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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  August 27, 2016 1:00am-3:01am PDT

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saying good-bye. a day of mourning is happening in italy after a deadly earthquake takes the lives of 281 people. marathon talks. u.s. secretary of state john kerry and his russian counterpart saying they are close to a cease-fire in syria more than five years after a civil war. five minutes. that's how long donald trump's doctor took to sign off on his medical form. welcome to our viewers here in the united states and around the
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world. i'm george howell. cnn "newsroom" starts right now. 4:00 a a.m. on the u.s. east coast. in just about 90 minutes time in italy, a state funeral is set to begin for some of the victims of wednesday's powerful earthquake in the central part of that nation. you're looking at live images this hour. it is 10:01 there where you see the service is about to start. 281 people were killed. rescuers there are hoping to find more survivors trapped in the rubble. but as each day passes, that hope is fading fast. in the meantime, thousands of people are living in camps until the civil protection agency can find them housing. cnn's atika is live at the state funeral where this is happening. if you could just tell us what is happening right now. >> reporter: that's right.
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i'm just near the gymnasium where that funeral will be taking place. scouts and police have formed a corridor for family to enter the gymnasium. that is where many of the coffins have been laid out, along with flowers. a total of 49 people died in this part of the earthquake affected area. so these are tiny villages that were completely reduced to rubble. and communities here are still gripping with that shock. so
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o test test test. test test test. test test test. into had
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. usair craft did strike but the nonsyrian boots on the ground are turkish. officials hearsay one of the goals of this operation is to set up a terror-free zone, in effect a buffer zone, to ensure the safety of turkish citizens living along the border. this is the wall that separates turkey from syria. for turkish forces as syria descended into an ever more brutal and complicated civil war. now turkish forces have crossed that wall and, in a sense, crossed the rubico into a war that it may be difficult to get out of. ben, thank you. after nearly 10 hours of talks in geneva, u.s. secretary of state john kerry said the u.s. and russia are close to reaching a cease-fire agreement but said
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washington will not rush into a deal with moscow. more now from matthew chance. >> reporter: after marathon talks, russia and the united states were unable to reach a final agreement. both sides reported progress on that front. the u.s. secretary of state john kerry he had long and productive talks with his russian counterpart sergei lavrov. he said he had received clarity on most steps towards renewing a syrian truce. the russian foreign minister said the two had made a number of steps forward and discussed ways of addressing humanitarian situation in syria, including aleppo, which was at the center of their discussions. russia and the united states are on the opposite sides of the war, with moscow a strong backer of bashar al assad, and washington calling on him to step down. but they have a common enemy in
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isis and other jihadist groups. and talks have been focusing on how to cooperate. for instance, in the sharing of battle field intelligence. there's also been talk of russia pressuring the syrian government to end air strikes on densely populated areas. those discussions we're told are still continuing. matthew chance, cnn, moscow. matthew, thank you. the next goal is to liberate the city of mosul, isis defacto capital. senior international correspondent arwa damon shows us how much life is is already changing for those of us no longer under isis control. >> reporter: this is the main road going through the town of on gayarra, liberated 24 hours ago from isis. he came out and he was waving
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his flag he said the iraqi people were told to come out waving white flags. so i just asked if he was afraid when the explosion ises happened. yes, of course, he was. isis was using them as human shields. another father was clutching his 2-year-old baby. he said that isis fighters were shooting from his front door at the iraqi security forces. there was incoming mortar fire. and he just remembers grabbing his 2-year-old, not being able to see anything, and making a run for it out the back door. we also met daud who is over here. daud was telling us how under isis -- and this may seem like something simple. but they weren't allowed to wear
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shorts. and the adults that we're seeing here are all newly clean shaven. because under isis they had to grow long beards. that is the simplest, most basics of the hardships people were going through. one little girl who was talk building how her father was strung from one of these posts for three days, accused of on collaborating with the coalit n coalition. you see the thick, black smoke. that is because the oil fields that isis had set on fire, they are still ablaze. people we met, this has been going on the last six or seven months. a number of them did lose their loved ones because of isis's brutal rule. all of them said they would have fled they could but isis would not allow them to do so.
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isis separated men from the women and the children. people were confined to their homes. it was the country's counterterrorism unit. you see one of the humvees coming down the road right now. some flashing the victory sign that moved in in the operation to liberate qayyara. even though this is considered a success, and it is a very significant victory for the iraqi security forces, people were saying the town itself can be rebuilt. but that they lost in terms of lives, that is something that will will never be restored. arwa damon, cnn, qayyara. bangladesh's national police chief said a ringleader killed.
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armed militants stormed the cafe in july, killing 21 people, including 18 foreign nationals. isis claimed responsibility is. bangladesh blame a homegrown islamist group. >> still ahead, allegations of bigotry and racism have become key attack lines in the race for the white house. the candidates's latest attacks coming up. >> pro-trump governor leaves an expletive-filled voice mail. what he said to that person when we come back. i knew in my gut with a little surprise. ancestry helped give me a sense of identity.
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a flash flood emergency was issued for the kentucky city, missouri metro region overnight as heavy rain hit that area. and our meteorologist derrick van damme is here to talk about it. >> there have been 10 rescue attempts at least in the kansas city metro region alone from rescuers and authorities trying to get to stranded people on tops of vehicles.
