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tv   New Day  CNN  August 15, 2016 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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>> reporter: throwing objects. >> looks like the gas tank just popped. >>. >> reporter: and setting cars on fire. at least one person was shot and rushed to the hospital. a police officer also hospitalized after a rock smashed the windshield of a squad car. the weekend of violence began on saturday with demonstrators torching several businesses, overturning cars, and throwing rocks at police to protest the police shooting death of 23-year-old silvel smith. police say he turned toward the officer with a gun in his hand. the officer's body camera capturing the deadly encounter. milwaukee's mayor tried to address the festering anger about whether the shooting was justified. >> without question, he had a gun in his hand. and i want our community to know that. >> reporter: governor scott walker activating the national guard to assist police and declaring a state of emergency. >> i was worried about whether or not things would escalate. >> reporter: smith's family and friends holding a vigil marked
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by prayers. >> thy kingdom come, thy will be done. >> reporter: with his sister calling for peace. >> don't bring the violence here and the ignorance here. >> reporter: local police confirmed they made several arrests overnight. that's in addition to the 17 people arrested saturday night. as the department of justice here in wisconsin continues to investigate the deadly shooting from over the weekend, there's still a lot of uncertainty about where this community goes from here, alisyn. >> okay, ana. thanks so much for that. we're following more breaking news for you at this hour. police have arrested a suspect linked to the shooting death of an officer outside of atlanta. the suspect is accused of killing police officer tim smith as he exited his car to confront the 24-year-old suspect. the officer a father of three, was rushed to the hospital, but he died of his injuries. >> we're going to cover both of those stories more this morning, but let's turn to politics. republican presidential nominee
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donald trump not keeping his plan to stop isis a secret anymore. he's going to give a speech about it today. perhaps it will give him a break from his new target, the media. trump is intent on tweeting and talking about how he is a victim of the press. cnn's jessica schneider joins us now with more. good morning. >> good morning, chris. donald trump trying to get back on message after a weekend of media bashing. he'll turn to the fight against isis in a speech at youngstown state university in ohio this afternoon. he'll outline a three-pillar approach to combat isis, painting the fight as an ideological struggle on par with the cold war. >> he's going to lay out his vision and his strategy for defeating radical islamic terrorism. >> reporter: donald trump turning his isis-sent cricentrin policy ideals into a three-pillar proposal to defeat them. >> he's going to talk about how you target your enemies and work
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with your friends. you don't overreach and destabilize countries like the obama/clinton administration has done. >> reporter: a senior campaign official says trump will unveil several proposals today. he'll declare an end to nation building and consider any country willing to help defeat isis an ally. a call that could include russia, a country he originally wanted to back in the fight. >> russia wants to get rid of isis. we want to get rid of isis. maybe let russia do it. >> reporter: trump will propose suspending visas from any country with heavy terrorist activity and raise the bar for entry into the u.s. the officials suggests trump's camp will formulate an ideological test for entry, including stances on issues like religious freedom but no specific mention was made of the muslim ban he called for just nine months ago. >> donald j. trump is calling for a complete and total shutdown of muslims entering the
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united states. >> reporter: and trump promises to make a clear statement to the world that the u.s. is fighting a battle not just militarily and financially but ideologically, a point far from trump's bombastic rhetoric of the past. >> i would bomb the [ bleep ] out of them. we have to knock the hell out of them. you have to take out their families. when you get these terrorists, you have to take out their families. >> reporter: the speech comes after trump repeatedly used a false claim on the campaign trail. >> i call president obama and hillary clinton the founders of the isis. >> reporter: and paraded his self-proclaimed expertise on the terrorist group. >> i know more about isis than the generals do. believe me. >> and trump's policy speech today comes amid sagging poll numbers in key swing states and days of distractions. everything from those controversial comments calling president obama and hillary clinton the founders of isis to his rails against the media at a connecticut rally saturday. of course, looking today to get back to that policy. chris and alisyn?
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>> jessica, thank you very much for all of that. joining us now to discuss it, cnn political analyst and washington bureau chief of the daily beast, jackie kucinich. and anchor of time warner cable news, errol louis. let's look the a the three tenants of donald trump's plan. he's going to build alliances based on willingness to fight terror, not on anything else. in other words, ally ourselves with russia or whomever if they're willing to go after isis. number two, suspend visas to countries the u.s. cannot appropriately vet. that's sort of like a morphing of the muslim ban that he's been moving towards. and three, define efforts as ideological struggle against radical islam. ee errol, what do you hear? >> i hear a mishmash. when you try to turn those into proposals, you'll run into all kinds of problems. we have alliances. those alliances have the force of law. those were approved by congress.
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you don't just sort of tear them all up and say, well, never mind, let's just pick and choose. so there will be some problems with that. there will be a lot of blowback, i think, from the professionals in the diplomatic and national security establishment. he's an anti-establishment candidate. he wants that fight. he's going to get that fight. i think when it comes to ideology, what ideology are we talking about it and how do you vet for ideology? these are questions that were raised the very first time he said he wanted to have a complete and total shutdown of muslims coming into the united states. then he adapted it and said, well, only ones that profess jihad. there's no stage along the way. it's already a cumbersome enough process. there's no point at which you're supposed to go with a checklist and talk about your ideology or religion. >> he would say why not. maybe we need that. that's also a part of it, that there might be a question asked. what if they lie? >> but it's politically much more palatable to a broader
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audience than what he'd been saying about banning muslims. >> here's the other thing with the idea that he's going to stop immigration from places where they've had islamic terror. does that mean the uk? does that mean france? does that mean european allies? that's not something that's going to go over well. >> let's hear if he says it today. i think one part that shows a growth, obviously he got a lot of heat for saying he knows more about isis than the generals, even in the world of hyperbole it was obviously afield too far. but it is an ideological war. that's an interesting point for donald trump to make. the idea of bombing the "blank" out of isis is satisfying, but you're fighting an idea. you're fighting an idea that manifests itself in different countries, different populations based on really need of that desperation. that's different for him. it's a subtlety of what we're doing here that is new out of his mouth. >> there's a real possibility that he could surprise us, right. you cannot bomb the crap out of,
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you know, somebody -- well, some kid sitting in his parent's basement looking at old videos that are online. if that's where it's coming from and we know, in fact, there are people who are, quote, self-radicalizing within the united states, who are, in fact, citizens. >> this doesn't deal with that at all. it doesn't deal with anything happens internally. it's all assuming the threat is coming in externally. >> but it may be a nod to the threat from this most recent spate of ridiculous statements. "the wall street journal" put out a really heavy handed editorial. let's put up part of the language. it was really the conclusion they came to that i think is going to have the most bite. if the trump campaign can't change its act by labor day, the gop has no choice but to write off the nominee as hopeless and focus on salvaging the senate. he needs to learn how to behave, stop blaming everyone else,
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decide if he wants to behave like someone who wants to be president, and turn the nomination over to mike pence. what do you think? >> seems like a fever dream. pence has been playing a really interesting inside game. he's going to release his tax returns. he's really honing toward a traditional political message. >> and differing from -- >> and differing from the top of the ticket, exactly. so it's been interesting to watch the two sort of drill their own paths. >> the frustration of the "wall street journal" editorial board is shared by many. but i think labor day is a little too early. the first debate in late september is going to be a clear defining moment where either this candidacy is back on track or those who have a problem with it are going to really start shouting, not just complaining and grumbling. >> jackie, let's talk about this new reporting from the "new york times" with paul manafort and his dealings in the ukraine with
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victor yanukovych. he was a consultant. apparently "the new york times" and investigators have found these hand-written ledgers that are off-the-book payments that they claim amounted to something like 12.7 million for paul manafort from his dealings there with yanukovych. well, he's responded. he says, once again "the new york times" has chosen to purposefully ignore facts and professional journalism. i have never received a single off the books cash payment as falsely reported by "the new york times," nor have i ever worked for the governments of ukraine or russia. >> it's hard to think manafort is terribly worried about his reputation. i'm surprised he's so concerned about that. that said, this muddies the
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water. they've made a lot of accusations against the clintons and the clinton foundation. at its core, this goes to that argument. look at your campaign chair. look who he's dealt with. look what he's done. i think it really does undermine that attack by the trump campaign. >> errol? >> also, i want to parse that statement from paul manafort. if i understand the article correctly, i don't think it was the governments that were funneling him the money. ping the accusation was that the parties that supported those who were in charge of those governments were funneling the money. we also know and this i think is probably provable, that he was involved in some cash flow, some cash transactions to try and set up businesses yausing some of t assets of the same region. he's got a lot of explaining to do. >> why do voters care about this? >> you could be right in that they don't. he's not running for office.
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the concern is that trump decided to bring a guy in who's represented bad people in the past. you know, he has a loose nickname of being the master of the dark arts when it comes to politics. >> just a little cute nickname. >> were you trying to move money for russian oligarchs? >> but we knew this. it's really just that there's these off-the-ledger payments. >> he's going to have cover to come out with a statement like this because they don't have him cold. they have a hand-written ledger. they don't have any proof of transfers into his accounts. they don't have any proof of manafort taking control of this money. he's seizing the initiative on that. that's one of the birds of investigative reporting. >> but the next time he comes on and talks to you or any other journalist about crooked hillary and all these problems with the clinton foundation, the next logical question would be, well, let's talk about what you were involved in. let's talk about some transparency when it comes to you. and it raises the ultimate
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question that the trump campaign has really not spent time on, which is how would they be different? if they're saying crooked hillary, she's no good, we can't put her in charge of this or that or the other, fine. what are your plans? what are the structures? what are you going to do to make sure no corruption of the kind you're decrying never gets near the white house? paul manafort is not the one to sell that message. >> one thing is for sure. manafort does not get rattled about this. his first interview when he came back on to the scene with trump, he did it with us. i went after this very early in the interview. he's not moved. he's not impressed by the reporting on this. he says he's owned what he's done in the past. >> guys, thank you. stick around. we have more to talk about. other news, member of congress will soon receive notes written by fbi agents who attended hillary clinton's three-hour interview with the bureau. now, what they wanted was transcripts. what they wanted was actual words. they're not going to get it, but is this going to be damaging and why? what could they have in their notes? we'll give you a closer look next.
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[ clock titime. ] you only have so much. that's why we want to make sure you won't have to wait on hold. and you won't have to guess when we'll turn up. because after all we should fit into your life. not the other way around. some new developments in the
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hillary clinton personal e-mail controversy. we have sources telling cnn that members of congress are going to receive notes from the fbi's three-hour interview with clinton. let's bring back jackie kucinich and errol louis. what's the law behind this? 302s are the official fbi interview documents, right. that's what makes a lie to the feds a crime, that it's written down and it's seen as perjury in itself. they're not going to get the 302s. they're going to get the notes from people in the room. this is kind of a compromise. how does it play, errol? >> my guess is that it will not quell the controversy. there will be some word somewhere in there that the republicans will seize on because remember, we heard from comey himself saying, you know, she was careless, there was this, there was that. anything sort of an actual indictment, i think, is not going to satisfy clinton's opponents. so they will start complaining. i'm sure they have their talking points lined up in advance.
