Skip to main content

tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  August 13, 2016 1:00am-3:01am PDT

1:00 am
for now, however, i'll settle for fixing mine. that hurt. shocking results for two olympic giants. a young swimmer from singapore clinches gold in the 100-meter butterfly, while michael phelps ties for silver. >> sweden shocks the world by eliminating the u.s. world football team. and a growing hamann tear yann crisis in aleppo. >> plus, fixing politics and sports. the turkish nba player who has been abandoned by his own family. we'll tell you why. from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, welcome to our viewers
1:01 am
here in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell. cnn "newsroom" starts right now. good day to you. day seven of the rio olympics and another list of winners to tell you about from friday's events. u.s. swimmer katie ledecky, did you see this? she broke her own world record winning the 800-meter. and this is singapore's first ever olympic medal. the u.s. women's football, a major upset when sweden knocked out the defending champions in the quarterfinals. let's go live to rio for the latest. shasta darlington live with us this hour to walk through all the highlights. good to have you with us.
1:02 am
katie ledecky breaking her own record, and michael phelps falling short of the gold. >> that's right, george. as you said, it was his 27th medal in the olympics. it wasn't meant to be gold. he was given a schooling by joseph schooling who beat him out in the 100-meter butterfly. but he did win the silver. he tied with two of his rivals, including south africa's chad le clos. schooling, on the other hand at a press conference, went on to say that phelps had inspired him when he was a kid and really it is the reason he's in swimming today. so despite the fact that phelps didn't get another gold, he thrilled the crowds with all of this great sportsmanship. all the swim or mers and these t stories. katie ledecky, she was on fire.
1:03 am
breaking a world record. really setting herself as one of the best female swimmers for the u.s. or the international teams as someone to watch in the olympics to come. so that was an exciting night in the pool. we have one more chance to see michael phelps tonight. that would be the relay. he said he's not coming back in tokyo. but his teammates seem to keep questioning him about it. >> let's also talk about women's football or soccer as we call it here in the states. a bit of controversy between the united states and sweden. >> exactly, george. a real disappointment for those of us who follow the women's football team, team usa. they were knocked out by sweden in penalty kicks. the most difficult part was the bad show hope solo put on. she again failed to catch some of those penalty kicks. but then went on to call the
1:04 am
swedish team a bunch of cowards, saying she still felt team usa was the better team that day. to tell you the truth, george, she hasn't been very popular here in brazil at all after comments she made about being afraid of zika, not wanting to come. she's been harassed by fans when she has on other people shooting goals at her, the crowd shouts, zika, zika. >> i also want to talk about the situation is of polluted water. what are we learning about the source of that? >> well, george, we have been focusing on the polluted water yet again. the belgian coach said one of their sailors got is sick with a
1:05 am
gastrointestinal disease they think could have been from the water. and that affected their performance during the olympics. so we went -- we actually followed some of this water upstream to see where all of this pollution is coming from. 50% of homes in rio aren't connected to sewage systems. when you go to the favelas in the hills, you can see the sewage dripping out from the homes, running down the streets. it all ends up in the water, george. >> wow. shasta, thank you so much. we'll stay in touch with you and find out what the next day brings for many of these athletes who are there to compete. thank you. when it comes to the medal standings, the united states is comfortably on top. the most gold medals at 20 and the most overall at 50. china is in second place with 13 gold and 37 altogether. and great britain and gentleman is pan neck and neck for third.
1:06 am
two golds separating their overall count. first in the pool, the women will swim 50-meter freestyle and 4 x 100 meter medley. the men will swim the 1,500 meter. gold number 23 in the 4 x 100 medley relay. on dry land, track and field athletes will compete and women sprinters will run the 100-meter race. for all the highlights from rio, you can get it right there at our website, cnn.com/olympics. other news we're following around the world, the united states claims an isis leader was killed in afghanistan. the pentagon said that strike in the eastern part of the country killed khan on july 26th and that it is a major blow to isis operations in that country. according to the pentagon, u.s.,
1:07 am
and afghan special forces conducted that mission. isis is is most often associated with iraq and syria but u.s. suppressed its concern about it growing in afghanistan. a u.s. is spokesperson said the terror group used the city to plan external operations and that it was an entry point used by foreign fighters. i want to show you these photos from reuters showing civilians celebrating when they were evacuated on friday. however, we are getting reports that isis fighters took many others as human shields. in man jib, it is becoming powerful.
1:08 am
the last remaining doctors serving the rebel-held areas sent an open letter to the president of the united states. the doctors are urging washington to do more to prevent the deaths of thousands more civilians. humanitarian needs for people still in aleppo are great. we're joined by pablo marco, the syria doctors without borders. first, if you could just generally describe the situation that your teams are dealing with on the ground. >> well, the operation in aleppo has been delayed for almost the last month.
1:09 am
the conditions are still critical. >> talk to us about the situation, though, for doctors that are trying to deal with patients there when it comes to medical supplies, when it comes to simply their safety, given the continued bombardment there. how are your teams coping with that? >> yeah. we are working now under extreme conditions. we had bombings last week. it is absolutely overwhelming the hospitals. eight of the hospitals have been
1:10 am
affected by bombings in the last three months. so you can imagine what it means to be a medical staff or even a patient at a hospital. the hospital is overwhelmed from the people. you know sooner or later a bomb is going to fall on you. >> this letter was sent to the u.s. president. if people are watching this broadcast now who can make a difference in the international community, in the united states politicians, government agencies around the world, what would you tell people that needs to be done right now? >> for me, the message is very clear.
1:11 am
if the bombing continues, pretty soon there will be no more medical services for anyone. >> i saw a clip of one of our correspondents talking about the situation there. she described it as just hell. wondering if it could get worse and said that it could get worse. people decided to stay and help people, they are dealing with situations no one can imagine. we wish you safety and continued support on on your efforts there. >> thank you. bye-bye. we move on to france where some women could face fines if they don't reveal enough skin on the beach. the mayor is banning burkinis on cannes beaches. it is is drawings heat from many humanitarian rights groups. michael holmes has this report.
quote
1:12 am
>> the burkini is is a modest way to swim in public. for the local authorities in cannes it is a provocation. they sa they said it is liable to create risks of disrupting public order. as the controversy grew, the mayor of cannes doubled down. by banning the swimsuit, i am banning a symbol of islamic extremism. the law came into escalate last month but is making news now because of local muslim said it will challenge in court. the mayor's office denied accusations of discrimination saying the law was meant to
1:13 am
diffuse provocative attitudes. islamic dress has been a controversial for some time. in 2004, a ban on head coverings in schools. this all coming at a time of nervousness and fear. muslim organizations and human rights groups say such laws add to the divisions in french society between muslims and nonmuslims and can feed the isis narrative on of them against us. michael holmes, cnn, paris. michael, thank you. this is cnn "newsroom". donald trump says he was being sarcastic when he claimed the president of the united states founded isis. he is sparking a controversy
1:14 am
over his comments on a key swing is state. plus, one of the most famous turkish players in the nba disowned by his own family. how turkey's fail military divided a son and his parents. jamie foxx here for verizon. did you know verizon has more than three times the 4g lte coverage of sprint? and i'm jamie foxx for sprint. pretty much the same coverage if you squint. you are not jamie foxx! sprint is last nationally in 4g lte coverage. well, who is going to notice? what about the left side of the country, huh? this part of texas, california, new york, et cetera? (announcer vo) don't get fooled by cut rate networks. get the best. and now get up to four free samsung galaxy phones, four lines and sixteen gigs for just one-fifty. only on verizon.
1:15 am
1:16 am
i just wish we didn't have to sell mom's piano. i know how hard she and dad worked to save for it. i know she wanted to keep it in the family. i know, but we need to pay for her funeral, the medical bills ... without life insurance to help, i don't see any other way. i'm worried i'll leave my kids in the same position. why? don't you have life insurance? we had to cut it out of our budget a few years ago, and we never put it back in. besides, i don't think i could even get covered with my recent health. you know, massmutual has a new policy called guaranteed acceptance life insurance. steve and i got covered, and it was affordable. i don't want to go through a long application process just to get turned down. it's one phone call, and you're guaranteed to be accepted. massmutual helped us through the whole thing. i know there's nothing we can do about the situation we're in. but this is definitely something you can do to help protect your family. if you're age 50-75, it's easier than ever to get reliable coverage at an affordable price.
