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tv   New Day  CNN  July 28, 2016 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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the big line from president obama is i'm ready to pass the baton to hillary clinton. the two rivals >> the democratic party's biggest stars also took time to slam donald trump's message that they characterized as one of fear. the stage now set for clinton's acceptance speech. what will she say tonight? we have it all covered. cnn's michelle kosinski is live inside the convention hall. hi, michelle. >> reporter: hi, alisyn. a lot of work went into that speech, weeks of writing, sick drafts. president obama said when he saw the first lady's speech on monday, he stayed up until 3:30 in the morning working on it. his task was, how do you make this different, new, how do you make it resonate? how do you top your own speech from 12 years prior? he just may have done it. he presented this as kind of a second chapter to that first
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speech, building on it with a lot of emotion. you could almost see the weight of this moment and of america's choice on president obama's face as he tried to connect past with present, with future. >> while this nation has been tested by war and it's been tested by recession and all manner of challenges, i stand before you again tonight after almost two terms as your president to tell you i am more optimistic about the future of america. >> reporter: optimism the focus, in a speech the president delivered almost with a constant smile, even as he ripped into republicans, laying out a stark contrast. >> but what we heard in cleveland last week wasn't particularly republican, and it sure wasn't conservative. what we heard was a deeply pessimistic vision of a country
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where we turn against each other and turn away from the rest of the world. there were no serious solutions to pressing problems, just the fanning of resentment and blame and anger and hate. and that is not the america i know. the america i know is full of courage and optimism and ingenuity. the america i know is decent and generous. >> reporter: and this time president obama didn't hold back. yes, saying the name. >> and then there's donald trump. don't boo, vote. the donald is not really a plans guy. he's not really a facts guy either. the choice isn't even close. there has never been a man or a
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woman, not me, not bill, nobody, more qualified than hillary clinton to serve as president of the united states of america. we're not a fragile people. we're not a frightful people. our power doesn't come from some self-declared savior promising that he alone can restore order as long as we do things his way. we don't look to be ruled. and the american dream is something no wall will ever contain. >> reporter: and making the point that unity and democracy work, not to be overlooked -- >> we all need to be as vocal and as organized and as persistent as bernie sanders supporters have been during this election. >> reporter: he urged this crowd to vote and for gun control advocates to be as vocal as the gun lobby, becoming emotional as he started to tell some real stories of american struggle, compassion, and perseverance.
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>> and i'll tell you what's picked me back up every single time. it's been you. the american people. it's the painting i keep in my private office, a big-eyed green owl with blue wings made by a 7-year-old girl who was taken from us in newtown. given to me by her parents so i wouldn't forget. time and again you've picked me up, and i hope sometimes i picked you up too. [ cheers and applause ] and tonight i ask you to do for hillary clinton what you did for me. i'm asking you to join me to reject cynicism and reject fear and to summon what is best in us to elect hillary clinton as the next president of the united states and show the world we still believe in the promise of
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this great nation. thank you for this incredible journey. let's keep it going. >> reporter: so hillary clinton's e-mails. it was interesting how he broached that subject, saying she has her critics, this is what happens when you're under the microscope for 40 years, everybody makes mistakes, at least she puts herself out there, softening her responsibility. he said really, between these two candidates, it's not even close as a choice, but the fact is, it is close. and the president knows that, but it's obvious that many people out there are not willing to see hillary clinton the way the president is portraying her. alisyn and chris? >> you're right, michelle. it's very close in all of the latest polls. so let's talk about what was effective last night and what wasn't. we want to bring in our panel. cnn political analyst and washington bureau chief for "the daily beast," jackie kucinich. david gregory and ron brownstein. great to have all of you here.
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jackie, what wiere your impressions? >> obama was in his element last night. he's so good at that kind of speech. this was about rallying the obama coalition and making sure they get out to vote for hillary clinton to continue his legacy. he even said at one point, she's more qualified than i was when i was running. >> and bill. >> and bill. then he apologized to bill, who was having a great time last night. camera kept going to him. that's what this was about last night. whether he was successful, we'll have to see, but that was certainly a step in the right direction if you are in the democratic party. >> looking at the different speeches and themes they laid out, what do you think the strategy is? >> i think very clearly on the plus side for them, they're trying to say this is not a contest. you heard it from the president. this is not a left/right election. this is not a battle between democrats and republicans. it's a battle between hillary clinton, this uber qualified candidate, and a total outlier from the republican party, someone who's uniquely demagogue
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and unqualified for the job. i think on the negative side, there's so much talk about optimism in the world. did they fail to reach out to people who feel so disaffected by the political system and from the political system? did they do a good enough job speaking to that element? >> i've covered every convention since '84. i thought this was the greatest single night for any party since bill clinton's acceptance speech. it was the sheer quality of the speeches. the biden, bloomberg, and obama speeches were extremely effective. a lot of the night was about going beyond the obama coalition, particularly with bloombe bloomberg. they made an important strategic choice to separate trump from
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the republican party. there was extraordinary message discipline. they built it on a series of contrasts over and over. they accused trump of a weakness and attributed the offsetting strength to clinton. top-down verse bottom-up, optimistic verse pessimistic, fights for you verse looks out for himself. there was a series throughout the speeches. we'll see how it matters. ultimately, it's on the nominee. the goal of a convention is to frame the choice for voters. they have done that about as well as they can do leading up to her. >> and targeting the ability to deploy a joe biden and tim kaine to reach working class white voters. then of course the president, michelle obama to target their coalition in 2008 and '12. that's a lot of resources at their disposal. >> to your point, when you listen to tim kaine's speech, he
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reached out to bernie voters and republicans within a couple paragraphs of each other. >> what about what they didn't talk about? president obama, i guess, went the farthest, ironically. he was supposed to be the cleanest last night, the most positive. she's made mistakes, we all make mistakes. >> do you want to hear that moment? >> please. >> let's listen to how he framed it. >> look, hillary's got her share of critics. she has been caricatured by the right and by some on the left. she has been accused of everything you can imagine and some things that you cannot. but she knows that's what happens when you're under a microscope for 40 years. she knows that sometimes during those 40 years she's made
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mistakes just like i have, just like we all do. that's what happens when we try. >> he tried to punctuate this proposition with a good use of the man in arena from teddy roosevelt, saying she's been in there, she's been fighting, she's not one of the timid souls, as teddy roosevelt said, obviously referring to trump. but does it work? >> i think that's not really the essential argument that everybody makes mistakes. their central argument, very clearly, is you can trust her to fight for you on the things that matter in your life. whether that's going to work -- in other words, trust is not whether you can believe every sentence and every clause that she said on the e-mail. trust is whether she has spent her life fighting for the kinds of things you care about. that's what they're trying to do. she has a bigger -- maybe a bigger trust deficit.
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i don't know if it's going to work, but that's clearly the strategy. >> but do you care about people like me. the famous poll question. they spent so much time on trump and his business record, that he has a record of not caring about people through his business dealings, and you might not completely trust her, but she's going to fight for you more than that guy. it goes back to this permission. >> it's true, but i do think they need to address the issue that the rules don't apply to the clintons. that's one of the chief criticisms of her and her husband for that matter. >> and that may be something only she can address. so far the signals they have been putting out -- it will be interesting to see tonight. the signal is she's not going to address this head on. we'll see what happens tonight. >> we all make mistakes. does that go far enough to the rules don't apply to the clintons? >> we don't make mistakes like that. >> it's an acknowledgment of her flaws. it's a way to offset all the
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bagga baggage, all the opinions about her that are baked in. she keeps plugging away despite how hard she gets hit. think about mike bloomberg trying to reach those people. >> that was bloomberg. it was the other side. it's not that you -- you may not respect her on every point, you may not agree with her on every point, but when you look at this contrast, he's arguing there is no choice. >> panel, thank you very much. great to talk to you. >> as we saw last night and as we're hearing from the panel, people had specific missions last night. the vice president as well as the vice presidential nominee were out there to take very specific swings at donald trump. in fact, the most intense attacks we've seen from the democrats against trump so far with only 102 days until election day. that's right, 102 days to go. cnn's manu raju joins us now with more. we're going to set up a graphic where you can watch my hairline move as we get closer to the end of the election. >> reporter: not a bad idea, chris. remember, this convention actually started off in
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disarray. there was that sudden resignation of the democratic party chairwoman. there were all these outbursts by bernie sanders supporters. but last night we saw this party unite against a common foe. that's donald trump. >> he has no clue about what makes america great. actually, he has no clue, period. >> reporter: the democratic party unleashing, launching their most blistering attacks to date. >> you cannot believe one word that comes out of donald trump's mouth. >> in an unstable world, we cannot afford unstable leadership. >> i'm a new yorker, and i know a con when i see one. >> reporter: deploying the party's high-profile stars, independent businessman michael bloomberg delivering multitiered attacks on trump's willingness to be president. >> how can there be pleasure in saying you're fired?
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>> reporter: vice president biden using his blue-collar background to question trump's dedication to the working class. >> he's trying to tell us he cares about the middle class. give me a break. that's a bunch of malarky. >> reporter: new york city's former mayor challenging trump's record as a businessman. >> trump says he wants to run the nation like he's running his business? god help us. >> reporter: former defense secretary leon panetta taking on trump's foreign policy credentials. >> donald trump says he gets his foreign policy experience from watching tv and running the miss universe pageant. if only it were funny. but it is deadly serious. >> reporter: and condemning trump's challenge to russia to hack hillary clinton's e-mails. >> russia, if you're listening, i hope you're able to find the 30,000 e-mails that are missing. >> it is inconceivable to me
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that any presidential candidate would be that irresponsible. >> reporter: clinton's running mate tim kaine stepping into the attack dog role, mocking the republican opponent. >> he's got a way of saying the same two words every time he makes his biggest, hugest promises. believe me. it's going to be great, believe me. >> reporter: while painti ining trump as untrustworthy, inciting his refusal to release his tax returns as proof. >> hey, donald. what are you hiding? >> reporter: the virginia senator also extending an olive branch to republicans disenchanted with their party's nominee. >> if any of you are looking for that party of lincoln, we've got a home for you right here in the democratic party. >> reporter: an effort echoed by bloomberg. who went off script to question trump's mental clarity. >> as an independent, i am asking you to join with me.
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together let's select a sane, competent person. >> reporter: now, donald trump's campaign responded forcefully last night releasing a statement saying this. tonight the democrats offered only more rewards for the rich, powerful, and well connected and more angry, demeaning, sniping attacks against all decent americans who want change for their families. so clearly, alisyn, this is an effort by the trump campaign to paint themselves as the outsiders going against the political class. >> okay, manu. thank you. we'll talk about all of that in our next secondment. so how effective will those attacks against donald trump and his attacks against her be now? our panel breaks that down next. now she writes mostly in emoji.
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his cynicism is unbounded. his lack of empathy and compassion can be summed up in a phrase i suspect he's most proud
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of having made famous, you're fired. how can there be pleasure in saying you're fired? he's trying to tell us he cares about the middle class. give me a break. that's a bunch of malarky. >> tonight is hillary clinton, but last night was the night that the case was made against donald trump. that's the vice president obviously, joe biden. he was leading the charge against trump in philadelphia. how effective were the democrats? is this the way for them to go? let's bring back the panel. david gregory, ron brownstein, jackie kucinich. the negative works in politics. we see it in the gop no, ma'am -- nominee. they're trying to return the favor. >> you heard it all the way through. did it work? we'll have to see what the polls say after the fact.