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they will find a word, a phrase that suggests some kind of a problem. they will blow it up into sort of a full-blown culpability and wonder why she hasn't been indicted and you go from there to the lock her up chants that happen daily at the trump rallies. >> this continues to have legs. despite director comey coming out and saying this is not prosecutable, that she was reckless, but it was in the prosecutable. she was not under oath at the time. >> they're going to match it up with what she testified to the benghazi committee. as errol said, if there's any kind of discrepancy there, you bet they're going to seize on it. will we see more congressional hearings? it's not impossible at this point. >> there's a little bit of an undercurrent of a disconnect between comey, which many people believe is unfair. comey is one of the hardest hitters there is in that business, and his field agents who are doing this case, that maybe some of them felt there was a case to be made and he
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didn't. will something be revealed in these notes that gives a nod to that? that's a problem. >> that's what you would expect. the field agents are, for lack of a better word, cops. they look for and their main tool is crime. >> but optically, it would be a problem if you see overt evidence of that. >> well, that's right. if there is any evidence or even a suspicion of it, it might find its way into those notes. comey, of course, is not just sort of a political appointee who sort of understands how some of this stuff works, he's also an attorney. he kind of puts it through a legal filter that maybe some of his agents don't. look, for the political class, the republicans, the trump campaign, they cannot outsource this. they cannot have the -- or expect to have the fbi do their work for them or even for their own campaign to do the work for them. it is going to be a question that is settled by the voters. there's really just no getting around it. >> but there's an added wrinkle.
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beyond the e-mails, it has been revealed that some of the content of those e-mails do show what some people believe is an overly cozy relationship between the clinton foundation and the state department. some of hillary clinton's top aides were talking to doug band at the clinton foundation. there's supposed to be a bright line between the two. some of the e-mails revealed there was not a bright line between the two. that's what some of the field office fbi agents wanted to pursue further. >> and the justice department already took a pass. there's a little bit of a dead end there already, unless perhaps they dig up something new. it does seem like that is a door that is closed at this point. >> it's become a little bit of an odd political dynamic. if we could put up some poll numbers, 63% of respondents to this poll of polls said -- or in this survey of poll of polls said, i don't want to hear about it anymore. okay, but when asked, do you think hillary clinton is being
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honest about this, 27% said yes, which means they don't think she's being honest. so this is a problem. the question is, can she do neg abo -- anything about it, and can trump's people do anything to make it worse? >> i don't know if she's going to do anything about it the. with less than 90 days, she's got a difficult path to victory. it doesn't involve talking about e-mails. as far as the trump campaign, those numbers to me suggest that the voters are making up their minds. they hear this. when you see these numbers about honest and trustworthy about hillary clinton t means people are absorbing the reporting. a lot of the reporting about sheryl mills, about some of these connections between the state department and whether or not they were supposed to be involved in clinton foundation activities. this stuff is being reported. i think we're doing what we as the media collectively are supposed to do. we're telling people about this. the polls are now giving us the feedback like, we hear you, we don't need to hear more about this. we've made our decision. it's up to the trump campaign to try and exploit that
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politically, but i don't think -- well, i think they've got it. they've got the complaints. they've got a voting public that sees when they say she's got some ethical issues, people get it. that doesn't necessarily translate into votes for trump because they've got to explain what they would do different. >> instead of doing that t he, doubling up. he's coming after the media saying the reason that hillary clinton isn't going down is because the media. the reason that i'm in trouble and my polls are slipping is because of the media. it's not me. it's how they cover me. this is an odd turn for a guy who's been made in large part by the amount of attention he got from the media, most of it not negative in the early days. we've juiced him to get into this race because we thought it would be exciting. he was given a pass on a lot of the stuff that came out of his mouth early on. and now he's a victim of the press. >> but you have to wonder if he had seized on some of these issues with hillary clinton
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instead of talking about whatever it is he's talking about or if they were running ads in early swing states -- we don't know whether her numbers would be worse. they have failed to execute sort of a traditional campaign strategy when it comes to tearing down an opponent. no matter what he says, the crooked hillary branding attacks he does, you haven't seen the sort of full frontal assault we've seen in other campaigns. we'll never know if that would have torn her numbers down even more. >> jackie, errol, thanks so much. back to some of our breaking news. there's another night of violence in milwaukee after a fatal police shooting of a black man. so what led up to that deadly encounter, and was this shooting justified? we'll dig deeper into all the details next on "new day." ♪
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one number 21 in the books. a dog, talked. we're decedent from the mighty wolf. a voice was heard. if you build it, he will come. a girl discovered magic. a revolution began. welcome, to the wonders that happen, everyday. welcome, to it all. comcast. by finding a policy to fit your budget. [ coughs ] sorry, tickle in my throat! water would be nice, but that would go right through me. ghost problems. for a second night in milwaukee, violent protests,
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including a car set on fire that you're looking at right here. this all started because of the shooting death of a 23-year-old at the hands of police. now, police say that he turned toward an officer with a gun in his hand before they opened fire, and they say they have proof. let's discuss the situation with cnn political commentator and host of b.e.t. news marc lamont hill, and law enforcement trainer and former nypd sergeant joe. gentlemen, thank you for being here. instructive in this situation, is it about the shooting? yes. is this about other tensions in this community that's been going on? yes. the sheriff there, clark, as you know, is now a national figure, well aware of the issues. i want to play you one excerpt of what he said in his presser yesterday. here it is. >> i keep focusing on the police. i keep focusing on the police. and i've said publicly before, stop trying to fix the police, fix the ghetto. >> they say they have body cam
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video that the cops had on. he said they've reviewed it, they'll put it out at some point. this was not an abuse or an excessive force case. but then we get to what he just said there. and that plays a larger dynamic. we're hearing the same things from that community we hear all over the country. what do you make of the situation? >> i think it is a microcosm, as you said, of every problem we have in urban america, but really america at large. i haven't seen all the details of the shooting. i haven't seen the body camera footage. let's assume for a minute the shooting is justified. when we hear something like that, fix the ghetto, it raises questions about police judgment. it raises questions about whether or not the shooting is justified legally, whether it had to happen. yeah, the police may be legally justified, but was it the absolute necessary thing to do? these are questions that get raised. again, it speaks from everything to economics to police relations and everything else. >> clark says, joe, yes, all that may be going on, life can
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be hard for people in these communities, but fix whatever leads a kid to want to go towards a gun when a cop comes at him and we'll have a lot less of these types of shootings. what's the point of that? >> well, i mean, we have to remain professional as police administrators. we have to be careful about the words they choose and the words they say. >> i think clark chooses his words very carefully. you know what i mean? that's part of what makes him interesting in the political die n -- dynamic. >> he's a bit of a lightning rod. in regards to that, he makes good television. from a former police perspective, i need to make sure we have cooler heads prevail. we need to make sure we fix some of the problems we have. if we're trying to build bridges to the community, we don't want to upset people more by saying whatever the rhetoric, combatting it with more rhetoric. >> but you have this reaction to the reaction that's in the country going on right now, which is -- you know, whether it's the media or different advocates or people with an
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agenda, you try to make every one of these guys who gets shot a victim, and then you have clark sit up there, and he plays to that and says let me read you the rap sheets. arrested for this, it d12 days that, cocaine here, drug dealing there. he says these guys have been given their chances. that's the reaction of a lot of people, these are bad guys. nobody wants to say that. >> if you're a police officer, your job is to deal with bad guys. that is the job. selling cocaine is a bad thing to do, but it's not a capital crime. you shouldn't be executed for it. so just because you're a bad guy doesn't mean you should be shot for it. if the shooting is justified, that's a different issue. but just because you have a rap sheet doesn't mean you deserve to die. the other thing is sheriff clark says something like stop trying to fix police, fix the ghetto. he didn't even say stop only trying to fix -- >> he didn't say both. >> he said stop trying to fix police. even the most extreme police acknowledge that there are some problems that need to be fixed. he's saying, no, stop all that, just fix the ghetto. even the choice of the word ghetto itself plays to a certain
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ideology of a certain kind of political stance that people have around black and brown people. all of this is part of the problem. again, it makes it hard for people to trust the police. it makes it hard for people to believe what's on the body camera footage. >> do you have a problem with the police departments bringing out body cam video to prove what they say is, you know, a justifiable shooting in cases like this? you think it should happen every time? >> absolutely. if we want to be transparent, we need to get this information out to the public. when you don't, chris, people start filling in the gaps, people start saying, oh, you're trying to hide stuff. get the video out there. if it proves he's holding a gun, that he turns to the officers with a gun, discussion is pretty much done with at that point. when you wait 10 hours, 12 hours, it festers. >> why do they wait? clark says he's seen it. they'll get it out at some point. what goes into the consideration not to put it out? >> it's about the old
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policemenalty of it's going to hurt our investigation. it's not going to hurt the investigation. >> what investigation? you mean the investigation into whether the cop did the right thing? >> right. if it's a justified shooting or not. first of all, there's no such thing as a good shooting. all shootings are bad. it's just if they're justified or not. we need to get this information out there. we need to get it out quickly because when we don't, it presents a whole other set of issues, especially in the age of social media where people just start running with their own stories and rumors start developing and then you can incite riots like we're seeing now in milwaukee. >> it reflects a little disrespect of the public to me. we're the police, you're not. we make the final decisions, you don't. and over the last few years, because of surveillance, because of protests, because of these kind of conversations we're having, suddenly the police are being held accountable in ways they haven't be ever. to some extent, many police resent it. so this resistance, a slow down of releasing information s
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almost a push back. >> the police are the ones that have to put out the fires. seems like they should want the most, if there's clear evidence, this is what this officer had to do in the situation. they have to deal with the reaction more than any other citizen. gentlemen, thank you very much. this conversation is going to continue. what do you think about this? please tweet us @newday. post your comment on facebook.com/newday. alisyn? >> okay, chris. there's a state of emergency in parts of louisiana this morning. deadly flooding destroying entire neighborhoods, driving thousands of people from their homes, and the threat is not over yet. we have a live report for you next.
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southeastern louisiana is under a state of emergency. there is historic flooding there. at least five people have died. there have been 20,000 rescues. some of them are just amazing to see footage of. cnn's boris sanchez live in baton rouge. the worst is not over there, boris. what's the situation? >> reporter: certainly not, chris. the rain may have stopped, at least in some places several hours ago, there's still more in the forecast, but the real problem is where all the flood
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water is headed. we're in a neighborhood now just outside of baton rouge where not much rain fell at all, but as you can see, this neighborhood is totally submerged. part of the reason is that behind these homes is the bayou. as that wetland overflowed, it came into this neighborhood. you see people's possessions floating in the water. yesterday we saw a children's toy just moving down the street. it's a very, very precarious situation for people here, especially as they're going out in the roads, either trying to escape the water or trying to go check on their homes. yesterday we saw some very impressive video from a cnn affiliate. a group of volunteers rescuing a woman who had become stuck on the street. i want to play it for you in full.
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>> her dog. >> get my dog. >> i can't get the dog. maybe she's gone. >> no, she better not be. >> i got your dog. >> reporter: as you can see, very, very dramatic video. that woman incredibly lucky that those volunteers were there to help her. it's something we've seen over and over again across the state. people coming with their personal flat bed boats, personal airboats to help those devastated. yesterday where we were standing was totally dry. now it's in about a foot of water. this is going to continue rising, continue going into homes. hopefully soon it will start to recede. >> boris, what a video you just showed us. what a guardian angel that volunteer was. first he saves the woman's life. then he saves her beloved dog.
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>> and boy, i hope that she'll realize how lucky she is. i don't know who that guy is or what kind of training he had, but to figure out how to deal with a submerging vehicle and get the dog out, it doesn't get much better. >> an angel on earth. we'll keep you posted on that story. meanwhile, the nypd is questioning a possible suspect in connection with the double murder of an imam and his associate. this happened on saturday. a gunman killed the imam and his aide in broad daylight as they were leaving a mosque in queens. investigators are trying to determine a motive. so far they say no evidence that the victims were targeted because of their faith. a massive police presence at jfk airport last night because there were reports of shots fired inside terminal eight. authorities do not believe shots were actually fired. they're investigating whether a hoax phone call forced the
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evacuation of two terminals. hundreds of passengers leaving behind luggage and leaving the airport with officers from the nypd's hercules strike team responding to the scene. airport operations getting back to normal this morning. a very scary incident for four u.s. olympic athletes. these swimmers, including ryan lochte, they were -- they're cooperating now with police after being robbed at gunpoint in rio. so what does this mean? are the other athletes safe? we have a live report from the summer games ahead.