1:17 am
call massmutual today for guaranteed acceptance life insurance. with no medical questions or exams, you cannot be turned down. with one phone call, you can get coverage ranging from $2,000 - $25,000, and premiums can start at less than $10 per month. guaranteed acceptance life insurance can help your loved ones cover expenses such as funeral costs, remaining medical expenses or credit card bills. we have several convenient payment options, and benefits are paid quickly and directly to your beneficiaries. they can use it for any expense they choose. for more than 160 years, our policyowners have mattered most to us. massmutual's ratings are among the highest of any company in any industry. you can feel confident we can help you protect the people who matter most to you with guaranteed acceptance life insurance. call us today at at this number. call now!
1:18 am
america's choice 2016. a new controversy from donald trump. now telling voters the only way he will lose the key state of pennsylvania is is if hillary clinton cheats. during a campaign stop there on friday, he said he wants law enforcement officials to closely monitor the polls to make sure the people don't vote multiple times. both campaigns have been devoting significant is resources to pennsylvania. candidates hoping to swing the election their way. in the meantime, donald trump appears to be walking back his widely criticized claim this week that the president of the united states barack obama and hillary clinton were the founders on of isis. jim acosta has this report for
1:19 am
us. >> reporter: have you heard the one about the presidential candidate who called president obama the tpouder of eyes dismiss. >> so i said the founder on of isis. obviously a bit sarcastic. but not that sarcastic to be honest with you. >> reporter: he said that is for stand-up than stump speech. >> barack obama is the founder. he got everybody out and he let them know when and we're leaving. he is the founder in the true sense. >> just kidding, says trump who asked a certain television network they don't get sarcasm? >> i know what you meant. you meant that he created the vacuum, he lost the peace. >> but sit more of a head scratcher than knee slapper. >> his candidacy is is the
1:20 am
imprecise language. sometimes he uses three words when he needs 10. i know what is is in his mind, but that's not what people hear. he has got to learn to use language that has been thought through and that is clear to everybody. >> the gop nominee's attacks come as reminders that he also wanted a quick exit in the war of iraq. >> would you take all america troops out of afghanistan and iraq? >> iraq, we shouldn't have been there. afghanistan is is is not the bigger problem. the bigger problem is pakistan. >> he trails by double digits in colorado, north carolina, and virginia. but he is hanging on in florida. it follows days of damaging moments like this one in florida when he asked russia to hack into hillary clinton's e-mail server. >> russia, if you're listening, i hope you're able to find the 30,000 e-mails that are missing.
1:21 am
>> trump said that was sarcasm too. >> i obviously was being sarcastic. the people in the room were laughing. they found it very funny. everybody knew that. >> but it makes it difficult to determine when trump is is playing it safe. when u.s. centers could be tried for terrorism at guantanamo. >> i know they want to try them in regular court systems. i don't like that at all. i would say they could be tried there. that would be fine. >> that was cnn senior white house correspondent jim acosta reporting for us. it has been a busy week. jacob is with the international think thank chatham house and joins us live in london. good to have you with us. the first talk about this latest claim from donald trump that if he loses the state of pennsylvania it is because hillary clinton cheated. >> this is a really dangerous claim. it is something that trump has
1:22 am
been saying not only about pennsylvania but the election generally. he is trying to delegitimize the election. if you look at donald trump's tweets on election tphaoeurbgts he said a similar thing. he doesn't really want to accept the idea that he could lose a legitimate election. so he basically laying the groundwork for ill legitimacy if he loses. so it is a little bit strange for him to be making this claim. >> i want to hear donald trump's words here. let's listen to the actual sound bite. is and we can listen to it on the other side, about cheating. >> if we get cheated out of this election, if we get cheated out of a win in pennsylvania, which is such a vital state. i know what's happening here, folks. she can't beat what's happening here. the only way they can beat it in
1:23 am
my opinion, and i mean it 100%, is if in certain parts of the state they cheat. >> is is trump laying out the groundwork for the possibility that, you know, he might not win? as he said in the state by talking about cheating. secondly, let's talk about how important a state like pennsylvania is for that candidate. >> well, to answer your first question, yes, he is absolutely laying out the groundwork. you saw his comments earlier in the week about how if you lost he would take a long vacation. i think in a way he's beginning to come to terms with the fact at the moment he is lagging considerably in the polls. we're still nearly three months out from the election. many things can change. but that realism, the sense that the polls are showing a hillary clinton victory if it were held today, is beginning to make its way into his rhetoric. yes, pennsylvania is very important for trump strategy.
1:24 am
there are very few routes to the white house for him if he doesn't win that statement the latest round of polls that came out last night showing clinton with double digit margins in colorado, virginia, north carolina, florida. other polls showing her head or just slightly behind in traditionally republican states like south carolina. pennsylvania may not matter in the end. >> let's also talk one other issue coming from donald trump. walking pack his claim that barack obama and hillary clinton were the founders of isis. he is now saying he was being sarcastic. >> this is a very strange claim for him to make. it's so absurd on its face i'm not even sure it is a particularly effective attack line. he said he was being sarcastic. but he is sarcastic repeatedly. we saw that in the video you saw
1:25 am
earlier. he was given multiple opportunities to walk it back and he stuck with it. i don't know what advantage that gives him, except for maintaining his space in the headlines. and the problem is, he is trying to replicate the strategy that worked for him in the republican primary contest by monday tphop likewising headlines. in a one on one general election contest increasingly becoming a referendum on whether he is suited to be president of the united states. >> it is is not the unforce errors or curious claims being made but rather her handling of e-mail. specifically we're getting a new controversy when it comes to the e-mail again the state department and the clinton foundation. how significant will that be with hillary clinton? >> i don't think these new revelations will be particularly significant. they show a degree of closeness
1:26 am
between the state department and the clinton foundation. there was some eupl pro pirate when clinton was secretary of state. but i don't think there are any new revelations. there is no sense of new impropriety there. frankly, if trump is is unable to let her bad news cycle be her bad news cycle, there is no way he is going to be able to capitalize it. >> thank you for taking time with us. a lot to talk about in the world of politics. we always appreciate your insight. thank you. >> still ahead, a family's public anguish. one of turkey's most favorite nba players, his family disowns him. we'll tell you why that happened next. in the u.s., heavy claim flooding has claimed three lives and numerous rescues.
1:27 am
you're watching cnn "newsroom". whatcha' doin? just checking my free credit score at credit karma. what the??? you're welcome. i just helped you dodge a bullet. but i was just checking my... shhh... don't you know that checking your credit score lowers it! just be cool. actually, checking your credit score with credit karma doesn't affect it at all. are you sure? positive. so i guess i can just check my credit score then? oooh "check out credit karma today. credit karma. give yourself some credit." sorry about that.
1:28 am
1:29 am
1:30 am
and a warm welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. you are watching cnn "newsroom". sit good to have you with us. i'm george howell with the headlines we're following for you this hour. >> the olympics saw a major upset on friday in women's football. in a quarterfinal bout, sweden knocked the defending champion u.s. out of the medal contention. the swedes won on penalties after a 1-1 draw led to 30 minutes of extra time. it is the first olympic loss for the u.s. team since 2000. in syria, forces back go
1:31 am
ahead by the u.s. have fully retaken a city, the city of manbij. we are getting reports that isis militants fleeing that city took many other people with them as human shields. the u.s. is is hoping to acquire key intelligence left behind by the terror group. >> the mayor of cannes, france is temporarily banning burkinis on the french riviera and the beaches there. the move follows several terror attacks in france, including last month's attack in a nearby city nice that killed 84 people. human rights activists say it could only in flame tensions. >> hillary clinton has released her 2015 tax returns and is is challenging her republican rival donald trump to do the same. the documents show she and her husband bill clinton earned $10.6 million, most of all of it in speaking fees.