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we have compelling video to show you just how it is. this is nighttime in the united states. the true scope of the flooding won't be known until the sun comes up around 7:00 this morning. but look at this, george. authorities going from car to car to car. that car likely was pushed into a tree or a telephone pole. remember, it only takes about two and a half feet or two feet roughly of rushing water to pick up an entire suv and move it downstream. you can see just how much water was filling the streets of kansas city on the overnight period there. here's the reason why. let's get into the latest radar imagery across this area. we're live from cnn headquarters. what you're looking at is a 12-hour radar loop for the kansas city region. the good news is that the flash
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flood warnings have been lifted for the kansas city metro area. however, there's still receding water in the urban areas of on kansas city, basically the speier metro region. there are flash flood warnings on interstate 435 that surrounds the city center. but what you're looking at here is the radar estimated rainfalls. there have been localized seven inches of rain. maybe that doesn't sound like a lot. but the thing is this happened in such a short period of time. water seeks its own level. it filled up the tributaries in this area. and the sewage and the drainage system can't cope in such a short period of time. that's why we saw the water rise so quickly. flash flood emergencies issued. thankfully the rain has come to an end. it appears they will have a
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drying trend through the rest of the day today, being saturday. really, that was scary moments for many of the residents there in that very populated part of the united states. i want to take you to the western pacific. pause we're also keeping our eye on typhoon lionrock. the joint typhoon warning center just issued a stronger storm, well, at least indicated this storm has strengthened from 165 kilometer miles per hour winds to 170. that's 110 for our domestic viewers. that makes it a strong for our atlantic hurricane equivalent. this is a storm we will monitor as it could make a north westerly turn towards tokyo monday, tuesday, wednesday of next week. >> derrick, thank you. we'll stay in touch with you. a story we're following in the u.s. state of mississippi. a man has been charged with
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capital murder in the deaths of two nuns. he was a person of interesting early on in this investigation. authorities found the nuns dead at their homes after they didn't show up for work. people who knew the sisters described them as outgoing and compassionate. officials have not released the motive in the killings. in the race for the white house, accusations of bigotry and racism. on friday, tim kaine told a crowd in florida that donald trump promotes values of the white extremist group the ku klux klan. >> donald trump is their candidate because donald trump is pussing their values. ku klux klan values. >> reince priebus condemned his comments saying the following. tim kaine sunk to new lows.
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no matter how desperate he is to distract from his running mate hillary clinton's litany of corruption scandals, there is no excuse for these vial and baseless smears. >> in the meantime, donald trump firing back saying he believes hillary clinton is a bigot. jim acosta has more on the latest attacks. >> reporter: the battle between donald trump and hillary clinton is shaping up to be a race to the bottom. and the bottom is nowhere in sight when it comes to their clash over race. >> they are often the kinds of kids called center predatories. >> he reminded the use of their term super predator. >> that is when she supported the crime bill in the '90s. stpwrr trump is is trying to bowl is sister her case that she is a bigot, an accusation he
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defensed to anderson cooper. >> she is a bigot. she has been extremely bad of african-americans. >> and dislike or hate is is at the core of that? >> or maybe she's lazy. >> reporter: earlier he claimed his immigration policy is is softening. now, not so much. >> i don't think it's a softening. people have said it is a hardening. >> reporter: he appears to have abandoned a proposal this week to allow them to stay in the u.s. if they pay back taxes. >> there is no path to citizenship unless they leave the country and come back. >> you can return home. and if you would like to go stand in line like everybody else is, the thing we learned in kindergarten, stand in line, wait turn. >> reporter: hillary clinton's
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message is it's trump who is the racist. >> the schools are no good. you have no jobs. >> look at my african-american over here. >> reporter: clinton warns to the nation trump will always be trump. >> he has built his campaign on prejudice and paranoia. and it's deeply disturbing that he is taking hate groups that lived in the dark regions of the internet making them mainstream, helping a radical fringe take over the republican party. >> reporter: trump is denying those allegations. >> do you want white supremacists to vote for you? >> no. i don't at all. not at all. >> when democratic policies fail, they are left with only this one tired argument. you're racist, you're racist, you're racist. >> reporter: so far top republicans haven't raced to
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defend trump. >> they're on recess. they're on vacation. it's august. >> reporter: stephen bannon was once charged with domestic violence 20 years ago. it involved his ex-wife and was later dropped. a bannon spokesperson said the bottom line is he has a great relationship with his children, the twins. he has a great relationship with the ex-wife. he still supports them. >> cnn's jim acosta reporting for us. jim, we appreciate that. and another tactic has been to raise questions about hillary clinton's health. he says he wrote in a rush. dr. harold bernstein wrote a note and he declared donald trump would be the healthiest individual ever elected to the presidency. bornstein tells nbc news he tried to write the note as fast as he could but still stands by
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his assessment. >> i get rushed, and i get anxious when i get rushed. this is governor paul le page. i would like to talk to you about your comments. i want to talk to you. i want to prove that i'm a racist. i've spent my life helping black people and you little son of a
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pitch socialist. i need you to (inaudible) i want you to record this and make it public because i'm after you. thank you. >> mr. le page there. he's also known for his very loose style. he's a vocal supporter of donald trump. he made comments in the past that 90 plus percent of drug dealers are black or his panic. he spoke on friday and said he didn't even call le page a racist. >> it was pretty shock to go get that voice mail yesterday. i've never received a voice mail like that before. you know, it's -- you know, this is a governor, as you pointed out, who continues to cross the line. every time you think he can't go
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any further, but then he draws a different line and crosses it. >> that is governor le page caught on tape. you're watching cnn "newsroom". >> still ahead, a setback for advocates of a controversial ban on burkinis in france. whether one town can stop the women from wearing the full suit in public. technology... say, have you seen all the amazing technology in geico's mobile app? mobile app? look. electronic id cards, emergency roadside service, i can even submit a claim. wow... yep, geico's mobile app works like a charm. geico. expect great savings and a whole lot more.
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welcome back to our viewers in the united states and arounded world. sit good to have you with us. i'm george howell. the headlines this hour,
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saturday is national day of mourning for the victims of the powerful earthquake that hit italy. the earthquake killed at least 281 people so far and has injured 400 others. u.s. secretary of state john kerry said the u.s. and russia are close to reaching a syrian cease-fire agreement but still have some issues to work out. they will finalize details in geneva. in syrian, an evacuation deal is giving hundreds of rebel fighters safe passage out of the besieged area of damascus. syrian government forces battle opposition fighters there. >> in brazil, the federal police are recommending charges against
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the former president da silva and his wife for money laundering and passive corruption. it is up to prosecutors now whether they will pursue charges with a judge. the allegations are tied to the corruption investigation into state-run oil companies, petrobus. and a ban on on burkini. on friday, a court ruling does not affect all the town but it could be a setback. more from bittermann. >> reporter: the mayor issued a decree forbidding any kind of beach wear that was suggestive of religious affiliation.
