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tv   CNN Newsroom Live  CNN  August 28, 2016 1:00am-3:01am PDT

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a moment of remembrance in italy. funerals held there for some of the victims of the earthquake. tensions spike along the syrian/turkish battle. how a three-way battle for control is intensing there and a new effort to attract a new group of voters. donald trump tries to reach out to black voters referencing a basketball star's murder. welcome to viewers here in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell. "cnn newsroom" starts right now.
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4:00 a.m. on the east coast, in italy, people are struggling with loss and sadness as they bury victims from the earthquake wednesday. they held a state funeral saturday which was also a national day of mourning. it reduced one town to rubble and badly damaged another. it is the human loss that is most painful in these communities. nearly 300 dead and many more are missing. atika shubert has more now on the service. >> reporter: a school gymnasium turned makeshift chapel fit for a state funeral. 35 coffins each with a bouquet of flowers and a picture of the person lost in italy's devastating earthquake. beside them, family members, many survivors themselves, their broken limbs in casts, faces bruised and bandaged, their eyes red and swollen from crying.
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italy's prime minister and president attended offering condolences to those who lost loved one, thanking those who pulled survivors from the rubble. a bishop led the service mentioning victims by name including julia rinaldi, the young girl who died shielding her 4-year-old sister as their summer home was destroyed around them. another lost friends and family in an earthquake. she and her husband used their bare hands to dig neighbors out of the rubble. community is very important to small villages like this, the relationship with the land, with those we love, with your family is very, very strong. it will be even stronger. we won't give up, she shays. there will be more funerals. the death toll from the earthquake continues to climb into the hundreds as more bodies
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are discovered in the rubble. this funeral is only among the first, a national day of mourning for the country to come together and begin the process of healing and rebuilding. atika schubert, cnn, italy. >> atika, thank you. in aleppo, syria, dual bombings hit a wake taking place there saturday. the media center says at least 24 people were killed and 30 were wounded. the wake was for several children who were killed in a barrel bombing in the same neighborhood on thursday. activists say that bombing left at least 15 people dead. a new attack in turkey rockets fired at an airport in the southeastern part of that country. it happened saturday night. turkey's state run news is blaming a kurdish militant group neen as the pkk for the attack. no casualties or injuries have been reported and flights have not been disrupted.
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a turkish soldier was killed saturday when two tanks were hit by rocket fire. th according to officials, three soldiers were wounded. soldiers helped rebels retake this city from isis earlier this week, the effort all part of an ongoing operation to secure the turkish border with syria. at first glance, it looks like turkey is simply ramping up the fight against isis inside syria, but as our nick paton walsh explains, there are some other motives at play. >> reporter: recently on turkish television, the deputy prime minister was pretty clear in suggesting a fairly wide scope to this reference. i made reference to a substantial town taken from isis on the border. another town to its west is located right below the major border crossing. that area has had turkish
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friendly syrian rebels in it for quite some time, but it's been separated from -- because isis has controlled that turf. what we're hearing is turkish-backed syrian rebels have been moving west into villages along that border area and according to the deputy prime minister appear to have an end goal of reaching -- establishing this line. now, that's a pretty big swath. the turkish/syrian border is long, but it's a pretty big swath of area for them to hold and it would give the syrian rebels who often lack a proper foothold as their own territory. that would then enable them to potentially move southwest, potentially too out east. after u.s. assurances, man jib has technically been released or given back to the local population by the kurds backed by the united states, a force
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that the u.s. put together to fight isis because they're effective, disciplined on the ground it has some syrians in it but mostly kurdish. there are some left behind who the kurds say are local fighters. we're hearing also that there may be new clashes between the kurds left behind who are kurdish backed and also the syrian rebel units. that's still playing out now. but another dangerous dynamic but most importantly we're getting a sense really of the sheer scope of this turkish operation and it's about taking a pretty big part of this border. >> senior international nick paton walsh for us. thank you. for more context on what's happening on the ground, cnn military analyst rick francona believes that turkey is planning for what will happen after isis. listen. >> the turks are not worried about what's happening right now in syria. they're worried about what's going to happen a year from now, two years from now when isiss is
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defeated and i think everybody understands that the at some point isis will be defeated. you can see it happening in iraq probably in the next year and soon after that in syria. everybody is vying for positions in what's going to happen post-isis and the kurds are also doing this as well. they're staking out as much territory as they can in both country because they're angling for much more territory, much more autonomy, some say even some sort of unified kurdish area across northern syria and northern iraq. >> turkey may continue to get more involved as it reacts to what the kurdish forces accomplish. hundreds of syrians are starting a new life after being trapped in a city that has been under siege now for four years. buses started to arrive this weekend bringing them to their new settlement. the syrian government prepared nearly 300 apartments there. families had essentially cut off from food, from water and supplies after rebels took over
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the town near damascus. >> translator: at first, they scared me. yes, i was afraid because the rebels told me that the government will take me and kill me. but when i got out and saw the situation here, everything changed. the situation is very good and they treat us very well here. >> the syrian forces, the government there, now has control of the city under the terms of the new deal for the evacuation of both civilians and for rebels. libyan forces are also fighting isis. officials in libya say they have nearly regained control of sirte. it's been under isis control since last year. it was the hometown of gadhafi. u.s. air strikes are helping. reports also say the last group of militants are now confined to just one area of the city center. this is "cnn newsroom." still ahead, donald trump trying to gain african-american voters by bringing up a tragic shooting
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in the city of chicago. how democrats are responding to that coming up. plus, the heroin epidemic in the united states, it has become even deadlier. the powerful concoction that's causing a spike in overdoses, still ahead. s frosted flakes gis you the sweet spark to go all in and let your great out. they're gr-r-reat!
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"are you okay?" "yeah, i just got charged for my credit monitoring. that's how i know it"s working." "ah. you know you can go on creditkarma.com and check it out there. it's completely free." "really?" "yeah" "oh, that didn't hurt at all." "yeah, completely painless." "credit karma. give yourself some credit."
