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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  August 21, 2016 11:00pm-1:01am PDT

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morning in turkey. president erdogan blames -- the bomber may have been as young as 12. also ahead, brazil brings the olympics to a close with a fantastic party in rio's maracana stadium. plus, donald trump hints he might back away from one of his signature proposals on immigration. hello, and welcome to our viewers here in the united states, and, of course, all around the world. i'm rosemary church, and this is "cnn newsroom." turkey's president says the
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suicide bombing at a kurdish wedding this weekend was carried out by a child perhaps as young as 12. the blast killed 51 people and wounded dozens. many of the victims were laid to rest sunday. saturday's bombing is the deadliest in a year of terrorist attacks in the country. president erdogan believes isis may be responsible. our senior international correspondent ben weederman joins us now. ben, this is a deadly blast. it's shocking enough, but to learn that the suicide bomber was around 12 yoerz oears old i to fathom. what are we learning about this haen heinous act, and is this the latest for isis? >> we haven't heard any more from turkish president about this bomber. yesterday he said he was -- he or she -- we don't know if it was a boy or a girl between the ages of 12 and 14. he also added it's not clear if
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the bomb -- the bomber was carrying was detonated by them or by remotely by somebody else, but this certainly is reminiscent of some of the tactics that were used by al qaeda in iraq just a few years ago. it may indicate that as the terror organization loses more and more ground in syria, which is only 40 kilometers south of here, they may be switching their tactics, going to more desperate means to spread terror, and certainly terror is what happened at about 10:50 on saturday night when this bomb went off in a very crowded road where people in this kurdish working class neighborhood were having a wedding celebration. there was a band. there was dancing. there were many people, many women and children in the spot where the bomb went off. we don't have precise numbers,
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but all kegs are that the majority of the victims were women and children. of course, if you go to the graveya graveyard, there are many new freshly dug and completed graves. we were there for the burial of one girl, 14 years old, as her extended family, her mother watched as her body was lowered into the grave. people are devastated at this sort of bombing. keep in mind that turkey is suffering from a series of attacks from the pkk, the kurdish workers party. in addition to isis. remember, on the 28th of june that isis launched -- here turkish police have in the past broken up isis cells, but given
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the proximity to syria, the fact that for quite some time the border between turkey and syria was porous. there's no doubt that there remain isis cells in this city. rosemary. >> ben, how are people across turkey reacting to this bombing at such an innocent occasion and what might this mean for how people live they are lives going forward in turkey? >> really this is just the latest in a series of attacks, and people are very much on edge. this is a country which for the last couple of years has seen a series of bombings. last year there is that multiple bombing suicide bombing outside the ankora trade station that left more than 100 people killed. peace activists for the most part. that was also the work of isis. people are worried, and there's a certain amount of anger where,
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so many of the kurds are angry that president erdogan let this situation get to where it is. that he didn't perhaps in their opinion crack down earlier and harder enough -- not hard enough on isis, and there's, for instance, in turkish media some people are complaining of the coverage in this attack and it isn't what it might have been if it had been on a different group of people. not kurds. more wealthy people perhaps in istanbul. . >> we know joining us there just after 9:00 in the morning in turkey. many thanks to you, ben, for bringing us up-to-date on that horrific bombing. >> well, in nearby iraq a local governor says 36 people have been hanged for taking part in a
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massacre that claimed the lives of some is,700 iraqi military recruits two years ago. the executions took place at the prison in nasiriyah on sunday. the victims' families were there along with the justice minister and other officials. the killings have become known as the spiker massacre. troops retook the base from isis last year. before that the victims' families waited a year to find out what happened to their missing loved ones. we're told more executions are expected. a heartbreaking update. a story that's drawn enormous attention around the world. the picture of a little boy covered in dirt and blood dazed after surviving an air strike in aleppo has become the face of horrific war. we have learned his older
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brother, ali, has died from the injuries he suffered in that air strike. for more i'm joined now from amman, jordan. it is, of course, an image that has reminded the woshrld what i happening in aleppo. this time his brother succumbed to his injuries. what more are we learning about the fate of this family? >> well, rosemary, according to rebel officials from aleppo at about 9:00 a.m. local time on saturday the 10-year-old brother of omran succumbed to the wounds he sustained in that air strike on wednesday. he was receiving intensive care, medical care for three days after that air strike and until he passed away on saturday morning. the mother of the two boys remains in critical condition. she's at a field hospital in aleppo where she is also receiving intensive care.
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the rest of the family, ali, omran and his siblings remain in aleppo where that humanitarian situation is -- humanitarian disaster continues, rosemarry, o unfold with the violence and the humanitarian situation in the besieged areas. according to activists on saturday he was not the only child who was killed. at least four others were killed in an air strike in the western aleppo country side. according to the syrian observatory for human rights, they say that 100 children -- ali was the 100th child to die between july 31st and august 20th. really adding to that staggering -- that shocking death toll of more than 4,500 syrian children who have been killed since the start of that uprising in 2011 and the civil
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war that followed just in the province of aleppo. >> those images shocking. they captured the attention of the world. many people saying what's going to be done now? many thanks to you. rio said good-bye. closing ceremony sent the games off with a flourish with all the style and pageantry we've come to expect from rio. fans and athletes gathered in the iconic marakana stadium. the olympic flag now officially belongs to tokyo, host of the 2020 games. christina mcfarland has been in rio since day one. she joins us now live. christina, it's all over now, but how did the closing ceremony compare to the opening ceremony, and what were the highlights everyone is talking about?
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>> well, rosemary, i was lucky enough to go to both the owning and closing tonight. i think the difference was that the opening ceremony felt rather more like a formal affair. there was a sense of anticipation and tension almost at what was to come for these games, but tonight while the closing ceremony, it was just one big party. a celebration that brazil has managed to deliver an olympic games with success. i think in the back drop is the fact that brazil took away their best ever medal tally count at these games. 19 medals. it was an extra special party. some of the stand-outs of the night was just the music, the color, the sheer spectacle of what they had on show this evening, and i think it was great to see the athletes themselves enjoying it every bit as much as the crowd. even though it was absolutely hammering down with rain. they were having a party. simone biles was carrying the u.s.'s flag, and she kept getting stopped every two minutes by other athletes wanting to have their picture
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taken with her, taking selfies. i think hands down the big talking point of the night came not from brazil, actually, but from japan. the japanese prime minister shinzo abe during the ceremonial handover from rio 2016 to tokyo 2020 arriving in the middle of the marakana popping up in the middle dressed head to toe as super mario, the well known video game character. no one was expecting it, and it really got a standing ovation from the crowd and gave us a tantalizing look ahead to what we can expect in four years time. as i say, just a riot of color. so many samba dancers. i believe there were 14 -- 12 carnivale queens at the end to round off the night, and everyone was dancing in the aisles. it was a spectacular party. >> yeah, absolutely. so what is everyone saying about the rio olympics overall after a pretty tough start? there were some incredible moments, of course, and you mentioned many of them, but what were some of your favorites?
