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tv   Anthony Bourdain Parts Unknown  CNN  September 24, 2016 6:00pm-7:01pm PDT

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of "anthony bourdain." i'll be back here at hofstra for the debate to watch live on cnn monday night 9:00 p.m. eastern. >> chris f.: all right. >> chris: you good? you wanna just sound -- >> anthony: one, two, one, two. >> chris: we're good? all right. we're doing "prime cuts 7." >> anthony: right. >> chris: do you know those locations? >> anthony: no. i want this. oh, that's nice. you want this. oh, i feel so ashamed. this is really good. we all want this, right? >> pierre: yeah, i think food is such a great way of uniting people, you know? it's like, uh, breaking barriers.
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>> anthony: this is so outrageously delicious. >> woman: okay. eat. >> anthony: with pleasure. good is good. very satisfying. yeah, i'd recommend it. ♪ i took a walk through this beautiful world ♪ ♪ felt the cool rain on my shoulder ♪ ♪ found something good in this beautiful world ♪ ♪ i felt the rain getting colder ♪ ♪ sha la la la la sha la la la la la ♪ ♪ sha la la la la sha la la la la la la ♪
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>> chris: um, so the first act's gonna be food and drink. >> anthony: yeah. >> chris: you know, what was interesting about this season across those seven episodes, i mean, we didn't have any huge, sort of, like, a formal, kinda, eating thing. it was more, more homey, more, sort of, of the people. did you, did you sense that at all? >> anthony: no. well, look. as i've gotten older, i'm moving more and more away from fine dining, let's put it that way, and, uh, and towards those foods and those meals that make me happy. food i can eat with my hands, peasant food, home cooking, you know, very small casual businesses. i'm not saying i'm suffering from fine dining exhaustion there's always gonna be aspects of that world that, that's the, you know, that's the world i came out of. um, but i like to experience food emotionally whenever possible and, as i've gotten older, you know, it's gonna be a pork shank or a bowl of noodles that makes me happy as opposed
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to larks, tongues, and aspic. maybe the first thing you think of when you think about chicago is not ass-burning sichuan food. but one of my favorite dishes in the world, anywhere -- mapo dofu. yes, a tofu dish. stippled heavily with pork in a burning, numbing, "9 1/2 week"-style exercise in sadomasochism that will start you thinking some deeply disturbing thoughts. do you know mapo dofu is it because it looks like spotted grandmother? or did spotted, pock-marked grandmother create the dish? >> man: both. >> anthony: both. >> man: yes. [ laughs ] >> anthony: right. night in metro manila, and i'm ready for my single favorite filipino street food. possibly the best thing you could ever eat with a cold beer. i'm talking, of course, about sisig. hot sizzling pig face with a
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runny egg on top, and, bitch, you better ask somebody, because nothing is getting in between me and this spicy, chewy, fatty goodness. this is really, really good. and then there's this, the dish that almost alone brought me back to cologne. it was sweet, sweet memories of this stegosaurus-sized shank of cured pork boiled and boiled until it literally falls away from the bone steaming and moist, a symphony of meat and gelatin and good, good stuff. god is hiding in there somewhere. it's when the himmel uhd erde, or heaven and earth, hits the table that i start getting deep into my happy zone. that's blood sausage, fried onions, and mashed potatoes with applesauce, which, if you don't like, by the way, pretty much removes you from my "will save from drowning" list. traditional rheinischer sauerbraten. morrissey is going to brown out his shorts he sees you eating this 'cause it is, how shall i say, equine in origin?