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independence day took a violent turn on saturday in moldova's capital. people there were celebrating the 25th year of independence who protesters went head to head with police. as you see in this video, they say they're upset with the government over a billion dollars that disappeared from the country over bad loans. demonstrators claim they're as poor as they were under the soviet union. border agents, san diego, california, seized $3 million in cash on saturday. it is a major haul for an agency focused more on security than struggling. mexican cartels are known to move huge quantities of money and drugs across the border all in order to sustain their businesses in the united states and stopping that flow would be a huge blow to the industry at large. passengers aboard
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high. for a lot of people, that's actually appealing. >> yeah, definitely. absolutely. you're staying well, you're staying not sick. so when you hear that somebody has overdosed or you hear about
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these crazy new drugs, you know, you're thinking, like, well, all right. it's about time. i'm trying to get high. that's all you've been trying to do. >> so that means that with this new strain of heroin that's cut with an elephant tranquilizer. >> i'm sure there are heroin addicts who are actively looking for it and thinking that the people who are dying are doing it wrong, they're doing too much, they're not -- you know what i mean? they're just thinking that they'll find a way to get really high and not die. or if they die, they don't really care. but they're definitely looking for it. i would be. >> my son is on drugs, and i think he's overdosing. i think he's overdosed. >> is he awake? >> no. he's awake but barely. >> he stopped breathing. >> what's he on? >> heroin. i guess it's [ bleep ]. >> this firehouse in cincinnati
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responded to nearly two dozen overdoses in a single day last week. more than ten times their daily average. and they don't know when the calls will stop coming in. but april's mom is worried about a different type of call. >> you know, we hear an ambulance, and we always wonder if it's someone we know or for our child. and that's something that we live with every day. you know, we go to bed at night wondering if we're going to get that phone call. >> april and her mom know better than anyone how difficult the addiction is. >> i'll do any drug you put in front of me so it's definitely a struggle. it's really hard. >> it's difficult because we can't, like, love them out of it, you know? so we love them so much, and it doesn't -- there's nothing that we can really do for them. >> april says getting sober is a daily struggle. but in her eyes, not using heroin is progress, even if other drugs are taking its
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place. >> i'm definitely not -- i wouldn't say i'm using, but i've used twice since i've been out. and i've been out for a month. >> how has heroin changed your life? >> well, i'm 22. i just did 11 months incarcerated. i'm back on probation with more time on the shelf. when in reality you, you know, i probably should have been applying for med school this summer. that's what i wanted to do. that's where i should have been. >> rachel crane, cnn, cincinnati. >> thank you. and as rachel mentioned, officials believe the heroin blamed in the rash of deaths was combined with an elephant tranquilizer. car fentanyl is the most potent opioid used commercially, ten times more strong than morphine.
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now to the state of florida. people are keeping their eye on the skies this day as storm systems bring problems through the tropics. let's bring in our meteorologist derek van dam to talk about it. derek? >> it's all about tropical invest 9 nie99l. that's a mouthful. the point is it's been getting a lot of attention because it's so close to the u.s. mainland and they've been sending out hurricane hunters to inspect this latest cluster of thunderstorms. and i think the word "disorganized" is probably the best way to describe it as it stands. but i've noticed some interesting features that have popped up over the past, let's say, two or three hours. let me show them to you. take a look at the satellite loop. here it is, tropical wave invest 99l. there's cube you ba, the bahamas, southern florida. this is the cluster of thunderstorms called tropical invest 99l. will it be officially named?
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just north of hispaniola, this little spin in the cloud cover overhead, that counterclockwise spin is an indication that we're starting to get a little bit of organization to this cluster of thunderstorms. so hurricane hunters will continue to investigate this throughout the course of the morning. i believe there's one on track leaving from the biloxi, mississippi, region to that area. it's the five-day forecast that has meteorologists very interested because once it get noose the open waters of the gulf of mexico, it has to travel through the straits of florida first, over the florida keys, bringing showers, gusty winds, potential for some flooding into south florida. but as it enters this warm, moist environment across the gulf of mexico, that's where we have the potential for some tropical development. that's where we have our highest probability i should say. nonetheless, in the near term from today through the next three days, southern florida will be impacted by rough surf, gusty winds and the potential
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for flash flooding it's not out of the question to really see a tropical wave like this produce anywhere from 4 to 6 inches locally. you can see some of those shades of orange, even white across cuba. that could easily see impressive rainfall totals especially in the mountainous regions associated with this tropical wave moving through. i've got to take you to the other side of the world, but we're keeping this theme of tropical development. we're monitoring typhoon lionrock. there's japan, china. 215 kilometer per hour sustained winds. this is equivalent to a strong category 3 atlantic hurricane. we have the track taking it into mainland japan in the next three days. from turkey, scary moments for people caught in an under pass rapidly rising water actually trapped these citizens of turkey's capital ankara. they were rescued but scary moments. you can see the water actually pouring out of their cars.
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>> wow. imagine being stuck in something like that. derek van dam, thank you. this is "cnn newsroom." still ahead, italy is in mourning, mourning the loss of people and communities after this week's earthquake. coming up, a report from near one of the country's most devastated towns. against all odds, migrants are still making the dangerous journey across the mediterranean. next, the horrors many chase searching for a better life, a better future and the race to prevent hundreds more from drowning. we are live from atlanta this hour, broadcasting across the united states and around the world. you're watching "cnn newsroom."
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. welcome back to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. you are watching "cnn newsroom." it is good to have you with us. i'm george howell with the headlines we're following for you this hour. a turkish soldier was killed saturday in a rocket attack. two soldiers were wounded there. turkish officials blame the attack on kurdish militias. earlier this week, turkish forces helped syrian rebels retake the city from isis. rockets were fired at turkey's airport saturday night. turkey's state run news agency blaming the kurdish militant group known as the pkk for the attack. no casualties have been reported, and flights have not been disrupted. in paraguay an ambush killed soldiers on saturday. government officials suspect the attack was taken out by a guerilla group called the epp.