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he said it could lead to a disturbance in the public order. the court ruled that he had overstepped his bounds essentially. that a mayor couldn't rule on his own. that's kind of a decision would have to be made at a national level. the question now is whether the other communities, who have enacted similar decrees, and there are 30 of them, whether they will see this as jurisprudence and say we're not going to try to enact and enforce our bans or whether they will try to test this even further. the court made it clear that anybody who is fined under the l law, the decree, can challenge the mayor and bring countersuits. the other mayors may think it is too much and back down or they may continue to test it. politically, this is an issue that the political parties moving ahead to an election in 2017 have taken this on, especially the center right and
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far right parties. and have suggested they would enact a burkini ban across the country perhaps in the next legislative session. jim, thank you. the brazilian senate is set to announce president rousseff's impeachment trial. she denies all wrongdoing, saying the investigation is is just an attempt to get her out of power. if she is ousted, the interim president would take over until the next election, which will be held in 2018. ukrainian armed forces are testing a new guided precision missile. officials say it has a range of up to 300 kilometers and can use ava right of warheads. publicized missile tests are not typical of peacetime affairs
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there, but ukraine's case is somewhat unique. a cease-fire has been in effect for a year and a half, but the truce remains in name only. >> reporter: one front line of a war still ravaging a country and destroying lives. a year and a half after all sides promised a cease-fire. where would ukrainian soldiers be in the country's east as they try to hold a position against pro-russian forces. >> that's incoming fire slamming into the walls of this shed. the people hearsay this is what it is like every single day. they're not lobbing stuff at each other, they are trying to move forward and take each other's territory. >> the captain tells us we must now run. this short dash for fire draws fire.
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we shelter in the remains of another devastated building. the source of the incoming fire is very close. so your enemy is out that way? >> yes. this way. >> 100 meters away? >> yes. yes. >> the pause in the shooting allows us to move forward. we cross more open ground between old buildings. this industrial site is a fiercely contested prize. ukrainian forces say they have lost 10 men here in the last month, and there are casualties every take. the captain wants us to show one of the positions they're being attacked from. a tall, tower-like building. so close we could stroll there in less than a minute.
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at that moment the fighting picks up. there's incoming fire from several directions. there is now fighting during the day every day. more than that, it's in the evening. 4:00. like clock work, this tpweupbs. >> he said the pro russian forces move forward from here, they could keep going and take any city in ukraine. from relative safety we listened
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to the noise of war. until it gets too close. mortars land just outside. they have punched through this building before. bullets whistle around our team during the final round of safety. this is what a cease-fire looks like in eastern ukraine. phil black, cnn. phil black, thank you. tunisia has a new unity government. how a nonconfidence led to the change at the top of the north after an country, next. plus, more horror for aleppo. a barrel bomb attack kills children in the devastated syrian city.
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how it has become a death trap for many people.
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welcome back to cnn "newsroom". i'm george howell. the tunisian parliament voted in a new government on friday. the national unity party won with over 75% support. tunisia's president appointed him in early august after a no confidence vote ousted the former prime minister in july. people in the syrian city of aleppo are mourning victims of a barrel bomb attack. many attacks after 15 people, including children, died in them. we're about to show you disturbing images of the aftermath. they are almost unbearable to watch. but we feel it is important for the world to understand the extent of what is happening in syria. residents dug frantically to
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look for loved ones buried in the rubble. these pictures show wounded children, coated in dust. barrel bombs are crude, imprecise weapons, packed with nails and other shrapnel, all to maximize carnage. mothers and fathers whose children didn't survive face the unimaginable prospect of having to bury their babies. more of the aftermath from aleppo. we warn you the content, the graphics, the images are hard to watch. >> reporter: this is my son hassan. he's gone, she says. she wants a last picture with her son. what follows is pain and anguish that doesn't even need to be translated. once again, she tries to wake 12-year-old hassan up.
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this is one mother. more than 100 children have been killed this month alone. reports say two barrel bombs dropped by the regime on this besieged rebel-held area of aleppo killed women and children. no comment from the regime. as rescue workers search for wounded and lifeless bodies, this distraught man sobs. don't step on them, he said. there are children underneath the rubble. these scenes a little over a week after an image surfaced and captured the world's attention and some would hope would force a cease-fire in aleppo, even if just for 48 hours to get
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desperately needed humanitarian aid in. >> that has taken more time frankly than i thought was needed. i thought everybody would help us make it happen. we're very hopeful that it will only be a very short time until we can roll and we can help the people of -- long-suffering people of aleppo. >> the syrian state is news agency is reporting eight deaths in the regime held part of aleppo. the people of aleppo stuck in this death trap where living one day doesn't mean surviving the next. despite the turmoil in his homeland, one syrian refugee has reason to hope. residents of his adoptive canadian town rallied to help
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him build a chocolate business after the one he lost. he named it peace by chocolate. >> how sweet sit when a dream comes true. once a desperate refugee, he had this proud chocolatier opens his new factory, a tiny but tasty enterprise. he now feels he has truly arrived. work is life. whenever you go out, whenever you work, you will have interactions with your community as well as you will have your skills. >> long before his new life here, he was a successful chocolate maker in damascus in syria. he had a large factory employing
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30 people, shipping his treats all over the middle east. then it was all destroyed in the war. he came to canada battered but not beaten. his dream to continue his life's work. his adopted community helped making it happen. buying his chocolates at every turn. at the local market, through special order. >> it is a caring, loving community. >> they built his little building and he donated to the fort mcmurray fire victims. he may know little english. but the fruits of his labor, his chocolates leave people almost speechless. >> this is like a small is community, small town, you know, in this province. but people here have so many big hearts.
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so we feel that our duty now is to start this process of turning back
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welcome back to cnn "newsroom". i'm george howell. a scientist in israel simulated a black hole inside his laboratory. what he created confirms a 42-year-old theory by physicist stephen hawking and could win a nobel prize for hawking.
