of the party of lincoln.
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we are watching it become the party of trump. and that's not just a huge loss for our democracy. it is a threat to it. >> the clock is also ticking on who will speak at next week's republic national convention, the rnc releasing a list this morning. interestingly, they include begin given and christie, but not pence. >> the tea leave reading all morning, who is on the list and who is not on the list, now trump advisors warn don't read too much into it. there is a list that will change. it is a partial list. as an example, tim tebow, very popular athlete, is not on the rnc's list, but a trump advisor says he is scheduled to speak. some of the other people that cross-section that are scheduled to speak, governor scott walker, the popular republican governor
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from wisconsin, ted cruz, the former intense opponent of donald trump, underwear model, well flown fessi-known professi this is certainly based on the speakers we're seeing, but don't read too much into the vp pick. we'll find out officially tomorrow morning at 11 clorng. >> this is the man of a face of anticipation that you see right now. you call out antonio sabato, jr., and mine with dana white. i can't wait to see what he says. for all the factors that distinguish these two, clinton and trump, the polls, they are nodded up. a new cbs times poll show clinton and trump literally neck in neck, heading into the national conventions. let's discuss the state of play, what's going to happen with the vp thing, what the convention
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means, what the polls mean. former trump campaign advisor, michael caputo. good to have you on the show. >> good morning, how you doing? >> can you give me some love on the vp situation? the idea of who it's going to be. let's just start with the idea that trump doesn't know yet. i don't buy that, michael. what do you think the state of play is? >> well, far be it from me to speak for donald trump on this. the only person who knows who the vice-president is going to be is donald trump. i happen to think that if i'm reading the tea leaves, i think it is mike pence. i think he is the best thing for this ticket. it is tough having two fire brands on the ticket, president and vice-president, and that's what you have if you choose a gingrich or christie. >> this is largely speculative, but you know the well. why balance all of a sudden, he is all in, 150 miles an hour all the time.
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why balance it? why not go with christie, we know he trusts, even though he went after him during the primary, you know, he went and kissed the ring first after that process. and he is a tough guy. that's what trump likes. why not him? >> and that's a good point. also, this whole idea of the familiarity, which is so important to get along with your vice-president, and gingrich and christie both have a long history with mr. trump. that's why this is a toss up. pence is straight out of central casting, if you would. he would certainly calm the rest of republicans who are still not on the trump train. he might even, who knows, bring along his neighboring governor, john kasich into the convention, and that might change the speaking schedule, by the way, if kasich come as long. they're both kind of close. and so pence brings things to the tagt thble that gingrich an
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christie don't. we've heard him say he wants somebody who will fight and then actually he is not looking for a fighter. i think in the end, it is going to be mike pence. >> i think he is stringing us out beautifully and dominating the news cycle. we don't talk about clinton, and it distracts other issues. >> he is an expert. >> he is doing great. good for him. it's working. so the convention, you kicked out a lot of the typical names here, even sarah palin is not on the list. what is the theory of why you want this amalgamation. >> trump wants a different convention. he has watch a few on television, and who knows how to read a ratings book, and he knows what has not worked in the past. they've been notoriously slipping in the ratings, and he
tv-commercial
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is looking to capture some eyeball, capture some minds, and nobody is as good at that as mr. trump is. i think we had a little bit of a limited group of people to choose from, because we had some, as i said earlier, restive republicans who aren't quite there yet. it will be interesting. the delegates themselves will be very much on edge looking forward to seeing what the no nontraditional speakers has to say. that will translate well into the tv audience, too. >> the polls are knotted up, and we're getting the state of definition and then the final sprint. clinton came out with a big ad that seems to be her big hammer for right now. let me play you the ad and get your reaction. >> i love the old days. you know what they used to do to guys like this, they would be carried out on a stretcher, fol folks. you can tell them to go
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[ bleeping ] themselves. i can stand in the middle of fifth avenue and i shoot somebody and i wouldn't lose voters, okay. when mexico sends its people, they're bringing drugs, crimes, they're rapists. >> you could see there was blood coming out of her eyes. blood coming out of her where ever. >> you gotta see this guy, oh, i don't know what i said. i don't remember. he is going i don't remember. >> our children and grandchildren will look back at this time, at the choices we are about to make, the goals we will strife for, the principles we will live by and we need to make sure that they can be proud of us. i'm hillary clinton and i approve this message. >> are you going to vote for clinton now? >> no way. absolutely not. but this is going to be an inten intense ad war. >> what do you think the plus and minus is? >> i'll tell you what.