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more history at the rio olympics as both superstar gymnast simone biles and jamaican sprinter usain bolt clinch gold. but the story that has everyone talking is the new risk for athletes down there. the armed robbery of ryan lochte and three other u.s. swimmers. coy wire live in rio with more. this was an undercurrent. everybody had zika on the brain when it came to what would happen. this is a dangerous place. this was a scary situation for several reasons. tell us about it. >> reporter: my goodness. you're absolutely right, chris. imagine, you're an olympian, you're celebrating a new gold medal. you finally get some time off after all that training. you have a barrel of a gun put to your forehead. that's what we're talking about here. we'll have more on that in a
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second. let's first get you to your medal count. usa in front with 69. china in second with 45. great britain in third with 38. chris, last night i got a once in a lifetime opportunity to see a once in a lifetime athlete, usain bolt. every person in that stadium watching, hanging on his every move as he made his move into the record books. jamaica's usain bolt living up to his name, the fastest man alive, catching, then pulling away from his competition to defend his title. >> i knew from the semifinals i won because i could tell i felt good. >> reporter: the jamaican superstar becoming the first man in history to win three consecutive gold medals in the 00-meter dash. american justin gatlan coming in just 0.8 seconds behind him to take home the silver. in gymnastics, simone biles just won't quit, striking gold for the third time in rio, wowing judges with her complex vaulting
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skills. biles is the first american woman to win gold in this event. teammate madison kocin clinching silver on uneven bars, flying high and nailing the landing. alex naddour's sharp moves on the pommel horse, earning him a hard-fought bronze. but the story that has everyone buzzing in rio is 12-time olympic medalist ryan lochte and three of his teammates robbed at gunpoint by men posing as police officers. >> they pulled us over. they pulled out their guns. they told the other swimmers to get down on the ground. >> reporter: lochte revealing chilling details about the encounter after refusing to comply. >> i was like, we didn't do anything wrong. so i'm not getting down on the ground. then the guy pulled out his gun. he cocked it, put it to my forehead. he said get down. i put my hands up, i was like,
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whatever. he took our money, he took my wallet. >> yeah, okay. that's terrifying. christine brennan joins coy now in rio. good morning to both of you. christine, how does this happen? is there any talk of protecting the athletes down there better after this incident? >> reporter: we're certainly asking those questions today in a way we have not before. obviously we've known about the issue of street crime in rio and many other cities around the world. but this is right at home in a big way. the australians are taking measures now for their team, saying they cannot be on the beach -- actually on the beach from 6:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m., basically during the nighttime hours. but here's the issue in a nutshell. what happened last week, athletes were competing. literally every athlete was still competing. therm not out on the town. now you've got thousands, coy, thousands of athletes who are finished with their competition
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wanting to enjoy a little bit of rio. who can blame them. the options are limited when you're out late at night to get transportation back to the village. and so this is an issue that these olympic committees have to deal with because it's either cabs, uber or walking. at 4:00 in the morning, athletes are going to be out. we know that. >> reporter: yeah, we were prepared greatly for security here, to keep ourselves safe. we were told what to do, whatnot to do. we were told only use the taxis in front of your cab that your hotel approves of. you know, highly prepared to keep ourselves safe. i was at one of these events. as christine mentioned, these athletes, as they finish their competition, swimming was over, they want to get out and celebrate. they've sacrificed. they've been on strict diet. they can celebrate a little bit, gold medals in the case of
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lochte. they're letting their guards down a little bit. i think that transfers when they go out to leave this venue to go back to the olympic village and they're a little less cautious maybe than they should have been. >> it's hard to blame the athletes in this situation. first of all, it's a dangerous city, as you're learning there right now. and this was sophisticated. this cabbie got pulled over by guys posing as cops. this wasn't your typical stick them up on the street because you're walking down the wrong place in a poorly lit area. that's the bad part. but there's a lot of good. christine, we haven't seen usain bolt in a situation like the one he was in last night. he's always slow off start because he's so long, but he was in fourth in that race with like 30 meters to go. what did you make of it? >> reporter: well, it was different. he's going to do something different each of these three gold medals. justin gatlan had the lead really three-quarters of the way in. of course, you kind of knew it.
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in fact, i think you definitely knew it, bolt was going to catch him. but this was not bolt then prancing and dancing and turning around as he crossed the finish line. he worked. in the end, he shut it down. it was fun to actually see him challenged in a different way. justin gatlan, of course, the olympic gold medalist from 2004, twice banned through doping, another doping issue, but bolt had it at the end. didn't you feel that way? >> reporter: absolutely. i had never been to a big-time race like that before, guys. when i was sitting there and you see bolt walk in and that whole stadium stands up on their feet, i'm getting goose bumps again because they go absolutely crazy. you can feel the tension building as he's walking around. he commands the whole stadium with his presence. he'll look to one section of the crowd, they go crazy. he gets in the brlocks, he goes like this, the whole stadium goes like that. to see the command he had over that fan base was incredible. so what an event.
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as gatlan got out, i thought, is he going to do it this time? then boom, he's gone. it was unbelievable to see and witness that history. >> so christine, beyond usain bolt, what has been the most striking winning moment for you? >> reporter: i think i have to go back to the swimming pool where i spent a lot of time the first week. i would say two things. i'd say two americans. on the men's side, michael phelps, 31 years old. we knew he was going to be good, alisyn, but we didn't think this good. five gold, one silver. this is remarkable. and katie ledecky, who just -- i think she's maybe the best closer in sports, not just in swimming. and 19 years old, already talking about rio in 2020. so get ready for more katie le de decky in four years. >> christine, coy, thank you. >> a big day for donald trump. he's slated to lay out his previously secret plan to defeat isis. his team, though, is just as focused on us, the media.
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donald trump, the victim of the press, is this what he should be talking about at this stage in a presidential election? we have more next. ♪ mapping the oceans. where we explore. protecting biodiversity. everywhere we work. defeating malaria. improving energy efficiency. developing more clean burning natural gas. my job? my job at exxonmobil? turning algae into biofuels. reducing energy poverty in the developing world. making cars go further with less. fueling the global economy. and you thought we just made the gas. ♪ energy lives here. i just want to find a used car start at the new carfax.com show me used trucks with one owner. pretty cool. [laughs] ah... ahem... show me the carfax. start your used car search at the all-new carfax.com. at ally bank, no branches equals great rates. it's a fact. kind of like grandkids equals free tech support. oh, look at you, so great to see you!
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>> protests and violence erupting again in milwaukee. >> i lost my brother. somebody supposed to be there for me. >> there is time for us to take action, and that time is now. >> i said the founder of isis. obviously being sarcastic, but not that sarcastic. >> i think he's being very serious, and he was making a point. >> isis has developed like wildfire under obama. i'm not running against crooked hillary. i'm running against the crooked media. >> we're coming. we're coming. i'm going to break this window. >> historic deadly flooding in louisiana. >> this is an ongoing event. >> water coming in on three sides. >> everybody is saying this is the worst they've ever seen. my heart is brokingen. >> this is "new day" with chris cuomo and alisyn camerota. >> very scary situation there in louisiana. we're keeping an eye on that. good morning, everyone.
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welcome back to your "new day." up first, it's a pivotal day for republican nominee donald trump and for the party, who want him to get back on message. trump is expected to lay out his plan to fight and defeat isis. >> today's speech comes as trump intensifies his attacks on us, the u.s. media, maintaining we're not treating him fairly. let's begin our coverage with cnn's jessica schneider. >> well, chris and alisyn, donald trump railed against the media the a his rally in connecticut this weekend, but this afternoon he'll look to get back on message with a pointed policy speech in ohio. a campaign official says he'll outline a three-pronged approach to combat isis, painting the fight as an ideological struggle on par with the cold war. >> he's going to lay out his vision and his strategy for defeating radical islamic terrorists. >> reporter: donald trump turning his isis centric foreign policy ideals -- >> we have to get isis. we will defeat isis. >> reporter: -- into a
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three-pillar proposal to defeat them. >> he's going to talk about how you target your enemies and work with your friends. you don't overreach and destabilize countries like the obama/clinton administration has done. >> reporter: a senior campaign official says trump will unveil several proposals today. he'll declare an end to nation building and consider any country willing to help defeat isis an ally. a call that could include russia, a country he originally wanted to back in the fight. >> russia wants to get rid of isis. we want to get rid of isis. maybe let russia do it. >> reporter: trump will propose suspending visas from any country with heavy terrorist activity and raise the bar for entry into the u.s. the officials suggests trump's camp will formulate an ideological test for entry, including stances on issues like religious freedom but no specific mention was made of the muslim ban he called for just nine months ago. >> donald j. trump is calling for a complete and total shutdown of muslims entering the
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united states. >> reporter: and trump promises to make a clear statement to the world that the u.s. is fighting a battle not just militarily and financially but ideologically, a point far from trump's bombastic rhetoric of the past. >> i would bomb the [ bleep ] out of them. we have to knock the hell out of them. you have to take out their families. when you get these terrorists, you have to take out their families. >> reporter: the speech comes after trump repeatedly used a false claim on the campaign trail. >> i call president obama and hillary clinton the founders of the isis. >> reporter: and paraded his self-proclaimed expertise on the terrorist group. >> i know more about isis than the generals do. believe me. >> and trump will make clear in his speech they won't be remaking the middle east. and he'll continue to hammer on his criticism of the iraq war. chris? >> all right, jessica.
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let's discuss what's going to be different and better in this plan with trump campaign senior adviser and pollster kelly ann conway. great to see you. different and better. that's the standard. when we look at the three prongs that jessica just laid out in the peace. build alliances based on willingness to fight terror. how is that different in. >> one message mr. trump is sending today is he's willing to work with moderate muslim reformers in that region who also want to make sure that the targeting of gays, of christians, of jews, of women ceases as well. i think what's different is the obama/clinton administration has clearly been about regime change. they made that very clear. that's created a vacuum in places like libya, iraq, egypt, syria, for isis to flourish. so isis and its predecessors have killed. >> so what's the message in that? because a big part of the
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democratic imperative that the united states puts out there in the name of freedom is if there's an oppressive regime, we will help those who want freedom. is america out of the freedom business? >> no, america is not out of the freedom business. we're the most generous country for those who want to come here, whether they're facing religious persecution or they want to come here legally as an immigrant. we're still the most welcoming country. that won't change. but this is a very important demarcation. when people say i don't see what's different about the two candidates, they need look no further than today's speech and this actual policy. we can't contain them. we can't have secretary clinton referring to isis as, quote, our determined enemies at her convention speech two weeks ago. they're killing people all over the world, including here in the united states. somebody has to take a firmer stand, not just call them the jv team. we've got them on their heels, they've been contained. americans don't believe that. we feel less safe.
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>> let's talk about how he's going to show it's stronger. one is defining efforts as a struggle against radical islamic terrorism. this is a debate of what do you call them that you're referring to. what's interesting is what's not in there. there's no muslim ban in his new definition of who the enemy is. why? did somebody talk some sense to trump about how to define what the problem is? >> well, this is definitely a speech and a policy that's of his own making along with his advisers. but what you do see in there is we're still going to ban people from countries that have a history of exporting terror, where we don't have the right checks if place to make sure that no longer happens. >> i get it. that sounds right here. but look, you know government so well. i don't have to tell you this. how do you put that into -- like, what states would qualify? seems like france would qualify right now and the test that you have for suspending visas, for individuals who don't share america's pluralistic value. how? how would you do these things?