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that is a leftist group that was formed over a year ago. sinaloa drug cartel leader was killed. the uncle was taken over when el chapo was recaptured. this is just the latest attack on the group's family members. el chapo's son was kidnapped but later released. in italy, people are in mourning. people are burying the almost 300 victims killed in wednesday's earthquake and hundreds of people came together to attend a state funeral saturday with nearly three dozen victims. cnn is live near the hardest hit towns in this earthquake. our senior international correspondent fred pleitgen is live. >> reporter: one of the things we have to keep in mind is this town is really by far the
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hardest hit community of the 291 people confirmed killed, more than 230 are from this area. having been out here the past couple of days and speaking to folks here, there's two things that really still very much get to them. on the one hand of course it's mourning their loved ones. it's the fact that every family in this town in one shape or form is affected. then it's the fear of the aftershocks that have been a big issue over the past couple of days. there was a major aftershock yesterday evening of about 4.7 magnitude that really rocked that area again. of course, every time that happens buildings that have been damaged continue to come down, the people there continue to be in fear. then one of the other things that now the italians are looking forward to is there's a real discussion of what is the future of a lot of these villages around this area going to be? it's a mountainous area. it's got a lot of very small villages that were barely viable before the earthquake. now a lot of them are saying, look, it's an unsafe area. is it really worth reconstructing these houses? are some of the villages going
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to be abandoned? it's tragic for a lot of folks we've been speaking to. we went through some of these places yesterday. they said, i don't know if i have a future here. we don't know if the community has a future. certainly tough decisions that the italians are going to make. on the one hand they're saying they're going to rebuild. but the big question is, does that count for all the small villages. it's a wide region that's affected. certainly a lot of communities right now are mourning the dead, that are afraid of the aftershocks right now and also very concerned about their future. >> fred, you're explaining so much uncertainty for these families there. obviously italian officials hoping, looking to rebuild, but the question is, will they? and for those families, for people who have homes there, who have everything that they've ever owned there, now gone, how are they handling the fact that so much has been lost and there is uncertainty about what to do
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next? >> reporter: well, it's a very good question. it's a very difficult one for them. i think right now the folks that we've been speaking to are saying, look, at the moment we're trying to survive day to day. we were in a small town yesterday where we saw a family whose home had been damaged but not completely destroyed. their house is unsafe so now they're living in an rv outside of their home. they said, look, we're too scared to go in the house. we're afraid there will be aftershocks. we'd rather be in a vehicle than a home. in the long term, they're going to have to see if the village will survive. the village we were in l 12 people that regularly live there. in the summer months with the vacation time, it's about 8 it to 100 people there. but they said, is this community really going to survive? a community that has 12 people there permanently? is it going to be rebuilt? is it worth rebuilding? it really is a serious question that the authorities are going to have to ask themselves. are you going to put a lot of money into building all of these houses earthquake proof. there are still a lot of historic houses that you basically can't make earthquake proof. it's very difficult.
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a lot of uncertainty for these folks as they're trying to come to terms with the losses they've faced. tess a very tight-knit area. people know each other. they go back and forth from the villages. they're dealing with the immediate loss and at the same time that uncertainty is something that looms and uncertainty is something that is being debated all over italy as well. >> our senior international correspondent fred pleitgen, thank you for the context, just getting a sense of what people are dealing with and some idea of how italian officials plan to move forward there. thank you. now to berlin. anti-immigration protesters climbed the famous brandenburg gate on saturday. the group of far right activists say that they are against the quote islamization of germany. angela merkel is dropping in popularity after welcoming a million asylum seekers. the alternative for germany is expected to do well in two
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regional elections next month. the united nations says thousands of asylum seekers continue to cross the mediterranean in search of a better future and better life in europe. it is an incredibly dangerous journey. human smugglers cramming migrants on rickety floats. many families have drowned. here are some of the stories who were rescued at sea. ♪ >> we're going to give everyone a life jacket. you're all safe, okay?
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>> sit down! >> they might not trust us, and their concern is they might be attacked by pirates or get arrested again by the libyan authorities. all we were hearing is people dying dying dying, boats capsizing, the italian coast guard cannot cope with mass migration. we have to do something. they called one of my cousins and they said, if you do not bring $2,000, you will be dead by evening. >> i get outside from the misery. here they are treating people like an animal.
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>> these people that i would come across are really desperate. they're coming from countries that tortured, they're beaten. >> so they took me with knife. he asked me for money. they are killing. there's no light. they are kidnapping. nigeria is too hard. >> time now is 20 past 7:00. we've been doing this since 4:00 in the morning. now we're on to another two boats.
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>> we have another boat. >> they do know about this journey before. they know exactly what is going to be. maybe they got two choice, either you're dying at sea or you're getting across the sea. this is the two choices that you have. ♪ ♪ o lord i am very very grateful for all ♪ >> at times they think it's so easy. they're going to get there and find a job and all this. but then i try to think that i wonder if they do get what they want, you know?
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>> they are treating people like real people, real humans. that's what we are looking for. >> when i look at these children, they're all happy, laughing and that. in my mind, i think these children don't know what they're going through. they might in a time go back to their country and share their expertise and whatever they do and make their country better. marco...! polo! marco...! polo! sì? marco...! polo! marco...! polo! scusa? ma io sono marco polo, ma... marco...! playing "marco polo" with marco polo? surprising. ragazzini, io sono marco polo. sì, sono qui...
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what's not surprising? how much money amanda and keith saved by switching to geico. ahhh... polo. marco...! polo! fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. polo!
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in the race for the white house, donald trump is pushing back against efforts to link him to the white supremacist group
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the klu klux klan. he re-tweeted a supporter's post that hillary clinton said a kkk member was her mentor. speaking in iowa, he also dredged up clinton's past use of the term "super predator." trump this week had repeated claims that he will do well among african-american voters. the retired basketball player turned author kareem abdul-jabbar has written a new book that takes a look at american society. it's called "writings on the wall: searching for a new equality beyond black and white." cnn's poppy harlow sat down with the sports legend to talk about this election season and race relations in the united states. >> reporter: in recent weeks we have seen donald trump speak about african-americans. >> you're living in poverty. your schools are no good. you have no jobs. 58% of your youth is unemployed.
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what the hell do you have to lose? >> what was your reaction to that? >> my reaction to that was, if he wanted to address african-americans, he should come and speak to them. a number of different african-american group that's are politically connected have invited him to speak to them. >> the naacp. >> naacp and other groups. and he hasn't done that. >> his supporters push back and they say his speeches, even though they've been in front of largely white audiences, are on national television. so he is speaking to african-americans. what do you make of that? >> i think that he should come and speak to african-americans specifically and give them some specific ideas as to how he plans to change things because he only speaks in generalities. and is very vague. he says he's going to make it better but he never says how. >> is there anything he can do or say that you think would increase the support he has among african americans?
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>> i don't know. but he hasn't tried to do anything. he's just talked about it. and talk is cheap. the only republican politician i've seen that actually said something along those lines and i believed him that he meant it was rand paul. he wanted to talk in the black community about conservative solutions for chronic unemployment and the failure of the educational system. but i think mr. trump's posturing has been very insincere. >> to be clear ush, you're a bi supporter of hillary clinton. >> i am. >> a new poll on race relations shows that americans think that race relations in this country are as bad as they were in 1992 after the rodney king beating and the ensuing l.a. riots. you write in your new book that america essentially patted itself on the back for electing
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the first black president but then, quote, the systemic racism in the country seemed to get worse. why? >> i think the systemic racism in the country got to be more pronounced because it became more obvious, and it's always been there but now it became a lot more obvious. and i think that that's really -- >> why did it become more obvious, because we have a black president? >> i don't -- that's a good question. i don't have the answer for that. but i think just people started to realize, geez, something's not right here. >> you have said being a black role model is a double-edged sword. for inspiration and frustration. was there a particular experience that taught you that? what made you feel that? >> people would say that, well,
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look, certain black americans are now among the wealthiest americans. that means that if they make it, all the other black americans should be able to achieve that. and people without the educational background to advance their lives don't make it. and it doesn't matter what color they are. you know, we have to deal with the facts here. it's not about color. it's about -- it's more about class than anything else. >> the tools for upward mobility. >> the tools for upward mobility have to be available and people have to take advantage of them, and it's the most difficult on the people who need it the most. >> kareem abdul-jabbar speaking on race relations and the election in the united states. you can hear more of his interview with my colleague p poppy harlow by logging on to our website money.cnn.com. rock climbing is one of the few sports coming to the olympics in 2020. we will introduce you to an
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amazing young star who's already good to go for the world stage.