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>> well, it does feel a long tile ago now, doesn't it, ro rosemary, that we were reporting on the doping scandal that dominated the buildup and the reaction of the crowds here to that, and we have the green pool. who can forget that? many organizational problems as well with the athletes village and the australian accommodations setting fire. everyone here was fully aware of what rio and brazil were up against when they were hosting these games. the economical, the political back drop and the turmoil. i think the feeling now is one of celebration. as i say, they managed to pull it off. my moments that will stay with me -- there were two, in fact. i was getting to see usain bolt and experience the triple-triple and see hig magnituki his magni stadium and then rugby seven, which was a new sport here, and the sheer unbridled joy from their country. it just proves that the olympics, you know, is not just about the big nations and the medal tally, but it's about the small ones as well and giving them a platform to shine.
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>> absolutely. and you have done a great job. it is just after 3:00 in the morning there in rio in front of the copacabana beach. i'm sure you won't miss those hours. we have another hour with you. stick around. thank you so much. >> thanks, rosemary. >> here's how the medal table looks at the end of the games. the u.s. finish with a huge lead at the top bringing in 121 total medals. great britain set a new national record for medals and held off china to take second. russia fought all the way back to number four despite losing nearly one-third of its team in a doping scandal, and germany ro rounded out the top five. well, south america's first olympic games went more shomooty than many people feared in the months leading up to them. for the most part focus stayed on the competition, but there was drama on the sidelines. we look back on all the highs and lows of a memorable games.
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>> reporter: the rio olympics was far from perfect. empty seats suggesting a lack of interest. heart breaking boxes and judges dismissed for debatable scoring. troubled waters that will turned uncontrollably green, and american swimmers disgracefully out of their depth. >> a guy pulled out his gun. he cocked it, put it to my forehead. >> i overexaggerated that story. >> but there was so much more. >>ates dream come true, and i am definitely very happy i cam back for one more. >> we bowed to a legend in the pool and crowned an immortal on the track. michael phelps and usain bolt signed off. we may never see their likes again. >> you can do it the right way. that's been important. >> katie ledecky crushed the field, finishing half a pool ahead of the best in the world. another 19-year-old simone biles took the sport of gymnastics to unimaginable new heights with four golds each.
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these are the stars of now and of the future. >> we're just all so happy and excited. >> we might be seeing you in four years? >> yes. >> it's about much more than simply winning. groundbreaking achievement, unconditional inclusion acceptance. the sheer joy of the refugee team in action was humbling. >> it was really incredible for me. >> she became homohope for a lot of people. >> for a new olympic nation kosovo's first ever gold medal was heart warming. >> it's such a historical moment. not just for sport of kosovo, but for kosovo as a country. >> reporter: and the brazilian who rose from the slums of rio to stand on top of the podium. a powerful symbol of hope. this was the games where athletes found a voice as olympic bosses ditherred. >> athletes have had their last straw. we're going to make changes in the doping world. >> with the war simmering in the pool lily king became a poster
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child. >> i have so much -- everybody is smiling. >> reporter: there was dignity at these olympics. if you get knocked down, don't just get back up again, but help your opponent out too. >> that was another experience in me. i feel like that was god's spirit in me. i know it was. >> reporter: rio has their problems, and the olympics can't clear them all. perhaps we've been shown the way. a global community helping a lending hand to those lagging behind. the games still inspire. the games do still matter. don, cnn, rio. >> some truly awesome moments there. now that the olympics in rio are over, we are looking ahead to the games in tokyo. after the break, we go inside a philippine jail as the war on drugs puts more people behind bars.
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>> this jail is so crowded that the guards tell me every single step is used as a place to sleep. >> and donald trump may be revising a controversial position. what his campaign manager says. that's still to come. stay with us. t-mobile's coverage is unstoppable. we doubled our lte coverage. and, with extended range lte, it reaches farther than ever. now you can stream video and music free in more places without using any of your data. from skylines to coastlines, out in the country, deep in the city. we got you covered. 311 million americans and counting. and we won't stop. come see why t-mobile is #1 in customer satisfaction. tempur-pedic mattresses is that they contour to your body. i just have to lay back in my tempur-pedic and it just kind of forms to my body. it comes up to you like, "hey, there you are!"
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>> the philippines has just wrapped up a hearing on the series of anti-drug deaths in the country where, more than 650 police killings have taken place since the president took office in late june. days before the united nations criticized his administration for its tactics. now the philippines' foreign minister is reviewing the foreign policy, the united nations after a threat on the president on sunday. >> i do not want to -- but maybe we just have to decide to separate from the united nations. what were you here the last time? never. except to criticize.