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cosmic black holes have is enormous destructive powers to consume entire worlds. jeff steinhauer constructed this in his la be in israel. >> i saw a phenomenon. and i thought these atoms must be traveling at supersonic speed. >> that was 2009. unlike enter stellar, the black hole is one-tenth of a military and lasts two-tenths of a second. he first uses mirrors and lasers to chill the atoms close to absolute zero, creating a called a bose einstein stream. it enters a vacuum and the laser triggers the black hole. the edge of the black hole is
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known as the event horizon. >> this is on outside of the black hole. >> exactly. >> we have the event horizon right in the middle. >> yes. >> and everything that's a bit lighter this way is inside the black hole. >> exactly. >> what jeff observed next excites him. confirming a 42-year-old theory by renowned physicist stephen hawking. >> it happened spontaneously. that is one of the very interesting aspects of the hawking radiation. the sound wave coming out of the black hole has positive energy and the one following into the black hole has negative energy. >> hawking has yet to comment. he said it isn't like what we see in the movies. how do we know? we have created 4,000 and we're still here. >> it only absorbs sound waves. >> they allow scientists to
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safely study their galactic cousins. >> well, they're both waves. and the equations describing these waves are the same equations in the real black hole and the sonic black hole. so that's how one can test predictions about light waves by studying sound waves. >> this discovery, if confirmed by the scientific community, advances our understanding of the universe. >> probably one of the main reasons one studies black holes is not to learn about black holes themselves but the new laws of physics. in addition, laws of physics often have applications years down the road. no one knows today what they're going to be. >> one more giant leap in unraveling the secrets of the universe. ian lee, cnn, israel. very cool story. ian, thank you. a lot of people may not consider air guitar a real instrument. real or not, you've not to respect the passion.
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this is american matt byrnes. this year he won it all. he finished second the last three years. but he finally broke through and is taking the brand prize home now. but he may not have much use for it, seeing how it is an actual guitar. good on him. thank you for being with us. i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. i'll be back after the break with more. you're watching cnn, the world's news leader. i'm only in my 60's. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans.
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laid to rest. families bid farewell to the victims of wednesday's deadly earthquake as italy declares a national day of mourning. pushing isis out. turkish forcings join with treat syrian army to drive the terror group out of a border town hoping to set up a terror-free zone. plus, another law school isis. iraqi army recaptures qayyara. twk to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell. "cnn newsroom" starts right now.
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5:00 a.m. on the u.s. east coast. it is a national day of mourning right now in italy, as that nation prepares for a state funeral for some of the victims of this week's earthquake. the disaster killed at least 281 people. it has injured close to 400 others. thousands of people are living in camps, their homes have been destroyed. rescue crews are digging through rubble and many towns and villages hoping to find survivors. fred pleitgen is live in amatrice. fred, let's talk about it. every day that passes it becomes a matter of survival for people who may be trapped in that rubble. can you tell us about those efforts by these rescue teams? >> reporter: hi, george. yeah, those rescue efforts are still ongoing even though the rescue teams tell us at this point in time, they have no hopes that people are trapped alive under that rubble. nevertheless, they are, of
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course, still continuing to find people. you know, the big problem they have is the aftershocks here in the region. it's something that is ongoing. every time there's an aftershock in amatrice. those rescue workers need to evacuate the area because the rubble itself starts shifting. it can bury the rescuers underneath. it's a very dangerous thing. the other problem with the aftershocks, the two main access road, the town of amatrice, the worst hard hit in the area. two of those roads have been cut, because aftershocks have destroyed those roads. there's only one access in amatrice. the local mayor says, the town will mostly be cut off by the land. so they can find some other ways to get in there, but it certainly will make things a lot more difficult. nevertheless, as i'm standing here right now, we can see the rescues ongoing.
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we can see them at work, 80 hours after the earthquake happened, it's very difficult to find survivors. attempts are dwindling, george. >> fred, while you're telling us about the situation there in amatrice, we're looking at these live images of the memorial services that are being held. i'd just like to get a sense from you in that community, as people deal with, you know, now many days after this earthquake, how are people coping with so much loss? >> reporter: well, you know, it's a very important question. and it's something that really has devastated a lot of these communities. you have to keep in mind that these are very small towns. these are very close-knit communities. these are people in this town people know everybody. in a place i can am traatrice, e talking about 2,000 inhabitants.
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to see some of these relatives having to watch as their loved ones bodies were taken out of the rubble by these rescue crews. it was certainly something very painful for them. you could see people walking down the streets in this town, traumatized in tears, trying to comprehend the situation. but at the same time, living with that fear that another tremor could happen. there was one that was 5.5 magnitude. so, there's that fear. there's, of course, the great loss that's happened. and then, of course, for a lot of these folks, there's also the material loss as well. a lot of the buildings have been destroyed. a lot of the historic buildings in town, and some of these smaller towns wonder why these places are still viable to live in at all. whether or not they might have to be abandoned. it's a huge loss for the community. obviously, a huge loss for italy. at the same time, i have to say the response time by the italian
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rescues are very important. you see the psychological help and material help as well. >> our senior international correspondent. fred pleitgen live for us on the phone in amatrice. again, we're seeing so much devastation and damage on one side. again, our viewers from around the world seeing memorial services that will soon be held for the many, many people who died. fred, thank you for your reporting. we'll stay in touch, for the people already rescued in various hospitals, the trauma is far from over. atika shubert talking with some of the survivors from this earthquake. >> reporter: a little girl plucked from the rubble alive. rescued 17 hours after the earthquake. many of the victims here were children. enjoying their summer holidays with their families. 4-year-old georgia rinaldi,
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survived because her older sister shielded her from the rubble. sacrificing herself for her little sister. this is the hospital where that little girl pulled out was brought to for treatment. 99 of those injured were brought here. this is where family members wait for word of their loved one, still living the trauma of their ordeal. here, georgia's father is dealing with the survival of one daughter and the loss of another. he is not ready to talk to media. giuseppe was lying in bed with his wife when the earthquake struck. now, he waiting for her to come out of a lengthy surgery. for us, it's the end, he told us. it's a house with so much memories, so much life, we're finished. we're scared. we saw death, we felt it, my wife -- and then he breaks down in tears.