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old bessie didn't quite make it to the soap factory. >> rene: you like horse meat? >> anthony: i do like it actually. this is one of the few places that still does it. >> rene: yeah. >> anthony: the arbitrary decisions we make about what animals we're gonna eat, even i do. you know, 15 years, i've been eating all over the world, i've never eaten dog. >> rene: if you are cute as an animal, you are lucky. >> anthony: i think it's the eyes. big eyes, it's not food. >> woman: hi, ma'am. jolly afternoon! ♪ >> anthony: i hate mascots. you know they fart in those suits. it is true that i lie to my daughter and tell her that ronald mcdonald has been implicated in the disappearance of small children. that i sneer at fast food,
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revile it at every opportunity. but i am also a hypocrite because, to me, filipino chain jollibee is the wackiest, jolliest place on earth. >> karla mae: thank you! hi, sir! >> anthony: hello, hi! >> karla mae: jolly afternoon! >> anthony: welcome to jollibee. there are over 900 of these things all over the 7,000-plus philippine islands and a whole lot more internationally wherever there are home-sick filipinos. there's a jollibee in new jersey by the way. oh yeah. chicken and spaghetti, and not just any spaghetti. i think it's like sweet banana, ketchup-y stuff with hotdogs. that spaghetti's deranged, yet strangely alluring. oh, it's not a burger. it's rice. wait -- eat it in a piece with my pork. sinister brown sauce. i don't know what it's for.
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ooh, that's awesome. that's what you do with the brown stuff. ugh, i hate myself. >> karla mae: hi, ma'am, jolly afternoon. >> anthony: it's time to drink. though, to be fair, almost any time is time for a drink. >> dima: hello, yamas. good morning. >> anthony: yamas. oh. >> lambros: yeah, it kind of puts the day into perspective when you start off with a drink. >> anthony: oh. hair of the dog. yep. in villages like gorvaleti, custom must be observed. there is, i gather, a very formal structure to these toasts. >> man: quite, for the first, uh, seven-ish i would say. >> anthony: well, you sort of lose the plot after seven. >> man: no. [ laughs ] no. seven is not a lot. >> anthony: so, drink up. >> all: yamas. >> anthony: these are supposed
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to be good, right? this is the finest of the local beer. >> pierre: well, it's the cheapest one. >> anthony: oh. well, i'm a cheap date. i don't like this custom, though. i don't -- that, this. i don't want to know how many beers i've had. they're forcing beers on us. i didn't order a beer, and another one just keeps coming. >> tracey: do you know how to make it stop? >> anthony: face plant into my schnitzel? you know that moment when an animal dies and they look at you and there's a look in their face, i always interpret it as, "i'm very disappointed in you." >> dan: yeah. >> anthony: i always felt like, look, whatever this thing i shot i will treat it the way i would like to be treated. i mean, if you're gonna shoot me -- >> dan: yeah. >> anthony: -- please -- >> dan: don't just rip my breasts out and throw my ass away. >> anthony: yeah. that's a country music song right there. "don't rip my breasts off." [ laughs ] prost. >> melek: prost. >> anthony: everything's fine. how do i get out of drinking? how do i avoid chugging chacha?
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>> paul: say you have a heart condition. >> anthony: a heart condition. >> paul: yeah. >> eric: nothing short of that will help? [ igor speaking georgian ] >> anthony: working on it. i'll get there. i'll get there. [ igor speaking georgian ] ♪ ♪ lease a 2016 lincoln mkx for $349 a month. only at your lincoln dealer. brewmaster. risktaker.. i sold everything i had to own a brewery. you might have heard its name... stella artois be legacy
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and i'm michael howard. we left on our honeymoon in january 2012. it actually evolved into a business. from our blog to video editing... our technology has to hang tough with us. when you're going to a place without electricity, you need a long battery life. the touch, combined with the screen resolution... a mac doesn't have that. we wanted to help more people get out there and see the world. once you take that leap, that's where the magic happens.
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maybe... the skate park today? you can make it gr-r-reat! ♪ kellogg's frosted flakes gives you the sweet spark to go all in and let your great out. they're gr-r-reat!
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>> anthony: i got it, i got it. >> chris: you, you, you alluded to it earlier. like, we found ourselves in places where shit was hap -- was going down. i'm just saying, like, what's your sense of the world? >> anthony: i don't know. >> chris: i -- i don't want to get all, like, you know -- >> anthony: look, we certainly seem to, you know, there are times where those of us who work on the show wonder, "are we some sort of, like, weird magnets for mishap?" i mean, we seem to find ourselves in places again and again where things suddenly are in crisis. where things go wrong. uh, is this indicative of some larger trend? is the world going to hell in a handbasket?