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>> the president's war on drugs has caused a spike in the number of inmates in the country's jails. senior international correspondent ivan watson takes us inside one of the most overcrowded facilities. >> this is a performance being staged for us at the jail in the philippines capital manila. we've been invited here to take a look at some of the exercises that this very overcrowded detention center performs every day with its inmates. it's built to house around 800 people. there are more than 4,000 incarcerated here awaiting trial. take a look. >> now we're going to take a
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look at the conditions that the inmates here are living in it. sir, this is one of the cells. come on in here. excuse me. sorry. there's barely room to walk here. take a look at these incredibly crowded conditions. 85 adult males living in -- sleeping in this small room. tuberculosis is in this. there are people currently living in isolation. the jail is so crowded that the guards tell me every single step is used as a place to sleep. hard to believe this jail is now accepting as many as 30 new
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prisoners a day. that's because the philippines new president launched a deadly war on drugs since its start a month and a half ago, police have arrested more than 9,200. the additional detainees brought here in the last seven weeks are now facing drug charges. >> as we're leaving, i want to finish with one astounding statistic. at any one time there are only 20 guards between the outside gate and the interior that are on duty for a population of more than 4,000 detainees. ivan watson, cnn, reporting from the city jail in manila. donald trump may be backing away from his hard line stance on deporting millions of undocumented immigrants in the
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u.s. the republican presidential nominee met with the hispanic advisory council over the weekend. buzzfeed reports trump said he wanted a humane and efficient way to work with undocumented immigrants. buzz feed interpreted that as a path toward legalizing some of them. dana bash asked his nigh campaign manager about whether trump will revise his position. >> well, let me play something from what mr. trump has said previously. listen to what he said back in november. >> you have a deportation force, and you may -- >> ripped out of their homes? how? >> they're going back where they came. if they came from a certain country, they're going to be brought back to that country. that's the way it's supposed to be. >> does donald trump still support that, a deportation force removing the 11 million or so undocumented immigrants? >> what he wants -- if you go back to his convention speech, what he supports is to make sure
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we enforce the law, that we are respectful of those americans who are looking for well-paying jobs, and that we are fair and humane for those that live among under the circumstances in this country. as the weeks unfold, he will lay out the specifics of that plan that he would implement as president of the united states. >> will that plan include a deportation force, the kind that he just -- you just heard in that soundbyte and that he talked about during the republican primaries? >> to be determined. >> well, the campaign of democratic rival hillary clinton dismissed the possibility of a change in trump's position. meanwhile, the clinton campaign is aaddressing calls for the clinton foundation to stop accepting foreign donations immediately. the foundation has said it will ban such donations if hillary clinton wins the white house. it has been scrutiny of access to clinton through the foundation. campaign manager robbie -- smoke
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with dana bash. >> if this is the right policy now, why not do it now? why wait until the idea of her being president? why not do it when she is running for president? >> well, the foundation is doing an enormous amount of work, and it takes time when you are in a number of countries around the world to retool, refocus the mission, and adapt. as you said, they received a great deal of funding through the streams, and it will just take some time for them to readjust. >> recent e-mail disclosures from clinton's top aides have added questions about ties between the foundation and the state department while clinton was secretary of state. the rio gimz are names are e past, and tokyo has taken the olympic flag for 2020. ahead, a look at the plans so far. plus, canada's indigenous communities are hit hard by sex trafficking. what police are doing to help
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welcome back. i'm rosemary church. want to update you on the main stories we've been following this hour. turkey's president says the suicide bomber who struck a wedding party in southern turkey saturday night may have been as young as 12. 51 people were killed and dozens were wounded. most of the victims were buried sunday. president erdogan says isis is the prime suspect in the blast. rio has bid farewell to the olympics after more than two weeks of competition. the closing ceremony brought fans and athletes together one last time in marakana stadium, but it's on to tokyo now for the 2020 games. japan's prime minister and
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tokyo's first female governor were in rio for the handover of the summer olympic games to tokyo. will ripley has more on the olympic planning. will, japan's prime minister shinzo abe stole the show at the closing ceremony at the rio games dressed as super mario. marking the passing of the torch too tokyo in the 2020 summit games. what can we expect four years from now? >> well, if the prime minister dressed like super mario is any indication, it could be an exciting tokyo 2020 games, rosemarrros rosemary. most japanese didn't get to see it on television live because the closing ceremonies were right during the morning commute here in tokyo as i atyphoon was approaching. people were probably running for cover with their umbrellas to stay dry as opposed to stopping and watching the ceremony on a lot of big screens throughout the city. i will tell you, people are, of course, looking forward to the
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showcase on japan. japanese technology and innovation. this is expected to be one of the most futuristic olympics ever really with a lot of new technology that could be unveiled, including super fast bullet trains, instant translator -- translation technology, robots doing everything from driving your taxi to giving you directions. there are also serious concerns about how japan is going to be paying for this. the multibillion dollar price tag has continued to grow. they had to throw out the first stadium design one because there was a controversy over how it looked, and also because it was just going so far over budget. two of the previous tokyo governors had to resign over funding scandals, and so i asked one of the executive directors just a short time ago this afternoon if tokyo 2020 has bounced back from all of that? zbloorj we are very much looking forward to tokyo 2020 and with
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that positive wind back behind us, we are going to make the most -- games ever. p. >> you know, one interesting thing, rosemary. tokyo in japan in general is putting a lot of focus on the infrastructure that they are building for the paralympic games as well because this is a country with an aging society. a shrinking work force, and the average age continues to rise dramatically, and so the paralympic facilities will be a great use far after the games for senior citizens who will be using those facilities as well. >> that's interesting because a lot of the problems for a lot of these countries that host the games, the amount of money that they spent e spend. whether there's any future use of the structures. i did want to go back to this problem, thisle chaening, that's trying to keep everything under budget because really the cost has been enormous, and people
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there in japan are angry about that, aren't they? >> the public debt of japan is twice the size of this economy. there's still an expensive i'm going. fukushima cleanup effort underway. people's salaries have been stagnant. the economy has been in the doldrums for many years. people are looking at the price tag. you know, the olympic stadium alone amounting to billions of dollars and just wondering why does it have to be this expensive? even with japan reusing some of the summer olympic infrastructure for 1964 from the summer games here in tokyo back then, still the costs are enormous. she's basically like an accountant trying to get the costs rnld control. >> i'm sure it is probably the biggest challenge right now. will ripley reporting to us from
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tokyo. many thanks. an update on the catastrophic flooding in in the u.s. louisiana now. more than 60,000 homes have been damaged. many people are returning to find there's just not much left. paolo sandoval has more. >> this is where the kitchen was right here. the water got up to about two and a half foot in the house. >> step through the door in the city of gonzalez, and you'll see what hundreds of homes in southern louisiana look like today. a bare interior stripped of any comforts of home. >> we had to gut everything totally in the house. >> he only saved what he and his son could carry out as the water approached his doorstep last monday. most of it was left behind and had to be discarded and now sits soaked on the front lawn. >> it happened fast. it's sad. you do what you got to do.
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>> la blanc saved his family and the irreplaceable things. >> i said we don't need to get that. i felt bad the next day. because i didn't want it destroyed. i said i'm going back. i don't care how deep it is. to get her things that she wanted. >> this is a damn shame. >> la blanc used his cell phone to capture that return home along with his son. >> i didn't even remember because of all the trauma that was going on. ♪ happy birthday to you, to you ♪ >> there was time for a brief celebration amid the heart break, though. >> i actually sang happy birthday to him while we were standing in the water in the house. >> dad fashioned a makeshift cake out of whipped cream and a few cookies. like many of the families on his block, says la blanc has help
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from friends, neighbors, and co-workers. >> i'm living in my camper. meteorologist karen mcginnis is here with us. it's heart breaking to see what people are dealing with, and it's just extraordinary. talk to us about the weather going forward and what is happening with some of this water, where it can go to dissipate. >> it really can't go anywhere. it's like in a bowl. the ground is so saturated. a lot of the really heavy rainfall that we saw earlier where they saw almost a year's worth of rainfall in a very short period of time over a period of a couple of days, well, that's just settling in. a lot of this is just actually going to have to make its way to
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other areas. it was really 1,000 year rainfall. let's see what we can expect. this is kiech a short range computer model. here's where most of the moisture is. just widely scattered isolated storms. nothing significant. until we look at the three to five day outlook. here you can see a little bit of a bull's-eye, but nothing significant. on the order of making it two, three inches of rainfall, there could be locally heavier amounts. i say that because when you need time to recoup, recover, and get their resources back together, just any kind of nuisance rainfall is going to be problematic. people are still sifting through their, you know, belongings and trying to figure things out there. we saw about 30 inches of rainfall or about 1,200 millimeters of precipitation, and you heard earlier about the tropical system that was moving across tokyo. well, yes, it's made landfall.