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i think it is an effective ad. they've been running one of the super pacs has been apparently mocking a reporter. they are really damaging. and the trump group, whether it is the super pacs or the campaign or whatever, they need to get on the air and they need to get on the air soon. these ads are hitting donald trump below the water line. i do think that in the end, how she closes that ads going to hurt her, because in the end, people are going to make a choice. she's right. they're going make a choice between change or eight more years of barack obama. and i think that's become fairly clear. >> i wonder, is that the proposition change or not. i don't know i'm hearing that as much as i'm hearing this is almost a hobson's choice for people. people keep talking about this choice in the negative. it is who is less bad that they're going to choose. almost like a war attrition at this point, when you look at the negatives, they're both over 60%
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in terms of people you don't trust. i mean, how do you strategize in a situation like that? >> it's difficult. especially since we're now seeing a whole new group of voters that have never come out to vote before. i mean, at the trump rallies, if you had done some serious deep diving into the demographics there, would you have found about half of them as registered republicans, the other half, democrats and independents, and there is really no polling firm out there that is measuring that right now. for those of us who have had the pleasures of trailer park living, what we're looking at here is a really, really different choice. we're looking for leaders. and it's not always, when you're looking for leaders, that air looking for someone that is milk toast or someone who is easily affiable, donald trump is running at a difficult time in this country. but in the end, i think that he is going to be victorious. >> and it will all come down to
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something boring, but as you know, very important, getting them to actually vote. getting them to the poll. >> that's true. >> mr. caputo, thanks for the in siekt. >> thanks, chris, have a great day. cleveland will be a big deal. it will be the moment, we'll see whether trump can get the party behind him and get going for the final sprint. we will be there, everyday, and we will there early. we're going to start the show an hour early, 5:00 a.m. eastern all week at the republican convention. please, be sure to join, without question, the best political team in the business for cnn's primetime coverage that's going to begin at 4:00 p.m. eastern. meantime, in dallas, a sea of blue, thousands turned out for the first funerals of the five fallen police officers. this, as president obama met for hours yesterday at the white house with law enforcement officials, civil rights leaders and black lives matters
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activists. sara sidner is live in dallas. what was it like there yesterday? >> reporter: show of support was absolutely amazing. we know that officer michael smith had a private funeral, but he will have a public one today, and we're expecting the same number of people to show up to honor him. but what was really extremely, em treely touching was the wife of the d.a.r.t. officer. they had just been married a couple of weeks ago, and she talked about that being the happiest day of her life, and that it was all take answer wn moment. >> though i'm heartbroken and hurt, i'm going to put on my badge and my uniform and return to the street along with all of my brothers and sisters in blue. to the coward that tried to break me and my brothers and sisters, you know your hate made us stronger.
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>> reporter: we also heard very wonderful words for lorne ahrens, he used to volunteer at his children's school in is uniform. we also know that president obama was here for the public memorial for all five of them. then he returned to washington try to get some work done between the racial divide, officers and the african-american community. he spent four hours talking to law enforcement as well as activists, including black lives matter activists, trying to come to some sort of terms to move this forward and find some solutions. chris. >> sara, the question is simple. how do we remove the divide. the answer, very complex. cnn hosting a town hall on the racial divide last night, at the same time, president obama was hosting a forum between activists and police. we're joined by two people who were at that meeting. what happened, next. you know we said we'd take a look at our retirement plan today.
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well, no question, tension is high right now in the debate about policing in america, certainly front and center. so in the midst of all of this, cnn hosted a very, very emotional, passionate town hall last night that featured all perspectives, victims' families sharing their pain and common hopes. >> he would want peace.
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he would want good to come out of all of this. >> two families, impacted by last week's violence, coming together, stressing the need for unity. >> this has to stop. by taking another person's life, it don't make the other person's life come back. >> violence to violence will never be the answer to nothing. i think we all come together to say we want peace. we want peace for both families. >> activists and law enforcement, all joining a candid conversation about whether policing in america is inherently bias against blacks. >> i have spoken to police officers who have told me that they believe that black people are genetically predisposed to be criminals, and it is their obligation to control these people by whatever means are necessary. >> the history of african-americans in this country started with slavery, then it moved to segregation, and who was it who was enforcing those racist policies?