1:32 am
they paid $3.6 million back in federal taxes. >> so exiled cleric gulen wants an investigation into last month's coup attempt. he said he would turn himself over if any accusations against him were found to have any substance. he believes that the government there is trying to control the country's justice system. turkey has been pressing the united states to hand him over. >> this rift between the turkish president erdogan has entangled the family of one of the most famous players in the nba. they disowned their own celebrity son. now he, in turn, is distancing himself from them. >> while dozens of nba players are battling it out to honor
1:33 am
their countries and families, one is being publicly disavowed by his. turkish nba player plays center for the oklahoma city thunder. in a statement released earlier this week, his family publicly disowned their son saying i apologize to the turkish people for having such a son. it comes in the wake of a failed military coup in istanbul. he belonged to a group specifically facing erdogan's wrath, the gulen movement. its founder was once an ally of the turk iraq president but now lives in self-imposed exile in the united states. president erdogan pwhraeufpls the group for the recent coup attempt. >> this organization will be
1:34 am
revealed properly in all of its expects. and to be destroyed within the framework of legal actions. >> gulen denies any involve many. >> translator: i consider what has been done is directly against our nation. an act of treason aimed to end the unity. >> because of his comments, kontir, it seems his family is willing to cut ties with the nba starks even demanding he changed his name. his father saying his statement sps behavior trouble our family. i told enes we would disown him if he did not change his course. he did not care. shortly after, he posted a message on twitter. today i lost those who for 24 years i called mother, father,
1:35 am
brother, my family. he finished with a defiant tonight. god will protect the devoted members of this movement. god will raise us. hang on my brothers, my sisters, my siblings. let's not lose this fight. >> and he actually signed that letter on twitter enis con tear gulen. his twitter account reportedly has been blocked in turkey. this is cnn "newsroom". still ahead, one local initial louisiana says the flooding you see here is the worst he has ever seen in that area. a look at the distraction it has caused when we return. plus, a singer shares tone deaf opinions on women and sex. how argentina is turning on one of its most many famous vocalists. vocalists. ♪ whoomp there it is
1:36 am
uh, yeah... well, uh, well there's this one. >>best insurance mobile app? yeah, two years in a row. >>well i'll be... does that thing just follow you around? like a little puppy! the award-winning geico app. download it today. be the you who doesn't cover your moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. be the you who shows up in that dress. who hugs a friend. who is done with treatments that don't give you clearer skin. be the you who controls your psoriasis with stelara® just 4 doses a year after 2 starter doses. stelara® may lower your ability to fight infections and may increase your risk of infections and cancer. some serious infections require hospitalization. before treatment, get tested for tuberculosis. before starting stelara® tell your doctor if you think you have an infection or have symptoms such as: fever, sweats, chills, muscle aches or cough. always tell your doctor if you have any signs of infection, have had cancer, if you develop any new skin growths or if anyone in your house needs or has recently received a vaccine. alert your doctor of new or worsening problems, including headaches, seizures, confusion and vision problems these may be signs of a rare, potentially fatal brain condition.
1:37 am
some serious allergic reactions can occur. do not take stelara® if you are allergic to stelara® or any of its ingredients. most people using stelara® saw 75% clearer skin and the majority were rated as cleared or minimal at 12 weeks. be the you who talks to your dermatologist about stelara®.
1:38 am
welcome back to cnn
1:39 am
"newsroom". i'm george howell. windy conditions combined with hot, dry weather are fueling wildfires in parts of europe. take a look at these pictures here. you get a sense of what's happening on the portugese island of madira. in france, 3,300 hectares have been ravaged by fire. three people were injured there. heavy rains have been drenching parts of the united states. louisiana specifically. and mississippi, causing the flooding you see right there. three people have been died. many have been rescued from rooftops, cars and in one case a tree. this shows what conditions were like on friday in the town of greenwell springs, louisiana. one official tells cnn these are the worst conditions he's ever seen. for the very latest, let's bring in our meteorologist derrick.
1:40 am
when you look at those, it is pretty intense for those communities. >> small towns have been completely caught off from infrastructure because of the roadways. they are calling this a near 1 in 500 year rainfall event. to show you how large this catastrophe is. you can see the problems that some of the people are dealing with. louisiana governor john bell has declared a state of message. his own basement is flooded because of the rains taking place here. three fatalities. one person missing. dozens of high-water rescues. people being pulled from rooftops. i'm about to show you something that gives you a i great indication of the ferocity of
1:41 am
the rushing waters, the rivers and creeks in this region. we are looking at the river at mount peelier. what is interesting to note is the river roads, 20 feet in four hours. that's six meters of water rise in a short period of time. no wonder there are flash flood warnings across this area. you can see the red. the brighter green follows the rivers and creeks as well. rainfall totals, in excess of 15 inches. i want to point out the greensburg and zachary region. this area has been hit particularly hard. that's where we are seeing some of the images. just like this, as people unform still don't take advantage from the national weather service and
1:42 am
meteorologists like myself to not drive across flooded roadways like this. it's a terrible decision. you just don't know how deep that actual water is. you need to start paying attention to the local emergency reports in this area. pat on rouge, your average for the month of august is 4 inches. you have already received 10 inches. there's the low pressure system. plenty of gulf moisture being drawn into this. unfortunately, there is more rain to come. the heavy rain papbdz still airline ating around into the hammond region. we expect it continue through next week. when flooding and saturated lands, it takes so long for the water to recede.
1:43 am
some of these areas are below sea level. new orleans is two feet below sea level. a former u.s. college student convicted of rape but has been spared prison. many people are asking why. dan simon has details on this case. >> reporter: 22-year-old austin wilkerson has been sentenced to to two years in boulder county jail. but there's a catch. it is is called work release. an arrangement where defendants are able to go to work or school during the day. prosecutors say it is too lenient of a sentence. >> we were hoping to see a prison sentence in this case. we feel prison is appropriate for someone who commits a rape of this nature. >> they were students at the university of colorado. it was a st. patrick's day
1:44 am
parting. lots of drinking. wilkerson looked over the victim. prosecutors say he actually assaulted her. when confronted by investigators, he made repeated advances on the victim but she rebuffed him each time. he later admitted to friends when she was passed out, he let his hands wander. >> he definitely in our opinion and as we argued to the court throughout the prours pros has given whatever is going to serve him. >> in the he was found guilty of sexual assault is and unlawful contact. he admitted to his crime and apologized at sentencing. judge butler also sentenced him to 20 years probation and said he struggled with the decision. he deserves to be punished.
1:45 am
we need to truly figure out whether he can or cannot be rehabilitated. victim add co cats are saying they are refusing to see the seriousness. >> we have come to accept that light sentences in these crimes are the norm. >> they have 4 to 20 years in state prison. his lawyer did not respond to repeated requests for client but his client is showing remorse. dan simon, cnn, san francisco. >> dan, thank you. an argentinean singer is facing major criticism after making a number of offensive remarks in a
1:46 am
recent speech to journalism students. his career is already suffering after he finds himself in a nationwide controversy. ♪ >> gustavo rose to fame in the '90s. it only grew when he launched a solo career in 1989. he made deeply offensive comments about women and is sex. there are women who need because they're hysterical, they need to be raped to have sex because it is a psych hroplg cal need, he said. he made this comment last week. he said he agrees disdisagrees
1:47 am
with sex with minor. he said he was not condoning violence again women. >> translator: me and my daughters have received death threats, he said. a lot of people on social media are threatening to rape my daughters. >> the argentine senate took issue with his controversial comments. senators approved the motion wednesday toe repudiate the singer's comments calling them sexist. >> translator: i believe his statements are very serious, this human activist rights says. they degrade women because they come from such a public figure now argentina's women council with the anti-discrimination institute, are planning to sue the singer, saying he is promoting sexual violence against women. his career is now in jeopardy.
1:48 am
several of his concerts have been canceled. and a radio station announced it will no longer play his music. >> some are calling him the lightning bolt. she calls him son. the mother of an olympic great, usain bolt, talks about his success. that's still ahead. n't give you. be the you who controls your psoriasis with stelara® just 4 doses a year after 2 starter doses. stelara® may lower your ability to fight infections and may increase your risk of infections and cancer. some serious infections require hospitalization. before treatment, get tested for tuberculosis. before starting stelara® tell your doctor if you think you have an infection or have symptoms such as: fever, sweats, chills, muscle aches or cough. always tell your doctor if you have any signs of infection, have had cancer, if you develop any new skin growths or if anyone in your house needs or has recently received a vaccine. alert your doctor of new or worsening problems, including headaches, seizures, confusion and vision problems these may be signs of a rare,
1:49 am
potentially fatal brain condition. some serious allergic reactions can occur. do not take stelara® if you are allergic to stelara® or any of its ingredients. most people using stelara® saw 75% clearer skin and the majority were rated as cleared or minimal at 12 weeks. be the you who talks to your dermatologist about stelara®.