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but it was consistent, and they said the same thing. he doesn't care about you. he cares about himself. over and over again we heard it last night and the night before. i'm sure we'll hear about it tonight as well. >> i think the theme of -- and the argument that trump is dangerous, that he's uniquely unqualified, that he's outside the major political experience, that he's not even a part of the republican party, those were really powerful arguments. just to be watching joe biden in that clip, you can understand why there were so many people in the democratic party who thought he should run for the presidency, why he should be the nominee. his plain spokenness, his ability to take the fight to the opposition, and to speak in a way that could appeal to the very voters that trump has really rolled up. >> the biggest blind spot is having speakers and messages aimed at those white working class voters. i thought joe biden did the best job by far of any speaker of tying the diverse modern democratic party back to its working class roots and showing a bridge between the two.
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i would differ a little, chris, in that i thought what made this unusual last night was that every time they identified a weakness in trump, they tried to define it against an offsetting strength in clinton. they kept saying, he's unprepared, she's the most qualified ever. he's talking down america, she's optimistic. he has been looking out for himself, she will fight for you. will that solve all of her problems? i don't know. but they have to find donald trump negatively. he's polling in the horse race above the share of americans who see him favorably, which is pretty remarkable, and is a statement of the challenges she has. i thought last night was a very disciplined way to create a series of dualities and contrasts between the two of them. >> it seemed as though everybody had their role last night, every speaker. vice president biden was the attack dog. vice presidential nominee tim kaine was also an attack teddy bear? let's listen to his moment at the podium. >> trump is a guy who promises a
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lot but you might have noticed he's got a way of saying the same two words every time he makes his biggest, hugest promises. believe me. it's going to be great, believe me. we're going to build a wall and make mexico pay for it, believe me. we're going to destroy isis so fast, believe me. there's nothing suspicious in my tax returns, believe me. >> jackie, i know that he's getting a little grief because his impression was not spot on, however, he has a folksy, conversational, warm style people will respond to. >> i was going to say like youth pastor. he has that sort of thing going on. but he's best when he's talking about hillary clinton, the woman he knows, the woman he worked with in the senate. the attack dog thing, it just -- i don't believe it.
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it just doesn't seem like tim kaine. >> i thought that was the one dissonant note in the evening. tim kaine is the first relatively big-city mayor on a ticket since 1968. his entire career in virginia has been built around consolidating strength in urban, metropolitan areas, both cities and the suburbs. he really embodies the democratic metropolitan future. i think they kind of overdid it. that's not who he is. he's a harvard lawyer, civil rights lawyer, mayor, governor, someone who can speak to that emerging suburban major. >> you say they turned him into it. did he write his own speech? >> whether it was him or the campaign, they dialed up -- the saturday speech where he introduced himself is a much better reflection of who he is. >> ron's point is any of us are naive to think anybody goes out
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there and freelances, especially when the clintons are involved. they are very methodical in terms of how they do things. i thought the delivery aside, him using that stick of the taxes on trump was unusually effective. we've been asking for the taxes forever. they say no t and it never seems to resonate. but it did in that hall. why, david? what was it galvanizing for at least the base about donald trump's shortcomings? >> you can't trust him. he's hiding something. he's a con. he's not qualified. he doesn't care about you. it's all an act. you know, it's the reality show element of all this. i think kaine has a role to play. i think he's smaller than some of the other democratic lions, including the president, who are around hillary clinton. i think what's important is that clinton is really wrapped in the mantle of president obama. he's very much on the ballot. that's going to invite criticism of his era and her role as secretary of state.
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i don't know how much they've really taken that on. i'll be looking for that tonight. >> i bet you on election day, over 80% of people who say they approve of president obama will vote for hillary clinton. 80% of people who say they disapprove will vote for trump. he might as well campaign. >> we're holding you to those numbers. all right. thanks so much, guys. meanwhile, donald trump, of course, under fire as we've been talking about for challenging russia to hack hillary clinton and to find her missing e-mails. his critics call that an act of treason. we have a live report on the latest next.
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by finding a policy to fit your budget. [ coughs ] sorry, tickle in my throat! water would be nice, but that would go right through me. ghost problems. all right. how big a deal will this be? donald trump challenging russian hackers to find thousands of hillary clinton's missing e-mails. the democrats are up in arms. they're saying that trump
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compromised national security. some are even calling it treason. cnn global affairs correspondent elise labott live in washington with more. what do you make of the situation? how serious is it? >> reporter: well, chris, the message by the clinton campaign is it goes way beyond politics and are a serious national security issue. last night on the convention floor, democrats used this as further evidence that trump is unfit to be commander in chief. >> as someone who was responsible for protecting our nation from cyber attacks, it is inconceivable to me that any presidential candidate would be that irresponsible. >> reporter: former cia director leon panetta changed his planned convention speech to sound the alarm bells over a challenge by donald trump to the russian hackers to go after hillary
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clinton. >> russia, if you're listening, i hope you're able to find the 30,000 e-mails that are missing. >> reporter: donald trump laughing off claims russia hacked dnc computers to help him win the white house. >> it is so far fetched. it's so ridiculous. honestly, i wish i had that power. >> reporter: but intelligence officials have little doubt russian military intelligence was behind the hack, even if they won't say it publicly. >> the russians hack our systems. not just government systems but private systems. but, you know, what the motives were in terms of the leaks, all that, i can't say directly. what i do know is that donald trump has repeatedly expressed admiration for vladimir putin. >> i said that putin has much better leadership qualities than obama, but who doesn't know that? >> reporter: trump batted away
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allegations that business ties were at play. >> i built an unbelievable company, but if you look there, you'll see there's nothing in russia. >> reporter: his only connection, he said, a russian billionaire who bought his palm beach mansion netting trump a huge profit. he denied any dealings with vladimir putin, but the russian leader has praised trump to cnn. >> translator: but there's one thing that i paid attention to and that i definitely welcome, is that mr. trump said he's ready to restore full-fledged russian/american relations. >> reporter: now, whether russia is manipulating the u.s. election to help get trump elected is an open question, but even members of trump's own party are warning the kremlin to butt out. a spokesman for house speaker paul ryan calls russia a global menace led by a devious thug and even whose own running mate, indiana governor mike pence, is warning of serious consequences if russia is interfering in the election, alisyn. >> all right. we'll be exploring that topic
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later in the program, elise. thank you very much. so the republicans' model of tapping into the fear, or the democrats' message of rejecting the fear, which one is most effective? we discuss that with our panel next. you don't let anything keeu sidelined. that's why you drink ensure. with 9 grams of protein and 26 vitamins and minerals. for the strength and energy to get back to doing... ...what you love. ensure. always be you. how do robots work? ♪ you need a team... ...working together... ♪ ...doing all kinds of jobs. and the best place to find the job that's right for you is on the world's number-one job site. indeed. how the world works.
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all right. interesting contrast to look at this morning. let's listen to donald trump at the republican convention and then president obama at the democratic convention. they offer americans two very different pictures of america today. >> the problems we face now, poverty and violence at home, war and destruction abroad, will last only as long as we continue relying on the same politicians who created them in the first place. >> we're not a fragile people. our power comes from those immortal declarations first put to paper right here in philadelphia all those years ago. we hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal. >> joining us now to talk about
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this is john phillips. he's a trump supporter. jennifer granholm, former governor of michigan. thanks so much for being here. john, how do you characterize those two different visions? >> well, hillary's essentially running for president obama's third term. if you're the party in power, the argument that you have to make to the public is you're better off now than you were eight years ago. that's what the president was doing. donald trump saying you're not better off, you're not safer, you don't have more economic security, and the comparison last night that president obama made to president reagan with his sunny optimism, i think he got the wrong election. because he was talking about 1980. with donald trump, the election he's running, the campaign he's running this time around is more akin to ronald reagan's 1966 bernatorial election when you had all the problems in the state university system in california, and he ran on a very law and order platform. he's tough enough to bring california back around. i think that's the reagan comparison that works here. >> why are the democrats not
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tone deaf to the despair and the darkness that exists in the country and around the world? >> i think joe biden addressed that. i think the issue for the democrats, and this is something that the republicans have tried to be the mantle of the patriots, and last night there was nobody more patriotic about the future of america than barack obama and all of those speakers. i'm a naturalized citizen. i was brought to this country when i was 4 years old. the world looks at america the way that barack obama described last night, with hope, with -- people want to come here because it's such a fantastic place and don't trash our country. that notion of pride, of being part of this, that is something that -- the reason why you saw this incredible emotion in the hall. we have such pride in this country. yeah, there are still problems, and he acknowledged that, the president did. but he also acknowledged we have come a long way, and we still have work to do.
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hillary clinton is going to take us to the next step. >> see, there are both these compe competing, and i think satisfying, messages that each side has. last night president obama said americans reject cynicism and they reject fear. that's satisfying. you feel proud when you hear that. and donald trump says, make america great again. that's satisfying. but they're mutually exclusive in this race somehow. >> when voters go into the voting booth, they're going to ask themselves the question, do i have safer now than i did eight years ago? do i feel like i have more economic security than i did eight years ago? if the answer is, yeah, i feel safer, then that's good news for hillary clinton. if the answer is no, i don't, then donald trump has a real pathway to victory. >> that's all about how you architect the question. >> yes, yes. >> in one way, a campaign comes down to whose question wins, whose proposition, or now the word we use today is narrative, whose narrative wins. the definitional compromise is, who do you want to be, america? the republicans are saying, i'll
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tell you who i want to be. i want to be tough against these people trying to kill us, not trying to make friends with everybody, and i want to bring this country back to what it was before all this pc madness, and pc madness means what you want it to mean. the democrats are saying the exact opposite. which do you think wins and why? >> first of all, if it's take america back again, we know there's a whole swath of populations that don't feel that america was good for them. so you're carving out all of the people, the rising american majority. donald trump is all about, i'm going to make you afraid again. and that fear message, you know, love trumps hate, positivity trumps fear. >> but they see it as strength, calling out darkness, calling out danger, terror. >> look at the messenger. this messenger is a messenger that will not just make you feel safer. in fact, he will create more danger, will make america more at risk based upon what he has
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said. every single day there's stories out about how risky he is, how unstable he is, how his temperament is unfit to run this country. that is not a message that is a winner message for the republicans. >> i want to the switch gears because i want to talk about this cnn investigation that drew griffin is leading. i want both of your takes on this. this is about donald trump and who he hires to work at his companies. he has said he's going to bring american jobs back, he's going to employ americans again. however, when cnn looked at his own business practices over the last 15 yeast, they found he had hired many, many foreign workers. 1,338 foreign workers to work at his jupiter golf club, for jobs such as waiters, waitresses, cooks, things that americans can do. you don't knneed specialty from foreign workers. he particularly liked hiring attractive women from south africa and places like romania. >> he likes marrying them too. >> how does he justify this as
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someone who he says is going to just give americans jobs? >> he says that he is a businessman that knows what's wrong with the law. he practices the law as it's written and knows how to change it. this is the same argument the democrats use on campaign finance reform when al gore was at the buddhist monk in california raising money. as the law exists now, this is what you have to do to compete. >> do you trust him when you say i'm just going to emphasize americans getting jobs here when this is his record? >> lots of people don't agree with laws on the books that follow them because they're the law. donald trump says that's the category he fits into. >> here's the problem. he's not abiding by the law. so many of the lawsuits that have been brought against him -- >> but this is legal. there were visas for them. >> but here's the problem. over the course of his existence as a business person, starting with polish workers in the '70s and '80s, people have brought
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lawsuits against him because he's violated wage laws, violated hour laws, brought in people and made them work overtime with no extra compensation. there's a lawsuit out of his casinos in las vegas where he just had to pay a settlement. he does not treat workers fairly. as a business person, for him to say, i'm a business person, we all do that, that's not right. business people treat their workers fairly, and he does not. >> governor, john, thank you very much. >> all right. so the latest gift to the democrats from donald trump is what he said about the russians maybe hacking b hillary clinton's e-mails and trying to find those deleted e-mails for the rest of us to see. now, you have democrats calling that treason. is it really that serious, or is this more politics at play? what should it mean to you? next. well she loves to say, "well, fantastic!" a lot. i do say that, you see... i study psychobiology. i'm a fine arts major. nobody really believes that i take notes this way, but they actually make sense to me.