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the white police officer. so that narrative exists in the community based on the history and it is factual. >> questions on how to comply with police, dominating the cnn town hall. many fearful and distrusting. >> instructing our young people day in and day out that there is something in their behavior that brings on the abuse is tauntment to telling women there is something that we do that causes street harassment and rape. we have to change. >> we should not have racial divide in the country any more, but would he do. so i say to him, you do put your hands on the wheel, you do be careful. maybe you do still have to be extra careful, because you're black. >> can we just take a moment as america and register how profound and immoral it is to say this is the only thing that will keep you safe. is that if you pack this
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toolbox, and you take it with you ever where you go, and this is not the way everybody has to behave, only the way you have to behave, and it is not your fault, and you have not done anything wrong, but it is because of who you are and they do not see you as the person that i love, but they see you as a person that they should fear. >> a heart wrenching moment, as one ma one mother shares her fear for her son. >> every moment he is not with me, i fear for his life. i keep hearing you tell me to tell my son what to do. my 14-year-old is sitting right there. you tell him he needs to be more respectful. you tell him he needs to be more compliant to your rules and your laws. because i've told him, and obviously it doesn't matter, because you're telling me i'm not telling him enough. >> then this officer comforts her. >> i'm sorry that we have not fulfilled our civil duty and our
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responsibility to you and this community, and your children. i'm sorry. i just want to take a moment and say to you i'm sorry. [ applause ] >> so this town hall came on the heels of a really big meeting yesterday at the white house. a meeting where activists from black lives matter came together with law enforcement officers and president obama hosted all of it. the goal, try to come up with actual concrete solutions. so what is going on. what is plaguing this country. let's talk to chief terrance cunning ham, and rashad robinson, the director of color for change. you let out a big sigh. what is going through your head watching that. >> so much of the story i hear every single days within my own
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families, within black communities of what more can we do. what more can we do to keep our community safe. but more importantly, what does our civil society, what does our elected leaders, what are law enforcement going to do to shift the burden from black communities of what we have to do to tell our children, what we have to do to tell our young people. and people of all ages in black communities to stay safe. how do we shift the burden to what shouindividuals have to do >> we heard the dallas police chief, you are asking too much of us. let me bring you in here as well, chief cunning ham. respond to rashad and also i would like your response from earlier in the program, the former superintendent of the chicago police who said basically you're having a conversation about us, not with us. >> agree with that. a couple of comments i would like to start off with. first of all, what we're seeing
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here is a perfect storm. you're seeing this culmination of a feeling of loss of dignity on the part of the minority community, but i don't think that's just because of law enforcement. i think it is because of the failure of the social system around us. so i think it is not just law enforcement's issue to deal with. the community needs to be involved in this. part of the conversation that we heard yesterday, it is really important that the police department reflect the community that they serve. now, if we talk about that, clearly in communities across america right now, there is implicit bias. we know that. so there are going to be implicit biases in the community weiss ser communities we serve. we need to root them out and make sure we hold them accountable. >> one of the things van jones said on cnn that struck me so much, he said we need to start on the front end. we don't need to just deal with bad individuals on the back end. we need to deal with it on the
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front end, whether it is training of police officers, working with community organizers. that stood out to me. but take me into the room, because we weren't there. take me into the room with president obama and what was said. >> what struck me most is how much time he spent. i was in the last meeting in february and we were there for a couple of hours, and that even seemed like a long time. it was clear the president really wanted us to concentrate on solutions. agree with the chief that many different people came from different walks of life and i think folks are interested in looking at what we can do. solutions were put on the table around data, and around how we can think about federal resources, one of the things color of change, my organization is doing, looking at how we can hold police departments accountable through federal funds, both incentivizing good behavior but pulling back money when things are not done right. at the end of the day, what we actually need with all of these policies is accountability. even if we're doing things on