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winds supporting this at 95 kilometers an hour, but it's probably weakening. it's not looking very impressive on the satellite imagery, but what will be impressive is that we will see staggering rainfall totals here on the order of maybe 200 millimeters. now, the ground is already saturated. mudslides, landslides certainly a possibility. zbloonchts canada's indigenous women are frequent victims of the sex trade. how one community is addressing the crisis. that's still to come. do stay with us.
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>> all this week the cnn freedom project explores the problem of sex trafficking in canada's indigenous communities. indigenous women frequently become victims of the trade, and in winnipeg an elite police unit has adopted new tactics to come to their aid. paula newton has the story. >> there's this guy talking to her. >> about 3:00, 4:00 in the morning i'll see them out here. >> a lot of the people here, they struggle with many different things.
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>> we will see older men just sitting in cars idling. >> nobody wants to be out here doing what they have to do. >> come here. how are you doing? >> good. >> reporter: words of comfort and support. they echo most nights through the streets of winnipeg. >> did you sleep yesterday? >> yeah. >> reporter: debbie is a community outreach worker. >> we'll see you later. >> you want a ride home or anything? no? you okay. you need anything else? >> reporter: herb is a police detective, part of an elite unit trying to counter sexual exploitation and human trafficking. >> there is our regular route. we drive in this area and the other areas that have high levels of exploitation. >> they are both leading a transformation, a new way to fight human trafficking. the approach firstly focused on victims and most of the ones they need here come from canada's minority indigenous
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community. >> two females on the south side of notre dame. they're walking westbound. they're going to be at the crosswalk shortly. >> we ride along with detective chapco, and we observe as undercover officers meet with two women they believe could be trafficking victims. >> passenger door is closed, and they are going to be heading westbound. >> what's different here than in past years. the intent. they are not out to prosecute, but to protect trying to understand how and why these women are being sexually exploited. >> it's the misconception that a lot of people have is that, you know, they want to be out there, but they truly don't want to be out there. it's -- >> they don't have a choice. >> they don't have a choice. >> law enforcement officials acknowledge a history of bias and racism that prevented police on the streets from truly understanding how and why indigenous women are vulnerable and at risk. >> there is bias in the police
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service. we recognized it that there's implicit bias. we certainly have taken steps to try to address that in a myriad of ways. we have a team that's dedicated just to outreach, just to being out there and trying to get to know who is out on the street. trying to establish a relationship with them. >> lots of kits for tonight. hopefully it will be a busy night. >> reporter: to do that they've teamed with community workers like devin. once a trafficking victim herself, she explains outreach is neither quick nor simple. >> we are controlled by our traffickers. a lot of people call them their boyfriends or drug dealers, says and, you know, you owe money. you have a choice. you get beaten or killed or go out and work. >> we have about 68 kids that are missing this morning. >> the new approach on the streets of winnipeg is supported by the government. jennifer richardson runs
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manitoba's strategy to battle exploitation and trafficking of children. crucially the provincial government has committed more than $10 million canadian dollars each year to fund it. a huge sum for a population of only about one million people. this groundbreaking endeavor focuses on prevention, intervention, and legislation while trying to tackle the issue of why indigenous people, small minority of the population, represent more than three-quarters of all human trafficking victims in manitoba. both independent and government studies have detailed poverty, addiction, family violence, and sexual abuse as key factors. >> when you look at the context of their environment and what is going on in the sex trade, the level of violence, the level of drugs, it's almost like mental terrorism. the kids are just acting out what they're engaged in. >> they've been terrorized? >> right.
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>> back with detective chapco, we learn the two young women they have approached are indigenous. police will now follow-up with social agencies. >> okay. copy that. >> and that's what's different and revolutionary about the approach here in manitoba. a first in canada, it uses targeted funds, and also words, deeds, and training to help fight human trafficking in a whole new way that prioritizes the needs of victims. >> be safe. . i overpack...
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jamaican sprinter usain bolt is the fastest man ever electronically timed and quite possibly one of the greatest athletes to have ever lived. his legacy is secure after another sterling performance in rio. don riddell looks back on the lightning bolt. >> on the greatest stage in the world of sport, usain bolt has been the biggest star. the olympic games has never seen anything like it. total domination in the marquee sprint events for three consecutive games. some more modest athletes might play it down, but not the man
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himself. >> awesome. that's my word. that's my one word i always use. awesome. he's been rewriting the record books since sweeping the 100, 200 and sprint relay events in beijing. bolt repeated in london and again here in rio, signing off his olympic career with an unprecedented triple-triple. it's unlikely we'll ever see his like again. >> usain bolt is the greatest track and field athlete of all time. >> i can't think of another athlete since mauuhammad ali th has so captured the public attention. >> for the nine gold medals bolt won at his last three olympics, he was on the track for a total of less than two minutes, transcending his support to become a global icon and a national hero in his beloved jamaica. >> truly humbling to be here and
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be present for this moment. it's a true honor to see him run. >> he has really lifted the sport and has brought all these people here, all these, the world has seen that you can do it the right way. >> words can't express. especially since we know it's his last olympics, it was great to be here and see history made. >> in a troubled era for athletics, usain bolt has become its shining light. ruthlessly crushing his rivals laughing all the way to the finish line. >> absolute game changer. we just talked about the attendance coming to the track. he has brought faces, fans, he's truly, i mean, a legend in the making, but, you know, i'm so grateful for that and what he's doing for the sport. athletics as a whole. >> tonight we've seen usain bolt write another page of history in his remarkable olympic career. but now it's over. he says he'll retire after the world championships next year.