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i will tell you this, russia, if you're listening, i hope you're able to find the 30,000 e-mails that are missing. i think you will probably be rewarded mightily by our press. let's see if that happens. >> did that just happen? did donald trump just ask russia to hack hillary clinton's e-mails or wherever they think they would find them and release them to the press? a lot of people don't like that. they're actually accusing trump of treason and saying this is proof that even if it isn't treason, it's proof that trump is unfit to be commander in chief. are they taking it too far? let's discuss with former
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undersecretary for political affai affairs, former state department official, and former ambassador to nato, nicolas burns, a hillary clinton supporter. thank you very much for being on "new day." how seriously should we consider this? is this just trump hyperbole and just throwing something out there that's really a political jab, or do you see this as something more? >> oh, i think this is shameful. what he did yesterday -- >> shameful like politics shameful, or dangerous, policy, russia mingling. >> in terms of the honor of the united states and in terms of the policy of the united states. russia is our greatest adversary in the world. russia is trying to hack the united states. we know that. to suggest the russian government go after hillary clinton or the democratic national committee's e-mails is wrong, and it shows extraordinarily poor judgment. he also said in that same press conference that he might consider recognizing russia's illegal annexation of crimea and lift the sanctions. what he's effectively doing, in my judgment, is contradicting the policy of every american
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president, democrat and republican, since harry truman, which is we need to contain russian power and we need to be strong in our own commitments to the european allies. he's -- you know, his kid glove treatment of putin, his constant denigration of the germans and the french and the british, is a strange way to try to run for president and show the american people he's got good judgment. >> what do you see in this? a lot of democrat types keep introducing this confluence of events, that russia hacks the e-mails. it seems that's what the fbi thinks happened. russia denies it. trump then says this to russia about the e-mails. paul manafort is running trump's campaign. he has connections to russia. the gop platform winds up, as you say, seeming to pull back from stopping russia's annexation of at least half of ukraine. what do you make of that?
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are these just -- is this a coincidence, does it not really matter, is this political hay, or is there something there? >> it's hard to know what he believes about foreign policy because he knows so little, frankly. he's ignorant about foreign policy. what he said in his press conference yesterday, and he's repeated this before, is we need to have a good relationship with putin, i can work with him, i alone can get through to him. so he gives up long-standing american positions that ronald reagan and george h.w. bush, dwight d. eisenhower in the '50s held, and that's not smart because the russians obviously are going to take advantage of someone like trump who doesn't have experience in foreign policy. last week, chris, i think he said something equally bizarre. he said under his presidency, he would not guarantee our nato allies that he would protect them if russia attacks them. he was referring to poland and the baltic states. that's a direct refutation of what the republican party has always stood for. >> one, he would say, i'm not
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bailing on nato. i'm saying pay your fair share. this has gotten too expensive for the u.s. you've gotten a free ride. he's saying, if you care so much about my foreign connections, why aren't you as upset about the clinton global initiative and all the money that came into that place from bad governments that the united states wants nothing to do with while hillary clinton was secretary of state? where's your outrage on that? >> i was ambassador to nato on 9/11. the day after 9/11, the nato allies pledged to go to war with us against osama bin laden. they invoked article 5, the clause of the nato treaty that an attack on one is an attack on all. they were there for us when we needed them. they can't treat this as some kind of tony soprano protection racket where if they don't pay up by monday morning, we cut them off. >> but they should pay their fair share. >> of course they should. 20 of the 28 nato allies have increased their defense spending since putin went into ukraine. >> and what about the foundation? if we're worried about the
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influence of bad actors it abroad on u.s. politics, why isn't there similar questioning and concern about the clinton foundation? >> the two are not at all comparable would be my answer to donald trump. we're talking about one of the most vital american strategic interests in the world. that europe remain free and democratic. you see the russians invading georgia, ukraine, and pressuring the baltic states. we need to stand up to that. what hillary clinton wants to do, what president obama is doing, is to stand up to the russians. donald trump is caving to the russians, and it's shocking to see a major presidential candidate take such a weak position on a core american national interest. >> appreciate your perspective on this. you're always welcome on "new day." >> thank you. >> so what did we see last night, and what will be its effect on the election? did president obama and vice president biden deliver for hillary clinton last night? you know how we talk about the bounce that can come out of a convention? will that be why hillary clinton
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gets one? we're going to discuss it next. . soon, she'll be binge-studying. now she writes mostly in emoji. soon, she'll type the best essays in the entire 8th grade. today, the only spanish words he knows are burrito and enchilada. soon, he'll take notes en espanol. get back to great with the right gear. from the place with the experts. office depot officemax. gear up for school. gear up for great. and these are the lungs. (boy) sorry. (dad) don't worry about it. (vo) at our house, we need things that are built to last. that's why we got a subaru. (avo) love.
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it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. you know what they used to do with guys like that when they were in a place like this? they'd be carried out on a stretcher, folks. and you can tell them to go f--- themselves! i could stand in the middle of 5th avenue and shoot somebody and i wouldn't lose any voters, okay? it's like incredible. when mexico sends its people, they're bringing drugs, they're bringing crime, they're rapists. you know, you could see there was blood coming out of her eyes, blood coming out of her wherever... you gotta see this guy - ahh, i don't know what i said, ahh. "i don't remember." he's going like, "i don't remember!" our children and grandchildren will look back at this time...
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...at the choices we are about to make. the goals we will strive for. the principles we will live by. and we need to make sure that they can be proud of us. i'm hillary clinton and i approve this message. to actually operate my business from everest.de and the surface pro 4 allows me i help clients achieve their dreams. being able to go between having a laptop and having a tablet is really important to me... i couldn't do that with my mac. i love that we as humans can go to the top of the world. it's the durability...the reliability...it's incredible. with usaa is awesome. homeowners insurance life insurance automobile insurance i spent 20 years active duty they still refer to me as "gunnery sergeant" when i call being a usaa member because of my service in the military
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to pass that on to my kids something that makes me happy my name is roger zapata and i'm a usaa member for life. usaa. we know what it means to serve. get an insurance quote and see why 92% of our members plan to stay for life. america isn't about yes, he will, it's about yes, we can. >> yes, we can. the brightest future for our country is the one that we build together. >> i'm a new yorker. i know a con when i see one. >> he has no clue about what
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makes america great. he has no clue, period. >> there has never been a man or a woman more qualified than hillary clinton. >> i want to say madam president. >> elect hillary clinton and show the world we still believe in the promise of this great nation. >> this is "new day" with chris cuomo and alisyn camerota. >> good morning, everyone. welcome back to your new day. chris and i are live here in philadelphia at the cnn grill. of course, we're at the site of the democratic national convention. so for democrats, it was a night steeped in symbolism and history. president obama saying that he's ready to pass the baton to hillary clinton, america's first black president there embracing his one-time rival and making the case for her to also make history. >> i like this line so much i will use it twice.
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but before he passed the baton, he used it to beat donald trump over the head. the president making a constructive case for why hillary is the only choice in this election, while others took to the podium last night to give the gop nominee a beatdown. we have all that was said and what landed and what missed covered for you. let's begin with cnn white house correspondent michelle kosinski, still inside that convention hall. just can'ter er itear yourself. >> reporter: yeah, now the excitement is building for tonight. it was only a couple weeks ago we saw president obama deliver a speech with hillary clinton in charlotte. it kind of made you wonder, how is this speech going to be any different? he seemed to put everything into the last one. but this was different in a number of ways. it was emotional. that in turn drew out so much emotion from that crowd. this seemed to be the first time, really, we heard the go good-bye from president obama, the i'm really leaving soon, and here's what i need you to do for
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me. you could almost see the weight of this moment and of america's choice on president obama's face as he tried to connect past with present, with future. >> while this nation has been tested by war and it's been tested by recession and all manner of challenges, i stand before you again tonight after almost two terms as your president to tell you i am more optimistic about the future of america. >> reporter: optimism the focus, in a speech the president delivered almost with a constant smile, even as he ripped into republicans, laying out a stark contrast. >> but what we heard in cleveland last week wasn't particularly republican, and it sure wasn't conservative. what we heard was a deeply
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pessimistic vision of a country where we turn against each other and turn away from the rest of the world. there were no serious solutions to pressing problems, just the fanning of resentment and blame and anger and hate. and that is not the america i know. the america i know is full of courage and optimism and ingenuity. the america i know is decent and generous. >> reporter: and this time president obama didn't hold back. yes, saying the name. >> and then there's donald trump. don't boo, vote. the donald is not really a plans guy. he's not really a facts guy either. the choice isn't even close. there has never been a man or a woman, not me, not bill, nobody,
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more qualified than hillary clinton to serve as president of the united states of america. we're not a fragile people. we're not a frightful people. our power doesn't come from some self-declared savior promising that he alone can restore order as long as we do things his way. we don't look to be ruled. and the american dream is something no wall will ever contain. >> reporter: and making the point that unity and democracy work, not to be overlooked -- >> we all need to be as vocal and as organized and as persistent as bernie sanders supporters have been during this election. >> reporter: he urged this crowd to vote and for gun control advocates to be as vocal as the gun lobby, becoming emotional as he started to tell some real stories of american struggle, compassion, and perseverance. >> and i'll tell you what's picked me back up every single
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time. it's been you. the american people. it's the painting i keep in my private office, a big-eyed green owl with blue wings made by a 7-year-old girl who was taken from us in newtown. given to me by her parents so i wouldn't forget. time and again you've picked me up, and i hope sometimes i picked you up too. [ cheers and applause ] and tonight i ask you to do for hillary clinton what you did for me. i'm asking you to join me to reject cynicism and reject fear and to summon what is best in us to elect hillary clinton as the next president of the united states and show the world we still believe in the promise of this great nation. thank you for this incredible journey.