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having withdrawal from rio 2016, do you miss it? it's a little early to start forecasting the next summer olympics, tokyo 2020. but the addition of a few new sports including rock climbing will certainly bring in a whole new cast of stars. cnn's patrick snell introduces you to one of them. >> reporter: at only 15 years of age, ashima may well be the best rock climber the world has seen. four years from now, there's a good chance she'll be a household name in the u.s. as she's considered america's best prospect for the 2020 tokyo olympics where climbing has been sanctioned as an olympic sport. >> it's interesting because the format that's going to be in the olympics has never been, you know -- has never happened ever before in any other competition. but basically there's three disciplines of claiming and it's sport climbing and bouldering
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and speed climbing. so for sport and bouldering, it's basically just getting to the top. that's the most important thing and just getting higher or just completing the climb. but then for speed climbing, it's about time. so we have to go up the wall as quickly as you can. but then at the end they're going to combine the scores of how well you do on all three of the disciplines so basically you have to be good at all of them, which is going to be a challenge. >> as for the challenge of growing the sport, rock climbing has benefitted from the rise of climbing gyms that have popped up. beforehand it was really only a sport attempted by those close to mountain ranges. but by being brought up in new york city, achic ma started her climbing careers on the rock walls of a brooklyn gym before graduating to the real rocks found in central park. >> since you were a baby, you walk or you just like crawl,
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then you climb, and it's just something that's really natural. i think that for me that's how i found climbing so interesting, because you don't really need to know much to be able to climb. all you have to do is just climb up the rock. >> reporter: memory described as a bouldering phenom, ashima is particularly excited by the tokyo games because it's taking place in the country of her parents' birth. nevertheless, the inspirational moments that took place at the rio olympics have clearly left an impression. >> there are so many athletes i'm really inspired by, but i would say michael phelps and usain bolt and simone biles are the most inspirational for me. they inspire me because they prove that there are no boundaries in sports and i guess
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history and all these barriers are meant to be broken. >> reporter: history beckons for the teenager who well may inspire the next generation of rock climbers to break barriers of their own. >> so do you like pizza? and could you imagine pizza when you want it to just fall from the sky? your dream might just become reality thanks to domino's pizza hoping soon to begin food deliveries by drone in new zealand. customers will be notified when the drone is approaching. they go outside, hit a button on their smartphone and then the drone will lower that pizza on a tether. domino's says the test deliveries will begin next month by drone. that's the brave new world we're in. thanks for being with us for "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. i'll be back after the break with more news from around the world. stay with us.
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tep tensions inside turkey. rockets fired, the fight intensifies for control in that region. finding closure. italy buries its dead after a devastating earthquake while survivors look for refuge. 100 overdoses in one week. police trying to stop a new spread of a form of heroin laced with a drug so powerful it can take down an elephant. live from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, welcome to our viewers here in the united states and around the world. i'm george howell. "cnn newsroom" starts right now.
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5:00 a.m. on the u.s. east coast and we continue to follow the crisis in aleppo, syria, where there seems to be no end to the war's rulety. the aleppo media center says explosions hit a wake that was taking place there on saturday. two barrel bombs struck the ceremony killing at least 24 people. 30 more wounded. the wake was for children for the victims of the barrel bomb that hit the same neighborhood on thursday. activists say the attack left at least 15 dead. and there is more violence outside gentlem outside jarabalas. two tanks were hit by rocket fire and three more soldiers were wounded. turkish forces helped syrian rebel retake jarabalas earlier this week. all part of the country's operation to secure its border with syria. following it all, senior international correspondent nick paton walsh live in turkey.
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nick, if we could first start with the turkish troops inside syria and the reports of the first turkish casualties. >> reporter: yes. overnight, george, we're hearing of one turkish soldier having lost their life as a result of rocket fire on two tanks. now, we don't know the precise location but it appears to be south of jarablus. that is as you know was the town that was swept into by syrian rebels with tishgish backing, turkish air cover on wednesday, taken with little resistance. the issue now is, where do they go next? we've had an indication from the deputy prime minister yesterday that the scope of the operation is pretty wide. we heard yesterday how the same syrian rebels with turkish backing have been moving west close to a very important border crossing where there are other turkish friendly syrian rebels that also get some element of american backing. it seems like they want to link ma ray ya up with jarablus and control a large swath of border. but the major contention is to
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the east, the southeast. that is where we hear the free syrian army syrian rebels with turkish backing are moving at the moment. in fact, one of them have -- one of the units have just claimed to have taken some villages to the south of there. now, there have been quite substantial clashes around the past 24 hours or so around there, claims that may be well where the turkish lost their lives, claims that the fire. the issue here is that these are basically the turkish rebels moving against territory held by kurdish fighters or those loyal to kurdish fighters. the kurds say that their sdf, unit that has american backing that held area, have moved back. but it's clear people are resisting the advance of the syrian rebels with turkish backing. that's the flash point ahead. complicated but in short we have two sets of fighters with american backing here, the kurds who have been fighting isis with pentagon support on the ground,
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the other side turkish fighters. they're headed for the same town. this could be a huge distraction from the isis fighting. joe biden absolutely clear that the -- back across the euphrates river. the issue is, given last night, there was a rocket attack on the airport in southeastern turkey. reportedly it seems by the kurds. turkey is widening its issues here on its southern border. yes, we've known they've had a long war against the kurds. now they're in clashes with the syrian kurds not just those inside of turkey and they're opening a broader offense to clear isis out of the territory. they have the second biggest army in nato apart from the united states but at a time of such great porousness and volatility along the south border where they have for years ignoring the growth of jihadism in southern turkey do they absolutely have the manpower and staying power in this turbulent time in turkey to see this