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he will celebrate his 30th birthday this sunday knowing that he is the greatest. it is a title that will likely never be surpassed. and make no mistake, he will be profoundly missed. >> certainly will. don riddell there. thanks for your company. i'll be back after the break with more news from all around the world. i'm rosemary church. this is cnn. calling all go-getters. all providers. all self-motivated self-starters. drive with uber and put a dollar sign in front of your odometer. like this guy. technically i'm a cook. sign up here. drive a few hours a day. make $300 a week. actually it's a little bit more than that. that's extra buy-you-stuff money. or buy-them-stuff money. calling all early risers, nine-to-fivers and night owls. with uber-a little drive goes a long way. start earning this week. go to uber.com/drivenow
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anger and mourning in turkey after a suicide bomber kills 51 people at a wedding. and president erdogan says the bomber may have been as young as 12. also ahead, a spectacular ending to the summer games in rio. a look back at some of the highs and lows. plus, donald trump thinks he might back away from one of his signature proposals on immigration. hello and welcome to our viewers in the united states and all around the world. i'm rosemary church, and this is "cnn newsroom." turkey's president says the
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suicide bombing at a kurdish wedding saturday was carried out by a child. perhaps as young as 12. the blast killed 51 people and wounded dozens. many of the victims were laid to rest on sunday. the bombing is the deadliest in a year of terrorist attacks in the country. president erdogan believes isis may be responsible. joining us now from ghaziantep is senior international correspondent ben wedeman. the news that this bombing could very well have been carried out by a child has shocked the world. what more do we know about this, and can we expect more of this type of tactic from isis? >> well, consider this. we've just learned from a turkish official, rosemary, that of the 51 victims so far in this bombing, 22 are under the age of 14. there are a lot of children in that area. there was a wedding party going
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on. the streets were crammed with people. now the turkish president tayen recep erdogan, is saying that the bomber, they believe, was between the ages of 12 and 14. we don't know at this point if it was a girl or a boy. there's no information beyond that. now turkish investigators did find pieces of the suicide vest on the scene. it's not clear whether -- n this is also in the words of the president -- whether the bomber detonated the bomb himself or herself or it was done remotely. but this is reminiscent of what we saw, for instance, in iraq when al qaeda and mesopotamia was doing similar bombings. and keep in mind that isis has a group called the cubs of the caliphate. these are young boys basically being indoctrinated and trained
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to fight. we're talking about children. some of them under the age of 10 being trained to fight and act as suicide bombers. so this is not without precedent. in fact, there are reports from iraq that in the city of kirkuk, a similarly young suicide bomber attacked there. but in that case with far fewer victims. this is a tactic that is not new, although every time you hear about it, it is shocking. rosemary? >> it certainly is. and, ben, give us an idea of whether this attack and the ones that have come before it are changing security in any way across the country and how people are approaching the way they live their lives now. >> well, certainly security has been ramped up. in fact, we were going to istanbul international airport yesterday. on the 28th of june, 44 people were killed in an isis attack.
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and there was a very long line of cars waiting to go in. they're being checked. the security has been ramped up, but many people certainly here in ghaziantep feel that security is still lacking. there's still complaints the border between turkey and syria and, of course, the syrian border is just 40 kilometers south of here. is not tight enough. there aren't enough controls. and the problem is there are already isis cells working in turkey. we saw them at work at the airport in june in istanbul. we saw them perhaps at work here in ghaziantep. over the last few months, turkish police have broken up isis cells, but there are certainly many more they haven't. rosemary? >> ben wedeman bringing us up to date on the situation there of that shocking blast that may have involved a child suicide bomber. talking to us there from
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ghaziantep in turkey just after 10:00 in the morning. on a much brighter note, brazil showed the world a stylish finish to the olympics. the closing ceremony was every bit as flamboyant as we've come to expect from rio. fans and athletes gathered in the iconic maracana stadium. there's still one last flourish left to wrap things up. they'll host a victory parade later monday. with the games over, here's now how the medal count finished. the u.s. ended with a huge lead at the top bringing in 121 total medals. great britain set a new national record for medals and held off china to take second. russia was at number four, despite losing nearly one-third of its athletes to a doping
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scandal. and germany rounded out the top five. all right. christina macfarlane has been in rio tracking everything since day one. and she joins us now live. of course, doing such a great job. so christine, it's all over now. how did the closing ceremony compare to the opening ceremony, do you think? and let's talk about some of the highlights, the ones that everyone else is talking about. >> rosemary, i can't believe it's all come to an end. i was lucky enough to witness it in the maracana earlier this evening. and if the opening ceremony was a bit more formal, a bit more sort of nervous tension for what was to come here in brazil, the backdrop of all the political and economic problems that they have been suffering, the closing party tonight was definitely more of a samba celebration. there were people dancing in the aisles. a colorful riot of music and dances and it was just fantastic
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to witness. i think some of the standout moments for me was in the pouring rain, and it really has been biblical here this evening, seeing the athletes coming in, the parade of nations and just enjoying themselves. taking selfies with one another. holding the -- bearing the flags, of course. the athlete who was most popular of the night was simone biles, the usa gymnast who set this alight. she caused a hold-up on the walk because so many athletes wanted their picture with her. the standout moment came from japan when the ceremonial hand-over took place between rio 2016 and tokyo 2020. the prime minister of japan shinzo abe stood up in the middle of the american maracana as super mario and took off the mask to reveal himself to the
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crowd. it was completely unexpected and gave us a hint to what we can expect from tokyo in four years time. the only disappointing aspect of this closing ceremony was that it was about half empty. about 60% full. it's a problem we've seen in these games. maybe the rain keeping people away. it really was very heavy indeed tonight. but the party still going on long into the night. and a real celebration that brazil has achieved something here that they didn't think they would get to this point delivering a largely successful olympic games. >> i think they certainly surprised everyone, didn't they? let's take a closer look at some of those success stories. the big winners in terms of medals. the ones to remember. >> well, you mentioned the medal count there earlier on. obviously team usa far and away the most successful nation of these games, as we thought they would, of course 1. 121 medals. their best showing except for 1984.
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we had the soviet boycott. now hardly surprising they have three of the best athletes on their side, michael phelps, simone biles and katie ledecky. swimming was their most successful event. great britain have been one of the surprise packages of these games finishing in second. after 2012 we expected their medal tally to drop, not go up. they've exceeded london by some six medals. they finished on 67 and ahead of china as well. china really underperforming, the worst performance they've had in two decades. the biggest crowd pleaser here and delight for the home crowd has been how well brazil have done here. they finished with another medal on sunday in the volleyball with the men. we could hear people cheering on the streets. they finished with 19 medals in total. a very special moment for brazil to round the games off that way. >> yes, certainly. and you have done a spectacular
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job, too. christina macfarlane joining us from rio. 4:00 in the morning. you've kept us all company, those of us who keep these ungodly hours. many thanks on a job well done. as the dust settles, organizers are calling the rio games a success. they were never even as close to being as disaster as critics warned before they began but they didn't lack controversy. our don riddell looks at the highs and lows of rio. >> the rio olympics was far from perfect. empty seats suggesting a lack of interest. heartbroken boxes and judges dismissed for debatable scoring. troubled waters that turned uncontrollably green and american swimmers disgracefully au out of their depth. >> the guy pulled out his gun. cocked it, put it to my forehead. >> i overexaggerated that story. >> reporter: but there was so much more. >> it's a dream come true. and i am definitely very happy i
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came back for one more. >> reporter: we bowed to a legend in the pool and crowned an importal on the track. michael phelps and usain bolt signed off in rio. we may never see their likes again. >> the world has seen you can do it the right way. >> reporter: katie ledecky crushed the field, finishing half a pool ahead of the best in the world. another 19-year-old simone biles took gymnastics to unimaginable new heights with four goalsgold each, these are the stars of now and the future. >> we're so happy and excited. >> might be seeing you in four years? >> yes. >> but it's about much more than simply winning. ground-breaking achievement. unconditional inclusion, the sheer joy of the refugee team in action was humbling. >> really incredible for me. >> she became hope for a lot of people. >> reporter: kosovo's first ever gold medal was heartwarming. >> such an historical moment.