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i resist that instinct. i mean, i think the world is filled with generally nice people clumsily blundering towards doing the best they can under ever-shifting circumstances. so, i mean, i think if you travel enough you will see things that are painful and ugly and hurtful and you will see conflict and, you know, maybe it's cyclical. i mean, we're certainly seeing a lot of things these days that we haven't seen in a while. cologne, of all places, is now the example for both sides of an increasingly bitter argument over whether europe, and by extension the world, should turn their backs on the millions of refugees spilling out of syria, iraq, and a middle east spinning into chaos and slaughter. with the bodies of children washing up on greek beaches and few other countries willing to help, germany has taken in 1.1 million people fleeing isis, russian and syrian bombs, and war.
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sakher al mohamad is one of many who found his way to cologne. hani zaitoun helps refugees as they try to integrate into german society. this is unsurprisingly easier said than done. getting to turkey, no problem. >> sakher: yes. >> anthony: turkey to greece, problem. >> hani: getting to turkey is now a problem. >> anthony: right. >> hani: but at that time it wasn't a problem. >> anthony: next went from greece to macedonia? >> sakher: yes. >> anthony: is that correct? welcome there? no. serbia? no. were you welcomed here? >> sakher: yes. very welcome. >> anthony: so here we are, a city doing the right thing. germany and cologne had reason to believe they could pull this off. absorb all those refugees from a culture very different than their own. the turkish presence is larger here than any other in the country. the infrastructure exists more
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or less to handle this enormous influx. >> hani: it exists. an integration of 200-, 300,000 would be easier than integration of 1.1 million that entered in 2015. this is a challenge not only for the germans, but also for those who came to integrate in the community. it's something that have to be work -- work on from both sides, not only the syrians, but also the germans. >> anthony: greece, probably the least prepared, least equipped to take in thousands of refugees from syria, afghanistan, and elsewhere, is being flooded with desperate children, women, men. they wash up on their shores alive and dead. but here on the cyclades -- >> female broadcaster: the country could find itself kicked out of europe. >> anthony: -- it feels a million miles from the greece
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you see in the headlines. the rest of the country is not doing so well, but apparently here it's pretty good. >> maria: yes. >> anthony: what's different about naxos? >> yannis: it's um -- >> maria: self-sustained. >> yannis: self-sustained. for example, in naxos, you can find 130,000 goats and lambs, and also, half of the population cultivating the land. so there are farmers. >> anthony: so, it's not just a tourist economy. you produce stuff here. you grow things. >> yannis: yeah. >> anthony: let me ask a difficult question. i'm not gonna ask you this question because you have to be diplomatic about difficult questions like this. i'm going to guess your father doesn't. so who caused the greek financial crisis? what happened here? [ statis speaking greek ] >> maria: he's not optimistic. he says we have a --
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[ statis speaking greek ] >> anthony: the farm itself, how long has it been in the family? >> maria: this was bought by the grandfather of my father in 1901. [ statis speaking greek ] >> maria: for us in the family, it's a very special place, and especially for me and i believe for my father. it has a special vibe. there's a good energy, this land.
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>> anthony: some places surprise you, even if you've been traveling nearly nonstop for 15 years like me. there are places that snap you out of your comfortable world view, take your assumptions and your prejudices and turn them upside down. they lead you to believe that maybe there is hope in the world. senegal is one of those places. ♪ [ djily rapping ] >> djily: each generation has its mission.
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we have a saying in wolof, we say -- "god is great." and, you always say where there is no solution, you say -- and you leave it in the hand of god. but we tell people, "this is in our hand. this is our future and the future of the next generation coming." [ djily rapping ] >> anthony: as relatively good as things have been for senegal, democracy, as it turns out, requires regular maintenance, diligence needed, and the willingness to stand up. ♪ [ djily rapping ] >> anthony: djily baghdad is a musician and activist who's doing what, well, the last poets and chuck d and others have done before him. say things that are important, loudly and often. wow. that was quick. from the beginning, i mean, was there always this, like, a social justice, um, political component to what you were doing musically?