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the front end, trying to ask for more training or mental health, if there is not accountability mechanisms, it won't work. >> let's talk about accountability, and you know, comey, head of the fbi said it is, quote, ridiculous and embarrassing that there is not better data on police involved shootings. chief, do you agree? >> poppy, i said that the other day. i said it is an embarrassment we don't have that data. that data is being collected by the media and not by the police agencies. first of all, that's our data, we shouldn't be embarrassed by it. we should collect it and take a deep cut and see what it tells us. we should be able to frame our policies, be able to frame, you know, our discussions around how we police in the communities around the nation. based on that data. we should be collecting that. we've been working on that the international police chiefs association has been working with the fbi and all of our stake hoholders. >> what struck you most with the
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president in. >> first of all, no matter what your politics are, you cannot question the president's commitment to this issue, number one. he spent two hours with us on monday, and then he spent four hours with us again yesterday. you cannot question his commitment. the second piece is, we absolutely have to tamp down this rhetoric, whether it is the hyperbole, the sound bites, we've got to stop. this is about trying to find solutions to these problems. >> let's get it done. chief, thank you for your service. thanks for talking to us this morning. rashad, thank you as well. we really appreciate. >> poppy, great conversation. so important to keep it going. the other big storely, what will happen in the election with the vice-presidential selection for the presumptive nominee, donald trump. newt gingrich, he says he is in the running, along with indiana governor, mike pence. one or the other. who has a better shot up next, we're going to talk to a senator who is no stranger to veepstakes. to two, he hinted in
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brett bear. mike pence is a great personal friend. we've worked on many projects
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over the years. trump has a tough call, because he has two really good, but really different choices. and i think it would be interesting to see, you know, i'm certainly one of the people that will be sitting by the phone waiting. >> newt gingrich, talking about himself there as one of donald trump's choices. will he get the rose. more importantly, who will be the president for the country. we have the veepstakes going on and we also have an issue that should resonate with you every bit as much as the election, which is what is going on in this country to combat drugs in the form of opioids overtaking the country. we're going to senator rob po portman. thank you for being on "new day." let's look at the polls coming out from your home state. neck and neck we have here, literally, 39/39.
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changes very slaightly, but you have 41/41. it is knotted up in your state. whom do you think will take the state? you almost have to say trump, but why will he take ohio? >> i don't know. this is classic ohio, isn't it. it always comes down to this in ohio. it did in the last four or five presidential elections. in fact, ohio determined was president in 2000 and 2004 and by a narrow margin. we're the classic swing state. it depends on who addresses people's concerns. what folks in ohio are looking for about the issues they care about, jobs and economy, wages being flat and expenses being up. the middle class squeeze is very really, and this issue we talked about before, which is this epidemic of prescription drug and heroin addiction and overdoses in ohio. and then this terrorism issue
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obviously is on everybody's mind. i tell a town hall where that issue is the top issue people cared about, national security and personal security. >> and he does well with people on that. it is a little bit of a mix. not a clear advantage for him, but in ohio, he is doing well on that issue as well. do you think he can win ohio without governor kasich? >> yes. you know, john, kasich is doing a great job as governor, including get the deficit under control and economic growth and regulatory relief. but yeah, i think, you know, john kasich is an incredibly popular elected official now too. there was a poll out today showing him the most popular elected official in ohio. he is doing a good job and i think in a way that will help donald trump. >> the trump people sniffing around the portman house for the veepstakes? >> no, i'm not interested. i took myself out early on if i was in.
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i don't think i was. i'm focused on one thing, ohio. i'm trying to focus so i can represent people in the buckeye state. >> who do you like? >> i think the choices you talked about earlier are about both people i worked within the house of representatives and know how to get things done. vice-presidential candidates don't really help when you look at the data. doesn't matter much. but what does matter, once you get elected, somebody that can reach across the aisle and get things done. newt gingrich showed that with welfare reform and tax relief and balance budget working with bill clinton. mike pence has shown that. he gets things done. that's what is needed in our country right now. so i think either of those choices would be good. i assume he'll surprise us with some other choices, too, before this is over, chris. >> it is supposed to be over tomorrow. we'll see. >> we'll see. >> he is getting free media attention. let me ask you this.