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>> france is not on the list, but here's the thing. >> but it could be. define export terror. we may wind up on that list. you and i take our families on vacation, all the sudden you're in the united states, you have a problem in all 50 states. >> if we do, it's because the bureaucracy that currently exists misses the right people and targets the wrong people. >> so you think it can be done? >> i think we need something better than what we have now. people are on edge by and large. what's happening now is you could just be standing in a candy line after the best deal day fireworks with your 10-year-old child and your life is over. you can be recreating the wrong park, standing in the wrong coffee line. people feel like the combination of lone-wolf attacks, the fbi, and obviously what's going on abroad, this is relatively new. the birth and growth of isis is relatively new. it's three or four years. it did have predecessor groups, no doubt, but 80% of those
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33,000 people killed by isis and its predecessors have just happened in the last three years. and i appreciate you covering this speech. this is the whole point of the trump campaign. please covered substance we put out there. he did a great economic speech, very policy leading, very specific, solution-centric monday. it got a little coverage. where was hillary clinton last week? i think it's not just biased coverage sometimes, it's unequal coverage. there's two candidates in the race. shouldn't we be talking about her? i know scarcity benefits her. the less we see of her, the better she seems to do, no doubt, but she can't hide forever. >> there's no question that they have very different strategies. and just for full disclosure -- >> and she's dull. she's not click bait. she doesn't get ratings. she's very dull. >> that's your opinion. what gets trump his ratings is also something that's debatable. we've been trying to get clinton on the show for the last week. we've been trying to get her surrogates on. the team is not putting them all. all we can do is ask. she doesn't want to give press
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conferences. she doesn't want to come on the show. her surrogates aren't here. that's her decision. people should know that. they should judge it. this idea that donald trump is a victim of the media is almost impossible for me to understand. now, you and i have known each other a long time. i'm not the deepest thinker in the world, but help me get this. he's getting ready to run. we hype it like crazy. trump's getting in, trump's getting in. he gets into the race. good friends of mine like you say, when are you going to start checking what comes out of this guy's mouth isn't t? the media was loving it. people are loving it. he flies up the polls with the media's help. good, bad, right, wrong, that's for people to debate. he spends no money on commercials because of us, and now he's a victim. >> i think he spent no money on commercials because of him. his message have been -- he's got a very different message from a conventional republican. he certainly has the
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reaganomics, of his speech. peace through strength, protect american interest and allies. at the same time, he also has a very populist message where he's the first guy to reach out to a lot of folks who feel like they're struggling, getting screwed by the policies in washington. i think now it's the coverage is -- i think if you have a panel where there are five people on a panel and four of them are anti-trump, it's sort of -- >> that's wrong. that's wrong. >> but it's constant. >> that's wrong. >> it suggests that 80% of america is for hillary, 20% is for donald trump. >> that's wrong to do that. my suggestion is don't generalize. go with the outlets. go with the individuals shows. go with the individual anchors and reporters. we don't do that here. the idea that the coverage is unequal, if that's true, it's in his favor. he gets more attention than anybody. what gets him in trouble is what comes out of i had mouth. we're not looking for reasons to give him a hard time. he presents them. >> if he gives a 45-minute speech at a rally with 10,000 or 15,000 people, he's breaking all
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these records -- >> he's a huge celebrity. >> i've been to them. here's what happens. people are just, you know, the people in the rally were excited. the press are kind of covering it, going along, plodding along. all the sudden he says something and they start typing. there it is, that's going to be the story today. where the heck is the other 44 minutes. >> it fendepends what it is tha coming out of his mouth. >> he's not up there riffing. he's talking about policies. >> here's the other thing i would ask of you. the way this election is covered is what americans are talking about around the kitchen tables and over the cappuccino counters. it's just wrong. in the cnn polling when you do the issues polling, what are you asking? you're legitimately asking, how concerned are you about health care, national security, jobs and the economy, ethics? you're not asking how concerned are you about what somebody said today. so why don't we have coverage, why is obamacare, why is the fact that 16 of the 23 state co-ops have already failed not covered? why did the networks spend 18 seconds on the financial
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meltdown of obama? >> "the wall street journal," which is a murdoch paper, which means it is not set up by design to be against donald trump, says he has to start thinking about what comes out of his mouth, his behavior as presidential, and if not, as you know, they conclude he should turn it over to pence. the idea of divorcing donald trump from responsibility for how he's covered just doesn't make sense to me. i take your argument. >> not divorcing. >> but i do not get it. >> there's a lot of substance there, including this radical islamic speech today. i appreciate covering the substance. >> if he sticks to message, that's what gets covered. thank you very much. alisyn? >> the second straight night of violence in milwaukee. one person shot and an officer injured are during bottle and rock throwing standoffs with police. the chaos erupting over the shooting death of an armed black man one day earlier. protesters took to the streets immediately after that shooting, burning down several buildings, as you can see on your screen.
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cnn's ana cabrera is live in milwaukee with more. what have you learned? >> reporter: quiet and calm here now, alisyn, but this community remains shaken. we know the national guard is still on stand by. it's been activated but not deemployed, even though it's been difficult for the local authorities to keep crowds under control. we're hearing from protesters that their unrest is all about the years of oppression and racism they say that's plagued their community. and there's been a tipping point now reached with this weekend shooting. protests and violence erupting again in milwaukee. demonstrators firing shots. >> a lot of shots. a lot of shots right now. >> reporter: throwing objects. >> looks like the gas tank just popped. >> reporter: and setting cars on fire. at least one person was shot and rushed to the hospital. a police officer also hospitalized after a rock smashed the windshield of a squad car. the weekend of violence began on
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saturday with demonstrators torching several businesses, overturning cars, and throwing rocks at police to protest the police shooting death of 23-year-old silvel smith. police say he turned toward the officer with a gun in his hand. the officer's body camera capturing the deadly encounter. milwaukee's mayor tried to address the festering anger about whether the shooting was justified. >> without question, he had a gun in his hand. and i want our community to know that. >> reporter: governor scott walker activating the national guard to assist police and declaring a state of emergency. >> i was worried about whether or not things would escalate. >> reporter: smith's family and friends holding a vigil marked by prayers. >> thy kingdom come, thy will be done. >> reporter: with his sister calling for peace. >> don't bring the violence here and the ignorance here. >> reporter: milwaukee police confirm they made multiple arrests early this morning in
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addition to the 17 people who were arrested on saturday night. now this investigation is in the hands of the wisconsin department of justice as they continue to investigate. there's still a lot of uncertainty, chris, about where this community goes from here. >> all right, ana. thank you very much. appreciate that. we also want to take you to louisiana. they have historic flooding down there. it's a horrible situation. we've been showing you this video all morning. this volunteer who winds up plunging into the water. that's a car that's sinking. he pulls out a woman as the car is sinking. now he goes back for her dog. i don't know how he found that dog in water where you can't see. thank god for that woman he was there. the state's governor is going to join us, john bell edwards. what is the situation? the worst may still be yet to come, next.
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at least five people have been killed by the historic
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floods that are devastating parts of louisiana. emergency crews rescuing more than 20,000 people, including one rescue of a woman and her dog that you have to see. cnn's boris sanchez is live in baton rouge with more for us. >> reporter: hey, alisyn. yeah, though it's extremely tragic that at least five people were killed, it's really impressive that there wasn't more loss of life considering just how devastating this flooding has been. 20,000 rescues, officials tell us, that they've conducted. and the worst may not be over yet. i'll give you an example of why. this neighborhood that we're in didn't actually get that much rain. in reality, what's happened is that because the ground is so saturated, all the flood water from across the state has to go somewhere. so rivers and wetlands end up overflowing into neighborhoods. this is actually the bayou behind us. it submerged this neighborhood almost entirely. neighbors were coming back yesterday to try to salvage what
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they could. it's a really dangerous situation to put yourself in, especially when you don't know how deep the water is. we've seen some really incredible rescues. one of them was a woman in her car. it became submerged. she was unbelievably fortunate there were volunteers nearby to help her. watch this. >> please help me. get my dog. get my dog. >> i can't get the dog. maybe she's gone. >> no, she better not be. >> i got your dog. swim to the boat. >> reporter: incredibly brave and selfless actions by those
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volunteers. it's something we've seen again and again across the state. people coming out with their boats, going into neighborhoods like this one to try to rescue people and get them out of harm's way. i can tell you, again, it's supposed to keep raining here, so the situation clearly not over. there still may be more problems ahead, and here is why. where i'm standing right now, this was dry ground at about 5:00 p.m. yesterday. this water is still rising, chris. >> all right, boris. thank you very much. be safe down there. joining us now, louisiana's governor, john bell edwards. we know you're busy. thank you for taking the time. we're trying to get the important information out. you just gave us new numbers. you had 12,000 in shelters overnight. you had 20,000, probably more, rescues because they're ongoing, probably as i'm speaking right now. you got 40,000 without power in businesses and homes overnight. you had to evac a hospital. how are you doing in controlling the aftermath of this current wave? >> well, we're doing quite well under the circumstances, but it
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is a tremendous challenge. we still have record flood levels on rivers and creeks across south louisiana. we have multiple road closures, including interstate 10, both east and west of baton rouge, remain closed. so we've got our hands full, but i'll tell you, chris, we have got five fatalities, which very tragic, but under the circumstances, it's -- we're fortunate we haven't had more. >> certainly one is always too many, but you're right to make a relative assessment here, having covered katrina and reooe rita. we know how devastating it can be. in terms of help being on the way, the president signed the emergency order. that gets you money for resources. what do you need? >> well, we're still in the response phase. we're still affecting search and rescue. we're still monitoring nursing homes and hospitals. we're going to get into the
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recovery phase in several days, but the president did within an hour or two of me making a request sign the major declaration for four of our parishes. we fully expect we will have close to 30 parishes that will be declared disasters before this is all over. and the individual assistance that comes by virtue of that declaration is going to be incredibly important. also the assistance we need, you know, something people haven't thought about, chris, we're going to have standing water all over south louisiana. we're going to have more than our share of mosquitos. with the zika threat, we need assistance to spray for mosquitos and for mosquito control and abatement. that is made available to us as a result of the declaration. so that's just one small component, but it's incredibly important that we have that disaster declaration in place. >> for people who are watching and they're seeing what many of us know from previous experiences, louisiana, residents getting up,
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volunteering, working with first responders and doing incredible things to stop loss of -- property loss and saving lives. what do you need from people? what can we do to get the word out? >> well, first of all, i always believe in prayer. so i ask for that around the country. but we have a lot of volunteers, hundreds of people are volunteering to go to our shelters and to assist in other ways. the volunteer effort is going to shift to the recovery phase because we have to go into these homes, and we have to rip out dry wall and carpet and other things to make sure that mold doesn't happen. that's all going to happen down the road. i will tell you that there's still a tremendous effort ongoing because traffic is not moving across our state. and we have other problems, as the waters move south, as they always do in louisiana, towards the gulf, every area south of baton rouge now and even over in lafayette are seeing record
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flooding. one of the things that the weather service told us is because this flooding is so far above anything they've ever seen, they can't really model or predict how wide the water is going to flow and how deep it's going to get. as a result, we have thousands of homes that have never taken any water that have flooded severely. it's been difficult to get people to leave their homes because they think they're safe. but you can throw all of the experience out whenever you break the records, as we have in louisiana. >> and what's unusual here for people watching this is that it didn't come because of a hurricane. we're used to the hurricane being the catalyst. this is the worst you've seen how in terms of the area affected, or is this just rain over time? how did you get into this hole? >> well, between thursday and really saturday night, the rainfall was so intense and there was so much of it. even though it was an unnamed storm, just a low-pressure
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system that sat over south louisiana and just dropped a tremendous amount of rain. the creeks, the rivers all swelled and flowed across south louisiana. it's been a tremendous challenge for us to deal with, but i will tell you i'm extremely proud of the state agencies, the local agencies at the parish level and the municipalities. but the people that are just being neighbors to one another, i'm talking about the neighbors we're called to be in luke chapter 10. that's happening all over the state of louisiana, and i'm gratified as governor to see our state coming together. because as you know, chris, we had an opportunity to speak in baton rouge a couple weeks ago, we've had more than our fair share of dhajs lately. >> well, you're dealing with the worst right now. hopefully the best in people comes out. you know how to get us as you figure out what you need to recover from this. let us know, we'll get the word out. best to you, governor.