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he said we prayed. the madonna wanted to save us. this 19-year-old was sleeping on the top floor of his family's summer house. his mother in the room next door when the house collapsed. >> my first thought was my mother. my mother is here, but i can't helper. >> reporter: he was buried in rubble. it took an hour for his uncle to find him and dig him out with his bare hands. >> when i came out, i kissed him, and i said to him that he was my life. and but, my thought, i still love my mother, because she passed away she gone now. >> reporter: he survived, but hairline fractures to several vertebrae. his greatest pain is the loss of
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his mother. >> i like this because my mother teach me to be a person like this. >> reporter: be strong. >> be strong, yes. >> reporter: given new live, the devastation of the earthquake are healing slowly. >> coming in a half hour, atika will be back for the start of that state funeral we mentioned a little later in the newscast. in syria some families under siege for nearly four years, they're finally being given a break. sort of a break. house to are given evacuation. hundreds of rebel fighters are leaving in what is a substantial territorial gain for the government.
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meanwhile, turkey is starting to clear militants out of syria near its border. the country insists its country's troops will remain in syria until guaranteed. let's go to nick paton walsh live near the turkey border with syria. nick, let's start talking about the situation there. >> reporter: yes, at this stage, we're learning that evacuation is continuing. troops said to be in the region, about 700 or so, have left on buss to the rebel province of the itlib in the north. they've moved in that direction. they've appeared to find a destination along with their families. the fate of figures there. differing figures, 3,000
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according to the regime or 8,000 were held in that area. a camp effectively run by the regime. obviously, their safety paramount to the u.n. urging great care and evacuation should be voluntary. let's bear in mind, this is the grinding end of an awful siege that lasted four years. people have been reduced to basically eating a broth made out leaves they could find. it was a territorial gain for the regime and possibly a sign that the rebels, frankly, needed the manpower elsewhere. potentially a broader sign of this sign. some pockets of resistance and alliance between the regime is beginning to be ironed out and more sustainable in the long term. it's a big loss, i think, for rebels there, caused by the starvation of many people
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besieged in that area. many of them civilians. i think those who perceive much of this war is down to cruelty of the regime for that regime strategy, george. >> civilians who have been cut off from food and medicine for such a long time. nick, let's also talk about the situation there along the turkey/syria border and turkish troops inside of syria. what more can you tell us about those efforts? and if we have an indication of a time line of how long those troops could be inside this other country? >> reporter: we don't know the number of turkish troops inside of syria. we've seen the same as everyone else has kraucrossing over. the prime minister said they will continue to serve that country until the threat of security is gone. that's indefinite and that is not what turkey said they're embarking upon. but they face not just the
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threat of isis as many do, many say the broader goal which is vehemently being denied is pushing the turkish kurds inside of there. the ppk and the ykg aligned there. focused on the town but deeply controversial because it was taken back backed by the united states, turkish troops focused on that deeply contentious in the retaking by turkish troops. george. >> nick paton walsh live in turkey. nick, thank you for the reporting. we'll stay in touch with you. iraq's big goal is to liberate the city of mosul under isis control and the de facto capital in iraq. the iraqi army just retook al qayyara. arwa damon shows us how life is changes for those already under
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control. >> reporter: this is the main road going through the town of qayyara. this is gashib. [ speaking in foreign language ] he said they told him to come out waving a white flag. isis was using them as human sheels shields. there was another father clutching his 2-year-old baby he said that forces were shooting at his front door. he just remembers grabbing his 2-year-old, not being able to see anything, making it out the back door. we also met dayoud who is over
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here. and he was telling us about how under isis. it may seem like something very simple, but they weren't allowed to wear shorts. and the adults were saying shorts were -- the adults that we're seeing here are all in newly clean shaven, because under isis, they had to grow long beards. the simplest, most basic of the hardship people were going through. there was story after story. one little girl talking about the iraq army, talked about how her father was strung from one of these posts for three days, accused of collaborating with the coalition. you see that thick black smoke. that is because the oil fields around here that isis had set on fire, they're still ablaze. and people who we've met, this has been going on for the last six or seven months. a number of people did lose their loved ones because of
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isis' brutal war. all of them said they would have fled if they could, but isis would not allow them to do so. some of them were telling us how isis separated men from the women and the children. kept people confined to their homes. it was the country's counterterrorism unit. you see one of their humvees coming down the road right now. and some of the other fighters flashing the victory sign that moved in. in the operation to liberate qayyara. even though this is considered a success and it is a significant victory for the iraqi security forces as people here were saying. the town itself can be rebuilt but what they've lost in terms of lives, that is something that will never be restored. arwa adamon, cnn, qayyara, iraq.
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>> a great deal of material and life lost there. but the lives differ now. this is "cnn newsroom." still ahead, donald trump's ever shifting immigration policy has some political watcher, well, scratching their heads. plus flash floods ravage the u.s. state of missouri. we'll have the very latest here. stay with cnn. yay! and take all of his gold! and take all of his gold! ya! and hide it from the crew! ya...? squuuuack, they're all morons anyway! i never said that. they all smell bad too. no! you all smell wonderful! i smell bad! if you're a parrot, you repeat things. it's what you do. if you want to save fifteen percent or more on car insurance, you switch to geico. it's what you do. squuuuack, it's what you do. ♪ it's peyton on sunday ♪ mornings. ♪ e-man! what up, peyt. you know i have directv nfl sunday ticket. i get every game, every sunday. all in hd.