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through. will it distract the broader, more pressing fight against isis, george in. >> nick, i'm sure the viewers around the world are appreciative of your explanation of different groups at play here. the united states also involved here t. is a multilayered situation, turkey doing its best to take control of that border region with syria. but is there any indication or idea of a timetable as to how long turkish troops will be inside this other country? >> reporter: nobody thought the syrian revolution would go on much longer than a year. here we are five years into what many might even consider yet another phase. we've had isis rise and now it seems ebb. now we have turkey throwing themselves in to prevent the advance ever the kurds who are trying to establish their own territory here as well. the kurdish fight the tushrkey s is decades old. it's possibly in one of its worst phases. we have the kurds who feel to
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some degree if you talk to them that they're owed their own homeland after the sacrifice they've given kicking out isis from that part of syria. they aren't going to give up that territory fast. we've even heard reports that the kurdish military is close to kobani, pretty much storied because of the level of coalition air power used to facilitate it. we're into a new chapter here for turkey, certainly some say maybe it's too late or late that turkey has joined the fight at this stage. they've known they've had this problem for a long time. some blame the military behind the coup saying it was the generals against them rather than political leadership. regardless of where we are now, turkey has absolutely skin in the game, very much in the mix now here. they have two enemies, isis and the kurds. everybody knows they consider the kurds to be the most existential threat. we're in i think now to a yet more complex and yet more --
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unsustainable or might say unpredictable part of this five-year war, george. >> it is a complicated affair. our senior international correspondent nick paton walsh live in turkey. nick, thank you so much for the reporting and we will stay in touch with you. for more context on what's happening on the ground there, cnn military analyst retired lieutenant colonel rick francona believes that turkey is planning for what will happen after isis is gone. listen. >> the turks are not worried about what's happening right now in syria. they're worried what's going to happen a year from now, two years from now when isis is defeated and i think everybody understands that at some point isis is going to be defeated. you can see it happening in iraq in probably the next year and soon after that in syria. everybody is vying for positions on what's going to happen post-isis. and the kurds are also doing this as well. they're staking out as much territory as they can in both countries because they're angling for much more territory, much more autonomy, some say even some sort of unified kurdish area up there across
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northern syria and northern iraq. italy is mourning. we will continue to get more on italy just a little later in the newscast, given the earthquake that happened there. a new attack in turkey rockets fired at an airport in the southeastern part of that country. it happened saturday night. turkey state run news agency is blaming a kurdish militant group known as the pkk for the attack. no casualties or injuries have been reported and flights have not been disrupted. hundreds of syrians are starting a new life after being trapped in a city that has been under siege now for four years. buses starting to arrive this weekend bringing them to their new settlement in ha raj la. the syrian government prepared nearly 300 apartments for these families. they had been essentially cut off from food, water and supplies after rebels took over the town near damascus. >> translator: at first, they scared me. yes, i was afraid because the rebels told me that the
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government would take me and kill me. but when i got out and saw the situation here, everything changed. the situation is very good. and they treat us very well here. >> the syrian government has now taken control of dayraya under terms for the evacuation of civilians and rebels. also want to tell you about the situation in italy. people there mourning the deaths of almost 300 people who were killed in wednesday's earthquake. hundreds of people attended a state funeral on saturday for nearly three dozen of the victims. our senior international correspondent atika schubert has more on the services there. >> reporter: the school gymnasium turned makeshift chapel fit for a state funeral. three rows of coffins 35 in all, each with a bouquet of floriwer and a photo of the person lost in italy's devastate willing earthquake. beside them, family members, many of them survivors themselves, their broken limbs in casts, their faces bruised and bandaged, their eyes red and
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swollen from crying. italy's prime minister and president attended offering condolences to those who lost loved ones, conveying their gratitude to the firefighters, police and emergency medics that pulled survivors from the rubble. a bishop led the service, mentioning victims by name, including julia rinaldi, the young girl who died shielding her younger sister georgia as their summer home collapsed around them. georgia survived with minor injuries. julia did not. this woman lost friends and family. she and her husband used bare hands to carry people out of the rubble. the villages, the relationship with the land, with those you love, with family is very, very strong. it will be even stronger. we won't give up, she says. there will be more funerals. the death toll from the earthquake continues to climb into the hundreds as more bodies
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are discovered in the rubble. this funeral is only among the first. a national day of mourning for the country to come together and begin the process of healing and rebuilding. atika schubert, cnn, italy. >> and rebuilding will take a great deal of time there in italy. atika, thank you. this is "cnn newsroom." still ahead, in the u.s. presidential race, donald trump claims that he has african-american support, but what are his true odds with that demographic? we'll take a look coming up. plus, the heroin epidemic in the u.s. has become even deadlier. the powerful concoction that's causing a spike in overdoses. this is "cnn newsroom." ng new... ♪ introducing rhinocort® allergy spray. powerful relief from nasal allergy symptoms, all day and all night. ♪ try rhinocort® allergy spray. muddle no more®. new luminous lightshows andhydrating lotiont?
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lots of vitamins a&c, and, only 50 calories a serving... good morning, indeed. v8. veggies for all. welcome back to "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell. the shooting death of an nba star's cousin has drawn fresh attention to the u.s. when it comes to gun violence. nakia aldridge was shot in the head in chicago on friday. it happened while she was pushing her infant in a stroller. she was the cousin of 12-time nba all-star dwayne wade. aldridge was an innocent victim in the wrong place at the wrong time when police say a dispute led to gunfire. wade has been an outspoken critic of gun violence, and he took to twitter to mourn. he said the following, quote, my cousin was killed today in chicago. another act of senseless gun violence.