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be well, stay safe. >> thank you, chris. another top story, congress expected to get its hands on fbi notes from the agents who attended hillary clinton's interview with the bureau about her e-mails. so what's the potential fallout on the campaign trail? we'll discuss that next. at ally bank, no branches equals great rates. it's a fact. kind of like bill splitting equals nitpicking. but i only had a salad. it was a buffalo chicken salad. salad.
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congress is expected to get the fbi's notes from hillary clinton's interview with the bureau as soon as today. this is about her use of a private e-mail as secretary of state. reports suggest the obama administration was hesitant to release these notes. they're concerned they are too politically sensitive. so here to discuss is cnn commentator and clinton supporter bakari sellers. great to see you. what are these notes with the fbi going to reveal, do you think? >> well, i think first and foremost, we have to understand this is really a bad precedent to set. the congress, the united states congress, the house oversight committee, they're really not the checks and balances of the fbi. so this is a really, really slippery slope that the fbi is on and the department of justice
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is on. with that being said, i hope we don't release bits and pieces. we know that these notes are going to be leaked the same way that sheryl mills' trip to new york was leaked from senator grassley's committee. my hope is they all come out as a whole, not piecemeal. i hope all of these notes come out so the american public can see it all as one. >> you say that the sheryl mills trip to new york was much to do about nothing, but obviously that's not what donald trump and his running mate mike pence think, as well as many republicans. mike pence was just on the sunday shows yesterday saying that the content of these e-mails, they do find very significant. let me play for you a portion of what he said. >> the public has a right to know because really and truly, this is exactly the kind of pay to play politics the american people are sick and tired of. but frankly, it's -- it is -- it's just one more example of
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the way the clintons have been operating over the last several years. >> what he's referring to is this new cache of about 300 e-mails that came out at the behest of judicial watch, the conservative watchdog group. they show evidence of a connection between the clinton foundation and the state department that mike pence, you heard there, characterizing as pay to play. >> well, that's just completely absurd and not true. let's go to the two e-mails that are in question. you have one e-mail where you have an individual who's not asking for anything from the state department but instead wants to give them information on an election that's going on overseas. that's first. the second, you have a young man who was a volunteer in haiti, who wasn't a donor to the clinton foundation, who was not an employee of the clinton foundation, simply vehicseeking employment. that happens a lot. i don't know if he got the job. then we have sheryl mills' trip.
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she went on her own time. she didn't use state department funds. the clinton foundation does extremely good work. it's a public charity. >> let me just focus, zero in on the very first one you said. that's the e-mail from doug band, who's a top executive of the clinton foundation, and he's talking about these lebanese billionaire. he says, we need gilbert to speak to the substance person at the state department regarding lebanon. as you know, he's key guy there to us and is loved in lebanon. in other words, it sounds to, at least mike pence and the republicans, as though there is some sort of paying for access. >> first of all, we need to make sure we're clear about what this gentleman wanted. what he wanted to do was give information about a presidential election in lebanon. he was not asking for anything in return. that is what pay to play means. that is not what occurred here. the second part, which mike pence knows and which mike pence knew when he went on air, went on tv and just didn't give all
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the information s that the conversation never happened. so there's no pay to play here. there's no fire here. there's no smoking gun here. this again are e-mails that the american public is tired of. that's why hillary clinton is still in the recent cnn/orc poll up 49 to 40 when it comes to honest and trustworthy over donald trump. >> you say there's no smoking gun. you're right, thus far. there is no evidence connecting there was a pay-to-play scheme. there's also not a bright line here between the state department and the clinton foundation that hillary clinton said was going to exist and this the obama administration insisted on. if there are these e-mails, that's not a bright line. >> i have to push back on that a little bit, alisyn. when you're talking about please do a favor for this person, we're talking about the e-mail where this young man really wanted a job with the state department so he could further his work in haiti. god forbid somebody doing good work around the country is not able to get a job. i hope that young man actually got it.
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what i hope the clinton campaign does is push back on all these false narratives about the clinton foundation. we need to start talking about the 9.9 million young people who got the hiv and a.i.d.s. medication they needed because of the clinton foundation. we need to talk about the young people in ethiopia who were saved because of the clinton foundation. we need to start talking about this good work. right now this message has completely got on ut of control and clouded. people don't understand that this public charity has literally saved lives around the world. >> bakari sellers, thank you for your perspective on all of this. always great to talk to you. >> thank you, alisyn. have a great morning. >> you too. donald trump is taking aim at the media. this time specifically "the new york times." the paper reports about trouble in the trump campaign. he says they have it all wrong because they didn't speak to him directly. can he stay on message? we debate it next. well she loves to say,
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"well, fantastic!" a lot. i do say that, you see... i study psychobiology.
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i'm a fine arts major. nobody really believes that i take notes this way, but they actually make sense to me. i try to balance my studying with the typical college experience. this windows pc is a life saver! being able to pull up different articles to different parts of the screen is so convenient. i used to be a mac user but this is way better.
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donald trump's campaign wants to address concerns about being on message, but he's doing it by giving a big speech today but also by saying he's not running against hillary clinton, he's running against the media. is that on message? joining us now to discuss, cnn political commentator and former donald trump campaign manager corey lewandowski. if you're wondering, yes, he is still receiving severance from the trump campaign. and cnn political commentator and republican consultant margaret hoover. she is not. korcover corey, when we look at what's going on inside the campaign, stay on message, talk about big things, help the american people.
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we got it. now he turns around and says, i'm running against the media, i'm a victim of the press. that's what's going on. i should be up 20% in this race. they're taking it from me. is this what he's supposed to be talking about right now? is this going to help him get elected? >> i think what he's trying to do is to remind the american people -- look, donald trump is unbelievably accessible to the media. he does rallies, speeches, policy speeches on a weekly basis. what happens is the focus from his policy speech from last monday was taken off the table by a comment that he made, and that became the narrative for the week and not the policy speech. >> but what's the responsibility for what comes out of his mouth? >> where's the responsibility for hillary clinton? where is her policy speech? she's disappeared. she was not anywhere this week. >> she just gave a big policy this speech. >> where was she this weekend? >> does that mean he doesn't have to be responsible for what comes out of his mouth? >> what it means is when he's laying out detailed policy discussions, that's the narrative the media should be picking up on and not some side
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bar comment about something else. he should be entitled to lay out those detailed policy plans, and that's what should be discussed. >> margaret, has the media been unfair to donald trump. >> if you're a republican, you think you're never going to get a completely fair, objective shake from a media that's well proved to be dispositionally, orientationally center left, not sympathetic to conservative leanings. but that was true for ronald reagan. that was true for george h.w. bush. that was true for george w. bush. that's true for every republican elected. suddenly the same fair measure doesn't apply to donald trump. look, if he's going to give a speech today, 90, 80 days out from the election, railing against the media, this just proves that he simply isn't capable of running a general election campaign. that would be a great message for a republican primary candidate. but he's no longer in the republican primary. and the challenge is that now he is struggling to hold on to states that republicans have
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easily held on to for general election candidacies. utah, georgia, arizona. suddenly you have a gentleman who's running for the president of the united states who is supposed to be representing the republican party and can't even get his head around 30 minutes of briefings a day to study for his debates that are coming up. you have somebody who is constitutionally incapable of disciplining his mouth. >> he's been wildly successful through his use of tactics. you as well. you were in there working on the campaign. some would say it was a more stable ship when you were there than what we're seeing now. a year ago this week i'm interviewing trump. he's whining. he's in a big whine mode. somebody calls him out, says he's a whiner. and he didn't push it away. he embraced it. watch this. wait for it. all right. so he says, yes, i whine, i like to whine, i'm the king of whiners. do we have it? good because i'm not doing a
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good impersonation. >> well, i think he's probably right. i am the most fabulous whiner. i do whine because i want to win. and i'm not happy -- >> are whiners winners? >> i am a whiner, and i'm a whiner and i keep whining and whining until i win. i'm going to win for the country and make our country great again. >> is that what he's doing right now? he doesn't like the coverage he's been getting. he does not want to take responsibility for why he's getting the coverage. so instead, blame the media, whine, whine, whine, eventually his supporters will say, okay, we get it. that's what it was. then he moves on. is that what's going on? >> i think, and rudy giuliani touched on this. if you look at "the new york times" coverage of the trump campaign, the front page stories have consistently been negative stories about the donald trump campaign, whereby when you look at the clinton campaign, sheryl mills and the e-mail exchanges and her desire to have a donor from the clinton foundation potentially meet somebody, there's no front page coverage. clearly it's biased against donald trump. pointing that out with his
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medium, going directly to the people, i think that's fair to do. >> i want to ask you about something you tweeted about paul manafort. the united states reporting that paul manafort, when he worked for yanukovych in the ukraine, that he got $12.7 million worth of cash off the books. why did you decide to tweet that little tidbit? >> you know what it does? it goes exactly to the point i just made. the media is now focusing on a private person who had a private business model. no one says there's anything illegal about what he did. he's saying he didn't receive the money. but sheryl mills, the chief of staff of the state department, doesn't make the front page of "the new york times" when she's doing personal favors. she's leaving d.c. on a train to come to new york. state department doesn't even know about it. so she can interview people for the clinton foundation. >> but your tweet didn't clarify that you were trying to show -- >> i didn't tweet anything. >> you tweeted out the link. >> just a story.
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>> but it wasn't meant to somehow denigrate paul manafort? >> no. if you read the article, paul is very clear. he didn't receive the money. "the new york times" is writing a staff story which has nothing to do with the candidate. when it's a staffer of the clinton campaign, there's a different method. >> we covered it all week long. >> but it wasn't front page. it's not the front page. >> most of what you know about the sheryl mills situation you probably got sitting on our sets. >> this is an independent bureau in the ukraine, as you know, that's intended to investigate anti-corruption. it's funded by the west in order to receive aid from the west. $12.7 million of line items directed towards paul manafort, there's no kind of accusation from an independent bureau like that about sheryl mills. it's not apples to apples. >> paul says there was no money received. number two, there's no proof of any money receive. sheryl mills was a government employee at the time. >> did he work for viktor yanukovych? >> i have no idea.