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america's choice 2016. donald trump appears to be sending mixed messages about whether or not he will deport 11 million immigrants living in the u.s. illegally. earlier this week, donald trump and his campaign signaled that he may support a pathway to a legal status for undocumented immigrants living in the u.s. but then, he appeared to walk those comments back with cnn's anderson cooper and then again with fox news, listen. >> my stance is very strong. it's going to remain very strong. there will be no am 234e69ty. there's no legalization. we're going to build a wall. it's going to be a tremendous, powerful wall. we're going to have great technology along with the wall. and we're going to stop people from coming in. day one, we're going to get all of the gang members and gang leaders and drug dealers and all of these people that have illegally crossed and they've been in our country.
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we're going to get them out very, very fast. >> in the meantime, a new headache about the trump campaign details are now surfacing about domestic violence allegations tied to steve bannon. bannon faced multiple charges stemming from an incident involving his former wife. that case was eventually dismissed. a spokesperson for bannon has said he has a, quote, great relationship with both his ex, and their twin daughters. >> we're also hearing from donald trump's doctor harold borenstein. it describe issed the 70-year-old republican as the, quote, healthiest individual ever elected to be the presidency, to ever be elected, if he would be elected. now that doctor tells nbc news that, well, he rushed to write
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it. >> at the end, i get rushed and i get anxious when i get rushed. so i tried to get that on there. it worked out just fine. >> scrutiny of trump's health following his allegations that hillary clinton who is 68 years old doesn't have the stamina to be president. her doctors have written that she is also in good health. in the meantime, clinton's campaign is repeatedly tying donald trump to racism. on friday, clinton's vice presidential pick tim kaine told a crowd in florida that donald trump promotes the values of white supremacists. take a listen. >> he has supporters like david
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duke connected with the clue clu klux klan. they're not our values, and we've got to do all we can to fight to push back and win. >> the republican national committee chairman reince priebus called kaine's comment, quote, vile and bases and have no part in this company. hillary clinton is expected to get her briefing in the coming hours. donald trump received his earlier this month. for a flash flood in the kansas city metro region, it has soaked that part of. our meteorologist derek van dam is here. we saw images before. it looks pretty bad. >> it is. it's been a rough night for residents of the kansas city area. this is by the way, the first time that the national weather service has issued a flash flood emergency for kansas city. i found that out in some of my research. taking a look at the footage, you can see what they're dealing
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with. to say the least, pictures speak a thousand words here. there have been ten swift water rescues that have taken place so far. street car service was suspended. portions of that highway that circumnavigates the entire city was actually shut down. you see rescuers going car to car making sure there is no one stranded in those vehicles. it only takes about a foot and a half to pick up an entire suv and let alone a car and wash it down the road. notice how the thunderstorms continue to move over the kansas city region for a prolonged period of time. we're talking three or four hours that is what is called in the meteorological world the training of thunderstorms. so when they come over a location for a long period of time that's where we get the excessive rainfall totals. by the way, i notice there's some storms developing just to the west over central kansas
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that could bring more rainfall to kansas city. the good news is that the national weather service has lifted the flash flood warnings for the metro area. but look at the excessive rain that did fall across that region. see a little shading in the southern suburbs just south of the metro. they receive anywhere between 7 and 8 inches. the other story we're following here is the potential development of tropical activity, across the whbahamas, of cuba. they have the possibility of a five-day development especially as it crosses florida and the keys. and look at that, a lot of dry air and strong upper level winds so that is not really conducive for a tropical development. which is good news, george, we don't want to see this develop into a full-blown storm or hurricane. but the major threats going forward for southern florida, heavy rains. not a good place to be in
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florida, today and tomorrow. now, to a story about life long friends in canada who made a startling discovery that they've been living were the wrong family for 41 years. cameron macintosh has the story. >> reporter: david spent 41 years thinking his woman was his biological mother. turns out it's this woman, raising leann swanson as her own son. dna now proving the suspicion that the two were switched at birth. both men were born in this federally run hospital in early 1975. three days a part. it's unclear how, but dna has proven that tate's biological mother went home with the wrong baby, swanson. shocking but not entirely surprising. for decades, there have been comments each resembled the
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other's families. >> about 20 years old, people started accusing of us being switched. >> reporter: this discovery last year convinced them to do the test. these two men born in that very same year in that very same hospital discovered they were switched. former cabinet minister eric robertson is helping both sets of men. >> first time it can be discounted as a mistake. the second time, a view it as a criminal activity. >> reporter: today, the federal health minister promised an investigation. >> it's fundamentally important that we understand how this could have happened at the time. >> reporter: for both men and their parents there's a lot of anger and confusion but also a sense that they're now all one big family. >> they would be my mom and dad regardless. raised me from day one. >> that was cdc's cameron macintosh reporting for us. still ahead, we'll go back
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to italy as funerals get under way. ukraine has been under a cease-fire for 18 months now. but they're still fighting on a daily basis there. a view from the ground -- ahead. live in atlanta and across the united states and around the world, you're watching "cnn newsroom." slept... you're not you. tylenol® pm relieves pain and helps you fall fast asleep and stay asleep. we give you a better night. you're a better you all day. tylenol®.
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welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and around the world, you're watching "cnn newsroom." it is good to have you with us. i'm george howell, with the headlines we're following for you this hour. turkey says that it will continue its first major military incursion into syria. the turkish military helped to
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drive isis out of a key border security town. turkey wants to fight the terror group but also prevent kurdish fighters from seizing more territory there. south of mosul, life is changing for the people of qayyara. this week, the iraqi army drove isis out of the town. the u.s. secretary of state john kerry says the u.s. and russia are close to reaching a syrian cease-fire agreement but still have some issues to work out. both sides will try to finalize details while they continue their meetings in geneva. hundreds of thousands of people have died in syria since that war began there, nearly 5 1/2 years ago. a state funeral is just about to get under way in central italy for many of the victims of the devastating earthquake. italy's president and prime minister are also attending. at least 284 people are dead. atika shubert is near the
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gymnasium where the state funeral is taking place and now join uses live. atika, if you could tell us what's happening there and how people are coming together to cope with so much loss. >> reporter: absolute lip. this is the gymnasium closest to the hospital here. is this where 99 of those injured were actually brought. 49 people in the area died in that earthquake. this is heir funeral today. it's a state funeral which means that the italian prime minister is here, matteo renzi is here. and the prime minister is also here. they expect that service to get under way any moment now. as you can see, hundreds of people have come out of the neighboring towns and villages to pay their respects. you can't see it from here. but actually, there's a church just behind here that put up a large tv screen so that people can follow the service as it begins.