1:50 am
1:51 am
1:52 am
aiming for the gold. he is one of the biggest stars at the rio olympics. here's the thing, though. he hasn't even competed yet. we're talking about jamaican runner usain bolt. fair to say few people can catch the lightning bolt on the track. but our own don rid dell caught up with a woman who knows him best, his mother. >> reporter: you could easily think he was born that way. that's not the case. his proud and loving mom
1:53 am
jennifer. >> as a boy, very jovial, friendly. can go up to people and say something them that will make laugh. >> he went from a happy-go-luck where kid to olympian. you use loses his confidence now. he wasn't sure. it was a scene pror portrayed in a any film approximate his love. >> what was it you told him? how did he process that information? >> when i talked with him, he stopped crying. he think about it ez, okay, mommy. i'm going to go in and i'm going to do my best. >> and what did you say to him? >> i said the lore is with you
1:54 am
and i'm going to pray for you. and i saw the race and saw him in front. and the crowd started to shout his name. i think that helped to motivate him because he could hear the crowd in the stadium. >> bolt won the 200 meters and became the youngest world record. >> your son is not just an amazing athlete. people adore him. there's adulation everywhere you go. >> i'm so overwhelmed. the joy. sometimes i cried tears of joy. >> what does he say to you when he finds you in the crowd after these gold medal performances?
1:55 am
he doesn't really think anything but i can see there is joy within him. >> rio will be bolt's fourth and final olympics. he is planning to retire next year. >> as a year, what would you hope for usain once he stops competing? >> i would hope he would settle down, get married, and start his family. >> can you see him settling down? >> yes. . he told me that many times, that he's going to start his family. >> what do you think hussein's message is? he's trying to, you know, get everybody to love. because he has grown close to us. yet he has gotten a lot of love. i would still like to share the joy with others. >> whatever happens whenever he
1:56 am
retires usain's bolt will be missed. >> usain bolt takes to the track. you can find it all at cnn.com/olympics. finally, we take you to mexico. producers, growers and others in the industry are work to go draw positive attention to the controversial plant. a number of politicians called for legalization. people at that expo will be pushing that, too, around the stigma of marijuana. thank you for joining us for cnn "newsroom". i'm george howell. more news from around the world right after the break. stay with us. stay with us. mmm, that smells delicious. thanks, but it's for sandra. i know ... such a shame about will. i'm glad you're doing this for her.
1:57 am
i just wish we could do more. she's got a lot on her plate now between william's hospital expenses and his funeral bills. she also lost his pension when he died. it makes me wonder... i've been thinking the same thing. and, you know, sooner or later one of us may end up in the same position. and i think we need to protect ourselves with life insurance. yeah, but at our age and with your health? we don't have that kind of extra money. if we were going to get life insurance, we should've done it years ago. well, it's not too late. i looked into it. mass mutual has a policy designed to cover the things we would need and it starts at 10 bucks a month. okay, so we can afford it. what about your health? you can't be turned down for health reasons. it's called guaranteed acceptance life insurance. what do you think? i think this is something we need to do. now, if you're age 50-75, it's easy to get reliable coverage at an affordable price. call massmutual today for guaranteed acceptance life insurance. with no medical questions or exams,
1:58 am
you cannot be turned down. with one phone call, you can get coverage ranging from $2,000 - $25,000, and premiums can start at less than $10 per month. guaranteed acceptance life insurance can help your loved ones cover expenses such as funeral costs, remaining medical expenses and credit card bills. you can choose from several convenient payment options, and benefits are paid quickly and directly to your beneficiaries. they can use it for any expense they choose. for more than 160 years, our policyowners have mattered most to us. massmutual's ratings are among the highest of any company in any industry. you can feel confident we can help you protect the people who matter most to you with guaranteed acceptance life insurance. call massmutual today at this number. call now!
1:59 am
2:00 am
a big day of wins but upsets, too. the latest from rio de janeiro and the olympic games. plus, coming to his wife's defense, former u.s. president bill clinton calls the controversy over hillary clinton's emails a load of bull. plus, venezuela's president making a drastic move to save his country's rapidly sinking economy. from cnn world headquarters, welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world, i'm george howell. cnn starts right now. aiming for the gold, the
2:01 am
united states has been putting on quite a show in the pool in rio. on friday, it was no different. the americans led with three gold medal in four events and a silver. the only other, women's sensation, katie ledecky, dominated the 800-meter freestyle. she broke her own world record and beat the next best time by more than 11 seconds. that success did not extend to the football pitch. the u.s. women have not -- haven't lost the olympics since 2000. but they fell to sweden on penalty kicks friday if a major upset. for the latest, shasta darlington is live from rio. katie ledecky breaking her own world record, and michael phelps falling short of the gold this time. >> reporter: that's right. michael phelps did win his 27th olympic medal, but it wasn't meant to be gold. that honor went to joseph schooling, but there's a great back story here.
2:02 am
joseph said that he was his friend in beijing, they snapped a picture together. he's come back and beat him in the pool, bringing home the medal. phelps did win the silver in a three-day tie with two of his rivals. in a show of good sportsmanship, they locked arms and stepped occupy the medals poed -- stepped up on the medals podium together. phelps has one more shot at it tonight. he will be competing in the medley relay. he insists he won't be back in tokyo in 2020, but he's changed his mind before. as far as ledecky, she was on a winning streak that has not stopped. she won her fourth gold medal, her third individual gold medal. at the tender age of 19, she is just beginning to create her legend. >> amazing to watch that. i mean, 11 seconds. incredible.
2:03 am
also want to talk about women's football, soccer as we call it in the united states. sweden defeating the united states, and bait of controversy. >> reporter: that's right. this has to be one of the biggest upset of these olympics. the u.s. women's soccer/football team being knocked out by sweden 4-3, penalty kicks. this is the first time since women's football was introduced to olympics in 1996 that the u.s. team doesn't make it to the final gold medal match. hope solo, i have to say, didn't take it kindly. she actually said -- called the swedish team a bunch of cowards and said thanks to their defensive play, the u.s. was actually the better team and should have won. the swedish coach shot back, well, if being a coward means winning, i guess that's okay. >> okay. shasta, also want to talk to you about the situation when it comes to polluted water. i know that you've been looking into the source of that. what did you discover?
2:04 am
>> reporter: that's right. this has become an issue over and over because there's so much raw sewage in the sailing venue. the latest came from the belgian coach saying that one of the sailors had actually gotten sick during a training session and wasn't competing at their best. we decided to follow the raw sewage upstream and see where it comes from. because only half of the homes here in rio are connected to sanitation systems, what you find up here in the hillside neighborhoods, it just is dumped out raw, running between the houses, downhill, and straight into the ocean. that's where you get all of this pollution. but as big a problem for the people who live up in the hillside communities as it is for the people down in the bay, george. >> that is important to point out. yeah, we talk about the games, but this is the situation of the people there living with, dealing with. shasta darlington, live for us in rio. thank you. so the tiny island nation of
2:05 am
naru, many people may not have even heard about it, but they are feeling the smallest olympic squad in rio are just two athletes. we spoke with them billion what it means to compete on the world stage. >> reporter: the americans brought more than 550 athletes to rio. the brazilians, about 100 less. in total, there are 11,500 total competitors at the olympics. the country of nauru has just these two guys. they're a long way from home. >> i'll be competing in judo. >> i'm a weightlifter. >> from nauru. >> the republic of nauru. >> small island in the pacific. you can hardly find us on the map. >> reporter: it's situated almost on top of the equator, right in the middle of the pacific ocean. >> nauru is the smallest republic in the world.