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that's a question for paul to answer. >> the answer is yes, he worked for yanukovych. >> sheryl mills was a government employee taking e-mails from the kle clinton foundation to do government favors. it's pay to play. no one wants to report about it. >> we did it all week. >> it wasn't on the front page of "the new york times." >> who cares about "the new york times." what comes out of my mouth is what i control. that's what we do. we covered it all week. >> i understand. but where is the equal coverage. that's the point of the biased media. >> it sounds like whining coming from a guy who rode the media like a bronco horse to where he is right now. that's where it does not ring true. i got to tell you, it just doesn't. not coming from him. >> speaking of the media, donald trump has spent less on tv ads, campaign ads than the green party. he is spending zero to run campaign ads. what's the strategy, do you believe, margaret, with that? >> look, corey is going to have to tell me. at least he settled up
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republican primary voters saying, it's okay, don't worry about the money, i'm going to write the check. now where's the money? this is a time where rubber hits the road. he's not doing great on his big-dollar fundraising. the only fundraising going well is the small-dollar online donations. >> so corey, why isn't he running any campaign ads? >> he raised $80 million last month. >> so why not spend some of it on campaign ads? >> what he's doing is taking that money, the big money is going to the rnc. he's taking small-dollar contributions. >> when you were running the campaign, why didn't you need to raise money to run ads? >> because donald trump funded his own campaign. >> why weren't you needing to run commercials? >> cnn would cover -- >> the media covered his events in full. >> that's exactly right. >> kelly ann conway, good personal friend, running for cruz, one of a group of people saying, when are you going to stop covering trump all the time? when are you going to stop giving him a pass? when are you going to start checking what comes out of his mouth? and how you're complaining you don't get enough media fairness. >> no, no. he's got $85 million sitting in a bank account. there are 82 days left in this
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campaign. >> and he's spending type talking about this. he's giving a big speech about isis today. why isn't he focusing on that? >> he's going to talk about isis and his plans today to defeat isis. >> why did me put out all these tweets about the media? how does that help? >> i think what you'll see in the next 12 weeks is donald trump on television, his field program growing, his state plan growing, his state staff growing, and working directly. he has a better relationship with the rnc and the synergy between the campaign and the rnc than any presidential campaign in the last 20 years. >> because he's outsourced his entire campaign apparatus to the rnc because he doesn't have his own. the rnc just doesn't have enough money to build the get out the vote operations they're going to need in the state he's supposedly going to win like florida, pennsylvania p ohio, and michigan. >> are you worried about and mi. >> it is a different campaign. the money is there. they'll start spending the money. raising 70 or $80 million a month, with say competitive a month than what hillary clinton has been doing. the knock was always donald trump can't raise money. he raised $80 million last
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month. >> he'll start spending the money on traditional adds. >> how much has hillary clinton raised? >> $90 million. >> and she has been doing this consistently. this is his biggest month. this is apples/apples. we have nothing on them. >> we have an opportunity to show he can be on message, talk about something the americans care about and offer something better. >> we'll be watching that closely as we know you will be. gold medal winning, u.s. gymnast, gabby douglas, as she describes how tough her second olympics experience has been. what is it like for the parents of these olympians. we'll speak with gabby douglas' mom live, next. i talked to my doctor and found a missing piece in my asthma treatment with breo. once-daily breo prevents asthma symptoms. breo is for adults with asthma not well controlled on a long-term asthma control medicine, like an inhaled corticosteroid. breo won't replace a rescue inhaler
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for a free quote today. liberty stands with you™. liberty mutual insurance. well, for female gymnasts, a second chance at olympic gold is a rare opportunity. gabby doug loss, of courlas was girl. she has had that chance this year. it has not been easy, though. she has faced critics criticizing her every move. despite the distraction, she helped the final five win a team gold. her mom, natalie hawkins, joins
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us now from rio. good morning. >> good morning. >> great to see you. it looks beautiful down there. tell us what has been like to watch gabby this time around, particularly with that shaky performance on the uneven bars. >> this time had its own challenges. in 2012, i would say the bulk of our challenges revolved around our lack of finances and trying to see how to keep her in the sport so that she could make it all the way. then we also had some challenges where the coaching situation was a concern. but when she landed in iowa, she went at it 100%, and then avalon done, we thought, oh, it is going to be amazing, she'll come back, 2016. the financial issues have pretty much resolved themselves. but we ran into a lot of coaching situations, a lot of
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negative coaching situations again. and so -- >> what is that? >> well, a lot of what she went through, we haven't discussed publicly, but she had challenges going on in the background. so for her to come out here and fight for her team and then get the onslaught of all of the online criticism and negativity that people just threw her way was overwhelming. it proves in the end to be a little too much. >> i do want to get to the online bullying in a second. in terms of the coaching situations that you say have been a challenge, i know you haven't spoken about them publicly, can you tell us more about what the problem was? >> yeah. well, i've been asked a lot about that, especially after trials, when you know, they saw just one particular coach instead of another. so i chose to really not speak on it, because i wanted to come
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from our perspective. and sometimes, you know, when you have like a one-minute segment or speaking to a reporter, you have couple of quotes, you're not able to get it all across. i want to be able to speak to the parents, i want to be able to speak to an audience that have their kids in that sport or any sport and let them know the challenges that we went through, what we did to overcome it. i want to take what was negative and turn it into a positive. that's what i've always taught my kids. that's what i'm teaching gabriel now. no one knows what they're going through in the background. they know the online adversity, because you see that. but you don't know what's been going on behind the scenes. so i want to have a chance to really tell that in our own words. >> i understand. i mean, we have two minutes left right now. do you want to send the message to those parents listening right
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now? >> be on the lookout something is coming your way. you're not alone. i often felt i was alone. but you're not alone. i would like to say can we just stop with the hating. can we stop with the fighting. we are one nation. and when we're divided, we fall. can we unitase as a nation and others are looking at us as a great power. >> i assume you're talking about all of the online vitreal that gabby has gotten, they've accused her of bleaching her skin, talked about her body, they call her crabby gabby because she is not smiling enough. how has she responded? how is she coping with that? >> well, not good, you know. how well, you know, can you cope with things like that when you go from people's adoration to being the brunt of criticism and
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hatred. it is hard, because her nature is so giving and so kind, she literally is just a very tender-hearted person. she was devastated. she tried to push it off and tried not to focus on it, but in the end, she couldn't understand it. she is a people pleaser. she loves to please people. so when she is saw everybody was attacking her for something she didn't know she even did wrong, which i don't see that she did anything wrong. i don't put my hand over my heart when the national anthem is played. we came from a military community and my entire life growing up, we never put our hands over our heart for the most part. everyone i know has, you know, my friends and family, my mom is a navy veteran, my dad is a two-time vietnam veteran. they said we don't put our hands over our heart. we salute or just stand at attention. so it was harsh to boil down your patriotism to one act, the
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act of putting your hand over your heart. that doesn't determine how honorable you are, or how happy you are to compete for your country. >> of course. >> it is actions. it is how you treat one another. it is how, you know you you interact with people online, you have responsibility. >> of course. and it is making the sacrifice to bring home the gold for the u.s., of course. well, natalie hawkins, thanks for sharing this. we know it has been a speperson struggle for you and gabby. we wish you the best going forward. >> thank you. we're following a lot of news this morning. donald trump preparing to layout his plan to fight radical islamic terrorism. let's get right to it. >> violent protests in milwaukee. >> people are throwing bottle ansd rocks. >> we're all ind rocks. >> we're all in this together. >> stop trying to fix the police. fix the ghetto. >> we're defeating radical islamic terrorism.
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>> if it weren't for them, you probably wouldn't even have isis. he is a terrible, terrible president. >> talk about how you target your enemies and work with your friends. >> we're going to open up those laws, folks, and we're going to have people sue you like you've never been sued before. >> a third consecutive gold medal and he didn't disappoint. >> simone biles just won't quit, striking gold for the third time in rio. >> and kala harrison, making judo history for the second time. >>announcer: this is "new day" with chris cuomo and alisyn camerota. good morning, welcome to "new day." it is monday, august 15, 2016. donald trump will unveil his plan to defeat isis. the speech is an opportunity for him to do what many supporters want him to do. stay on message. >> today's speech as donald
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trump is blaming the media, and not treating him fairly. jessica is joining us with the latest. >> donald trump trying to get back on message, after a weekend of media bashing. he'll turn to the fight against isis in a speech at youngstown state university. he'll outline a three-pillar approach to combat isis, painting the fight as an ideological struggle on par with the cold war. >> he is going to layout his vision and his strategy for defeating radical islamic terrorism. >> donald trump turning his isis centric ideals. >> we have to get isis. we will defeat isis. >> into a three-pillar policy proposal to defeat them. >> talk about how you target your enemies and work with your friends. you don't overreach and destabilize countries like the obama/clinton administration has done. >> a senior campaign official says trump will unveil several
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proposals, and consider any country willing to help defeat isis an ally, a call that could include russia, as a possible partner. >> they want to get rid of russia. we want to get rid of russia. what the hell do we care. >> he'll propose suspending any visas with any heavy terrorist activities and raise the bar for entry into the u.s. the bar could include an ideological test according to the trump campaign official. the test would question visa applicants on their support of u.s. values, and seek to weed out any supporters of radical islam. but no specific mention about muslim ban that he called for nine months ago. >> donald j. trump is calling for a total and complete shut down of muslims entering the united states. >> and finally, trump will make a clear statement to the world that the u.s. is fighting a battle not just military and financially, but ideologically, a point far from trump's
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bombastic rhetoric of the past. >> i would bomb the [ bleeping ] out of them. we have to not the hell out of them. >> you have to take out their families. when you get these terrorists, you have to take out their families. >> the speech comes after trump used a false claim on the campaign trial. >> i call president obama and hillary clinton the founders of isis. >> and paraded his self--proclaimed ex per it is a on the terrorist group. >> i know more about isis than the generals do, believe me. >> trump will make clear in his speech that the u.s. won't be, quote, remaking the middle east into one democracy into another, and hammer on his criticism of the iraq war. >> jessica, thank you for that were he view. let's discuss this and so much more with republican senator from alabama and chairman of the national security advisory committee, jeff sessions. good morning, senator. >> hey, good morning. >> okay, so tell us specifically what we're going to hear from donald trump this morning that
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will be new. >> i think he is going to be direct and unvarnished. he is going to layout the threat that we have from isis, which is a group that wants to hold territory, plan a flag and actually have a nation state. they want to expand worldwide and take over the whole world. they've got to be confronted. they have to be defeated. there is no doubt about that. but it is going to be a long-term ideological battle. he'll talk about how to do that, how to call on our allies. one expect from the middle east told us the greatest way to expand terrorism is to create instability around the world. topple governments. that's where they grow. that's an absolute fact. so he is going to attack the obama and hillary clinton policies that have created instability in iraq, syria, libya, and have created bases for isis and all those areas. so in a way, their policies,
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destabilizing their countries, did in fact create and nurture isis. >> i do want to get to the comments about president obama being the so-called founder of isis in one moment. one more detail about what he is going to announce today. we have heard, our cnn reporting has talked to an official familiar with the material, who says that a trump administration would seek to bar the entry of any people who harbor anti-semitic, antigay, or other views that don't mesh with the u.s. values. how would a trump administration determine who is anti-semitic or antigay? >> what we do when we admit people is we bring them in and we can interview them and should interview them, and ask for background material. i don't think there is anything wrong with asking questions concerning whether or not they can adhere to the constitutional order of the united states. how you do that, we'll have to
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wrestle with the right way to do it legally and according to our history and our values. but we're not required to interview two individuals, one of whom has a hostile view to the united states, and another one a very positive view, and we admit the hostile one and not the positive one. those are things that you can legitimately ask and should do so in a proper, carefully thought out way. >> okay, let's talk -- >> we admit 100,000 people a year from the middle east. that's the fastest growing area in the world. we've had now at least 40 refugees charged with terrorism. the numbers have grown in 13, 14, 15. president obama is now admitting 10,000 refugees from syria this year by september 30th. hillary clinton wants to bring in 65,000. >> yep. >> we cannot vet those, even the 10,000 today.