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four kids lost their mom for no reason. unreal. at least 455 people have been shot to death in chicago in the first 7 1/2 months of the year 2016 according to the "chicago tribune" newspaper which has been tracking every homicide in that city. the death of nakia aldridge has become even a talking point in the u.s. presidential election as issues of gun violence and race take center stage. the republican donald trump is reaching out to minority voters now with an emphasis on economic growth, but he's also citing violence in u.s. inner cities as a reason why african-americans should vote for him. saturday he tweeted about aldridge's death and its possible effect on his campaign, saying the following, quote, dwayne wade's cousin was just shot and killed walking her baby in chicago. just what i have been saying, african-americans will vote
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trump! the republican candidate also mentioned aldridge's death as he he campaigned over the weekend. >> the cousin of nba star dwayne wade, a great guy dwayne wade, was the victim of a tragic shooting in chicago. she was the mother of four and was killed while pushing her infant child in a stroller just walking down the street. shot. it breaks all of our hearts to see it. it's horrible. it's horrible. and it's only getting worse. this shouldn't happen in our country. this shouldn't happen in america. >> trump misspelling dwayne wade's name in a first tweet but correcting it later. my colleague jonathan mann spoke earlier to larry sabato on more
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perspective on what donald trump plans to achieve with african-americans. >> what is this really about? is donald trump actually making a pitch for the african-american vote? i can tell you right now and riz advisers have told him that he has very little chance of getting more than a handful of percentage points from african-americans. this is designed to reassure conservative or moderate normally republican whites who are living in suburbs or central cities and their concern that donald trump is to be blunt about it anti-black. they don't want to be associated with that. >> is it working? i ask because the examples jump out at you. when he started this outreach effort, he started with a series of really offensive generalizations about african-americans, that they have no jobs, that they have no homes, that they have no safe neighborhoods. and today that tweet which seemed to capitalize on the
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murder of an innocent woman as evidence that african-americans will vote trump, like there was somehow a logical connection between that woman's death and his success. i mean, does this look good even to white voters? >> well, i would think that most people who had at least tentatively decided they weren't going to vote for donald trump are still right there. they haven't changed a wit. you talk about stereotypes and overgeneralizations. trump's attempts to correct his problems are usually ham-handed. and i'm not being overcritical there. when you go back and you think about the controversies he's had over this year and how he has tried to correct them, he generally causes his problems to double or triple, and he gives democrats a week or two to attack him on his course corrections. i think he's done precisely that again. >> now, there was a recent poll i think a "washington post"/abc
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news poll, that found 56% of registered voters believe trump is biased against women and minorities. and yet at least some of those people plan to vote for him anyway. he clearly thinks this is a serious challenge, but what do you think it's going to cost him on election day if he doesn't fix this problem? >> he's already losing women badly. incredibly, he is losing college-educated whites. all of the republicans in modern times have won college-educated whites usually in a landslide. he certainly is losing minorities by a record amount. it's really incredible when you look at the numbers in some of these polls. some polls have him at 8% of african-americans. more have him at 1% or 2%, which is actually worse than some segregationists who have run such as george wallace in 1968. so i think he's already cost himself a lot of support. and to be honest, jonathan, i don't see it coming back to him.
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>> larry sabato speaking to my colleague jonathan mann. on top of the backlash over trump's tweets, one of his top aides is under fire for alleged anti-semitism. the ex-wife of trump's new ceo steve bannon claimed that in 2007 he didn't want his daughters attending a school because too many jews attended it. our diane gallagher has more. >> reporter: it is important to note that those charges of antisemitism do come from his now ex-wife during a child custody case. back in 2007, she said in a court statement that bannon did not want his daughters to attend a certain girls school that they were considering due to the number of jewish students. now, the documents show her stating, quote, he says he doesn't like jews and he doesn't like they raise their kids to be whiney brats and he didn't want the girls going to school with jews. again, these are his now ex-wife's words from a court
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declaration involving a dispute over child support. cnn has reached out to the trump campaign. we haven't heard back from them just yet. but bannon's spokeswoman tells us that, quote, at the time mr. bannon never said anything like that and proudly sent the girls to archer for their middle school and high school education. now, of course, all of this does come as the newly appointed campaign ceo is already facing scrutiny about his background. we learned this week just that 20 years ago bannon faced multiple charges including misdemeanor domestic violence stemming from an incident involving his ex-wife. now, those charges were eventually dismissed because his ex-wife didn't show up to court. she said later that it's because bannon's attorney threatened her saying she wouldn't be able to support her children if she did. that is a charge that attorney has denied. of course, it is just another chapter in what has been a very controversial career for steve bannon. >> diane, thank you. drug dealers in the u.s. are mixing heroin with a powerful
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elephant trin quillizer, creating a drug so lethal there have been 100 overdoses in cincinnati, ohio, in just one week. cnn's rachel crane spoke with one self-described addict about why this drug is so appealing and why it is so dangerous. >> terrified. it terrifies me. >> reporter: a recent spike in heroin overdoses. nearly 100 in the last week alone, have laurie fearing for her daughter's life. >> i would love to get high. i would. i'm a drug addict. that's what i do best. >> reporter: april is 22 years old and she's been using heroin for the last six years. in those years, she says she's lost about a dozen friends. >> i just had one of my friends die i think yesterday morning, and she left four kids behind. >> reporter: officials suspect a batch of heroin laced with elephant tranquilizers is to blame for the latest string of overdoses.
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but april says that's not enough to scare away regular users. >> when you are addicted to heroin, when you're using, you don't care about dying. you're just chasing the next high. and for a lot of people, hearing that there is a souped up strain of dope on the streets, that's actually appealing. yeah, definitely, absolutely. because you stop getting high. that's why they call it chasing it because you stop getting high. you're staying well. you're staying not sick. so when you hear that somebody has overdosed or you hear about these crazy new drugs, you know, you're thinking like, well, all right, it's about time. i'm trying to get high. i mean, that's all you've been trying to do. >> reporter: so that means that with this new strain of heroin that's cut with an elephant tranquilizer -- >> i am very sure there are heroin addicts who are actively looking for it and thinking that the people that are dying are
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doing it wrong. they're doing too much. they're not -- you know what i mean? they're just thinking that they're going to find a way to get really high and not die. or if they die, they don't really care. but they're definitely looking for it. i would be. >> my son's on drugs and i think he's overdosing. i think he's overdosed. >> is he awake? >> no. he's awake, but barely. >> he stopped breathing. >> what's he on? >> heroin. i guess it's [ bleep ]. >> reporter: this firehouse in cincinnati responded to nearly two dozen overdoses in a single day last week. more than ten times their daily average. and they don't know when the calls will stop coming in. but april's mom is worried about a different type of call. >> you know, we hear an ambulance, and we always wonder if it's someone that we know or for our child. and that's something that we live with every day.
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you know, we go to bed at night wondering if we're going to get that phone call. >> reporter: april and her mom know better than anyone how difficult the struggle with opioid addiction is. >> i'll do any drug you put in front of me so it's definitely a struggle. it's really hard. >> reporter: it's difficult because we can't like love them out of it. you know? so we love them so much, and it doesn't -- there's nothing that we can really do for them. >> reporter: april says getting sober is a daily struggle but in her eyes not using heroin is progress, even if other drugs are taking its place. >> i'm definitely not -- i wouldn't say i'm using. i've used twice since i've been out, and i've been out for a month. >> reporter: how has heroin changed your life? >> well, i'm 22. i just did 11 months incarcerated. i'm back on probation with more time on the shelf.