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the opioid bill passes the senate. obama says he is in favor of it, but doesn't do enough, the president says. you care about this issue very intensely. it hits you at home, but you know it is a scourge that many have been ignoring. what do you believe about the bill and the future? >> it is historic. surely, the first time congress has gone on record to say that addiction is a disease and ought to be treated as a disease. you know, if it were cancer, we wouldn't be allowing it to happen. so i think it is amazing. there are about 200 groups around the country who represent people who are in the trenches on treechlt and recovery and also the law enforcement community who strongly supported the bill, they helped write the bill. the white house helped write the bill. we took three years to do it. i'm just excited we're finally at this point. it is tough to get stuff down in this town, even if it makes sense. this one clearly made sense. we had to go through the house, senate, different bills, put it together. it will make a difference in the
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people's lives i represent. that's what is important. funding is critical. it increases the amount congress is able to spend, $189 million a year, which is a big increase. i would like to see more. >> what will it do and what still needs to be done? >> it takes a comprehensive approach. it funds additional education, but also more treatment and longer term recovery. the first bill i'm told ever in congress that focuses on the recover reside of this, as one recovering addict told me recently, it was easier to get clean and it is harder to stay clean. it is about a longer term recover refocus and it hopes in terms of getting the prescription drugs off the street. it stops some of the overprescribing, prescription drug monitoring programs, helps people to get rid of their drugs if they have them. these are narcotic prescription drugs, usually painkillers, and it helps law enforcement. it is is a comprehensive approach, narcan, the miracle
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drug. every angle you have to combat this on. if we do that, we can begin to turn the tide. it is unfortunately growing, the problem is growing, more people are becoming addicted. more people are overdosing, putting it ahead of their family and their job. it is timely to get out there and help save lives and help allow people to achieve their purpose in life. >> as i told you the last time, i share your importance with this, and people in the frontlines keep saying the same thing to me. this is potentially worst than crack. so senator, as i said before, you let us know how to help by getting information out, we will do so. senator portman. >> you're already doing it. by doing that you're going to help save lives and i appreciate your interest in it. take care. >> so, so important to talk about and do something about. coming up, you're not going
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to want to miss this interview. an amazing individual, zaevion dobson, taking on the fight against guns and making a plea for others to do the same. she'll join me live on "new day." i'm confident this 10% can boost your market share. feel me lois? i'm feeling you. boom! look at that pie chart. the ready for you alert, only at laquinta.com. think fixing your windshield is a big hassle? not with safelite. this family needed their windshield replaced but they're daughters heart was set on going to the zoo. so guess what, i met them at the zoo. service that fits your schedule. that's another safelite advantage. ♪ safelite repair, safelite replace. ♪
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time now for the five things to know for your "new day." number one, donald trump set to announce his vp pick in about 24 hours. who will it be. indiana governor, mike pence, some say the front-runner. newt gingrich, he says he is a finalist too. hillary clinton meeting with senate democrats behind closed doors. her first meeting with senate lawmakers since bernie sanders endorsed her earlier this week. phoenix police, searching for a serial killer who investigate -- investigators believed, monster of maryville, most of his victims shot with a semi-automatic handgun. u.s. officials trying to confirm if it took out a top isis leader again. isis confirming the terror known
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as omar the chechen was killed in iraq. they thought they killed him four months ago in syria. prime minister theresa may, naming boris johnson, the country's foreign secretary, big job. johnson, former london mayor led the brexit campaign. poppy. chris, an emotional moment on national television last night. you may have seen it. a mother stepping into the spotlight for her son's heroic actions. >> i'm here to fight back. we as a country need to take a stand to consider the effects of gun violence on families throughout america. >> you will hear more from her powerful speech at the espys last night. straight ahead.