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i was quickly inside earlier. and as you can imagine, it's a very sad scene inside. there are three rows of coffins. and each family is clustered around a coffin. each coffin has the name of the deceased taped to it. and there are flowers and often photos of the deceased on the coffin. and what really strikes you is just how many people there are survivors themselves. you can see them wearing casts. broken arms, bandages on their face, on their necks. these are the same people that were pinned down in the earthquake that were coupled with rubble and debris and were pulled out. but in that the same moment, they also lost their loved ones. they're only family members. so it is a very emotional, a very raw moment for so many families inside. and the reason for this funeral today is in many ways for the entire community to come together. to bring some closure to his
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terrible tragic event. many of the families will have their own private funerals afterwards. but this is a way for the entire community to mark it together. george. >> cnn's atika shubert, again, just outside the gymnasium where this state funeral is being held. atika, thank you so much for your reporting. again, as we're looking at those live images there. people are coming together. 281 people killed in this earth quick. many others could be still trapped in the rubble. 400 could be injured from this. that number could go up as well if they are able to find more people in that rubble. we'll continue to follow that state funeral happening in italy. after nearly ten hours of talks in geneva, the u.s. secretary of state john kerry said that they're close a cease-fire fire. cnn's matthew chance has more
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for us. >> reporter: well, after marathon talks in geneva, russia and the united states were apparently unable to reach a final agreement to cooperate in syria, although both sides reported progress on that front secretary of state john kerry said he had long and productive talking with his russian counterpart sergey lavrov. he said he received character on most on the troops. the russian foreign minister said the two had made a number of steps forward and also discussed ways of addressing the humanitarian situation in syria, including aleppo which was at the center of their discussions. russia and united states are on opposite sides of the war in syria, with moscow a strong backer of the syrian president bashar al assad with washington calling them to step down. but they have a common enemy in isis and other jihadist groups
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and folks are talking about how to cooperate for instance sharing in the battlefield in presence. and as the syrian government to end air strikes in densely populated areas. both discussions, we're told, are still continuing, despite the fact that there was no conclusive agreement at these talks. matthew chance, cnn, moscow. the ukrainian-armed forces are testing a new guided precision missile. officials say it has a range of up to 300 kilometers and can use a variety of warheads. publicized missile tests are not typical of peace time. but ukraine's case is somewhat unique. a cease-fire has been in effect there for more than a year and a half. and our phil black shows us, that truce exists in name only. >> reporter: through this gate is one front line of a war still ravaging a country and destroying lives, a year and a half after all sides promised to
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cease-fire. we're with ukraine soldiers in the country's east as they try to hold a position against pro-russian forces. >> that's been coming fast. people here say that this is what it's like every single day. they're not just lobbing stuff at each other. they're trying to move forward and take each other's aterritory. the captain tells we must now run. >> quickly, quickly, quickly. >> reporter: this short dash for cover draws fire. we shelter in the remains of other devastated building. the source of the incoming fire is very close. so your enemy is out that way? >> yes. only 100. >> reporter: 100 meters away? >> yes, yes.
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>> reporter: the pause in the shooting allows us to move forward. we cross more open ground between old buildings. this industrial site say fiercely contested prize. the ukrainian forces say they've lost ten men here in the last month. and there are casualties every day. the captain wants to show us one of the positions they're being attacked from. just there. a tall tower-like building, so close we could stroll there in less than a minute. at that moment, the fighting picks up, there's incoming fire from several directions. there is now fighting during the day every day. but more than that. it's in the evening.
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4:00. like clock work this begins. and it really picks up. why is this position, this territory so important. he says the enemy has already moved beyond the line of control set in the mintz agreement. as forces move forward, they could keep going and take any city in ukraine. from relative position, we lins listen to the movement of the war, unless it gets too close. mortars land just outside. they've punched through this building before. we're going out. ready? we good? chris, we good? >> yep, let's go, let's go, let's go. come on.
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>> reporter: bullets whistle around our team during the final run to safety. this is what a cease-fire looks like in eastern ukraine. phil black, cnn. >> phil black, thank you so much for that reporting. five people are in custody in the killing of a bolivian deputy minister. authorities say that he was kidnapped and beaten to death by miners who tried to negotiate with miner unions. after weeks of protests and strikes, the miners are demanding that they work directly with companies. and they're recommending charges against the friday, they say lua and his wife should be indicted for embezzlement. prosecutors must decide whether to ask a judge for an indictment. suspended brazilian
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president dilma yousef's impeachment trial is under way. the senate will vote on tuesday, but there have already been fireworks. listening there to a shouting match that forced the presiding supreme court justice to suspend the session on thursday. rousseff was suspended in may on corruption allegations, but she said she's done nothing wrong and that her competitors just want her gone and out of the way. if she's voted out, the interim president will finish out her term until 2018. this is "cnn newsroom." ahead, amid heated debates around the world, a french court rules on a town's ban of women wearing burquinis. we'll tell you all about that. plus, 50 years of bloodshed appear to come to end after
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marxist rebels and colombian rebels seem to be coming to an end. stay with us. try zyrtec® for powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin®. because it starts working faster on the first day you take it. try zyrtec®. muddle no more®. hey, it's been crazy with school being back- so we're constantly going over our data limit. oh, well, now - all of our new plans come with no data overages. wow, no more overages? so that means... go on...say it... we'll finally be in control... and we're back... introducing new at&t plans with no data overage charges.
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welcome back to "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell. in france, a french court has ruled that french mayors do not have the right to ban full-length swimsuits worn by muslim women known as burquini's, friday's ruling does not immediately affect all towns with the ban but it could set a precedent. more than 30 french towns have banned the suits. frustration over the burquini ban has boiled over after photos came to surface of police making a woman remove some of her clothing on the beach in nice.