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>> djily: from day one. the first thing we did was go do a campaign called "my voting card, my weapon." and we did songs and we did mobile concerts all over the country to raise awareness and it was the bum rush in the various spots. everybody went to register. that's, that's the step that's leaving us, you can see, that's the step into being conscious of what your power is. with this specific movement that we started and raising awareness i think the african union of people can start from here 'cause this is amazing. the new generation will learn from what we've done and maybe the next president might not be a politician at all. you never know. >> chris: i mean, are things more troubled? or -- what, is that just the way it is? >> anthony: i'd like to think it's all gonna be okay.
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i hope so. i have to believe that, i'm a father. hhi.o. welcome. this is the chevy malibu. it was awarded "most dependable midsize car" by j.d. power. it looks great. wow! what is happening? oh my gosh, it's going up! but the malibu's not the only vehicle that was awarded. this is mind blowing. the chevy camaro, equinox, and silverado hd were awarded most dependable as well. this is extremely impressive. there's so many! doing it once, yea, great job, four times, obviously, they're doing something right. absolutely for fastidious librarian emily skinner, each day was fueled by thorough preparation for events to come. well somewhere along the way, emily went right on living. but you see, with the help of her raymond james financial advisor, she had planned for every eventuality. ...which meant she continued to have the means to live on... ...even at the ripe old age of 187.
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[ clock titime. ] you only have so much. that's why we wanna make sure you won't have to wait on hold. and you won't have to guess when we'll turn up. because after all... we should fit into your life. [ laughing ] not the other way around. [ clock ticking ] ♪
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♪ ♪ >> anthony: here, back in
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manila, o.f.w. stands for overseas filipino worker, and they are one of the philippines's largest and most important exports -- people. go abroad, make money, improve the quality of life for the whole family. the entire filipino economy relies heavily on the money sent back by more than 10 million o.f.w.s. roughly 30 billion u.s. dollars a year, or about 10% of the nation's gdp. until recently, after domestic workers, the largest category of o.f.w.s were musicians. ♪ it's a nice day to start again ♪ >> anthony: like filipino cover bands. they're everywhere. on cruise ships, in hotel lobbies, bars, and, of course, in manila, where the competition is fierce and the penalties for not getting a beloved biker favorite like i don't know, billy idol, can be severe. ♪ come on it's a nice day for a white wedding ♪
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♪ it's a nice day to start again ♪ >> anthony: know this, pampered rock and roll stars, at any given moment somewhere in the philippines there is at least one person, and probably many more, who can step in and do your act better than you and after only a couple of hours practice. what about the musicians? i mean, how much money does, um, a guitar hero deserve to make? >> steve: well, all of it, obviously, because that's what people are listening to. people are listening to somebody's creative expression. >> anthony: one of the things people have always loved about chicago, of course, is the music, and if one guy has defined rock and roll and punk sounds for the last three decades, well, this guy, steve albini, would have to be a powerful candidate. member of the legendary chicago punk band big black and one of
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the most important producers of underground rock, albini produced some of the most influential music of the last 25 years. you have remarkably lenient, um, views on, uh, music sharing. your pricing structure as a producer is, you know, somewhat against the grain of the usual business model, unusual for the music industry. what, what are you, some kind of a communist? what -- what -- what -- what -- ? >> steve: well, i mean, i have a, i have a healthy suspicion of capitalism as a method. i feel like, you know, left unchecked, capitalism is, is a kind of cultural sociopathy. like, the endgame of capitalism is that everything is crappier and crappier and people are more and more exploited, and i feel like the social model that i'm comfortable with, which is that we're all in the same game. we're all trying to do the same thing, we just want to make sure that things get better for everybody. >> anthony: thank you so much. >> waiter: you're welcome. >> steve: the people who are productive and content and part of an enterprise that is, you know, righteous, for lack of a better term. >> anthony: right.