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we need to slow down on that. trump will be clear on that. >> senator, let's talk about donald trump saying that president obama is the founder of isis. do you agree with that statement? >> oh, that's just a device to communicate to the american people the enormity of the error they may when they said they're going to topple the syrian government, that we're protecting christians and other minorities, and we've created chaos there. we withdrew all our troops out of iraq, which is borders syria. and that allowed isis to pour into iraq. it would never have happened with just 15,000 troops in a supporting role. the military opposed that. so this is a colossal series of errors. >> that was a -- >> that's the word i was looking
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for, a rhetorical device to communicate responsibility to put the hat on the person responsible. withdrawing all troops from iraq was one of the, maybe the colossal error of the 21st century. we have given away a whole chunk of iraq that our soldiers fought so bravely for. >> donald trump said he was being sarcastic when he said it. that seems to concur with what you're saying, it was a rhetorical device. senator, how do we know when donald trump speaks what a flourish and what is the truth? >> well, everybody knows that clinton and obama didn't meet the plot the foundation of isis. so yeah, he stirred things up with that comment. you can say it was smart or not smart. but in a way, it had a fundamental truth to it that huge errors by our administration allowed isis to come on the scene in a powerful way.
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6,000 troops and isis members in libya, which hillary clinton ov overrode, and toppled that regime, a million refugees there and benghazi arising from it. >> senator, what you're saying now that everybody knows that that was just being sarcastic and just a device is different than what his running mate thinks. here is what mike pence said this weekend about donald trump's claim about the founding of isis. listen to this. >> i think he is being very serious, and he was making a point that needs to be made. there is no question that the failed policies of president barack obama and secretary of state, hillary clinton, in the wider middle east created a vacuum within iraq in which isis was able to arise. >> senator, you can understand the confusion. his running mate says he was very serious. you say he was joking or sarcastic. how do we know -- you said it
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was a rhetorical flourish. how do we know. >> well, if i'm unclear, i agree with mike pence. he was exactly correct. that's what i intended to say. >> wait, wait a second. senator, he was -- >> he was deadly serious that -- >> when he said that the president was the founder of isis. >> he was deadly serious in a rhetorical way that the failures and misjudgments of this obama and clinton led to the surge of isis, and i think that's true and correct. i think it is almost in disputable. >> was he deadly serious when he said president obama was the founder of isis? >> well, he was serious in a rhetorically. >> unserious way. >> i think it was a legitimate way to say that. people can disagree. but i understood immediately what he was saying, and i think most americans do. >> senator jeff sessions, thank you for being here to try to explain -- >> i thought i did.
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>> thank you, senator. we appreciate you being on "new day." great to see you. let's get to chris. it's what you say and how you say it. that's the politics. all right, thank you very much for that, alisyn. let's take a break. second straight night of violence in milwaukee. the police confirming one person shot and an officer injured as protesters hurled bottles and rocks. now, we all know this chaos came about as a result of saturday's deadly police shooting after an armed -- there is no break right now. i'm wrong. it is ana cabrera with more. >> reporter: things are still unsettled and the national guard remains on guard. the local authorities eventually got things under control. the unrest is about years of oppression and racism, many in the african-american community have felt here. and this weekend's shooting was simply a flash point.
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protests and violence erupting again in milwaukee, demonstratoring firing shots. >> a lot of shots. a lot of shots right now. throwing objects. >> looked like the gas tank just popped. >> reporter: and setting cars on fire. one person was shot and rushed to the hospital. a police officer also hospitalized, after a rock smashed the windshield of a squad car. the weekend of violence began on saturday, protesting the police shooting death of 23-year-old sevell smith. police say he turned toward the officer with a gun in his hand. the officer's body camera, capturing the deadly encounter. mill walk cowauk milwaukee's mayor spoke about it. >> without question, he had a
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gun in his hand. i want our community to know that. >> governor scott walker, activating the national guard to assist police and declaring a state of emergency. >> i said i was worried about whether or not things would escalate. >> reporter: smith's family and friends, holding a vigil, marked by prayers. with his sister calling for peace. >> don't bring the violence and ignorance here. >> reporter: milwaukee police tell us they made multiple arrests overnight, in addition to the 17 people they arrested on saturday night. and now that milwaukee and wisconsin department of justice are continuing their investigation into that deadly police shooting. there is still a lot of uncertainty about where the community goes from here and what kind of change will take place. alisyn. >> don't bring the violence here, that's a powerful message from the sister. ana, thank you very much for all of that. members of congress may receive notes as early as today from hillary clinton's interview
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with the fbi over her use of private e-mail. we discuss what that means, next. when heartburn comes creeping up on you. fight back with relief so smooth and fast. tums smoothies starts dissolving the instant it touches your tongue. and neutralizes stomach acid at the source. tum-tum-tum-tum-tums smoothies, only from tums.
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vice-president joe biden will be hitting the campaign trail for the first time with hillary clinton, just hours from now. the duo stumping in pennsylvania, an cnn athena jones is live in washington with more. so what's on the agenda, athena.
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>> reporter: hi, alisyn. probably no better place than sc scranton, pennsylvania. he was born there, and a popular figure in scranton. it is important for him to reprize his role, a role he has been playing since the joined the obama ticket, and his appeal will be important in a state like pennsylvania. pennsylvania is one of the rust belt states that donald trump is really hoping to put into play, and so that blue collar appeal will be important. we should remind our viewers of course, pennsylvania, hasn't voted for a republican for president since 1988. president obama won here in 2008 by ten points, by five points in 2012, and about a 10 or 11 point lead right now that hillary clinton has opened up for herself in the state of pennsylvania according to the latest nbc/"wall street journal"
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marist poll. we know the president argued at the convention that hillary clinton was the best prepared candidate to be president. no other candidate has been as prepared by her. biden will make the flip side of that remark, of that argument, saying trump, there has never been a nominee as ill prepared as trump is to be president. chris. >> one thing for sure, never been a race like this. plenty of politics and policy to talk regarding the clinton campaign. new headline, the fbi could release to congress, the notes of hillary clinton's interview with the bureau over her private e-mail use as secretary of state. what could those notes reveal. what do they mean to the discussion. here to discuss, maryland congressman chris van holland, running for senate and has endorsed hillary clinton. i want to talk politics and policy with you, sir. thanks for being on, congressman. >> thanks. >> the heart of the matter, what do you think could be revealed in these notes that could compromise the clinton campaign
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further? >> oh, chris, i don't think you're going to find anything more in the notes. obviously we'll find out soon enough. but the benghazi hearings have turned over millions of different hours, they've gone through millions of materials. we've had the fbi investigation of the e-mails, and i don't think there is going to be anything more to be found. and i think the focus needs to be on economic policies and what these two candidate also do for the country, which is exactly what hillary clinton is doing today in pennsylvania, and i think you're going see the trump campaign continue to unravel, especially in light of the new cnn poll that shows that hillary clinton is actually above donald trump when it comes to dealing with the economy for the first time. so that's going to be the continued focus of the clinton campaign on things that the american people care about. >> but part of that is convenience, right. you want to ignore the trust issue, because it doesn't work
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in the campaign's favor, and yet it does count. it counts on the level of people's trust, not just to the person, but of the system that they would be operating. i think the concern is you had a division want the fbi, speculative, by the way. this is the theory that's motivating a lot of these lawmakers that want the notes. fbi field agents wanted to make a case against clinton. the brass, the top of the fbi, did not. maybe we'll see that disconnect in the notes. do you buy that speculation? >> chris, i really prefer not to deal in speculation. i think we should deal in facts. the trump campaign has lived on conspiracy theories for a very, very long time. he launched his political career on the birther stuff, and then accused ted cruz's father being in jfk assassination. we're better off when we deal with facts. as you indicated, this will be released soon and people will
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see what's there. this has been turned over a million different ways. which is why secretary clinton and vice-president biden are today focused on economic policy issues and if you look at the differences between the two candidates economic plans, you can understand why hillary clinton is much stronger now with respect to economic policy, because trump has got all these tax breaks that help people like, guess what, trump. although we don't know to what extent, because he hasn't revealed his tax returns. but his tax proposal, as you well know, it has been analyzed by independent groups, helps people in the 1% at the expense of everybody else. that's going to be the focus of the discussion in pennsylvania, and other places. >> all right, let's talk about the policy. what do you see in her plan? yes, she does argue that trump has a tax structure that would be better for the upper echelon than hers. the criticism of her plan, it
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costs too much. billions and billions of dollars that will bust the deficit, and there are deals that she may not be able to strike any way, because it is asking from so much from a stingy congress. what do you say? >> if you look at the clinton plan, she talks about paying for important investments in education, in debt free college, by closing the many, many tax breaks that currently benefit people, the very top of the income scale. we're talking about millionaires, billionaires, we're talking about people who -- >> but chris, everybody always says they're going to close the loopholes and it never happens y would we have confidence in that? >> i think if you take the case to the american people and you win a big election, the american people said we've got to finally close these tax breaks. i mean, if you look at the current structure, 17% of the benefits of all these tax breaks
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go to the top 1% of income earners. hillary clinton says that's outrageous. that's not fair. we're going to get rid of some of those tax breaks for folks at the very top, but invest in jobs and higher wages for the rest of the american people. and that is something that i think people will respond to, and you're already seeing that in the cnn poll. >> you know, one of the attacks against democrats in general is that you take people's money and then it goes into the government and who knows where it comes. one of the metaphors is theest sta -- the estate tax. if you were to reduce or remove the cap on estate taxes, so you're targeting the super wealthy. but why do that? democrats want to do it, republicans in general do not. why do that, when you know, basically you're taking money that people already earned for themselves and their family.
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what's the virtue in that? >> the purpose of that, chris, is to be able to invest in opportunity for everybody in the united states. as you indicated, the only people affected by this are people who have estates over $10 million. so let's just be clear what we're talking about. you have republican presidents like teddy roosevelt who would be rolling in their graves to hear republicans talking about how we need to provide people who already have millions of dollars with a head start, a super head start, when it comes to the next generation. the estate tax provisions are already very generous. the first $10 million in a couple's estate faces no tax at all. and so in an era when you're talking about trying to make investments to grow the economy, to modernize our infrastructure, to make sure that we can compete in the 21st century and students
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have the skills they need, and don't have huge debts, my goodness, it seems reasonable to ask couples who have estates over $10 million to at least continue paying the current estate tax, rather than getting rid of it entirely. i'm glad you raised that issue. because i think it is another example of where donald trump is trying to help people like donald trump. >> chris van hollen, thank you for making the case on "new day." >> good to be with you. donald trump waging war on the immediate yeah. is that a red herring or are we the enemy. our media analysts dissect that, next. autiful moments. by choosing flonase, you're choosing more complete allergy relief and all the enjoyment that comes along with it. when we breathe in allergens, our bodies react by overproducing 6 key inflammatory substances. most allergy pills only control 1. flonase controls 6. and six is greater than one. with flonase, more complete relief means enjoyment
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i'm not running against crooked hillary clinton. i'm running against the crooked media. that's what i'm running against too. >> i hope we win the presidency, if we're running against donald trump. >> hey, i don't want it. >> he has called the media the lowest form of life. >> that's more spot on.