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the tunisian government voted in a new government. the prime minister essid's part. the tunisia appointed him after a no vote ousted the prime minister in july. clolombians have to approve the deal, but they are already celebrating. cnn mpatrick oppmann has this fr us. >> reporter: colombia's president declared that five decades of bloodshed were over. today begins the end of the suffering, the pain and the tragedy of war, he said. from their camps to revolutionary armed forces of colombia known as farc in spanish, battle the government and accused of carrying out
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kidnappings, extortion and drug tracking. the one point, the marxist guerillas controlled an area the size of switzerland. but it forced the farc here. as many of the farc leadership had bounty on their heads cuba was considered neutral territory. wednesday, they had a deal. i assert to that the agreement is the best possible agreement. we all wanted something more but the deal we struck is a viable deal said the chief negotiator. october 2nd, the countries will go to the polls to vote. as part of the deal, they'lle leave the jungles. and admit to the crimes they committed and pay restitution to their victims they might enjoy
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serious jail time. something they insisted on. we are considering going to jail, this farc commander told me. we don't act like a criminal terrorist group. we have a sacred fight. while not perfect, observers say the colombian government got the best possible deal. >> it's the best you can do. i think getting something better than this on the battlefield would have taken many more years or cost thousands or tens of thousands more lives. >> reporter: supporters of the deal are in full campaign mode. while the majority approve the peace process, still after taking 200,000 lives to see the farc leadership walk away free and form a political party, that's a pretty bitter pill to swallow. for many colombians the best opportunity for peace after a half century of war is an opportunity they refuse to let slip away.
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patri patrick oppmann. a family flees and say they're welcome with open arms in germany. we'll have their story. aczone dapsone gel 7.5%. i apply it once a day, any time. aczone gel 7.5% is fda approved for the topical treatment of acne for people 12 years and older. aczone gel is a once-a-day acne treatment with clinically proven results. in clinical trials, acne got better for people using aczone gel in just 12 weeks. aczone gel may cause the serious side effect of methemoglobinemia, which decreases oxygen in your blood. stop taking aczone gel and get medical help right away if your lips, mouth, or nails turn grey or blue. talk to your doctor if you have g6pd deficiency. using benzoyl peroxide with aczone gel may cause skin or facial hair to temporarily turn yellow or orange where applied. common side effects of aczone gel include dryness and itching of treated skin. now, i have less acne to think about because i use aczone gel. you could pay as little as $15 for aczone gel.
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learn more at aczone.com aczone. prescription treatment. proven results. ssoon, she'll be binge-studying. now she writes mostly in emoji. soon, she'll type the best essays in the entire 8th grade. today, the only spanish words he knows are burrito and enchilada. soon, he'll take notes en espanol. get back to great with the right gear. from the place with the experts. office depot officemax. gear up for school. gear up for great. ♪ it's peyton on sunday ♪ mornings. ♪ e-man! what up, peyt. you know i have directv nfl sunday ticket. i get every game, every sunday. all in hd. yeah. i know that. so you wanna come over? i'll make nachos! i can't right now man. i'm playing. oh yeah. alright. i'll pencil you in for tuesday.
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syrians have been fleeing their country by the tens of thousands since the civil war began there, hoping to find a safer new life. isha sesay introduces us to a couple making a successful journey out of the long road to germany. >> reporter: muhammad and his wife bayan have a comfortable life in germany. a happy one. happy they say, to be welcome with open arms by the people in the small down of nasa. life in germany is nice. the country gave us so much. they gave us everything. there's no life in syria. everything is destroyed in syria. our houses are destroyed. we'll start a new life here in germany. >> reporter: a little more than two years ago muhammad and bayan were living in the midst of war in aleppo, more surviving than living.
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bombings, destruction, carnage became their norm since the war started in 2011. >> translator: the planes were always dropping rockets on civilians and buildings. people died from those strikes. children, women and the elderly dies. young and old people died. >> reporter: fed up with the violence and the lack of job opportunities muhammad was forced to flee, leaving his wife and family behind. to begin a complicated journey hoping his family could one day join him. he saided to damascus from there, he took a bus to lebanon, a plane to egypt, a boat to italy, a train to france and finally germany. the length of the trip, a mere ten days. the price $3,000. >> translator: we slept in camps. camps on the roads. they served us food and drinks, just enough to keep us going on the road. we spent most of our time on trains and buses until we got
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here. >> reporter: almost two years after he left, muhammad's wife bayan followed her husband paying a smuggler to bring her by boat like so many others. >> translator: i was scared when i was traveling by boat. we were scared to drown. it was a difficult experience. we left at night, the waves were high, but we safely arrived in greece. >> reporter: after arriving in germany, the couple like others seeking refuge had to go through a long process in order to be able to stay in the country. he won't talk about bashar al assad -- >> translator: other question? >> reporter: he says he doesn't like to talk about politics. muhammad has a job in metal industry and though the government has helped his family, he's proud he paid his own way. despite what happened, the couple still love their home
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country. >> translator: when the war is over in syria, and i wish they would work on rebuilding the country to become the strong country is used to be. >> reporter: i dream that syria returns to the prewar state a dream to be reunited with our families. until then, they plan on staying here and filling these empty walls with new pictures and new memories far away from home. isha sesay, cnn, los angeles. thank you for joining us for this hour of "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. for our viewers in the united states, "new day" is next. for other viewers around the world "amanpour" starts in a moment. thanks for joining cnn. be the you who doesn't cover your moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. be the you who shows up in that dress.
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he has supporters like david duke connected with the ku klux klan. >> do you want white supremacists to vote for you? >> no, i don't. >> ku klux klan values, david duke values, donald trump are not american values. whoever committed this act, i pray for that person. >> rodney earl sanders charged with two counts of murder in connection with the death of two nuns. >> they live their lives to make the world better for people who have nothing. at least ten water rescues occurred overnight in kansas city as a flash

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