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>> steve: they tend to not just give lip service to the notion of egalitarianism or fairness, but they tend to embody it. >> chris: all right. um, music. >> anthony: music is important to the show. music is important to me. uh, i grew up in a house filled with music, uh, and records. i happen to believe that music and, like food, is an expression of a place and a culture. you know? they're both very heartfelt methods of communicating feelings and identity, and it's something i like to focus on in the show whenever possible. ♪ >> anthony: sometimes we get lucky. we get to do things on this show because, just because it's a show, that are, frankly, awesome. like this, a small restaurant in dakar.
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the delicious smells of senegalese cooking coming from the kitchen. a band. [ youssou singing ] >> anthony: youssou n'dour -- one of the most beloved musicians on the african continent. famous throughout the world for blending traditional music of the region with cuban rumba, american jazz, and r&b. m'balax, as it came to be known, has had an enormous influence on musicians worldwide. like that sting guy, tracy chapman, and saint bruce of asbury, and, most famously, his frequent collaborator peter gabriel. [ youssou singing ] ♪ >> anthony: people started to talk about you when you were age 12 when you started to perform, um, professionally. >> youssou: yeah. >> anthony: but did you come
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from a musical tradition? >> youssou: my mom, she's a griot. griot are the storytellers. they are also singers, rappers, and everything. and i grow with my grandma, she was big singer. she give me a lot of things. and from there going to the school for two years then left the school and start my career. >> anthony: wow. >> youssou: ah. >> anthony: that looks good. >> youssou: that's good. good, good, good, good, good. thank you. >> anthony: so what's the future? twenty years from now. where will senegal be? >> youssou: what i hope is in 20 years senegal is gonna be the place for great and big contribution of what we call islam. >> anthony: do you think there's any danger of the kind of radical islam that we see taking
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hold in many places in africa? >> youssou: all these people who are using the religion, muslim religion, to do bad things, i think senegal have examples. i think this country have models of the religion. this country, you know, you are here, i'm doing my local bissap and you are with your beer and country 95% muslim. ♪ >> youssou: and i think this example can help all the world. >> anthony: i hope so. inshallah. >> youssou: inshallah. [ youssou singing ] ♪
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>> youssou: merci, thank you. mom, i have to tel. dad, one second i was driving and then the next... they just didn't stop and then... i'm really sorry. i wrecked the subaru. i wrecked it. you're ok. that's all that matters. (vo) a lifetime commitment to getting them home safely. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. that lets you write con the screenen if you try to write, on a plain old mac the difference can be seen (it doesn't work) get the surface pro (the keyboard detaches from the screen) get the surface pro (i like the blue!)
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i've bfrom nature's bounty to support my heart. i'm running, four times a week. eating better, keeping healthy. so that no matter what happens in the future, my "future self" will thank me. thank you! you're welcome! hey listen. whatever you do, don't marry dan! hey babe, i'm dan. hey babe, can i get 14 dollars for... thank you. 45 years of experience has taught us: no matter what the future holds,
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you're always better off healthy. nature's bounty
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>> chris: the sixth act was always the, "we're gonna sit down and have a family meal and it's gonna be our out." >> anthony: right. >> chris: these sit-down meals now have become something even more important, and there's more that comes out of them. i've, i mean, just, you know, there, there was --
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>> anthony: look, i think it's like this. i think whereas, in the old days, we often looked at the family meal as a way to sort of sum up everything. uh, as an emotional resolution. i don't really do that anymore. uh, i'm uncomfortable with happy endings where we think we may have really learned something comfortably. increasingly the meal, particularly the family meal, is another, just another place where people say interesting things. it is a place where people are comfortable in telling you, often, very complicated and very personal stories. while i'm always interested in what's cooking, i'm much more interested these days in who's cooking, why they're cooking what they're cooking, and what else they have to say. we're here for a supra at the home of ushangi and