2:06 am
and yeah, it's just really small. it's been an olympic nation since 1994, and nauru proudly competes against the heavyweights of world sports, marching alongside them in the opening ceremony. >> before coming here, i tried to picture what it would be like. it's nowhere close to what i had in mind. it's amazing. being around the athletes, all the champions around the world, is really overwhelming. >> the famous athletes i bump into was -- the two williams siste sisters, because i never thought i would meet them in real person. >> reporter: the opening ceremony -- >> the opening ceremony is amazing. overwhelming. the feeling when i walked in, i was speechless. >> reporter: while the athletes is been in rio, their tiny homeland has made headlines. nauru's controversial treatment of refugee from war-torn areas of the world exposed in a
2:07 am
damning report by amnesty international. the athletes prefer not to talk about politics but have found ways to connect with refugees through sport. >> they've been released and living amongst the people on the island. they're really good. most of them are really good. we even have a few friends who are practicing with us in judo. >> reporter: whether at home or at the games, the olympic spirit ring true. the athletes are flying the flag for a country most people have never heard of and making plenty of friends along the way. don riddell, cnn, rio. america's choice 2016. donald trump is telling voters the only way that he will lose the key state of pennsylvania is if hillary clinton cheats. during a campaign stop there on friday, he said that he wants law enforcement officials to closely monitor the polls there
2:08 am
to make sure that people don't vote multiple times. >> the only way we can lose in my opinion -- i really mean this -- pennsylvania is if cheating goes on. i really believe it. >> both campaigns have been devoting significant resources to pennsylvania which has been a base of working class voters hoping to swing the campaign either way. in the meantime, donald trump appears to be walking back his widely criticized claim this week that the u.s. president, barack obama, and hillary clinton were founders of isis. cnn's jessica schneider has more. >> reporter: donald trump trying to clarify his comments about president obama and isis. >> i said the founder of isis -- obviously i'm being sarcastic. then, then -- than sahr caster, to be honest -- sarcastic, to be honest i. said the founder of
2:09 am
isis. i said soon he's going to pick up his most valuable player award. did i say that? i say it all the time. so they knew i was being sarcastic. >> reporter: that after trump repeatedly insisted thursday that the president was the founder of the terrorist organization. >> i call president obama and hillary clinton the founders of isis. >> he meant that he created the vacuum -- >> no, the founder of isis -- >> he's not sympathetic to them. he hates them -- >> i don't care. he was the founderment. >> reporter: trump's attacks on the president come as more evidence surfaces that trump also wanted to rapidly pull troops out of iraq including in this 2011 interview on cnn. >> iraq, we shouldn't have been there. i'd get them out real fast. >> reporter: not the first time trump has claimed sarcasm to get out of a jam. latest july -- >> russia, if you're listening, i hope you're able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing. >> reporter: he later dismissed the uproar. >> i obviously was sarcastic. people in the room were
2:10 am
laughing. everybody knew that. >> reporter: trump's supporter, newt gingrich, encouraging the straight-talking businessman to be more careful with his words. >> one of the things that's frustrate being his candidacy is the imprecise language. he sometimes uses three words when he needs ten. he has got to learn to use language that has been thought through and is clear it to everybody. >> reporter: as the latest nbc news/maris street poll shows trump trailing clinton by 14 points in colorado, 13 in virginia, 9 points in north carolina, and 5 points in florida. trump even acknowledging he's having trouble in traditionally red utah. >> having a tremendous problem in utah. utah's a different place. and i don't know -- is anybody here from utah? i mean, it's -- i didn't think so. [ laughter ] we're having a problem. >> reporter: donald trump acknowledging the importance of this state, telling his supporters "we need to win pennsylvania." here in altoona, he also lobbed
2:11 am
a serious charge saying the only way he'll lose the state is if cheating goes on. he encouraged people to get to the polls and report any voting irregularities they might see. cnn, altoona, pennsylvania. >> thank you. hillary clinton is challenging donald trump to release his taxes. the u.s. democratic presidential candidate ramped up the pressure on her rival, releasing her only tax returns for 2015. they show that she and her husband, former president bill clinton, earned $10.6 million, much of that from speaking fees. they paid about $3.6 million in taxes. trump has refused to release his taxes saying they are being audited. and the trump campaign says that clinton is just trying to deflect attention away from the e-mail controversy that has been plaguing that campaign for months. bill clinton in the meantime is defending his wife on her e-mails at a gathering of the asian american journalists association in las vegas.
2:12 am
mr. clinton was asked about why americans should trust hillary clinton when she allegedly lied about never reading classified emails on her private e-mail server when she served as secretary of state. sheer how the former -- here is how the former u.s. president responded. listen -- >> first of all, the fbi director said when he testified before congress he had to amend his previous day's statement that she had never received any emails marked "classified." they saw two little notes with a "c" on this. this is the biggest load of bull i ever heard -- they were about telephone calls that she needed to make. and the state department typically puts a little "c" on it to discourage people from discussing it in public in the event the secretary of state, whoever it is, doesn't make a telephone call. does that sound threatening to the national security to you? >> earlier this year, the fbi decided not to recommend charge against hillary clinton over her
2:13 am
e-mails. just this week, newly released emails are raising questions about the possibility of inappropriate links between the u.s. state department and the clinton foundation during her tenure there. the hacker who goes by the name goosifer 2.0 has struck again, and it is personal. the hacker published cell phone numbers and personal e-mail addresses for hundreds of democrats in the house of representatives. the files apparently were stolen in a cyberattack on the democratic congressional campaign committee, the dccc. guccifer also claimed responsibility for the high-profile hack of a democratic national committee. in that attack, 20,000 emails were stolen and given to we look which released them just before last month's democratic convention. cnn goes inside a government facility where cyberexperts are working hard to try to stop i.d. hackers, to stop them before
2:14 am
they strike. >> reporter: russian malware is in hundreds if not thousands of computer that hold information, and americans fear cyberattack second only to an attack by isis. >> what happened is one of the large breakers or several of the large breakers were operated remotely by the attacker. >> reporter: it was the first-known cyberattack of its kind. three attacks 3 minutes apart -- 30 minutes apart, against three electrical substations serving ukraine's power grid. >> this has happened. we've had a cyberattack on critical infrastructure that was destructive. >> reporter: destructive and a real threat to the united states says suzanne spaulding. she's in charge of protecting the nation's 16 critical infrastructure sectors. a power outage impacts everything from air traffic
2:15 am
control to subways and traffic lights, cell phone, computers, water, and food supplies. cnn was given rare access to a government test facility in idaho falls where a team of cyberexperts, led by marty edwards, is busy identifying hackers and trying to stop them. is it difficult for some sort of a cyberattacker to take down a power grid? >> it's much more simple than we would like it to be. [ siren ] >> reporter: to show us just how simple it is, the cyberteam re-created the ukraine attack. a hacker using a common e-mail phishing scam steals an employee's credentials, takes full control of the computer operating the power grid, and shuts it down. in the ukraine, power of knocked out to several of their substations. >> correct. >> reporter: could that happen here? >> you know, it could. all of our infrastructures are
2:16 am
run by the underground systems. >> reporter: the malicious code identified as having played a role in ukraine's attack is the same code dhs recently admit is in hundreds if not thousands of u.s. computer systems that control critical infrastructure. the code known as black energy has been linked to russia. >> there are companies across the country and this is not just with respect to electricity companies, that don't fully appreciate the nature of the threat. >> reporter: 75% to 80% of the nation's critical infrastructure is owned and operated by private sector companies. despite many warnings, dhs says some companies have failed to take even basic cybersecurity measures. >> ultimately comes down to a business decision for the company. >> reporter: a business decision that could allow attackers not only to turn off the lights but destroy the machinery, as well. i'm standing on the actual testing site of the generator. it was the first test of its kind to prove that a cyberattacker could gain control of a generator and cause it to
2:17 am
self-destruct. if an attack were to happen on a generator, how long it would take a plant to get back on line? >> oh, wow. some of the generators and large electrical equipment literally takes years to manufacture. >> reporter: dhs has trained more than 11,000 people both in the private and government sector how to better secure their systems. that includes limiting remote access only to those who need it. and if there is an attack, worst case scenario, the only way to resolve it is to disconnect from the internet. cnn, new york. >> that is an eye-opening report. thank you. still ahead on "cnn newsroom," heavy rains have been soaking parts of the south. louisiana and mississippi, dangerous flooding in communities. my advice for looking younger, longer? get your beauty sleep. and use aveeno® absolutely ageless® night cream with active naturals® blackberry complex. younger looking skin can start today.