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let's keep it going. >> reporter: so on hillary clinton's e-mails, he approached the subject very gently. he seemed to soften her responsibility, saying, yes, she has her critics, but that's what happens when you put yourself out there and try to effect change, when you're under the microscope for such a long time, and everybody makes mistakes. he even said it's not even close between these two candidates, that it shouldn't be close, but we all know in the polls it is extremely close. for democrats, broadening that message, trying to get it to resonate more broadly is the challenge. khr chris and alisyn? >> well, that is the proposition from the democratic perspective. how did it resonate? what will it mean? let's discuss. cnn political analyst jackie kucinich, cnn political analyst david gregory, and cnn political commentator and political anchor for time warner cable news,
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errol lewis. the theory of the case, we are better than they say and she is better than he is. did it go far enough? >> you know, this really was about getting that obama coalition really excited, especially from the president. some of the other speakers were bringing in republicans and some other demographics, but for president obama's speech, that's who it was aimed at. you can trust this woman. she's going to carry on my legacy. you kept on hearing, yes, we can, chanted in the arena. >> [ speaking spanish ]. >> yes, as chris says. >> and tim kaine. >> this is obama's legacy. he's saying she's the only one that can carry it on. >> errol, you're new to the panel this morning. what were your impressions? >> i was struck by the way he kept going back to the 2004 speech where he sort of burst on to the national scene. i remember being in the rafters at the fleet center, all the way in the last row. it was remarkable. he was a state senator at the time. nobody knew, you know -- really, he was just coming from relative
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obscurity. but i thought he put together the coalition that night. that was when he said, there's no liberal america, there's no conservative america, there's only the united states of america. people really sort of clued in and tuned in. so he assembled the coalition there. today or last night rather, he was really trying to sort of hand it over to hillary clinton. >> but he's also presided over a time when politically the country's even more divided, even more entrenched. >> he was wrong about there being no liberal america and no conservative america back in 2004. >> right, and this is part of his legacy. and the legacy is not over. there's no question he's still on the ballot. he is passing the baton. what he was saying last night is let's sweep hillary clinton up into this project of a new america. let's continue some of this work. so he's got to own that legacy. she's got to own it as well. the other thing that struck me is how they've made a decision to separate donald trump from the republican party, to cast him as an outsider and an
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outlier, youuniquely unqualifie based on temperament, based on intelligence, based on the work he has or hasn't done to get up to speed. i think that's interesting. probably other democrats would like to sweep him in with the rest of the republican party, but it's that outlier argument that is a pitch to other republicans to say, look, you have permission to reject this guy. he's not one of you. >> jackie, what do you think of this idea that the speeches, they did what they were supposed to do essentially. that video before president obama took the stage of all the things that he has had to deal with, not so much as a referendum on him and his notable ek we anymorety, but what you deal with as president. do you think that may be the democrats' best foot forward in terms of why you choose hillary clinton over trump despite the 68% trust problem she has? >> yes. i mean, just showing everything a commander in chief has to deal
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with day to day, month to month stretched out in the that video. you forget. it's easy to forget as you go about your life. that serves as a remeender. i wouldn't be surprised if you see that again at some point in the campaign. >> we saw, as our friend ron brownstein pointed out, despite a lack of trust, people believed he would fight for you. if you close your eyes, can you imagine hillary clinton in the white house dealing with these tough things? i do think that's an advantage for her. it's something that donald trump has to overcome. i do think that's the argument you're going to hear over and over again. >> president obama did go back to some common themes that he has hit on for, you know, the past now 12 years, even from his launch. one of them is hope. let's listen to that moment last night. >> time and again you've picked me up, and i hope sometimes i pi picked you up too.
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and tonight i ask you to do for hillary clinton what you did for me. i ask you to carry her the same way you carried me. because you're who i was talking about 12 years ago when i talked about hope. it's been you who fueled my dogged faith in our future, even when the odds were great, even when the road is long. hope in the face of difficulty, hope in the face of uncertainty, the audacity of hope. america, you've vindicated that hope these past eight years. >> errol, what did you think? >> almost directly lifted, by the way, from the 2004 speech. >> plagiarizing himself. >> that was, in fact, borrowed from a guy named jeremiah wright. we won't get into that this morning. it does remind me of the gap between the high-flown rhetoric he's talking about there.
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he's really trying to talk to the civic soul of america and the actual deliverables that in a divided congress, in a divided washington, you know, you've got a subsidy here, a program there and an underfunded program over there. it really in some ways contributes to a lot of the frustration that the pollsters are picking up, that people want to be at that level that he's talked about. they've always wanted to be at that level. but you look at the deliverables, and it's very hard to come anywhere near that. >> and this is who donald trump is speaking to, that voter who feels they don't have the same shot, that even the elites in the democratic party have a shot at. highly educated, upwardly mobile. >> tell them what ron brownstein keeps reminding us of. >> the democratic party, they all met at ivy league schools. i think there's a danger in
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this, the message discipline of the drremocrats. are they failing to speak to a lot of supporters of donald trump who fall completely outside the political system and who don't have faith in the kind of status quo that's being talked about here. >> and how do you become a champion for people who are suffering through things that you don't seem to speak to with as much strength as the republican does, right. i know he's the insurgent, but he's saying it's too hard for too many. culturally, they're taking things away from us. it doesn't mean the same thing to be american anymore. the democrats are saying, for better or worse, things are pretty good here. >> look away, look away. no, but i think that was kind of joe biden's role. he's been the spokesman to the blue-collar worker. i think that's what part of his speech was last night. when joe biden goes away, who's that messenger? >> and a reason why a lot of people wanted joe biden to run for president. >> he use three words.
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ma-lar-ky. president obama unleashing on donald trump last night. joe biden and tim kaine among the other speakers making their thoughts known last night. cnn's manu raju joins us with that part of the story. what did you hear, manu? >> reporter: actually, this convention really started off not the exact way that democrats wa wanted. there were those leaked e-mails that caused so much turmoil in the party, the sudden resignation of the party chairwoman, and all those outbursts and angry protests from bernie sanders supporters. what we found is this party unites when they all start going after donald trump. >> he has no clue about what makes america great. actually, he has no clue, period. >> reporter: the democratic party unleashing, launching their most blistering attacks to date. >> you cannot believe one word that comes out of donald trump's mouth. >> in an unstable world, we cannot afford unstable leadership.
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>> i'm a new yorker, and i know a con when i see one. >> reporter: deploying the party's high-profile stars, independent businessman michael bloomberg delivering multitiered attacks on trump's willingness to be president. >> how can there be pleasure in saying you're fired? >> reporter: vice president biden using his blue-collar background to question trump's dedication to the working class. >> he's trying to tell us he cares about the middle class. give me a break. that's a bunch of malarky. >> reporter: new york city's former mayor challenging trump's record as a businessman. >> trump says he wants to run the nation like he's running his business? god help us. >> reporter: former defense secretary leon panetta taking on trump's foreign policy credentials. >> donald trump says he gets his foreign policy experience from watching tv and running the miss universe pageant. if only it were funny. but it is deadly serious.
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>> reporter: and condemning trump's challenge to russia to hack hillary clinton's e-mails. >> russia, if you're listening, i hope you're able to find the 30,000 e-mails that are missing. >> it is inconceivable to me that any presidential candidate would be that irresponsible. >> reporter: clinton's running mate tim kaine stepping into the attack dog role, mocking the republican opponent. >> he's got a way of saying the same two words every time he makes his biggest, hugest promises. believe me. it's going to be great, believe me. >> reporter: while painting trump as untrustworthy, inciting his refusal to release his tax returns as proof. >> hey, donald. what are you hiding? >> reporter: the virginia senator also extending an olive
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branch to republicans disenchanted with their party's nominee. >> if any of you are looking for that party of lincoln, we've got a home for you right here in the democratic party. >> reporter: an effort echoed by bloomberg. who went off script to question trump's mental clarity. >> as an independent, i am asking you to join with me. together let's select a sane, competent person. >> reporter: now, chris, last night the trump campaign wasted no time pushing back. in a statement, they said, tonight the democrats offered only more rewards for the rich, powerful, and well connected and more angry, demeaning, sniping attacks against all decent americans who want change for their families. the trump campaign does not think these attacks from, what they you as political insiders, will work in a year in which voters are frustrated with washington. chris? >> all right. we had all these big story lines coming up last night. the first black president saying he's ready to pass the baton to hillary clinton, who would be
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the first woman president. how big is that move? this hug, how important will that be for the democratic base that the democrats so sorely need to come out? dnc speaker, famous maryland congressman elijah cummings joins us next. ♪ to protect and care for the things we cherish and the ones we love each and every one of us has a natural, human instinct to cover. covering is caring. because covering heals 5 days faster. band-aid brand
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tonight hillary clinton will accept her party's nomination. she hits the stage after president obama's speech last night, which was steeped in symbolism and history. >> and that's why i can say with confidence there has never been a man or a woman, not me, not bill, nobody, more qualified than hillary clinton to serve as president of the united states of america. >> here to discuss all of the themes that came up last night and tonight, u.s. congressman elijah cummings. congressman, thanks for being here. >> good morning. >> what does hillary clinton need to say tonight? >> she needs to say that she's on the side of americans. and that she's going to do
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everything in her power to deal with the issue of income inequality and give people a sense of hope that their children will do better than what they're doing. one of the reasons why bernie sanders has done as well as he's done is because so many people feel that government has left them and that government doesn't hear them. in some instances, government is doing them more harm than good. i.e., flint, michigan. so she has to come and say, okay, he's now passed the baton on to her, she's got to be in a position to say, i've got this baton, and i'm going to run with it. >> so what do you say to the voters out there still making up their minds who are looking at the problems? you come from baltimore. i walked those streets with you. you know that the prosecutor just said no more charges in the freddie gray case, i'm dropping them. people see what appears to be racial tension between the blacks and police. what do you say to them when
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they say, look at what the country is, look at the status quo, we need someone else? >> first of all, the president said it best. we need to back off for a moment and realize the great country that we do have. sometimes i think you can have so many blessings that your problems block your vision. but i would say, let's see what we can do about having somebody who will bring us together. when i hear donald trump, to be frank with you, i feel like there's somebody who is almost trying ing ting to divide us. i think what we need to be doing is having somebody like a hillary clinton who will cause us to look at each other, be honest with each other, face our problems, come up with practical solutions, and talk to each other as opposed to past each other. >> and congressman, specifically, what do you think hillary clinton would do about the tension that people in black communities feel with the police and vice versa? >> first of all, i think she will hear them. see, i don't even think donald
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trump even hears them or even sees them, the freddie grays of the world. so hillary clinton has a balance. the other night, they had the mothers who had lost sons because of gun violence. then on the other -- but just before that, they had the police officer who was great. and that's the balance. that's what we need. we need people who understand that -- and hillary does this. she understands we need to protect our police and we need to respect them, but at the same time, when african-american men are being afraid to even get in a car because they're afraid of being killed, that needs to be respected too. what donald trump has done is tried to divide us. he put the police in one corner, the community in another corner. i'm telling you, and i've said it over and over again, and the american people have got to get this. you all spend a lot of time talking about donald trump. i see donald trump as someone who's about the business of
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destruction and distraction. destruction with regard to people who run against them and their reputations, distractions from the things that affect people on a day-to-day basis. health care, education, things of that nature. i think hillary clinton, again, she has that history. she will -- she has shown she has those concerns. you know who said. best? bloomberg. when bloomberg, an independent, got up there and said this is not about democrat or republican, this is about what we want for america, you know -- i mean, bloomberg, i suddenly became a major fan, really. he was like the guy in the middle. >> right, but to your point about discussion of trump, bloomberg was there last night to bash trump. the democrats can't stop talking about trump at all, especially when it comes to this latest wrinkle, this gift that you guys say he gave you about asking russians to hack hillary clinton's e-mails, to release them. you guys are calling it treason.
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he went on tv this morning, said i was being sarcastic, this is the democrats trying to frame me. >> we have to stop excusing him when he says these nasty things. we really do. because words do matter. >> but is it treason? >> i'll let the fbi and others decide that. my point is -- and by the way, no matter what it is, it should not have been said. if i did that, i'd be out of office or in jail. and he should not be held to some different standard. i don't know how we get -- we're talking about the president of the united states of america going around saying these kinds of things. that's ridiculous. again, we've got to the concentrate on what we are fighting for, not so much who we're fighting against. donald trump, if he loses, he'll go off and make more millions. i guess establish more universities. i want somebody like a hillary clinton who's going to go in there and hear me, see me,
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understand me, bring folks together so that we can be the very best country we can be. by the way, let me make it clear. america's going to miss president barack obama. he's one of the most brilliant human beings i have ever met. i have never been in a room, in a meeting with the president where i didn't walk out saying he's the smartest one in the room. we're going to miss him. you saw michelle. they have shown us what a president ought to be about. and the idea that this great man who has been bashed over and over again -- and i know it because i've been defending him. even with all that opposition, he's been able to accomplish the things he's been able to accomplish. then he says, this is the person that i think ought to run with the ball. you can't get too much better than that. >> congressman elijah cummings, great to have you here. >> thank you. >> pleasure, as always. >> which message will resonate? the dnc's one of hope or the rnc's message of america in
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crisis. we'll ask someone who's been through a presidential race, former democratic presidential nominee michael dew caucus is going to join us live. we left on our honeymoon in january 2012. it actually evolved into a business. from our blog to video editing... our technology has to hang tough with us. when you're going to a place without electricity, you need a long battery life. the touch, combined with the screen resolution... a mac doesn't have that. we wanted to help more people get out there and see the world. once you take that leap, that's where the magic happens. i wanted to know where i did my ancestrydna. the most shocking result was that i'm 26% native american. i had no idea. it's opened up a whole new world for me. ♪ soon, she'll type the best essays in the entire 8th grade. get back to great.