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not just for sport of kosovo, but for kosovo as a country. >> reporter: and the brazilian judoku who rose from the slums of rio to stand on top of the podium. a powerful symbol of hope. the level playing field was demanded. >> we're going to make some real changes in the doping world. >> reporter: america's lilly king became a poster child for clean sport but her russian opponent conveyed a love for her training home of five years, of all places, america. >> everybody is smiling. >> if you get knocked down, don't just get back up again but help your opponent out, too. >> that's was another spirit in me. i feel like that was god's spirit in me. i know it was. >> reporter: rio still has its problems and the olympics couldn't possibly cure them all. perhaps the games have shown us the way.
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the global community pushing each other and lending a helping hand to those lagging behind. the games still inspire. the games do still matter. don riddell, cnn, rio. >> a job well done there. we'll take a very short break, but still to come, donald trump may be revising one of his more controversial positions. what his campaign manager says. and after the break, we go inside a packed jail in the philippines to show you the consequences of the president's war on drugs there. >> this jail is so crowded that the guards tell me every single step is used as a place to sleep. one day a rider made a decision. the decision to ride on and save money. he decided to save money by switching his motorcycle insurance to geico.
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donald trump may be back away from his hard line stance on deporting millions of undocumented immigrants in the u.s. the republican presidential nominee met with the hispanic advisory counsel over the weekend. buzzfeed reports trump said he wanted a humane and efficient way to work with undocumented
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immigrants. buzzfeed interpreted that as a path toward legalizing some of them. dana bash asked his new campaign manager about whether trump will revise his position. >> let me play something from what mr. trump has said previously. listen to what he said back in november. >> i'm going to have a deportation force. you'll do it humanely -- >> will they get ripped out of their homes? >> they're going back where they came. if they came from a certain country they'll go back to a certain country. that's the way it's supposed to be. >> does trump still support that? a deportation force removing the 11 million or so undocumented immigrants? >> what he supports, and if you go back to his convention speech is to make sure we enforce the law, that we are respectful of those americans who are looking for well-paying jobs, and that we are fair and humane for those who live among us in this country. and as the weeks unfold, he will
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lay out the specifics of that plan that he would implement as president of the united states. >> will that plan include a deportation force, the kind that he just -- you just heard in that sound bite and that he talked about during the republican primaries. >> to be determined. >> the campaign of democratic rival hillary clinton dismissed the possibility of a change in trump's position. meanwhile, the clinton campaign is addressing calls for the clinton foundation to stop accepting foreign and corporate donations immediately. the foundation has said it will ban such donations if hillary clinton wins the white house. there has been increasing scrutiny of access to clinton through the foundation. campaign manager robbie mook spoke with dana bash. >> but if this is the right policy now, why not do it now? why wait until the idea of her being president? why not do it when she's running
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for president? >> well, the foundation is doing an enormous amount of work, and it takes time when you're in a number of countries around the world to retool, refocus the mission and adapt, as you said. they receive a great deal of funding through these streams, and it will just take some time for them to readjust. >> recent e-mail disclosures from clinton's top aides have added to questions about the ties between the foundation and the state department while clinton was secretary of state. louisiana's governor says donald trump's visit to his state was helpful in focusing attention on the devastating flooding in baton rouge. president obama came under fire for not interrupting his vacation, but the governor had told the white house to hold off on a visit. dana bash has more on the history of presidents work following them on vacation. >> having a great time, as always.
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>> reporter: for presidents, even being on vacation doesn't necessarily mean get away. after historic flooding hit louisiana this week, the baton rouge newspaper "the advocate" demanded president obama break his annual trip to martha's vineyard to visit the victims. >> i got you. >> reporter: they seized the moment. the white house announced later that day that obama plans to visit on tuesday. >> morning, everybody. >> reporter: he's hardly the only president to resist pressure to interrupt his time away from the white house. president bush decided to stay on his texas ranch as hurricane katrina made landfall in 2005. a decision he later told oprah winfrey he regretted. >> i shouldn't have flown over and looked. i made a mistake. i should have landed.
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the problem is that when the president lands, resources are taken off the taskatand. i didn't realize a picture of me looking out would look like i didn't give a darn. >> reporter: of course, a president is commander in chief no matter his location. it's a point presidential press secretaries have been making ever since teddy roosevelt made the working vacation the norm by relocating most of the without staff to his summer home in oyster bay, new york. the press corps has been chasing presidents on summer vacations ever since from eisenhower on the links of augusta national to jfk on his sailboat at the kennedy compound in hyannis. nancy reagan defended her husband's frequent visits to their santa barbara ranch by arguing presidents don't get vacations. they just get a change of scenery. and nixon said escaping washington kept him from being isolated from the reality of american life. >> hope you have a great summer. >> reporter: as president obama was reminded this week, the
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realities of politics never go away. even when you're at the beach. dana bash, cnn, washington. the philippine' foreign minister says the country has no intention to leave the united nations. the organization recently criticized president duterte's administration for its anti-drug tactics. more than 650 police killings have taken place since mr. duterte took office in late june. the president responded to the criticism with an insult and a threat. >> i do not want to insult you. but maybe we'll just have to decide to separate from the united nations. when were you here the last time? never. never. except to criticize. >> the president's war on drugs is throwing thousands of suspects behind bars. senior international
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correspondent ivan watson shows us how the jails are bursting at the seams. ♪ >> reporter: this is a performance being staged for us at the kazon city jail in the philippines capital manila. we've been invited here to take a look at some of the exercises this very overcrowded detention center performs every day with its inmates. it's built to house around 800 people. there are more than 4,000 incarcerated here. awaiting trial. take a look. ♪ now we'll look at the conditions that the inmates here are living in. sir, this is one of the cells?
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>> yeah. >> come on in here. excuse me. sorry. there's barely room to walk here. take a look at these incredibly crowded conditions. 85 adult males living in -- sleeping in this small room. tuberculosis is in this jail facility. there's a separate tuberculosis ward where there are more than 70 patients currently living in isolation. this jail is so crowded that the guards tell me every single step is used as a place to sleep. ♪ hard to believe this jail is now accepting as many as 30 new prisoners a day. that's because the philippines' new president rodrigo duterte launched a deadly war on drugs. since its start a month and a
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half ago, police have arrested 9200 suspects. almost all the detainees here are facing drug charges. i want to finish with one astounding statistic. at any one time, there are only 20 guards between the outside gate and the interior that are on duty for a population of more than 4,000 detainees. ivan watson, cnn, reporting from the kazon city jail in manila. a sad update to the story of amron. the brave little syrian boy who survived an air strike on his home, the latest on amran and his family still to come. plus, devastated residents in the u.s. state of louisiana are returning to what's left of their homes. we will take you to the flood zone in just a moment.