2:18 am
absolutely ageless® from aveeno®. i've heard it all. eat more fiber. flax seeds. yogurt. get moving. keep moving. i know! try laxatives. been there, done that. my chronic constipation keeps coming back. i know. tell me something i don't know. vo: linzess works differently from laxatives. linzess treats adults with ibs with constipation or chronic constipation. it can help relieve your belly pain, and lets you have more frequent and complete bowel movements that are easier to pass. do not give linzess to children under six and it should not be given to children six to seventeen. it may harm them. don't take linzess if you have a bowel blockage. get immediate help if you develop unusual or severe stomach pain, especially with bloody or black stools. the most common side effect is diarrhea sometimes severe. if it's severe stop taking linzess and call your doctor right away. other side effects include gas, stomach-area pain and swelling. talk to your doctor about managing your symptoms
2:19 am
proactively with linzess. (lion♪it's peyton on sunday mornings.♪ (peyton) you know with directv nfl sunday ticket you can watch your favorite team no matter where you live. like broncos or colts. (cashier) cool. (peyton) ah...18. the old number. ooh. i have got a coupon for that one. (vo) get nfl sunday ticket - only on directv. and watch live games anywhere.
2:20 am
is it a force of nature? or a sales event? the summer of audi sales event is here. get up to a $5,000 bonus on select audi models. 5:20 on the u.s. east coast. welcome back to "cnn newsroom." the isis leader targeted in iraq on july 26th, the pentagon says a strike in the eastern part of the country killed khan. isis is most often associated with iraq and syria, sbubut u.s officials have expressed concern about the growing presence in afghanistan. want to tell you about a combination of hot, dry weather,
2:21 am
and strong winds making things difficult for firefighters dealing with wildfires in france, spain, and portugal. the portuguese island of madeira has been hit especially hard. at least three people died there this week, and more than 1,000 people have been evacuated from their homes during the fires. let's talk more about the weather there, but also in the united states, mississippi and louisiana, with flooding. >> wish we could take the rainfall and douse fires across southern europe. it will stay hot, dry from spain into portugal. in terms of the deep south and the united states, louisiana, that's the area we're focusing in on, take a look at some of the video coming out of the area. you can get a depth of idea just what people are dealing with down there. you see some of the rescues taking place. there have been dozens of high-water rescues. the louisiana governor, john bell, declaring a state of emergency. his own basement has been flooded from the event. the national weather service
2:22 am
calling this almost a one in 500-year rainfall event. record levels on many of the rivers. unfortunately, three fatality. one person missing. many small towns cut off completely from the flooded roadways throughout the area. get a load of this -- i've got to show the ticfa river gauge. this gives an indication of the rapid rise in the river. in 14 hours, the river rose 20 feet. that is six meters in a short period of time. that is called flash flooding, my friends. current level at 24 feet, well above flood stage. that's why the national weather service has highlighted the area as a flash flood warning. you see the watches including new orleans, you see baton rouge included in the warning, as well. radar estimated rainfall totals over the past 24 hours, locally some areas have had 15 inches or more. that is why we have scenes like this.
2:23 am
this is coming out of zachary, louisiana, just outside of baton rouge. and the rainfall totals across a few other locations, you see 20-plus inches. by the way, baton rouge has received 150% more rainfall in a 24-hour period than they received in the entire month of august. wow. there's a storm system. tell continue to bring heavy -- it will continue to bring heavy rain. the flooding concern will continue today and well into next week as the rivers continue to be swollen by all the excessive rain. >> our meteorologist, derek van dam, thank you very much. we'll stay in touch obviously as we watch the flooding situation there. >> thank. >> thank you. this is "cnn newsroom." we'll continue to follow that obviously. in syria, rebel-backed forces by the united states say they have fully retaken a key city from isis. the u.s. says the terror group used the city to plan external operations and that it had been an entry point for foreign fighters. the u.s. is hoping to acquire key intelligence left behind by
2:24 am
the terror group. meantime, the battle to control aleppo is becoming bloodier. the city used to be syria's economic powerhouse. now forces are on the defensive there after rebels broke the regime's siege last week. the last remaining doctors serving aleppo's rebel-held areas have sent an open letter to the president of the united states urging washington to do more to prevent the deaths of thousands more civilians. earlier i spoke with pablo marco, the syria program manager for doctors without borders, supporting hospitals and medical personnel in aleppo. i started by asking him to describe the situation as his teams are dealing with it there on the ground now. >> in the last week, very little aid has been able to get inside the city. it's a desperate populations.
2:25 am
needs are critical. >> talk about the situation, though, for doctors that are trying to deal with medical supplies and their safety given the continued bombardment there. how are your teams coping with that? >> yeah. yeah. the situation in aleppo, they are working under extreme condition. the brutal bombings in the last week have brought a high influx of injured people to the personnel theaters. absolutely overwhelming the capacity of the hospitals. at the same time, they're being bomb bombed on a constant basis. daily bombing in the last three months. in the last three weeks -- you can imagine what it means to be
2:26 am
a staff member or patient in aleppo. basically being overwhelmed, the people, terrified because you know sooner or later a bomb is going to fall over you. >> pablo, the letter sent to the u.s. president, you know, if people are watching this broadcast now who can make a difference in the international community, in the united states, politicians, government agencies around the world, what would you tell people that needs to be done right now? >> for me, it's very clear. the hospitals need to be protected from bombing, for the wounded to be evacuated to a safe place, and do not -- if the bombing continues soon there will be no access in aleppo for
2:27 am
anyone. coming up still here on "cnn newsroom," the mayor of cannes, france, bans the bikeno the french riviera's famed beaches. human rights activists say the move will only heighten tensions. we're live in atlanta this hour, broadcasting in the united states and around the world. you're watching "cnn newsroom." yes, it's riding a horse across fields and stuff. but it's mostly getting to watch your directv with unlimited data from at&t. we're setting families free. so they can stream away - and not squabble over who's using how much. so go, family. watch. freedom. ha! seize the data! get our best unlimited plan ever so you can stream and surf all you want...with unlimited data from at&t ssoon, she'll be binge-studying. now she writes mostly in emoji. soon, she'll type the best essays in the entire 8th grade.
2:28 am
today, the only spanish words he knows are burrito and enchilada. soon, he'll take notes en espanol. get back to great with the right gear. from the place with the experts. office depot officemax. gear up for school. gear up for great. it's my decision to make beauty last. fix. roc retinol started visibly reducing my fine lines and wrinkles in one week. and the longer i use it the better it works. retinol correxion from roc. methods, not miracles. ♪ ♪
2:29 am
lots of vitamins a&c, and, only 50 calories a serving... good morning, indeed. v8. veggies for all.
2:30 am
welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. you're watching "cnn newsroom." the headlines this hour. american swimmer katie ledecky dominated the 800-meter freestyle friday. from start to finish, she broke her own world record with the
2:31 am
next closest swimmer more than 11 seconds behind her. at 19, she's already got five medals to her name. hillary clinton released her 2015 tax returns, putting pressure on republican rival donald trump to release his. the document shows she and her husband, former u.s. president bill clinton, earned $10.6 million, most of it from speaking fees. they paid about $3.6 million in federal taxes. in the south central u.s., a parish hit hard by floodwaters in louisiana has a curfew this hour. heavy floods have claimed at least three lives there. they forced numerous rescues. many highways in southern louisiana and mississippi have been shut down. one official telling cnn the floods are the worst that he's ever seen. in thailand, no one has claimed responsibility for a series of bombings across the country that killed four people. authorities still don't know the reason for those blasts, but they say the attacks are not linked to international
2:32 am
terrorism. our senior international correspondent, ivan watson, has more. >> reporter: this normally bustling nightlife district is all but deserted right now because it was the scene of a small but deadly bombing on thursday night. you can see evidence of some of the damage here. the blast ripped through from the street corner and killed at least one street vending woman here and seriously wounded several more. on the planned parenthood-sta -e blood-stained pavement you can see discarded shoes and bouquets of flowers here after this attack. it's important to note this was just one of at least 11 bombings to hit in a period of 24 hours in at least four different tourist resort cities across thailand. a business bar at a popular resort transformed into a crime scene after a deadly bomb blast. the bomb one of a series of
2:33 am
explosions that erupted across five prop provinces in 24 hours. the targets mostly major tourist destinations popular with locals and foreigners alike. the coastal city sustained the most casualties after two explosions thursday evening followed by another twin bombing friday morning. two explosions also hit popular holiday spot phuket. another two bombs hit a transit point for tourists for islands thailand is famous for. they say the attacks don't appear to be related to international terrorism. >> what we know for sure is that the incidents did not link directly with any kinds of terrorism. in fact, we're trying to identify suspects who are behind the scene. so it's too soon to jump to any
2:34 am
conclusion. >> reporter: authorities tightened security across thailand, but many tourists clearly rattled. cnn spoke to one foreign witness of thursday night's attack. shane brett has been here six times already but says this may be his last trip. >> i love it here. beautiful scenery, a lot of foreigners here that just want a nice, quiet vacation. after this visit, i've heard it other bombing in other areas of thailand, it's unsettling. i might be looking at other places in southeast asia for to vacation. >> reporter: if others feel the same way, it could seriously hurt thailand's economy which depends heavily on tourism. many of the bombs were placed in potted plants like this. the prime minister of the country has come out on television. he's called for calm and insists that thailand does not have enemies abroad or at home. he didn't cast blame for the attack.