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and that helps put my craving in its place. that's why i only choose nicorette. big day? ah, the usual. moved some new cars. hauled a bunch of steel. kept the supermarket shelves stocked. made sure everyone got their latest gadgets. what's up for the next shift? ah, nothing much. just keeping the lights on. (laugh) nice. doing the big things that move an economy. see you tomorrow, mac. see you tomorrow, sam. just another day at norfolk southern.
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democratic nominee hillary clinton will close out the democratic national convention tonight here in philadelphia. the acceptance speech will be a big deal, but it was last night where the case was really made. all the big dogs of the democratic party were out there. the president, the vice president, maybe the next vice president. it was a big deal. so let's discuss whether the case was made and how this election goes going forward with someone who knows this deal well. 1988 democratic nominee, governor of massachusetts, michael dukakis. great to have you with us. >> good to be with you. >> you brought out your best last night here for the party. you had the vice president and the president making the case. you had tim kaine. >> who i thought was terrific. >> you thought he was? he's getting some heat. >> i don't know what he's getting heat about. there was humor there, a little different style.
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i like the spanish, needless to say. >> did you like his impression of donald trump? >> yeah. >> you don't want to talk about trump, i know that. i know you don't like all the attention. >> i think we got to start talking about trump because the guy is getting away with murder. he's a screwball. every day is another -- >> and you don't think the people have been talking about donald trump enough in this campaign? >> no, and a point of fact, take for example the income tax returns. this guy has got to produce his income tax returns. >> he says he's under audit and no lawyer would let you put out tax returns when you're under audit. >> absolute foolishness. he's running for the presidency of the united states. all he has to do is release them, and i think it's pretty obvious that there's something in there he doesn't want released. i think we've got to insist on this kind of stuff because no presidential candidate i'm aware of in the last 30 years has not done so. >> that goes to integrity, goes to trust, right? do you win that battle with hillary clinton against donald
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trump with everything she has hanging over her head? >> it's very interesting. i've known -- kitty and i've known bill and hillary clinton since we both started as young governors. we were very close. as you remember, he nominated me, went on johnny carson a few months before he ran for the presidency and carson said, why are you running? he said, because i want to finish my speech for dukakis. but both terrific people. hillary is warm, she's funny. one of the things that happens to you in these presidential campaigns is, you know, a narrative begins. i was the bloodless technocrat. i've got my strengths and weaknesses, but greeks are not bloodless technocrats. that's not where we're coming from. it's interesting. you know, she's a very good person. one of the things i think we've got to do is to help people understand that. >> so how does she do that tonight? how does she break away from that stereotype, fitting or unfitting, of who people have sort of categorized her as? >> well, i think she's got to be
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personal. i think she will be. even as her husband was in talking about how they get together. i remember once somebody in one of my gubernatorial campaigns, someone said, we've got to give people a sense of where you came from. think they you're this guy that dropped out of the sky some place, you know. and he put me in front of my -- of the house in lowell, massachusetts, where my dad and his family came when they got off the boat from greece. i just talked about what it was like to be the kid of a greek immigrant who went on to become a doctor, of all things. back in the early 1900s is this 15-year-old who came over from western turkey, greek island, became a doctor. it made a difference. i think that's part of what we've got to do here. >> so she's got the problem of whatever, dealing with the negative character aspects as people perceive them. that's very real. then there's another challenge, which you could argue is even harder. this is not your democratic
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party. with all due respect, the democrats get very mad when i say this, but guys like you, this isn't your party. you fought for the middle class all the time. that's what you did. to your benefit and detriment in elections. that's not what this party has become. it's what it wants to be now because trump is invigorating those people. how does she do that? >> that's a problem we've had for a long time. ronald reagan got 45% of the union vote. so this is not a new thing. i had a problem with one of my races that i lost, same thing. how do we do this? i think bernie sanders is absolutely correct. i'm a huge believer in grassroots organizing. elizabeth warren would have never been elected without an extraordinary grassroots campaign. 25,000 people out knocking on doors. we've got to do that. >> the party boxed bernie out. you saw the wikileaks. you pick the insider. you pick the one who friendly with the machine. >> i'm not going to apologize
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for that kind of thing. it was inexcusable. but i think he's been very good about this. and i think he's absolutely correct when he said yesterday this has got to be something that involves not only the presidency but everything up and down the line. i think we can do that. we've got millions of folks out there. we need 200,000 precinct captains. that's what it takes. half a dozen block captains. they've got to be out there until the 8th of november knocking on doors, making the case to people on a person-to-person basis. >> as the former presidential candidate, what's it been like to watch this one unfold? >> as i often say, i owe the country an apology. if i'd beaten old man bush, we never would have heard of his kid and wouldn't be in this mess. i'm as much to blame as anybody. but it's great to be a part of it. you know, i'm married to the best looking medicare recipient in america who's about to be 80. and we're still going strong. >> very impressive. people will be very happy to
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hear that. >> and i'm teaching full time. i love working with young people. we're producing fabulous young people in this country. and they want to do public service. it's really interesting. so it's a very full life. and it's great to be here. i wish maybe i might have been here in another capacity. >> on that hopeful note, michael dukakis, thanks so much. >> thanks for having me. great to see you. >> great to talk to you. we have a quick programming note for everyone. tomorrow on "new day," i will be speaking with the newly minted democratic vice presidential nominee, senator tim kaine. stick around for that. send me some questions if you have them. meanwhile -- >> so this intrigue that's going on about what donald trump said to russian hackers, his words are pretty clear. if you can, if you hear us, russia, try to get those deleted e-mails. now he says he was being sarcastic. should that be the end of it? next. y they made a mistake. the check they sent isn't enough to replace your totaled new car.
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i will tell you this, russia, if you're listening, i hope you're able to find the 30,000 e-mails that are missing. i think you will probably be rewarded mightily by our press. let's see if that happens. >> that was donald trump at the center of another fire storm for those comments that he had made yesterday. well, this morning he has changed his tune. and when i'm being sarcastic with somebody -- >> were you being sarcastic?
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>> of course i'm being sarcastic. but you have 30,000 e-mails deled dele deleted. the real problem is what was said on those e-mails from the democratic national committee. >> here to discuss is our panel. christine quinn and former lieutenant governor of south carolina and donald trump supporter andre bower. thanks to both of you for being here. governor, he was just being sarcastic. no big deal. why is everybody freaking out that he invited russia to hack into hillary clinton's e-mails? >> i think what he did was brilliant. he hijacked the democratic campaign for a full news cycle. 25% of their convention is now reminding people about the e-mails. >> so he was trying to throw that out there to detract energy from the dnc? >> well, i haven't talked to him, so i don't know. just looking at it from somebody that has gotten more engaged this last couple weeks in politics, to me it was strategically very good to divert what you're talking about, remind everybody about the whole -- so many people have
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a distaste in their mouth about this whole e-mail and the way it was handled. i think it sends a bad message. again, it's taken the discussion away from fixing problems, which is what as americans we need to talk about, whether it's republican or democrat. >> well, depends. now there's a statement against your own interest because as the gop you should like this conversation, but a lot of people in your party, and a lot of independents, do, christine, want to harp on the e-mail situation. they see it as a baseline trust issue and for all the talk we had last night and the grand themes and ideas, nobody tried to explain away the e-mail controversy. do you think trump gets away with this and it goes from controversy to non-troversy because he's talking about the e-mails, something people care about more than him saying silly things about what the russians should do. >> first of all, they're two different things. one is the question of hillary's e-mails. we're going to set that aside for a second. no one is going to try to
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explain that at the podium at a convention. that's one thing. the second thing, and if this is the best donald trump has to pivot to a topic, i really think it underscores what a mess his campaign is because we're not talking, really, about hillary's e-mails, and we shouldn't be today in relation to this because yesterday he called on a foreign government -- >> he says he was being sarcastic. >> but you know what? i don't think he was. let's say he was, for the benefit of the doubt. is that appropriate if you want to be president of the united states, to think talking about hacking as it relates to russia, not one of our allies, not -- >> he talks like regular people do. they don't take it as seriously. >> two things. i don't think regular people suggest over dinner conversation that russia should hack into institutions' e-mails. two, what you and i might say
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over a drink, it's just chitchat, right? he wants to be the president of the united states. every word he says matters. nonetheless, every word he says in relevance to russia, in relevance to putin, a terrible dictator whose leadership he has heralded. he's not running to be regular joe. he's running to be president. he doesn't appreciate the seriousness of that. >> one would argue from the other side, her foundation got $145 million from russia. i mean, you can start connecting the dots and say, wait a minute, trump didn't get a buyout from russia and her foundation did. $145 million. >> yesterday in that bizarre press conference, my friend jonathan capehart said he felt like the onion was running the press conference. he said in that he'd had no business dealings with russia, none at all. then in the same press conference says he ran the miss universe contest there for a
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number of years. so which is it? he had a business there or he didn't have a business there? we might know if we saw his taxes, but again -- >> you bothered by the taxes? that's been brought up a lot here. tim kaine took a lot of time last night to unpack why he sees the refusal to disclose taxes as a metaphor for trump not being trustworthy. >> i think it's interesting that last week hillary was talking about from the podium 203 times, three days into this donald trump's been talked about 332 times. we still have a day left. 63% more already they're talking about trump here than they were -- >> what about the taxes? nice try. we've been up all night long. >> the math confused us for a minute. >> she's very smart, and i only look as dumb as i come off. >> i don't think the public is concerned about donald trump. if he's not paying his taxes, they're concerned. >> how do we no? >> andre, would you disclose your taxes if you were running for that office? >> yes. but i don't know the legal ramifications of --
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>> there's zero. even if he's under audit. there's zero legal ramification to putting them out. he says your lawyers would tell you not to do it. he told me that in person. maybe that would be legal advice because a lawyer is trying to protect you. that's what they do. but there's no legal fallout if he puts them out. >> but there's no upside. remember we went through this with romney. he did give it out. immediately he didn't give enough to charity. he kept taking hits. >> shady hillary. you want to be transparent. >> the upside is, one, transparency for americans. and every other candidate has done this. why is he the exception? why can he make jokes about almost treasonous behavior and not provide his taxes? people have a right to know what's in there, which may be nothing, but the longer he doesn't disclose, the more we're finding problems that may or may not exist. >> governor, christine, thank you very much for the debate. well, he helped donald trump write the art of the deal. you've probably heard about
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this. this ghostwriter is now speaking out. why does he say the idea of president trump scares him so much? to tony schwarz is going to join us live next. when heartburn comes creeping up on you. fight back with relief so smooth and fast. tums smoothies starts dissolving the instant it touches your tongue. and neutralizes stomach acid at the source. tum-tum-tum-tum-tums smoothies, only from tums.