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unfair, no. >> taking the social amedia to what he calls a corrupt press. 85 days left, how will it end? let's discuss it with media analyst bill carter and host of reliable sources, brian stelter. thanks for being here. you don't seem like the lowest form of life. we joke about it, because it is obviously laughable on some level, but there needs to be a distinction between journalism and reality tv journalism. they're supposed to point out hypocrisy. do you this it has been unfair. >> the line always sticks in my mind when i think about campaign coverage, i think reporters are trying to get to the best truth. he is an especially hard candidate to cover. sometime there is are missteps. sometimes it does feel like
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there is a pile-ongoing on, because we live in this world of saturation media coverage, where everything gets hammered home ten times again and again. that said, there is some serious controversies to cover. he has conspiracy theory, and if he doesn't think we're going to hold him accountable, he has another thing coming. >> you say something day after day, he is making all the reason for us to cover him, you know, very emphatic, are we supposed to say that's outrage for him to say. >> i think his argument fails on every level of fact that you could apply to it. however, it may succeed, because what he is doing is what he does best. he is using a tactic. >> he is not running against the media. if he is running against the media, he can't win. he is running against another candidate. >> except what he is doing is running against the system, media is part of the system. it is rigged against him. he is the under dog. they may steal the election from
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us, us versus them. the media is a very good pinata. >> it is. but don't you think the people who agree with him already will vote for him. how many more votes do you add by saying the media is against me, instead of going on -- >> you get the attention off of what has been coming out of his mouth. we're talking about us, instead of talking about what got him in trouble with us in the first place. >> media literacy, they have to recognize and many viewers do recognize that when trump does it, he is using a shield. he is putting up a shield, as you said to distract from the controversies and the question about his staff and things like that. it is almost like a vaccine. when he complains about the media, he is giving himself a vaccine so people won't take seriously the tough coverage of him. >> it does maybe make some of the media say we do have to maybe cover her, go after her a little bit, if it seems overwhelming. >> we have asked him to come on
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the show. she doesn't want to put surrogates on, these are her decisions. >> we should give the trump campaign some credit. paul manafort, katrina per son, clinton spokespeople say no. >> as the press, shouldn't we trump at that, no pun intended, and tell people. that's not fair. we just have access to him more, which we appreciate. and not access to hillary clinton. so isn't that by definition sort of making not a level playing field. >> how many times can you say that. you just said they didn't come on. it is an effective strategy, if you are ahead, the oldest rule in the playbook, you don't make mistakes. they're sitting on the ball when you're away ahead. >> both strategies do a disservice to the voters. donald trump is wasting precious time when it shouldn't matter.
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he should be talking about what matters to the american people. hillary clinton is limiting exposure to her because she doesn't like what's in the news. she is hoping stall. both of those things objectively do a disservice to the voter. >> i agree with that. both of them are making mistakes to the voters, but if you are a clinton, you can understand it. i don't understand his strategy saying i'm against the media. it doesn't add votes for him. >> he told me he likes to whine. whining gets him what he wants. >> even in the "art of the deal" he knows how important the media is to his campaign. but it is unprecedented to have a candidate, a presidential nominee attacking the media the way he is. there is a lot of good reasons for freedom of speech advocates to be concerned about the chilling effect these kind of comments are having. i don't want to take it too seriously -- >> how many presidents, we're not going to give press
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corresponden credentials. >> or escorted to her car because of the concern of the crowd. >> this is unusual. certainly, republicans he sha, especially, thomas jefferson said nothing can be believed in a newspaper. trump is taking it to a whole new level. i would say to a new low. >> bill, the same question i started with with brian. do you think that the press has been fair or unfair to him in chasing everything he says and pursing his every word within an inch of his life and to making it sound -- to questioning his sanity? do you think they've been fair? >> yes, because he has never done this before. he is a new thing for most people. they're examining every aspect of him and some of it is coming out negatively because it appears that way. >> brian, bill, thank you. great to talk to you guys. what is your take on all this. tweet us at new day, or go to
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facebook. there is some horror for families from the nigerian school girls. there is a new video, and what the terrorists want in exchange for the girls release, two years, this has been going on for these families. stay with us. i have asthma...
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we have a grim update for you now. the terror group boca haram, releasing a disturbing video that appears to show the bodies of some of the schoolgirls. they claim they were killed in an air strike. dozens of other girls are still alive, but they appear weak and of course, hopeless. cnn senior international correspondent, has covered this story. what do we know? >> reporter: this was an extraordinarily difficult watch. one can only manl how hearbreaking this was for the parents to watch their daughters, who were falling apart behind this one girl who
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had been chosen to speak on behalf of the whole group. you can see these girls, one by one, start covering their faces, beginning to cry. one girl appeared to be holding a very small baby, and then those horrifying pictures of the aftermath of what they claim is a nigerian government air strike. they deny it. in the video, which we can't show you the specific fames, because they are too horrifying, they are turning over the dead bodies of what appear to be young girls so the camera can capture these do indeed look like teenage girls, and one can only assume to give those who might have known these girls the opportunity to recognize them. it is really an escalation on behalf of this terror group. they are now ratcheting up the stakes for the nigerian government. they're asking for the release of the boca haram militants that are currently in nigerian
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custody, and they make the girl to ask as her fellow abductees unravel behind her. >> help us understand this. why is it taking so long to find these girls? >> reporter: that is the question that i know from so many of the parents, they ask themselves almost everyday, alisyn. why has it taken so long. and the reality is that we know from the fbi, we know from law enforcement agencies that deal with abduction cases on this scale around the world, those few first days are extraordinarily crucial. in those few first hours and those few first days, the then nigerian government did not move. they did not prioritize these girls, and their families. so now two, almost two and a half years later, this trail is very, very cold. but also, and this a lot of the concern that the families have,
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the nigerian government while it says it has been continuing a negotiated settlement like many governments around the world is very concerned about the kind of message this sends. and negotiating with terror groups. they've been pushing forward on a military solution, and that solution has not delivered. for the parents that we've spoken to today -- >> what about the u.s.? is the u.s. offering any sort of significant help? >> reporter: a lot of the fly over-the-intelligence gathering has been american. the reality of the terrain on the ground, realities that the nigerian forces say they know better than anyone else. quite possibly they do. while the americans have been able to help with intelligence gathering, acting on the intelligence has been left in the hands of the nigerian government, and again, when the u.s. and other countries shall, france, the uk, israel, when they made the offers of help, the nigerian government didn't
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accept them. but realistically now, more needs to be done and the nigerians are finally admitting over the last few months that they need more help and want more help. this now is the opportunity for the u.s. to perhaps step in with a greater offer of help, alisyn. >> let's hope this video does get the attention of all of the leaders and decision makers and they can find these girls. thank you for the update. let's get to chris. all right, we're going to take a break ach. a judo master makes history. cala harrison joins us to chat about her big victory and how her incredible story is helping people all over the world. when this busy family... ...got a cracked windshield... ...their dad went to the new safelite-dot-com... ...and scheduled a replacement... ...in just a few clicks. with safelite you don't have to miss a thing. y'all did wonderful! thank you. (girls sing) safelite repair, safelite replace. i study psi'm a fine arts major. being able to pull up different articles to different parts of the screen is so convenient.
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kala harrison making juds doe history and this for the second time. kayla is the second to take back-to-back gold. her tremendous win, hello, champ. how do you feel to be a back-to-back gold judo artist? >> good morning. it feels pretty good. i don't think it has sunk in to be honest, though. >> how did you feel coming into this one, and what do you believe set you apart? >> i felt really good coming
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into the games. i mean, it has been a long four years. a hard four years since london. but i think really what set me apart is my coaches made me train as if i wasn't reining olympic champion. i fought in places i don't even know how to pronounce. if you look at the stats, i fought twice as much as any girl in my division. because of that and going through the grind, i showed up here and knew i didn't want to lose. i had been through too much. >> let's talk about that. a lot of people who don't under marshall arts, people come to it to deal with what is going on in their life, for family, for structure, discipline what role did it play in your life. what did it help you get through? >> well, absolutely, judo, i think has something to offer for everyone. especially for me, i was sexually abused by my first coach, and judo saved my life.
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judo changed my life. it was something that i was able to do and wake up everyday and have a goal and have something to wake up for. and i was able to be surrounded by people who are so positive and so strong, mentally and physically, who raised me to new levels. >> what is your message to victims, when young women hear your story and they come to you and they say i can't say anything, or i was a victim of it? what do you tell them? >> yeah, i think whenever i talk to victims, i just, you know, my message is always that i know it is really hard right now, and i know that you feel completely alone, and isolated and completely hopeless. but i promise you that if you have -- if you can find the courage to say something to anyone, and you can find the courage to someone who will believe in you, then, you know, there is hope and there is some light at the end of the tunnel.
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there is a shiny gold medal maybe even two. >> maybe even two. we've only seen one person do that in judo, and i'm talking to her right now. what do you do now? go to the beach. >> go to the beach. >> no, i'm going to -- yeah. i'm really looking forward to working on my foundation and i'm, you know, i have the rights to the championships for judo, so i'm going to help promote it in the united states, get it attention that i think it really deserv deserves, and for what else, we'll see. >> all right, the foundation work is most important to you obviously. and you want to maintain high profile for it. i will for full disclosure, i am a huge mma fan. i know they're offering you contracts, they've never seen a female fighter of your caliber come into that game. are you considering that?
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>> i mean, it's something i'm definitely going to consider. i have -- i'm still in rio mode. i'm still in olympic champion mode. when i go home i'm going to sit down and make the best decisions for kayla and everything i want to accomplish in my life. if that means get anything a cage, we'll see what happens. but for right now, i'm just going to live in the moment. >> i'll tell you what, the concern will be for the other competitor in terms of how they get out of the cage if you're on the inside of it. congratulations on doing something we have not seen before. the country you've made proud and hopefully you've made yourself proud as well. kayla harrison, we look forward to hearing from you in the future. >> thank you so much. >> thank you, champ. well, it doesn't get any better than that, right. guess what? we've got more good stuff coming up, next.
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get back to great. this week sharpie twelve-packs just three dollars. office depot officemax. gear up for school. gear up for great. the image on the surface book, life. transports you into the world which is our main goal as animators. and you can actually touch the screen... you can't do that on a mac.
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get between you and life's dobeautiful moments.llergens by choosing flonase, you're choosing more complete allergy relief and all the enjoyment that comes along with it. when we breathe in allergens, our bodies react by overproducing 6 key inflammatory substances. most allergy pills only control 1. flonase controls 6. and six is greater than one. with flonase, more complete relief means enjoyment of every beautiful moment. flonase, six is greater than one, changes everything. ♪ today's good stuff comes from hartford, connecticut, where 911 dispatcher got an unusual call for help. listen to this. >> they're calling 911, it is an emergency to them, so it doesn't
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matter if it is small or big. >> so what was it? on the other end of the line, 86-year-old francis royer. her request was not typical for katherine. >> i just wanted to know if somebody was going to take my garbage out tomorrow. it has been there two weeks and it is overloaded. i'm 86 years old, i'm handicapped and i got a heart condition. i have nobody. >> now, as hearbreaking as this is, it is not what 911 is supposed to be about. but katherine saw it differently. she went above and beyond. >> well, i'm not a police officer, but i do have tomorrow off and i can drag your barrel down to the end of your driveway if you would like. >> you can? >> yes. >> where are you? >> at the police department. >> she didn't stop there. after she took out the trash, she helped francis with some other choirs around the house. just some perspective of not
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just what the first responders do, but what people can do. people can do beautiful things. >> we've seen great examples of that today, particularly the guy who rescued the woman and her dog in louisiana, and now this wonderful dispatcher. they are an inspiration to all of us. thanks for watching. time for "newsroom" with carol costello. thanks. "newsroom" starts now. happening now in the "newsroom," donald trump set to layout his strategy to fight isis. >> isis has developed like wildfire under our incompetent president obama. >> and aiming to reset again. >> i said the founder of isis. obviously a big sarcastic. >> i think he was being very serious. he was making a point. >> also, milwaukee on edge. protesters throwin

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