2:35 am
clearly, the coordinated appearance of the series of bombings in so many cities in such a small amount of time, it suggests that there was some kind of coordinated effort here. the big question -- what is the political message and who was trying to send it with these deadly bombings. ivan watson, cnn, thailand. >> a lot of questions with the what, who, and why. i'll stay in touch with ivan to continue to follow the situation there. now france where some women could face fines if they don't reveal enough skin at the beach. the mayor of cannes, france, is temporarily banning women from wearing burkinis at the beaches. full-body bathing suits or overtly religious clothing. a move that is drawing heat from some human rights activists. cnn's michael holmes has this report for us. >> reporter: the burkini is a body-covering swimsuit with the face usually exposed, seen by
2:36 am
many muslims as a modest way to swim in public. to the local authorities in cannes, it is a provocation. the new municipal law says beachwear that "on, stint -- that displays at a time of terrorist attacks is a risk of disrupting public order." as controversy grew, the mayor doubled down telling local media that "i am banning a symbol of islamic extremism." the law came into effect last month but is making news because a local muslim association, the collective against islamaphobia, says it will challenge the law in court demanding that it be revoked as discrimination. the mayor's office denied accusations of discrimination saying the law was meant to defuse "provocative attitudes" and that police would have discretion when and if to enforce it.
2:37 am
islamic dress has opinion a controversial issue in france for some time. in 2011 laws were passed against women wearing full-face coverings, and in 2004, a ban on head coverings in schools. this, of course, at a time of nervous not aness and fear over terror. the nice attacks were a few miles from the beaches impacted by the cannes law. human rights groups say such laws add to the divisions from n french society between muslims and non-muslims and can feed the isis narrative of it's them against us. michael holmes, cnn, paris. >> thank you. the popular documentary series "making a murderer" led many viewers to question why a u.s. man was convicted of murder. next, why a federal judge has now ruled in his favor. plus, there are new questions surrounding the safety of amusement park rides in the u.s. following four accidents this week.
2:38 am
stay with us. be the you who doesn't cover your moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. be the you who shows up in that dress. who hugs a friend. who is done with treatments that don't give you clearer skin. be the you who controls your psoriasis with stelara® just 4 doses a year after 2 starter doses. stelara® may lower your ability to fight infections and may increase your risk of infections and cancer. some serious infections require hospitalization. before treatment, get tested for tuberculosis. before starting stelara® tell your doctor if you think you have an infection or have symptoms such as: fever, sweats, chills, muscle aches or cough. always tell your doctor if you have any signs of infection, have had cancer, if you develop any new skin growths or if anyone in your house needs or has recently received a vaccine. alert your doctor of new or worsening problems, including headaches, seizures, confusion and vision problems these may be signs of a rare, potentially fatal brain condition. some serious allergic reactions can occur. do not take stelara® if you are allergic to stelara® or any of its ingredients. most people using stelara® saw 75% clearer skin and the majority were rated as cleared or minimal at 12 weeks. be the you who talks to your dermatologist about stelara®.
2:39 am
...one of many pieces in my i havlife.hma... so when my asthma symptoms kept coming back on my long-term control medicine. i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment with breo. once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms. breo is for adults with asthma not well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. breo won't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden breathing problems. breo opens up airways to help improve breathing for a full 24 hours. breo contains a type of medicine that increases the risk of death from asthma problems and may increase the risk of hospitalization in children and adolescents. breo is not for people whose asthma is well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. once your asthma is well controlled, your doctor will decide if you can stop breo and prescribe a different asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. do not take breo more than prescribed. see your doctor if your asthma does not improve or gets worse. ask your doctor if 24-hour breo could be a missing piece for you. see if you're eligible for 12 months free at mybreo.com.
2:40 am
2:41 am
a u.s. federal judge has overturned the murder conviction of a man featured in the popular documentary "making a murderer." in 2007, a jury convicted brendan dacy for assisting his uncle in the rape and killing of a woman in the state of wisconsin. da dassye was 16 when he confessed. a federal judge in milwaukee says the confession was essentially coerced. the judge says investigators failed to consider that he has learning disabilities. his uncle, steven avery, was convicted separately and is serving a life sentence. avery of the main subject of a
2:42 am
documentary that many have watched on netflix, "making of murderer." it led many to believe that they were convicted improperly. earlier, my colleague, zain asher, spoke with cnn legal analyst and former federal prosecutor, laura coates, about this story. what happened is you have to under the fifth amendment have the right to make a voluntary confession. and you have to be warned about all the repercussions that could come if you actually did give a confession. but if somebody capitalizes and tries to manipulate and capitalize like you have many limited intellectual abilities and tries to give a series of false promises to give you the impression that you're not actually in custody and you're not a suspect, that will create the atmosphere of coercion that will take out a confession entirely. >> reporter: also because he was 16 years old. he wasn't technically an adult when it happened. >> yes. absolutely. and he had no attorney present or a parent. >> right.
2:43 am
right. if the questioning was unconstitution unconstitutional, if that's the case, why has it taken ten years? he's 26 years old now. why has it taken ten years to get this far? >> unfortunately, there are so many people incarcerated in the united states with a similar story that they're telling. but for this particular series, "making a murderer," i don't think that it would have gotten the necessary attention to even have a state appeal, let alone a federal habeas claim. remember, a federal court has intervened and said that the state court's findings and state appellate court's findings were completely wrong. they were forced as a federal entity to step in. that does not happen in the united states very often. in fact, most of the time the federal courts will stay in their own lane except in an instance where there's an extraordinary case where it's so out of bounds and was so obvious what should have really happened. and that's what happened here. now a story in the united states. four amusement park ride accidents in the past week have
2:44 am
many people wondering who regulates these attractions. cnn's jake tapper reports the answer may surprise you. >> reporter: the week ended with an accident at an amusement park in pennsylvania. a 3-year-old boy injured when he was thrown from a roller coaster. and it began horrifically with the death of 10-year-old caleb schwab, whose neck was broken after he was tossed from his raft on, this the world's tallest water slide, in kansas city, kansas. >> we found out what happened and were sick thinking, oh, my gosh, the same things likely happened where the raft went airborne and this young little guy was killed. >> reporter: every year, more than 4,000 children are rushed to emergency rooms because of injuries at amusement parks. from may to september, 20 children on average every day are rushed to the e.r. according to a study from nationwide children's hospital. the study's senior author calls
2:45 am
for a national system of regulations to "prevent amusement ride-related injuries through better injury surveillance and more consistent enforcement of standards." what, there are no federal standards? no federal body making sure that these rides are safe? that's right. the federal government used to regulate safety of amusement parks such as the one in kansas city, but in 1981, amusement parks at standing locations suddenly became exempted from regulations. a loophole inserted, critics say, without deliberation or debate. complying with federal regulations costs money. though amusement parks are a $12 billion-a-year industry, leaving it up to states better for their bottom line. jim preger was a senior executive at six flags who helped fight to create the loophole in 1981. he was also a board member of the international association of amusement parks and attractions or iaapa. preger told cnn he was wrong.