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take it from the guy who co-wrote donald trump's auto biograp biography. here is what he said, quote, lying is second nature to him. so do you believe him? >> let's talk to him. you can find out, why tony schwartz, the ghostwriter of donald trump's best-seller, "the art of the deal" is now saying negative things about donald trump. you made headlines last week when he broke his silence, revealing his blistering account of the billionaire, shadowed for 18 months. schwartz said he helped create what he calls the myth of trump. now he says he regrets it. joining us now. why the regret? this man is known as a showman, has had tremendous success. the book was just apart of it. why such regret? >> because he is running for president of the united states. you don't want someone with the attention span of a 9-year-old with adhd and a remarkable lack
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of knowledge about the key issues facing us and inability in my mind based on my experience to reflect and to compose himself. you saw it yesterday, when he came out with the comments he did about russia. he is not a person who thinks through what he says. he reacts impulsively. he was feeling small and diminished that so much attention was being focused on the democrats, and he just couldn't stand it. that's my experience. when the attention and spotlight is not on donald trump, he will do anything to get it back. >> well, then, how do you account for his success? people find him compelling. the media has admitted he has the ability to see a feeling, a mood, a trend in this country, especially culturally that resonated that took out a field of the gop's best, some 16
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large. >> yeah, listen, i'm not a pundit. i am a person who watches a man in the way he behaves. i'm looking at his character. and what i think trump did that i observed him doing was he used his force of personality, his insistence that any given thing he says is true. his ability to repeat and repeat and repeat, to tap into people's frustration. they think he is going to be, those who currently support him, their savior. there is no one, no one that donald trump cares about less than the people who are not making it in this world. those people, those people don't yet realize it, he considers to be losers. and the minute, because he has to be the winner, and others have to be the loser, the minute that that gets clear, the minute that he gets their votes is the last time he will pay attention to them. >> so what do you make of what
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we hear about character accounts that are contrary to that, what his kids say about him, people who have said he has been charitable to them? is this a split personality? >> no, not at all. that is -- what do you expect his children to say. there is only one way to get trump's attention and his interests, and that is to reveer him. that's the set up he created with his children. of course, every child needs a father who loves them. that's what he did. there is no second donald trump. the inner trump is the outer trump. he himself has said i'm the exact same person i was when i was 8 years old. i believe him. that's my experience of him. >> are you -- you know, what are we talking about here, though? we're not trying to elect him priest in chief. these are politicians. they do persuasion, they often
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don't follow-through on promises, and frankly, why donald trump is seen as a freshi refreshing change? chris, chris, i heard you in the last ten minutes, a falls equivalency. they're treating him as if he is a legitimate candidate for president of the united states. there is no way he is. no more than my two-year-old grandson would be a legitimate president for. if the media treated my grandson as somebody who would be president, but when they treat trump, who has no attention span, only a profound self-interest, no experience, and only has his inflated confidence as a qualification, it is terrifying. it is terrifying. >> but mr. schwartz, let's look at the two men on the screen right now. you got paid to advance what you say is a myth about him, lying him, i'm blacklisted by trump and the trump campaign, because of taking him to task and
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testing him over issues. he is the real nominee of the gop. got more votes than anybody in gop modern history. you can't just take it all away from him, especially when you tried to create it, right? >> yes, well, i tried to write a book when i was 35 years old about a guy who was a small real estate developer with an instinct for promotion. in a million years, i never imagined he would be somebody who would run for president, and at that time, i don't think he did. it is a mistake i made. i did something that i deeply hope that young people in my position would not do, which is i did it for the money. it was a mistake. i have regretted it for 30 years. in my journal, in the time i was writing the book, i wrote my regrets. i feel that the fact that i did it is irrelevant to whether or not he is qualified to be president. the reason i'm with you is to be
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able to warn the american people that this man is not the man those who are had in support of him, is not the man they think he is. he is their enemy because he is the one percent. he is the million of one percent. he is the one who wants to get all of their money, and as a consequence, leave them without the very power they're so angry they don't have. >> i understand your motivation, and that's why we brought you on the show. i appreciate your perspective. what i'm trying to get out of you though, if somebody is listening to you and wants to support trump, you need to convince them that he is different than hillary clinton, and that other politicians are, because these traits that you're ascribing to trump often get put on politicians. so what do you think you know about him, especially from so long ago, maybe he has changed, maybe he is different, that people need to pay attention to now? >> he, as i said before, and as
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tim kaine quoted me saying last night, he is an -- he is a unrepent liar. he says things that aren't true. that's what i experienced him as. i invented the phrase, in order to help him kind of cover over the fact that he lied truthful hyperbole. >> you created that? that was a good one. >> the problem is that there is no such thing as truthful hyperbole. if it is hyperbole -- >> that's why it is such a good line. >> at the time i thought it was a harmless lie, and for reasons of self-interest, and i'm not the only person who operates in self-interest, but i did, i'm sorry i did, but truthful hyperbole is an admission of deceit. i think that the notion that this man makes it his business to lie, as he did by the way this morning, when he said i was being sarcastic.
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he wasn't being sarcastic about russia. he was responding impulsively, reactively, without thinking, which is what he does. do we want a president who doesn't think? do we want a president who doesn't think? that's a difference between him and hillary clinton. i'm not here to argue hillary clinton's case. i know she has plenty of issues, and so do all politicians. but what i am here to say is no one doubts that if hillary clinton had to make a decision, she would think carefully, she would seek outside counsel, she would be reflective, and trump is incapable of doing that. >> tony schwartz, i appreciate you coming forward. i know this is not a comfortable situation for you, but it is important. this is our country we're talking about. thank you for sharing your perspective. appreciate it. >> thank you very much. all right there is a lot going on in the election. last night, was the night for the democrats to date. did they get it done. did they make the case they
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needed to make to you. we've got full coverage, let's get to it. america is already great. america is already strong. >> with hillary, it is not just words, it is accomplishments. she delivers. >> the american dream is something no wall will ever -- >> he is trying to tell us he cares about the middle class. give me a break. that's a bunch of malarky. >> put a bully in his place and a woman in hers, the white house. >> yes, she can. yes, we can. we're going to carry hillary to victory. >>announcer: this is "new day" with chris cuomo and allison cam
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ro camerota. we're still here in philadelphia. >> you say it like you're getting tired of it. >> no, not at all. these are fake. so the big night last night was headlined by the president of the united states. he said that he is ready to pass the baton to hillary clinton. this hug, the most overt expression of the big bet for democrats, hillary clinton as an extension of the obama administration. is this the magic that they need president elected in the united states? >> the party's biggest stars came out. they slammed what they called donald trump's message of fear. the stage now set for clinton's acceptance speech. what will she say tonight. we have it covered. let's begin with michelle s kusinski. do we have a preview? zr >> reporter: it is part of this message they're crafting. first with this video about president obama's
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accomplishments, told in the voices of the people who are closest to him. but that was also about the temperament of a president. all that the job demands. the tough decisions that you have to make. so they set up the framework there. then president obama comes out to deliver the speech that he spent weeks writing, long nights. six drafts. and this is really the first time i think you feel the goodbye starting from him. i'm really leaving. here is what i need you to do for me. you could almost see the weight of this moment. and of america's choice on president obama's face, as he tried to connect past with present, with future. >> while this nation has been tested by war, and it has been tested by recession, and all manner of challenges, i stand before you again tonight, after almost two terms as your
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president, to tell you i am more optimistic about the future of america. >> reporter: optimism, the focus, in a speech the president delivered with a constant smile. even as he ripped into republicans laying out a stark contrast. >> but what we heard in cleveland last week wasn't particularly republican. it sure wasn't conservative. what we heard was a deeply pessimistic version, where we turn against each other, and turn away from the rest of the world. there were no serious solutions to pressing problems. just the fanning of resentment, and blame and anger and hate. and that is not the america i know. the america i know is full of courage, and optimism and and
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generous. >> reporter: this time, president obama didn't hold back. yes, saying the name. >> and then there is donald trump. don't boo. vote. the donald is not really a plans guy. he is not really a facts guy either. the choice isn't even close. there has never been a man or a woman, not me, not bill, nobody, more qualified than hillary clinton to serve as president of the united states of america. we're not a fragile people. wire not a frightful people. our power doesn't come from some self-declared savior, promising that he alone can restore order as long as we do things his way. we don't look to be ruled. and the american dream is something no wall will ever
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contain. >> reporter: making the point that unity and democracy work, not to be overlooked -- >> we all need to be as vocal and as organized and as p persistent as bernie sanders supporters have been. >> reporter: he urged the crowd to vote and for gun control advocates to as vocal as the gun lobby. becoming emotional as he told real stories of american struggle, compassion. >> i'll tell you what has picked me back up every single time. it's been you. the american people. it's the painting i keep in my private office. a big eyed green owl with blue wings. made by a 7-year-old girl who was taken from us in newtown. given to me by her parents, so i wouldn't forget. time and again, you've picked me up. and i hope sometimes i picked you up too.
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and tonight, i ask you to do for hillary clinton what you did for me. i'm asking you to join me to reject cynicism and reject fear and to summon what is best in us to let hillary clinton have the next president of the united states. and show the world we still believe in the promise of this great nation. thank you for this incredible journey. let's keep it going. god bless you. >> reporter: there has been so much emotion this week. we've heard these very unique speeches. from michelle obama, bill clinton, joe biden, now president obama. so tonight, everyone will be watching how hillary takes that baton. how she takes that message that was so carefully crafted at this convention, and makes it her own. she'll be introduced by her
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daughter, chelsea. chris and alisyn. >> okay, thanks so much for that preview, michelle. let's bring in karen finney, hillary clinton's supporter. she knows what will happen tonight. how are you, karen. >> great. how are you doing? >> don't try to distract us. what will she say tonight? >> here is what i think -- she is still working on it, but you'll hear her story and her vision of where we want to go in this country, but i think you're going to hear kind of the core values and the experiences you've seen this week and heard from a lot of the people who have really shaped her life from her -- >> will she talk about her past? >> sure, her high school friends, her time in children defense fund, the work she has done on, you know, child care and health care for kids, and serving our country -- >> anything we haven't heard before? not that that's a bad thing, her time in government service matters. >> i think you're going to hear,
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as i said, her personal journey and her personal experience, there is a thrill line and it is this fundamental belief, it is why we're talking about stronger together and she talks about it takes a village. really, this fundamental idea that when we come together, that's how we solve problems, and i think there is -- you also hear a very fundamentally vision for the country, than what you heard last week, and i think if you look at the arc of this week and ending with hillary and her investigati vision and her story, we're putting together a much different vision and optimistic vision. that's why there were so many, wonderful little girl, you know, carla and the blue star mothers, or i'm sorry, the gold star moms, and just hearing from people all across the country who are doing incredible things, but represent this idea that we can solve our problems together. >> let's talk about the arc of this week. >> you got it. >> up until now, it culminated
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with the embrace with president obama and hillary clinton. it got off to a bumpy start with the e-mail leak and bernie sanders supporters revolting. did you fear it was derailing? >> no, and i'll tell you why. we knew the first night really needed to be about senator sanders and honoring him and his supporters, and really, making this about unity. that's part of why you heard from keith ellison, prominent people who have supported senator sanders, who are making the case for affirmatively why they support hillary. i think you also saw throughout the week, a lot of people, you heard senator kaine, you heard from the president, there is a lot of respect for senator sanders. even monday night, as the night went on, i think people kind of, you know, they had some energy to get out. we saw that in 2008 quite frankly. the arc of the day and this week have brought us to a different place. >> let's get to some news.