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welcome back to "new day." zaevion dobson, who died shielding his friends from
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random gunfire, honored at the espy awards in los angeles. he got the arthur ashe courage award. his mother and brother accepted the awards, and she gave an incredibly powerful speech. >> i'm here to urge all of you to join the movement tonight, to save innocent lives. we need to rewrite laws. to make it harder for the people to get guns. all the athletes in this room, you have lot of power. people look up to you. i know zaevion did. and i urge you to think tonight about why he died, and what you can do tomorrow to prevent the next innocent young man or woman from being lost as well. >> zanaboi dobson joins me now, and you brought the house to tears calling for action to do
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more. your son is in good company with legends like muhammad ali, billy jean king getting this ward. take me into that moment for you as a mother. >> wow, just joy in my heart to think about it all and to think about zaevion. just joy to my heart. >> what would he say? i have no doubt zaevion was looking down on you and your other sons last night. what would he be saying? >> zaevion, he was a fighter, so he would say mom, just fight for me. do the right thing. you always told me to do the right thing. do the right thing for me. just get your voice out there, and let your voice be heard. and make sure justice be served for me. >> something that you told the audience last night that people didn't know, even though your son's story has become very well known is that his 12-year-old cousin was shot and killed by random gunfire in a drive-by shooting just months after he
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was. >> yes. >> how can that be the state of america right now? is that a question you ask yourself? >> yes. it is not right. our children, they fall victim all the time. they get caught up in the middle of the moment of just other people's mess, and they fall victim. >> so president obama has spoken about zaevion before. let's play the viewers about what he said. >> he was shot in the head, and the girls were spared. he gave his life to save theirs. an act of heroism, a lot bigger than anything we should ever expect from a 15-year-old. >> and then he tweeted out, we can build a future worthy of his
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promise. you called on all of the athletes powerful men and women in the room last night to do something. tell us what it is you want them to do. >> give back to the community. go in to the core of everything and it is a strong need for men and women to be role models in a community, because some kids don't have parents that just stand up and take them places and do things for them. it is a strong need in a community to just get in there and give our kids a hand. in school, recreation centers and all that kind of stuff. >> so it goes far beyond some of the gun control fight for you. it is about a lot more than that. >> yes, it is a lot of things that go on that could lead up to this. but you have to go to the core of everything. >> four very famous basketball players stood up there last night, carmelo anthony, chris
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ball, dwayne wade and lebron james, and they made a plea as well to america. what were your thoughts as you watched them last night? >> it was powerful. i was glad to see four men get up there and talk about what really needs to be done. they have children of their own. so i'm sure they're in their lives, and it is more children that, you know, don't have role models, they don't have the same things as, you know, some other kids do. and it is time to just go inside the community and see what the need is for our children. >> the one word that describes your son, what is it? >> bold. >> bold. >> we remember, we remember zaevion. he is a hero, and our thoughts are with you. thank you so much for being with us this morning. i'm glad he got that ward. >> thank you. >> all the best. the good stuff is next. to keep up with the data from over 30 billion connected devices.
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i think when people hear about i think it's important for, everyone to know that there is so much more to memory support than the stigmas you hearabout. that these residents still have lives and their lives still matter and that they are still living their lives. that they're not locked away and that they still have a lot to live for, you know, that they have people that care about them and they have people that love them and i love them, so (laughs). call now to find out how we can put our 30 years of understanding to work for your loved one today. ready for a little good stuff. >> i could use some good stuff. >> relevant and poignant. a group of police officers were waiting for their meal in a local diner when a couple walked if and refused to sit any where
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near them. >> you don't have to worry about it. we won't hurt you. and he looked at me hard again and said he is not sitting here and walked away. >> that's officer chuck thomas an and he wanted to turn it into hope. he paid for the entire meal. >> essentially, i was the whole goal to let him know that we're not here to hurt you, if you're not -- i mean, we're not here for that. we're here for you. we work for the public. we just want to, i mean, vet a relationship between the community and the police. >> what do you think? >> it's incredible in what he wrote there, i left a tip, too. you know, it's all good. i mean, that is an embodiment of what we've been talking about, and those small things add up. >> that's right. there is tension, there are problems. what do you do about it. he decided to turn a negative into a positive. >> by the way we can't just look to washington do it.
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it is about these things, every single community, being bigger than the fight. >> absolutely. in fact, we can probably look to washington last. this is a local and state issue. >> unfortunately. >> a lot of news this morning. let's get to ana cabera. keep it coming. we need more positive stories. >> yeah. "newsroom" starts now. happening now in the "newsroom," the frenzy at a fever pitch. >> i'm thinking about two. >> who has what it takes to be trump's running mate. plus, real problems, a deep division. president obama speaks out after his meeting with police and community activists. >> i think it is fair to say we will see more tension between police and communities this month, next month, next year. >> what happens next? let's talk, in the cnn "newsroom."

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