2:46 am
>> children are not well served by the law as it now reads. we haven't done enough to make rides safe. we should do more. amusement parks don't want regulation because it costs money. >> reporter: in 1999, then-congressman, now-senator ed markey of massachusetts began a crusade for a bill to push a loophole so amusement parks would again be covered by one set of rules and regulations nationally. >> that loophole is responsible for a situation that now has major accident occurs occur -- accident occurring in huge amusement parks across the united states. because of that, the federal government is prevented from investigating accidents at amusement parks, sharing accident information with operators of of the same ride in other states so that malfunctions are fixed before
2:47 am
more riders are hurt, requiring manufacturers to correct design flaws and make the ride safer, and enforcing a full range of safety measures on amusement park rides. >> reporter: what happened to that effort? well, since around the time markey began that crusade in 1999, the iaapa spent more than $11 million lobbying against his bill among other items, according to the center for responsive politics. the iaapa hired a pricey lobbying law firm in d.c., williams and jensen, which represents many different businesses and whose members and sfril facilities have powered more than $7 million. the group declined to talk but the wii says, "states are best equipped to regulate amusement park industry." oh really? let's look at kansas, home of the schlitterbon water work --
2:48 am
water park where caleb schwab was killed. the opening of the ride was delayed several times due to safety concerns. all right, so after it opened in 2014, how many times did the kansas department of labor inspect the ride? well, zero, according to "the topeka capital journal" journal" which opened a records filing request this week. >> i believe some of the horrific accidents that continue to occur could be avoided if there was more regulation. >> reporter: the last time markey introduced his bill, iaapa president and ceo chip clearly released a statement opposing it saying "the industry is already safe and well regulated." the family of caleb schwab might disagree. jake tapper, cnn, washington. >> in a statement, the water park said the following, "safety is our top priority at schlitterbon. all rides are inspected daily before opening." the park passed a safety
2:49 am
inspection in june conducted by an insurance company that the water park its hired. we should note that we heard from the pennsylvania park where the 3-year-old was hurt. it says nothing like this has ever happened in the ride's 78-year history, and its roller coaster is inspected daily before opening. despite threats against his life throughout his years, fidel castro is turning 90 years old. coming up, a look at the life and assassination attempts on the cuban dictator's life. ♪ is it a force of nature? or a sales event? the summer of audi sales event is here. get up to a $5,000 bonus on select audi models.
2:50 am
...another anti-wrinkle cream in no hurry to make anything happen. neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair works... ...in one week. with the... fastest retinol formula. ...to visibly reduce wrinkles. neutrogena®. they keep telling me "drink more water." "exercise more." i know that. "try laxatives..." i know. believe me. it's like i've. tried. everything! my chronic constipation keeps coming back. i know that. tell me something i don't know. (vo) linzess works differently from laxatives. linzess treats adults with ibs with constipation, or chronic constipation. it can help relieve your belly pain, and lets you have more frequent and complete bowel movements that are easier to pass. do not give linzess to children under 6 and it should not be given to children 6 to 17. it may harm them. don't take linzess if you have a bowel blockage. get immediate help if you develop unusual or severe stomach pain, especially with bloody or black stools. the most common side effect is diarrhea, sometimes severe.
2:51 am
if it's severe stop taking linzess and call your doctor right away. other side effects include gas, stomach-area pain and swelling. talk to your doctor about managing your symptoms proactively with linzess. built a sandcastle?id? ha, no, i switched to geico and got more. more? 24/7 access online, on the phone or with the geico app. that is more. go get some mud... all that "more" has to be why they're the second-largest auto insurer. everybody likes more. mhm, i think so. geico. expect great savings and a whole lot more.
2:52 am
be the you who doesn't cover your moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. be the you who shows up in that dress. who hugs a friend. who is done with treatments that don't give you clearer skin. be the you who controls your psoriasis with stelara® just 4 doses a year after 2 starter doses. stelara® may lower your ability to fight infections and may increase your risk of infections and cancer. some serious infections require hospitalization. before treatment, get tested for tuberculosis. before starting stelara® tell your doctor if you think you have an infection or have symptoms such as: fever, sweats, chills, muscle aches or cough. always tell your doctor if you have any signs of infection, have had cancer, if you develop any new skin growths or if anyone in your house needs or has recently received a vaccine. alert your doctor of new or worsening problems, including headaches, seizures, confusion and vision problems these may be signs of a rare, potentially fatal brain condition. some serious allergic reactions can occur. do not take stelara® if you are allergic to stelara® or any of its ingredients. most people using stelara® saw 75% clearer skin and the majority were rated as cleared or minimal at 12 weeks. be the you who talks to your dermatologist about stelara®.
2:53 am
welcome back to "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell. fidel castro is celebrating his 90th birthday on saturday. what may be most remarkable about the former cuban leader is how long he has survived despite hundreds of attempt to kill him. some of those have been, for lack of a better word, creative. >> reporter: how many people have tried to kill fidel castro? according to cuban intelligence officers, there have been over 600 attempts on castro's life. and while that number is impossible to confirm, we know from a u.s. government report
2:54 am
that both the american mafia and the cia tried to do castro in. and this have also been scores of cuban ecoaisles to try -- ex-aisles to try to kill castro. plots have varied from attempted poisoning of his cigars, wet suit, and even a chocolate milkshake he box office to drink. assassins have tried to shoot him, blow him up, and make his beard fall out. according to officials, no modern leader has faced so many assassination attempts. castro is now retired but remains heavily protected. he says he never expected to live to see 90 years old. that's something that his many enemies probably agree with him on. >> thank you. fidel castro, 90 years old. friday was world elephant day. and it's a reminder of this beautiful and intelligent species and the many threats that elephants face around the world. we wanted to share with you now a report from our own david mckenyay that he -- mckenzie
2:55 am
that he filed on friday. he traveled to a national park with one of the largest concentrations of elephants in africa. >> reporter: i'm on the banks of the toby river in botswana. and this gorgeous elephant herd is rite behind me, coming to -- is right behind me, coming to drink. today is elephant day. across the world, we're celebrating this great iconic african species. what is so special about elephants? >> well, elephants mean so much to so many people around the world. ecologically, they're a keystone species. economically, they support the ecotourism industry in africa. culturally, they are africa's proudest symbols. >> reporter: elephants in the continent are in strongholds like here in botswana. but they are threatened, as well. >> unfortunately, they are. the immediate threat is the ivory poaching prices. the long-term threat is loss of habitat. gradually humans are taking over habitats which used to belong to elephants. if we can't conserve africa's mega species, iconic african
2:56 am
elephant, what is the future for the rest of africa's wildlife? >> reporter: researchers believe if we don't act soon, beautiful scenes like this could be something that the next generation will never see. and you could get even localized extinctions of elephant populations in parts of africa. david mckenzie, cnn, on the toby river, botswana. >> they are indeed iconic. the hope is that something can be done. we thank you for being with us for this hour of "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell at the centre center in atlanta. for our viewers in the united states, new day is next. for other viewers around the world, "erin burnett out front" starts in a moment. we thank you for watching cnn, the world's news leader. she spent summer binge-watching. soon, she'll be binge-studying. now she writes mostly in emoji.
2:57 am
soon, she'll type the best essays in the entire 8th grade. today, the only spanish words he knows are burrito and enchilada. soon, he'll take notes en espanol. get back to great with the right gear. from the place with the experts. office depot officemax. gear up for school. gear up for great. ♪ ♪ (lion♪it's peyton on sunday mornings.♪ (peyton) you know with directv nfl sunday ticket
2:58 am
you can watch your favorite team no matter where you live. like broncos or colts. (cashier) cool. (peyton) ah...18. the old number. ooh. i have got a coupon for that one. (vo) get nfl sunday ticket - only on directv. and watch live games anywhere. it's my decision to make beauty last. fix. roc retinol started visibly reducing my fine lines and wrinkles in one week. and the longer i use it the better it works. retinol correxion from roc. methods, not miracles.
2:59 am
3:00 am
well, welcome to saturday. we're so grateful to see you, i'm christi paul. >> i'm victor blackwell. your "new day" starts right now. the only way we could lose, in my opinion, i really mean this, pennsylvania, is if cheating goes on. >> this is the biggest load of bull i ever heard. >> he refuses to do what ever other presidential candidates in decades has done and release his tax return. >> the folks out here say they did not expect it to happen this way. they thought they'd get some rain and some flooding maybe up to their front pomps. terrifying scene out here in st. helena parish. at this point, more rain to

375 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on