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>> sure. >> certainly from your perspective. tonight, are we going to hear hillary clinton talk about donald trump baiting the russians to hack her e-mails? >> you might. certainly you'll hear -- >> he said he was being sarcastic, this a non-controversy. >> here is the concern. i can only go off of what has been reported. we know that he has praised p put putin. the platform in cleveland, they changed it in how they deal with ukraine. >> via vis the russian. state actors if you lrks and i've got to say, when you have leon panetta, the former defense secretary, really talking about, you know, you don't make jokes about, you know, inviting the russians to hack into our e-mails. i mean, again, you know, if it was a joke, then again, that
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just shows, this is not somebody who has a judgment or temperament to be commander in chief. it is not funny. >> how much will she focus on donald trump in her speech? >> you'll hear a contrast, both in what the positive and what she talks about, because if you remember, that's not what we heard last thursday, quite frankly, in cleveland. but yeah, i think you'll hear her make some points of contrast. >> how did you feel that your man, tim kaine did last night? he has to work on his trump impression. >> he had the whole audience going. oh, please. >> did you think it was good? >> it was a ywesome. audience participation. >> for those who know tim kaine, he is passionate, but what did you want him to be last night and do you think he was? >> i thought he was fantastic. here is one of the things about senator kaine that is so important on this ticket. he and hillary clinton, their story, a lot that is similar that inn terms of she in part,
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motivated by her faith, and her desire to do good in the world worked at children's defense fund. he partially motivated by his faith and became a civil rights lawyer, went and worked abroad for a year. there is this social justice, civil rights tradition and he told his story quite well. he can take on the donald pretty well. you have like the impression that he did, but i think people were having fun with it last night. >> absolutely, they were enjoying it. i have become a trump impersonation -- >> look, i have to just say, i also, you know, having worked for hillary clinton for 30 years or known her for 30 years, that moment as a black woman to see the first black president embracing a woman, who could be our first female president, like, it was a puddle. like the idea, that says something about who we are as a country. and i just think that's so important. i think that image is so important that you know, yes, we have our problems, and our
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challenges, but i hope that people can feel positive about the idea that, like, we really do incredible things in this country. >> karen finney, we look forward to watching tonight. thanks for previewing with us. >> you bet. senator tim kaine will join us live tomorrow on "new day." tune in for that. >> so which message will resonate most with the voters. you have choice. it was laid out last week and now this week. culminating in tonight. what do you think about the country? is it america in crisis, or is it america that has its best days to come? we're going to discuss with one of hillary clinton's short list choices for vp, next. the 21st , the earth needed to find a new way to keep up with the data from over 30 billion connected devices. just 30 billion? so, a bold group of researchers
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that this nation's future should be filled with hope. that's what this convention is about. it is very different than what we saw a week ago, which was functioning as a real look at what is crisis in america. so which message wins? joining us now, the honorable tom paris and sherrod brown. what is the risk of being hopeful? here is the risk. politically, it is that you may seem tone-deaf. there are real problems, parent racial division, fear of being
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killed by terrorists, if you say everything is okay, we should all be about hope, are you missing? are you tone-deaf to the problem? >> i don't think anybody is tone-de tone-deaf. i think hillary clinton understands clearly, we've come along way. when president obama took office, we were in the throws of the worst recession in our lifetime. we inherit aid mess. 2.3 million jobs lost before president obama took office. now we've seen 70 months in a row to the tune of 14.5 million jobs. that unfinished business is to make sure the wind at our back shares prosperity for all. that's what hillary clinton is talking about. that's what president obama talked about last night. we are a nation of fighters, when we get kicked to the side of the road, we get up and we drive. that's why i love america. that's why hillary clinton loves america. she is all about marshaling that collective power of "we" so there is indeed shared prosperity, because we're stronger together.
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the biggest difference is about pronou pronouns. he is about me and she about we. >> complicated to get out to voters, is this a third obama term. if things are good and if everybody is in lock step, then it is a third obama term, and some voters seem to not want that. >> it is more complicated than that. the voters, you know, as tom suggests, when he took office seven plus years ago, since we did the auto rescue and since the recover react, which turned this economy around, we've seen 70 plus months of economic growth. it doesn't satisfy me, the labor secretary. that's one of the reasons for his overtime rule, why he and i and the vice-president kicked it off in columbus, ohio. 14,000 ohioans will get a pay raise. donald trump, of course, things can improve, especially on
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wages, but donald trump paint ace picture everything that is wrong in this country. he uses the word disaster, terrible. he makes us look like we should aspire to be rush sharks tsia. americans are frustrated. we don't think things are going into the right drisirection, bue don't think it is as dark when i sat on the stage with you in cleveland and how dark they were, and how negative, how negative they were about this great country. it is astounding. that is why michelle obama's speech was so good. i've never seen a presidential candidate talk so down about the united states of america. i don't think people buy it. >> what does hillary clinton have to do with the negatives. we know it is your convention and we know you're not going to have speakers go up there and talk about the e-mail scandals. our last poll, neck in neck. 68% said i don't think she can
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be trusted. how does she take that on tonight? >> she'll tell the story about herself. we have heard this all week. she is the most famous unknown person in america. when bill clinton told his story, nine or ten of the stories people didn't know. i've been on the stump for her in my personal capacity for the last five, six months. that's what we tell, the story of hillary clinton, who gets up everyday in her north star are people who are striving to get in the middle class and stay in the middle class. that's what she has done day in and day out. she is a fighter. she is fighting for people with disabilities. she is fighting for people who doesn't have health insurance. and that's the story we're going to tell. we're going to make sure that at the end of the campaign, she is the most 235ifamous known perso america. yes there are people out there, that president clinton pointed out, people are trying to paint this cartoon picture, and we're
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going to counter that with the facts. she gets up and makes sure that person who has access to paid leave has paid leave. >> it is interesting about the cartoon character. when hillary clinton has held public office, as a senator, secretary of state, she had very favorable, if you want to talk polls, she had favorable ratings from the public. each of those eight years in the senate, each of the four years as secretary of state, once she was out of office, the attacks began. she is not perfect. she made mistake. when she wins this, and i think she is going to win, people will see the empathetic side, the side of caring for people with less advantage, the side of helping small business, all the things that she stands for, that she will do well and lead this country. >> the voter whose have known her best, the voters of the state of new york elected her not once but twice. i grew up in buffalo. i have a lot of friends who are
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republican. when she first ran, they were skeptical. what they saw was a workhorse. someone who came to farm country to listen to the flight of farmers. someone in central new york to say to mothers, and i remember being out there recently and a mother was saying we have a nano tech sector, thanks to hillary clinton. she is bringing jobs back home so my kid doesn't have to move to north carolina. she is a workhorse. tim kaine is a workhorse. >> when i came to the senate in 2007, i had my office across from hillary clinton's office. i used our whole, how do we help small towns, how do we help rural areas, the whole program was based on advice she gave me. i would go across the hall. she talked to me about what she did in areas, which are hurting not new york city, because that wasn't the probably, but ro rochester, what i could take to springfield and dayton.
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it made a difference and made me a better public servant. that's why i support her. i understand how she looks at public service. >> two people who know hillary clinton, making the case for her. thank you very much, gentlemen. >> thank you. donald trump now says that he was just kidding. he was being sarcastic when he suggested the russians should hack hillary clinton's e-mails. rudy giuliani joins us live, next. get back to great. all hp ink buy one get one fifty percent off. office depot officemax. gear up for school. gear up for great.
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you just got a big dose of the case for hillary clinton. the case is, though, what about the other guy. what about donald trump. what about how a lot of voters see hillary clinton, that is not favorable. here to make the case is former new york city mayor and donald trump supporter, rudy giuliani. always a pleasure to have you on the show. >> nice to see you. how are you? >> we had two friends of hillary on, here is who she is. she is a workhorse. she is somebody who has always done for others. she is someone who has made mistakes, but ultimately, is fighting the good fight.
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donald trump cannot compete with her pedigree or her passion. what is your case? >> my case against her is she was found by the fbi to be extremely careless in handling national security information. seems to be a pattern. the dnc was extremely careless in handling national security information. she was secretary of state, you can't point to a single accomplishment. you can point to over throwing gaddafi and libya. you can point to her re-setting the relationship with russia and putin is pushing us all around the world. you can point to her agreeing to take the troops out of iraq, hence, we get isis. you can point to the fact that she agrees with the agreement with iran, which is disapproved by 60% of the american people. and you can find a 65% disapproval rating in the latest poll. plus, she has never accomplished anything as secretary of state.
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there is no treaty, no agreement. just i can honestly make the case that from the day she walked into office until the day she walked out, the world was more dangerous in every key area of the world under the jurisdiction of the secretary of state than before. oh, by the way, i left out the south china sea. china has challenged us in the south china sea and she is sitting by and watching obama reduce our military to pre-world war ii levels. >> you say that putin is pushing us around. that's not how donald trump frames it. he seems to have been somewhat complimentary toward his leadership, and as you know, yesterday, he seemed to invite russia to hack into hillary clinton's e-mails. what did you think when you heard him say that? >> first of all, i know what he meant when he said it, because i got a call from his campaign manager. >> was it your idea that he say that? >> no. he was telling a joke. when he got off the plane, he
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tweeted out the e-mails should be sent to the fbi. he was joking around. now, let's analyze this for a minute. according to hillary clinton, if she is telling the truth, which 65% of the american people think she is incapable of, but if she is telling the truth, there is nothing on those e-mails that has anything do with national security. this is the stuff she destroyed. it is all about chess slsechels. >> what's the point. >> no security implications. second, it doesn't exist. third, i will be willing to give you a 98% guarantee that russians already have it. >> but isn't the point that americans don't know when donald trump is joking. when do we believe his words and when do we think he is joking? >> i don't know. if he tells me i'm joegiking, i take him at his word. >> i don't think rudy giuliani makes that joke to the russians when they are the number one
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nimical state. >> you flip it to an offhand comment by donald trump, as opposed to hillary clinton, for years and years, putting a private server at her home, clear violation of federal law, exposing thousands and thousands of secrets, and destroying, destroying 35,000 -- >> can't both be wrong? >> both are wrong? you can say both are wrong? you don't stand up as a potential president and -- you don't do what she did. >> except one made a flippant comment for 30 seconds, and the other for four years as attorney general acted with extreme carelessness, which is gross negligence as secretary of state. we're going to put somebody in the white house who acted with extreme carelessness. did you hear anyone last night defend her on that? >> no. >> no. did you hear anyone defend her on advocating for the removal of gaddafi. did you find anyone up there
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defending her on the removal of the troops from iraq? no. did you find anyone up there defending her on re-setting the relationship with russia, no. last night was fantasy land in philadelphia. they didn't touch a single substantive issue. substantive issues, hillary goes down. >> a convention, you know you don't point out the time talking about the negatives. >> i said i've known -- i didn't say ted cruz. >> no, you didn't. you don't know what i said about ted cruz. i said i know donald trump for 29 years, and here are the good things about him. this is what he is for. and he is for being a lot tougher on isis. >> you didn't say the bad things about him. >> that's not what you do at a conventi con. >> no, i did he fended him. they didn't defend her. >> they just didn't address her negatives. they are different things. >> i defended donald against his
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negatives. i took them on. by the way, she hasn't had a press conference since december 4, 15. >> that's fir criticism. she doesn't address the media the way trump does. >> excuse me. i do n't want to be confrontational. >> you should be ashamed of yourself? >> why. >> you should everyday be saying where is the press? look, if i were the mayor of new york and i don't are a press conference for four -- >> we've had access, we've had interviews. >> that's a lot easier. >> let me tell you, her people come at us about trump and interviewing him and giving him too much time. >> she should not be able to get away for running for president of the united states and not having a press conference. >> and people say he shouldn't be able to get away with this stuff when he runs for the president. >> at least he is open and transparent and not afraid to answer any questions. she is. >> always beats me to that. >> she is the buttoned up
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candidate. >> what about the taxes? >> should he release his taxes. >> rudy giuliani would. >> up to him. that's a personal question. >> how is it a personal question and not a transparency. >> there is no legal requirement. >> i mean, it is a personal question whether you release your taxes or not. taxes are generally private. >> not when you're running for president. >> yes, they are. as a matter of law. >> everybody releases them in the modern era. >> it doesn't make it a matter of law. >> i'm saying you have to. i am saying should you. >> it is up to him. let him decide. >> do you see a downside to that? >> i don't see any downside. i think what she did with e-mails is so much worst. someone asked me the other day, would you rather have a politically incorrect president or hillary clinton. i said i would rather have politically incorrect than someone who is extremely careless. do you know no uniformed police officers were allowed on the
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floor of the convention, and nobody in the media covered it. >> i don't know if that's true. is that true? they weren't allowed? >> hand to god? >> i'll take an oath. comes from a high official from the police department. in the way in here, i asked the police officer -- >> i'll check it. >> i said were you allowed into the convention. he said how did you feel about it. he sadid i don't want to be thee any where. they don't like cops. >> did you cover baltimore yesterday? >> yes. >> did you cover elijah cummings for finding them guilty. did you cover hillary finding them guilty before they were innocent. where do they get their reputation back? >> you try the case, you see what happens to the charges. we'll discuss this more. >> then you apologize -- you don't find somebody guilty
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before they go to trial. you know that. >> this is a longer discussion. we don't have the time for it right now. >> thank you. >> this may be why she failed the bar exam the first time. >> see how he went out on that. it comes down tonight for hillary clinton. can she sway voters with her convention speech and what kind of bump will she see coming out of philly, next. i'm a fine arts major. nobody really believes that i take notes this way, but they actually make sense to me. i try to balance my studying with the typical college experience. this windows pc is a life saver! being able to pull up different articles to different parts of the screen is so convenient. i used to be a mac user but this is way better.