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when in reality i mean, i probably should have been applying for med school this summer. you know, that was what i wanted to do. that's where i should have been. >> reporter: rachel crane, cnn, cincinnati. >> rachel, thank you. and as rachel mentioned, officials believe the heroin blamed in the rash of deaths was combined with an elephant tranquilizer, the most potent opioid used commercially, a version of fentanyl, the painkiller that investigators say is responsible for the death of entertainer prince that happened earlier this year. you're watching "cnn newsroom." still ahead, colombia's main rebel group says that it is taking steps to officially end the longest running civil conflict in latin america. we'll have details on that. plus, a guerilla group in paraguay is suspected of carrying out an ambush that killed eight soldiers. how colombia's farc inspired the
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and welcome back to you're viewers here in the united states and around the world. you are watching "cnn newsroom." it's always good to have you with us. i'm george howell with the headlines we're following for you this hour. rockets were fired at turkey's airport on saturday night. turkey's state run news agency blaming the kurdish militant group known as the pkk for these attacks. no casualties have been reported and flights have not been disrupted. a turkish soldier was killed saturday in a rocket attack south of the syrian town of jarabl jarablus.
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a turkish military source says two soldiers were wounded in that attack. turkish officials blaming the attack on kurdish militias. earlier this week, turkish forces helped syrian rebels to retake jarablus from the terror group isis. in the presidential race in the united states, donald trump saying tragedies like the death of nba star dwayne wade's cousin are the reason that african-americans will vote for donald trump. nakia aldridge was killed in a shooting in chicago on friday. trump cited her death in a tweet saying in part, just what i have been saying. african-americans will vote for trump! and in italy, people have started to bury the 291 people killed in wednesday's earthquake. hundreds of mourners gathered to remember nearly three dozen caskets there. the government declared saturday a national day of mourning. in the u.s. in the state of florida, people are keeping an eye to the skies as storm systems brew in the tropics. to talk more about that, meteorologist derek van dam is
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here. what's going on? >> residents from ft. lauderdale through to miami, they all need to be alert of this tropical invest 99l. kind of a mouthful, but it's been creating a lot of buzz on social media because it's been so slow to develop. it's very disorganized at the moment, but i'm gooding to try to break it down for you because it is showing signs that it perhaps is starting to gain some circulation which is a sign of strengthening. take a look at this. here it is in all its glory. tropical wave invest 99l. the cluster of thunderstorms, shades of red and yellow, the that's the cloud tops from the convective cell cells. here's cuba, the bahamas, the southern tip of florida. now, notice the last few images of this animation, the counterclockwise rotation is starting to develop. that is an interesting feature because when we start to see that rotation, that means that this thing is starting to get a little bit more organized.
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so the hurricane center has upped by 10% its five-day potential development forecast. no better way to actually put that. the shaded area we've put there just gives you an indication of the potential region that it could follow over the next five days. what we're really concerned about is not the next 24 hours, even 48 hours. it's really once it passes the straits of florida and enters the warm gulf of mexico waters do we see this potentially developing into let's say a tropical storm and perhaps even a hurricane as well. something we're going to monitor very, very closely. there's a few things acting against the development of this storm system, strong upper level wind shear that really just tears apart tropical development. in fact, and quite a bit of dry air being funneled into the system as well, dry air and tropical development don't really mix well together so that will actually inhibit the growth of topicropical systems. there's good news but nonetheless in the near term,
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rough seas, gusty winds, flash floods and be aware that the riptide current could be significant, especially along the east facing shores for the u.s. state of florida. so look out, miami, west palm beach, all the way to jacksonville. and we can't say that they won't have a problem with rip currents along the gulf of mexico as well. i want to take you to turkey quickly because there's some interesting footage we've come across of some individuals trapped underneath a tunnel in the capital city of ankara. there was a flash flood event that took place saturday night. the water levels, george, rose from 5 centimeters to nearly 2 meet others spilling water out of the cars. >> just happens so quickly. >> that's why they call it flash flooding. it's dangerous but fortunately no one was injured. >> derek, thank you. now to the u.s. state of mississippi. police say that they have a suspect in custody for the murder of two nuns, but residents there say that they can't understand why anyone would have wanted to hurt them. cnn's reed bennion has more for
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us. >> it's sad that people come to this whatever motivates them. >> reporter: 46-year-old rodney earl sanders is facing two counts of capital murder in the stabbing death of two mississippi nuns. officials say the two were found dead inside their home thursday morning. both were nurse practitioners who worked for hospitals in the state's poorest community. >> they take time to explain things to patients where they can understand it. you know, they go way beyond. >> reporter: clinic employees notified police when tnuns failed to show up for work. a car missing from the home was found later that night about a mile away. the bodies were found. >> it's hard to imagine that one who served the poor untiringly day and night sometimes, that her life would be taken in this
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violent way. >> reporter: those who knew the nuns say they had real empathy and compassion for the people they served. >> everybody was the same in their eyes, you know. all you had to do was go to them, ask them for help, and they helped you any way they can. >> reporter: authorities have not revealed a motive or a possible link between sanders and the nuns. i'm reed bennion reporting. >> reed, thank you. italy is mourning the loss of people and communities after this week's earthquakes. still ahead, a report from one of the country's most devastated towns. and migrants are still making the dangerous journey across the mediterranean despite all the risks. next, the horrors that many face searching for a better future and the race to prevent hundreds more from drowning. listerine® total care helps prevent cavities, strengthens teeth and restores tooth enamel.
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welcome back to "cnn newsroom." i'm george howell. in italy, people are struggling with a great deal of sadness as many bury the victims from wednesday's earthquake. that country held a state funeral on saturday. you see people gathered there. it was also a national day of mourning. the earthquake reduced one town to rubble, and it badly damaged several others. but it's the human loss that is most painful in these communities. almost 300 people are dead and many, many more are missing. cnn is live near amatrice, the hardest hit town from this earthquake and our senior international correspondent fred pleitgen is on the ground to give us an idea of what the damage means for people, fred. >> reporter: absolutely, george. i want to give you the reason why we're actually out here right now. you'll see behind me this mountain range over there. this entire area of italy through the force of that
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earthquake, which is of course a magnitude 6.2. this whole region in italy dropped by about 8 inches or about 20 centimeters in an instant when that earthquake happened. that's also one of the reasons why the damage is so bad and also another one of the reasons why a lot of the access roads have actually been cut off through the force of that earthquake in the aftermath of that happening. now, of course, all of this caused major damage to the towns around here. a lot of the people we've been speaking to say, look, after this happened we don't know if any of these small villages are actually going to be viable in the future. they've been destroyed. a lot of historic buildings have been destroyed by the earthquake. do you really want to rebuild on a fault line, in a place where you know there is seismic activity, there is this major earthquake now. there was a major earthquake in the '70s. so many of them are now questioning whether or not the places that they live in are still viable. it's a big question on people's minds here, also of course on italian politicians' minds as well. and it's something that just adds to the trauma of this earthquake. many of these people have lost
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loved ones. many many of these people have loved ones who have been injured. many of these people of course have lost the houses they live in, are now sleeping out in the open or in camper vans. now they have to deal with this long-term question about whether many of the places in this area here are going to be viable or actually going to be exist in the future, george. >> fred, you also -- we were speaking just a moment ago before your report about the aftershocks that you have experience. if you could tell us about what the situation is now. i mean, have there been pretty powerful aftershocks? and how has that affected people just getting in and around those areas? >> reporter: i would say, george, that the aftershocks that this area is experiencing is probably the biggest impediments to the search and rescue efforts and also the biggest thing driving fear into these folks after going through this horrible earthquake. we just had an aftershock moments ago that we felt. there have been other powerful aftershocks as well.