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a warm welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and, of course, all around the world. i'm rosemary church. want to update you on the main stories we've been following. the olympics have come to an end in rio. fans and athletes packed into the iconic maracana stadium. the city officially handed off to tokyo, host of the 2020 summer games. donald trump may revise his hard line stance on deporting undocumented immigrants in the u.s. the republican presidential nominee reportedly said he wanted a humane and efficient
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way to work with undocumented immigrants. his new campaign manager says his position is to be determined. a turkish official says at least 22 of the 51 people killed in a terror attack on a wedding saturday were younger than 14. turkey's president says the suicide bomber may have been as young as 12. most of the victims were buried sunday. the president says isis is the prime suspect. the more than 60,000 homes have been damaged in the catastrophic flooding that's engulfed parts of southern louisiana. residents are now returning home to sift through what remains of their belongings. but for many, there's just not much left. cnn's paolo sandoval has more from the flood zone. >> this is where the kitchen was right here. the water got up to about 2 1/2 foot in the house. >> reporter: stepped through his
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door in gonzalez and you'll see what hundreds of homes in southern louisiana look like today. a bare interior stripped of any comforts of home. >> we had to gut everything totally in the house. >> reporter: leblanc only saved what he and his son alec could carry out as the water approached this doorstep last monday. most was left behind had to be discarded and sits soaked on the front lawn. >> it happened fast. and it's sad. you do what you got to do. we saved a lot. we -- thanks to him and my brother. they put everything as high as they could. >> reporter: leblanc saved his family and the small irreplaceable items, including his mother-in-law's albums. >> her stuff she kept in this blue tote. i said we need to get that. so i felt bad the next day. because i didn't want it destroyed. and i said i'm going back.
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i don't care how deep it is to get the things that she wanted. >> this is a damn shame. >> reporter: leblanc used his cell phone to capture that return home along with his son. >> i didn't even remember it was his birthday because of all the trauma that was going on. ♪ happy birthday to you >> reporter: there was time for a brief celebration amid the heartbreak, though. >> i sang "happy birthday" to him while standing in the water in the house. >> reporter: dad fashioned a cake out of whipped cream and a few cookies. he has help from friends, neighbors and co-workers. >> i'm living in my camp, and it's going to be rough for the next two months, but, you know, all of us are safe. we're alive. >> reporter: even with those helping hands, he says it will be weeks, perhaps months before he turns his house into a home again. paolo sandoval, cnn, ascension parish, louisiana. and meteorologist karen maginnis joins us.
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these are tough stories to tell. of course there is more bad weather ahead. maybe not as bad as they've seen, but the biggest problem of all as we talked about last hour is the water being able to dissipate, and it can't at this point. >> it's like a basin. and that's why every time we see any kind of tropical system there, we know it's going to take some time for it to drain because there's no place for it to go. louisiana is so beautiful, but this precipitation was so staggering in the scope. let's show you what we expect over the next 24 to 48 hours. there you can see just some isolated showers and storms expected as we go into the next 6 to 12 hours. most of that moisture is going to be over in texas. just a few isolated storms in louisiana. but as we look more towards that five-day precipitation outlook, there you can see right around baton rouge. these are computer models. they do change but overall the pattern is there's going to be a
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weather system that's quasi stationary. we'll expect that wet weather. how much? computer models are saying one to three inches. now it's not necessarily going to be in those same hard-hit areas, but it's going to be sprinkled about. and for people trying to get their lives together, this is just going to be insult to injury there. now let's talk about our latest mindulle, the system impacting tokyo. it's already made landfall. we could see mud or landslides because the ground gets so saturated so quickly here. in the forecast, we draw it toward the north and northeast at 20 kilometers per hour. it's moving quickly. still the wind damage that could be associated with this. this is the second storm. there's another one well to the south of japan. but that one is so erratic. and it's moving to the southwest. it's moving to the southeast. here's some of the rainfall totals we're looking at over the past 24 hours.
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generally speaking, 100 to about 175 millimeters. those were some of the common amounts we have seen. and across europe, the warmth is back on. paris bumped up and then their temperature came down. this is about ten days ago or so. but look at the forecast in paris coming up. we go from wednesday to thursday and those temperatures in the mid-30s. this is really troubling because we probably thought the best part of summer was over. we were going to transition more toward a fallish pattern. no, that's not in store for paris at least. >> and the problem is there's not a lot of air conditioning in some places. so it can be stifling. all right. many thanks, karen, as always. now to the latest in a tragic story that's drawn enormous attention from around the world. the little boy pictured covered in dirt and blood, dazed after surviving an air strike in
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aleppo has become the new face of suffering in syria. and we've learned that his older brother ali has died from the injuries he suffered in that air strike. for more i'm joined in amman, jordan. first, it was the image of omran and then of his brother. both images reminding the world of what's happening in aleppo. what more are we learning about this family, and how likely is it that these images could trigger perhaps some sort of action from the international community? >> well, rosemary, according to local officials, rebel officials, they say that ali daqneesh, the 10-year-old brother of omran died early saturday morning in aleppo as a result of the wounds he sustained in that air strike on wednesday. for three days, he remained in critical condition and was receiving medical care. but finally, he lost his life on saturday morning. now this family that has lost so
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much, that is recovering, that is mourning, they remain in aleppo. n the mother of the two boys remains in critical condition. we understand she's in an intensive care unit in a field hospital in aleppo. and according to activists, he was -- ali was not the only child who was killed in aleppo in that violence that has been escalating. on saturday, according to activists, four other children, at least, were killed in another air strike in the western countryside of aleppo. that death of ali daqneesh, he was the 100th child, according to figures by the syrian observatory for human rights that keeps track of casualties in the syrian conflict. he was the 100th death so far this month between july 31st and august 20th. really adding to that horrific death toll of at least 4,500 children who have been killed in aleppo province alone since the start of the uprising in 2011
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and the civil war that followed. and as you mentioned, there's a lot of -- there was some hope amongst activists and aid workers that this image of omran, the story of this one family that is a snapshot of what life is like in aleppo, in besieged areas of syria's largest city. that this could refocus the world's attention on the syrian conflict, especially the situation inside aleppo that is being described as one of the most devastating conflicts of modern times with the international committee of the red cross warning that the city is on the brink of a humanitarian disaster. there was this hope that maybe possibly this would refocus the world's attention, try and basically bring back all parties to work harder to try and achieve some sort of a cease-fire there to bring in the much-needed humanitarian aid that so far, for weeks now, has not reached these besieged
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areas. and the concern is that this could be just an image that brings back the world's attention just for a short time and then people will forget about this conflict again. >> that is the big concern. just horrifying what is happening in aleppo. many thanks. bringing us up to date from amman, jordan, where it is 10:40 in the morning. women of the indigenous community in canada frequently fall victim to sex trafficking. what police are doing to tackle the problem. that is coming up in a special "cnn freedom project" report. the rio games are in the books. and tokyo has the olympic flag for 2020. a look at the plans so far. that's ahead. stay with us.