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this is a big night. hillary clinton is going to make history when she accepts her party's nomination. what does she need to say. what will she not say. what is she hoping for to get out of the voters. let's discuss with commentator, carl bernstein, author of a woman in charge, considered the definitive biography of hillary clinton. former hillary clinton press secretary, lisa caputo and former white house press secretary, jay carney. okay, here is the challenge. we just had rudy giuliani here, whose theme was very simple. i don't care what you say about trump. she lies more. she is less trustworthy. whatever he does, that's who he is. it is not a big a deal as her. what can she do tonight to take
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on the trust challenge? >> first of all, mayor giuliani is wrong. donald trump is sellihas shown to be a pathological liar. last night, mike bloomberg, who knows him well, set things up when he said we need a sane president. we have in the mix the question of donald trump's stability. beyond the fact that he is reckless, beyond the fact that he is a sham businessman. and those are the negative issues that this convention has developed. and hillary clinton, happen i will -- happy for her, has given a picture of the whole woman. that's why i did this biography. she is the most famous in the world, not really known as a whole person. she has to carry herself now. she has had obama. she has had michelle obama. she has had her husband do it. she has had cory booker. they have been fabulous in
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defining her and she has been unable to do herself. so how can she now do it with humility and this wonderful amazing life she has had, including all of this service, who she is as a religious person. very few people know about. she doesn't wear it on her sleeve. and perhaps to deal personally with why she has had these difficulties with the so-called distrust faction. >> lisa, you know her as well as everybody, will she tackle that? >> i think she'll talk about her life story. i mean, you're seeing a lot of the themes coming through in the various speeches that she has been a change maker all of her life. i think you're going to hear a biographical story, but also, the people who touched her life. people who had an impact on her life. you're also going to hear a
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message, i think, of unity, optimism, much of what the president talked about last night. but she is going to get very personal, i think, about the influences, her mother, chelsea, you're going to hear a personal side of her, a side of her i know very well. carl makes a point not everybody knows it. she is a deeply religious person, very grounded in her methodist roots. i think you're going to see and hear from her tonight all of those different pieces of her persona to try to present more of a complete picture of who she is to the american public. >> so what is the hope? the person who is tuning in tonight is tuning in because they don't know if they can vote for hillary clinton, because they're worried about the e-mail, they're worried about benghazi, how does telling the complete story help them on that part of the story? >> because even though she has been on stage for so long, and she might be the most familiar
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woman in the world to americans, that story about the rest of her life hasn't been told. what people have absorbed largely when she has been in the political strum, has been the negative, as you talked about, the issues surrounding benghazi and the e-mail server. her goal is not to try to compete with the extraordinary oritary from president obama or joe biden. if she says you know what, i'm not that kind of politician, i'm the kind of politician who rolls up my sleeves and works hard and works across the aisle, which is something we desperately need and is whoa fully under valued. i worked for him before president obama. he always says don't compare me to the all mighty, compare me to the alternative. that's a huge advantage for
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hillary clinton. she is as president obama said, you know, the most qualified person ever to win the nomination for any party to be president. more qualified than obama was, more qualified than her husband was. and i think she doesn't have to win 80% of the vote. she just needs to persuade enough people that she is a safe choice to make sure she wins in november. >> carl, up to your point, we've seen the titans of the democratic party turn out for her, the president, former president, vice-president, donald trump did not have that advantage at his convention, but it is unclear whether or not it mattered. he got a seven point bump after the convention. what do you think will she'll be looking at after this convention? >> i'm not good at predicting those things. but this has been a successful convention of showing america totally at odds with the one we saw in cleveland, but also, let's talk about president obama for a moment. first of all, he is the most popular politician in america. and we're going miss him. and for finally, i think, there
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is a sense that has been coming together here of celebrating his accomplishments, which are quite extraordinary. whatever we think of individual things that have happened in this presidency, he is going to go down in history very well, i think. he is going to go out there, he is fired up for this. he is going to make a difference in this election. he is going to go to places. michelle obama is going to be out there. this is going to be a concerted effort to show that what we saw in cleveland is not the america that we want and not the president that we want. we want someone who is on view at this convention. this america. there are two americas, i've said this election is also the gettysburg of the cultural wars. whoever wins the election, the country will be different for a long, long time. >> it is interesting. the convention took time to remember that my father was gone, his speech, 1984, that got
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the democrats going was about ronald reagan said we are a a shining city sitting on the hill. still true, 32 years later. it is a different question. that election, back then when you put up mondale to no great effect, who do we want to lead us, and both propositions are in the negative. who is less bad. you're saying the complete story is what clinton presents tonight. how does that get her over this hurdle of the trust and of the negative, the negative. >> she has to earn it, right. she has to earn it. i think telling the story of her accomplishments, her experiences, the tangibles is very important for her to do. the american public needs to hear that. the other thing she has got to talk about, and jay alluded to this, is how she understands how to legislate. that's really critical. you have to govern by reaching
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across the aisle. knowing how to engage congress. to legislate. she understands how to do that. she did it in the senate. she also worked to do that as secretary of state. but i think this notion of two americas is an important one, because the country is looking for somebody to bridge the divide, to unite the country. to have solutions over slogans, to have an optimistic view versus fearful. she'll present that tonight and i think you'll hear a credible case from her and from chelsea clinton about the kind of person she is, not just as a wife, but as a mother and a grandmother. i think that's a personal side of hillary clinton who a lot of times carries that moniker of super woman, how doeshe do it all. i think you'll hear a personal story from chelsea. >> you've done an excellent job of predicting a speech that hasn't been written yet. thank you, panel.
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great to have all of you. democrats are hoping the personal stories will make her more relatable to voters. one of those emotional stories, from a woman who lost her husband in iraq. she'll join us next.
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hillary clinton's accomplishments turned into a major theme last night and those taking the stage, including jamie dorf, she lost her husband in iraq, in a rescue for other soldiers. >> before hillary took office, the families of fallen soldiers received $12,000. and yet when you need to bury your best friend, when you need to raise a child on your own, when you need to rebuild your life from rubble, $12,000 doesn't go far. hillary understood, so she did something about it. >> that woman, jamie dorff, joins us now. thank you for being here. >> hi, thank you for having me this morning. >> that's not easy to get up in front of tens of thousands and tell a personal story. how did it feel?
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>> very overwhelming. i mean, i was humbled, a little scared. i thought i didn't want to trip over my words, and wanted to really represent our gold star families. >> how did it come to pass that you were chosen to speak at the convention? >> another spouse had facebooked me and asked me if i would be interested. yeah, you can release my name and number. and a weeks had passed by and i didn't hear anything, so i forgot about t out of the blue, they called me up, and we talked. we really like you, we loved your story, and literally, that's when the avalanche went right down. it occurred. >> wow, well, you've really held up well under all the pressure. you did a great job. so what is your story, for people who missed it? tell us about your husband. >> he was a helicopter pilot. he loved to fly. and like you mentioned, he was on a search and rescue mission
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on the river, and a boat had capsized, and on the way back, and on the first bridge, they just had a cable, and the helicopter went down. it was a low velocity. both him and adam both survived the actual accident. but they didn't survive the river. >> i'm sorry. it is a terrible outcome for these two, who were doing something so brave. why do you credit -- have you met hillary clinton? >> no, i have not. >> you've never met her yet you give her credit. why? >> because of the fact that during the time 12 years ago, you know, you just go through this trauma, and you're not thinking. you're just in this void. unbeknownst to me, i had someone looking out for me and other countless families after me, you know. she thought ahead that $12,000, you know, wasn't enough, just to help us.
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i view it as i was able to stay home and spend quality time with my daughter. and that extra benefit gave me stability to start our healing process. and you know, you don't think about those things. but she thought about it. you know, unbeknownst to me. >> do you feel that politicians in general don't understand people like you? >> in general, i think they do. i think they really want to help the people. but i think it is hard at the same time. i think the hearts are in the right place. you know, with so many different opinions, and so many different thoughts and ways, i think it gets lost a little bit. you know, but at that time, she was able to do what she wanted to do. she pushed through it. >> you have daughter. >> yes. >> who was three when her dad died. >> yes. >> now she is a teenager. what was her response to what happened last night? >> she was so proud.
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i saw her texting, and she was saying i am so proud of my mom and so glad to be her daughter. it just -- it lifted me up, you know, because we honored my husband, and we honored her dad. we also honored all the other families that have lost loved ones in the line of duty. >> that's high praise from a teenager. >> yes. especially one that's your own. >> absolutely. did she tell you that? i know she texted it. did she tell you directly. >> she did. she said mom, i love you and i'm so proud of you. i was -- i cried. >> i know, you're making me cry. jamie, thank you very much. what a beautiful story. thanks so much for sharing it on "new day" and last night. >> thank you very much. same here. i appreciate it. >> thank you. thanks for joining us this morning on "new day." we'll see you tomorrow. "newsroom" with carol costello
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starts right now. hi, i'm live from the wells fargo center, site of the democratic national convention in philadelphia, pennsylvania. good morning, everyone, i'm carol costello. thank you for joining me. the final day gets underway in just hours from now, the most important speech of hillary clinton's career. chelsea clinton will speak and set the stanl fge and hillary clinton has quite an act to follow. >> thank you so much, everybody. >> president obama brought down the house with a high energy speech, optimism and the dangers of fear mongering. it sounded reagan-esque. one of his drop the mike moments, ronald

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