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he time those happen of course the rescue efforts going on and recovery efforts going on here have to stop immediately because all the rescue crews have to get out of the rubble because the rubble can shift itself, could potentially bury the rescue crews underneath. so it's something that just stops everybody. all the folks here are in great fear every time that happens. these aftershocks are very powerful. we have to keep in mind the original earthquake was 6.2 magnitude. there have been aftershocks of 5.5 and last night 4.7. that's something that really rocks the earth and causes additional buildings to collapse as well, george. >> our senior international correspondent fred pleitgen live near amatrice. thank you for giving us a sense of what happened there. just seeing that range behind you and explaining what that means, wow. it was a very powerful earthquake. thank you. now to berlin. anti-immigration protesters climbed the famous brandenburg gate on saturday, the par right activists say that they are against the quote islamization
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of german. german chancellor angela merkel is facing a drop of popularity there after welcoming over a million asylum seekers last year. the and anti-immigration party alternative for germany is expected to do well in two regional elections that are to take place next month. according to the united nations, thousands of asylum seekers continue to cross the mediterranean searching for a better future, a better life in europe. but it's an incredibly dangerous journey. human smugglers are cramming migrants on rickety floats and many of those families drown. here are some. stories from those who are rescued at sea.
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>> we're going to give everyone a life jacket. you're all safe, okay? sit down! >> they might not trust us and their concern is they might be attacked by pirates or get arrested again by the libyan authorities. all we were just hearing is people dying, dying, dying, boats capsizing. the italian coast guard, they cannot cope. we're talking about mass migration. we have to do something.
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they called one of my cousins and they said, if you do not bring $2,000, you'll be dead by evening. >> i get outside from the misery. they are treating people like an animal. >> these people that we come across are really desperate. they're coming from countries that torture. they're beaten. >> but they choke me with knife and he asked for money. there's no light. they are killing. they are killing and kidnapping.
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>> the time now is 20 past 7:00. we've started early. it's 4:00 in the morning. now we're coming to another two boats. >> we have another boat. >> they do know about this journey before. they know exactly what it's going to be. maybe they got two choice, whether you die at the sea or you are getting across the sea. this is the two choices that you have. ♪ o lord i am very, very
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grateful ♪ ♪ for all you have done for me >> at times they think it will be easy, they'll get there and find a job and all this. but then i try to think i wonder if they do get what they want, you know? >> they're treating people like real people, real humanity. that's what we're looking for. >> when i look at these children, they're all happy, laughing and that. in my mind, i think these children don't know what they're going through. they might in a time go back to their country and share their expertise in whatever they do and make their country better.
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but the new addition of a few new sports including rock climbing, that will bring a whole new cast of stars. and our patrick snell introduces us to one such talent. >> reporter: at only 15 years of age, ashima may well be the best rock climber the world has seen. four years from now, there's a good chance she'll be a household name in the u.s. as she's considered one of america's best prospects for the 2020 tokyo olympics where climbing has just been sanctioned as an official sport. >> it's really interesting because the format that's going to be in the olympics has never been, you know -- has never happened ever before in any other competition. but basically there's three disciplines of climbing, and it's sport climbing and bouldering and speed climbing. so for sport and bouldering, it's basically just getting to the top.
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that's the most important thing. and just getting higher or just completing the climb. but then for speed climbing it's about time so we have to go up the wall as quickly as you can. but then at the end, they're going to combine the scores of how well you do on all three of the disciplines. so basically you have to be good at all of them, which is going to be a challenge. >> reporter: as for the challenge of growing the sport, rock climbing has benefitted from the rise of climbing gyms that have popped up. beforehand it was really only a sport attempted by those close to mountain ranges. but by being brought up in new york city, ashima started her climbing careers on the rock walls of a brooklyn gym before graduating to the real rocks found in central park. >> since you're a baby, you walk or you just like crawl, then you climb. it's just something that's really natural. i think that for me that's how i found climbing so interesting,
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because you don't really need to know much to be able to climb. all you have to do is just climb up the rock. >> reporter: memory described as a bouldering phenom, ashima is particularly excited by the tokyo games because it's taking place in the country of her parents' birth. nevertheless, the inspirational moments that just took place at the rio olympics have clearly left an impression. >> there's so many athletes that i'm really inspired by, but i would say michael phelps and usain bolt and simone biles probably the most inspirational for me. they inspire me because they prove that there are no boundaries in sports, and i guess history and all these barriers are meant to be broken. >> reporter: history beckons for the teenager who may well inspire the next generation of
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rock climbers to break barriers of their own. patrick snell, cnn. >> patrick, thank you. so do you like pizza and could you imagine pizza when you want it just to fall from the sky delivered right to your door? well, it could become a reality thanks to domino's pizza, hoping to soon begin food deliveries by drone in new zealand. customers will be notified when the drone is approaching. they go outside, hit a button on their smartphone, the drone lowers it on a tether. but domino's says test deliveries to customers will begin next month. that is the new world we're in, people. this thanks for being with us. i'm george howell at the cnn center in atlanta. for our viewers in the united states, "new day" is next. for other viewers around the world, "the best of quest" starts in a moment. we thank you for watching cnn, we thank you for watching cnn, the world's news leader. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com
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because of nba star dwyane wade, a great guy, dwyane wade, was the victim of a tragic shooting. >> the tweet isn't important. what's important is this horrible crime. sympathy for the family is the thing we ought to be feeling. >> hillary clinton called black youth super predators. remember that? >> he's got guys connected with the klu klux klan. they're claiming him. passengers on board a southwest airlines flight feared the worst when they heard a big boom as one of the plane's engines blew. >> it felt like half of the plane almost like capsized. >> we're

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