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all this week, the "cnn freedom project" explores the problem of sex trafficking in canada's indigenous communities. canadian native women frequently become victims of the trade. and a local government is adopting new tactics to help fight the problem. our paula newton has more from winnipeg. >> there's this guy talking to her. >> about 3:00, 4:00 in the morning, i'll see them out here. >> a lot of the people here struggle with many different things. >> you'll see older men sitting in cars idling. >> nobody wants to be out here doing what they have to do. >> come here. how are you doing? >> good. >> words of comfort and support. they echo most nights through the streets of winnipeg. >> did you sleep yesterday?
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>> debbie is a community outreach worker. >> be safe. see you later. >> you want a ride home? you okay? you need anything else? >> reporter: kurt is a police dctsiv detective, part of an elite unit. >> this is our regular route. we drive in this area and the other areas that have high levels of exploitation. >> reporter: they are both leading a transformation. a new way to fight human trafficking. the approach firmly focused on victims and most of the ones they meet here come from canada's minority indigenous community. >> two females on the south side of notre dame. they're walking westbound. they're going to be at the crosswalk shortly. >> reporter: we ride along with detective chapko and observe as undercover officers meet with two women they believe could be trafficking victims. >> passenger door is closed. and they are going to be heading
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westbound. >> reporter: what's different here than past years? the intent. they are not out to prosecute but protect. trying to understand how and why these women are being sexually exploited. >> it's the misconception that a lot of people have is that they want to be out there. but they truly don't want to be out there. >> they don't have a choice? >> they don't have a choice. >> reporter: law enforcement officials say a bias of racism that prevented them from understanding how and why indigenous women are vulnerable and at risk. >> there is bias in the police service. we recognize there's implicit bias. we certainly have taken steps to try to address that in a myriad of ways. we have a team that's dedicated just to outreach. just to being out there and trying to get to know who is out on the street. trying to establish a relationship with them. >> lots of kits for tonight.
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hopefully it will be a busy night. >> reporter: to do that they've teamed with community workers. once a trafficking victim herself, she explains outreach is neither quick nor simple. >> we're controlled by, you know, our traffickers. a lot of people call them their boyfriends or drug dealers. and, you know, you owe money. you have a choice. you get beaten or killed or you go out and work. >> we'll get started. i think we have about 68 kids missing this morning. >> reporter: the new approach on the streets of winnipeg is supported by the government. jennifer richardson runs manitoba's strategy to combat sexual exploitation and sex trafficking of children. crucially, the provincial government has committed more than 10 million canadian dollars each year to fund it. a huge sum for a population of only about a million people. this groundbreaking endeavor focuses on prevention,
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intervention and legislation while trying to tackle the issue of why indigenous people, a small minority of the population, represent more than three-quarters of all human trafficking victims in manitoba. both independent and government studies have detailed poverty, addiction, family violence and sexual abuse as key factors. >> when you look at the context of their environments and what is going on in the sex trade, the level of violence, the level of drugs, it's almost like mental terrorism. the kids are just acting out what they are engaged in. >> and they've been terrorized? >> right. >> reporter: back with detective chapko, we learned the two youngle. they've approached are indigenous. police will now follow up with social agencies. >> okay. copy that. >> reporter: and that's what's different and revolutionary about the approach in manitoba. a first in canada, it uses targeted funds but also words, deeds and training to help fight
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human trafficking in a whole new way that prioritizes the needs of victims. >> be safe. >> reporter: paula newton, cnn, winnipeg. we'll take a break right here. still to come, the summer olympics in rio are over. but we will look ahead to the games in tokyo. back in just a moment with a live report. bounce back like... ...it used to? neutrogena® hydro boost water gel. instantly quenches skin to keep it... ...supple and hydrated... ...day... ...after day. with hydrating hyaluronic acid, which retains up to 1000 times its weight... ...in water. this refreshing water gel... plumps skin cells with intense hydration and locks it in. for supple, hydrated skin that bounces back. hydro boost... from neutrogena®. see what's possible.
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the closing ceremony lit up rio for one last night as the summer olympics began a four-year break. but some special guests from around the world may have been the biggest highlight. japan's prime minister and tokyo's first female governor were in rio for the handover of the olympic games. will ripley joins us with more on the olympic planning. will shinzo abe certainly stole the show dressed as super mario. tell us about that and what we can expect from the 2020 games in tokyo? >> i think that certainly does help set the tone for what japan is hoping to accomplish in tokyo 2020.
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they want a moment the world will be talking about, in a good way. we saw and japan saw as well how brazil had real troubles in the lead-up to the summer games. tokyo 2020 has had its own troubles as well. when they won the bid three years ago, a time of excitement and a time when japan needed a comeback after the disasters of 2011 that killed so many and rattled this country but also years of economic stagnation before that. this is supposed to be a turn around but there was massive overspending concerns. the first olympic stadium design was scrapped and thrown out because, in part, it was way over budget. also controversy over how it looked. there has been a bribery investigation. there was a plagiarism allegation about the original 2020 logo. they scrapped that one and came up with a new one. i asked the newly elected governor, the first female governor of tokyo, if she is ready to handle all of those
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challenges, not to mention the massive overspending. >> the cost of running the 2020 tokyo olympics and paralympics is so enormous, and the -- it's still very hard to find out the reason why this cost is so enormous. so i'm checking out the -- which facility cost this much and then another cost -- i mean gymnasium center, which may cost enormous as well. so i'm checking just like accountant. >> yuriko koike, the first female governor who won 3 million votes here in tokyo and wore a traditional kimono as she officially accepted the flag in the handover ceremony from rio to tokyo as the next host of the summer olympics. but she was upstaged a bit by the prime minister shinzo abe.
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whoever convinced him to dress up like super mario and got the prime minister to do that, i'd like to meet that person and wond ering how they did that. >> sometimes those things can backfire. you can never be sure how it's going to turn out. certainly it's got everyone talking. will ripley joining us live from tokyo. i'm rosemary church. "early start" is next for our viewers in north america. for everyone else, stay tuned for more news with hannah jones in london. you have yourself a great day. . . listerine® kills 99% of bad breath germs. this is 100% useful for a 100% fresh mouth.
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is donald trump ready to make the biggest policy reversal of his campaign? trump may be edging away from a deportation force. what his campaign manager said to fan the flames. and parts of louisiana still desperate for help more than a week after devastating floods. now president obama is preparing to head to the region, but some say it is too late. and the games of the xxxi olympiad come to a close in

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