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makvala kokashvili. a supra is like a feast, super traditional. a pig is dispatched and broken into constituent parts. the neighbors pitch in, helping to make three different varieties of a traditional cheese-filled bread known as katchapori, variously stuffed here with potato, beet leaves, and stewed cabbage. roast stuffed goose. wow, look at that. shashlik, grilled kebabs of pork with a sour plum sauce. there's also quarma, a slow-cooked stew of the pig's heart and liver with onions, bay leaves, and parsley. >> dima: if we have a choice, we prefer west to russia because the future for our children is much better there. >> anthony: but they're still here. [ dima speaking georgian ] [ maia speaking georgian ] >> dima: we're not afraid. [ maia speaking georgian ] >> dima: they're here, but we sleep peacefully. [ igor speaking georgian ]
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>> pierre: senegal is a special country. teranga is hospitality, that's the translation, but it's -- the most important value is really the way you treat the others. love, that's what teranga is. so, today you are our guest, so you'll be treated with our national dish. >> anthony: i'm gonna watch you and i'm gonna do what you do. >> pierre: let's do it. let's go. >> anthony: thiebou jen, which
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in wolof means simply "rice with fish." the meal is eaten from one communal platter, an experience both fun and instructive. mm. oh, that's good. sustenance and life lesson. >> woman: normally children are not allowed to go too far in the middle of the plate. so you will have an adult cutting pieces of fish or meat for them. >> pierre: it's a way to teach them to be content with their portion. >> anthony: mm-hmm. >> pierre: you know? not only children, but everyone, you have to imagine that the triangle in front of you and you have to chew slowly, there's, you have to be patient. so, all these values are taught when we eat around the bowl. >> anthony: so, if i were looking for a metaphor for senegalese society, this would be it? >> pierre: this is it. this is senegalese society. >> anthony: you know, i have a -- i have a personal connection to the philippines. um, i felt unsatisfied with the first show i did there many years ago, and i really wanted
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to do something about not necessarily the philippines, but the filipino character that i've come to know. that sense of caring and generosity and -- it was a personal mission to try to show people something that i've come to appreciate and know a little bit. >> aurora: oh, come in! come in! >> anthony: it's always, always about family in the philippines, or anywhere you find filipinos. and if you're an overseas filipino worker, you will recognize this immediately. the balikbayan box. a christmas tradition. a way for o.f.w.s to show loved ones, though separated by oceans, that you miss them -- >> aurora: oh, this is from albert. >> anthony: -- that you're still out there. what's in these boxes?
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whatever you can send. little things you'd casually give to a loved one, if you didn't live on the other side of the world. >> that's mine. that's my name. >> anthony: that's a lot of love. >> aurora: "i really hope you enjoy the simple gift i sent and i know that my heart is with you always. i love you very much, albert." >> anthony: i'm at this christmas gathering today because of one of our directors, erik osterholm. it was aurora who raised him. for over 20 years she cared for and loved erik and his sister, looked after his whole family. erik sent me a letter talking about you. i want to read you what he said. "aurora is such an incredible woman. she has an infections and loving energy that is so powerful. i am 100% the man i am today because this women literally raised me from when i was
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6 months old, singing to me, dancing with me, wiping away my tears, cooking for me, and making me laugh at every turn. unfortunately, like so many filipinos, her story is not all smiles and love. she had to choose a life away from her daughter and thousands of miles from her family. there are literally thousands of people around the world, thousands of people around the world, me included, who have been influenced by her endless kindness and love." filipinos give -- of themselves, of their time, their money, their love to others. they do, and continue to do, what needs to be done to survive.
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i am sebastian artois. brewmaster. risktaker. i sold everything i had to own a brewery. you might have heard its name... stella artois be legacy
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♪ ♪ ♪ don't just eat. mangia! bertolli. ♪...nausea, heartburn,♪ indigestion, upset stomach, diarrhea!♪ ♪nausea, heartburn, indigestion, upset stomach, diarrhea!♪ here's pepto bismol! ah. ♪nausea, heartburn, indigestion, upset stomach, diarrhea!♪
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♪ >> anthony: a few years back i got the words "i am certain of nothing" tattooed on my arm. it's what makes travel what it
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is -- an endless learning curve, the joy of being wrong, of being confused. at first you see what you see in so many places -- busy markets, the noisy streets, but look just a little bit longer, a little bit deeper and you'll see it's not so different here from anywhere, really. ♪
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[ woman speaking greek ] ♪ [ woman rapping ]
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♪ >> anthony: my rented villa is pleasant enough, but to be perfectly honest, lonely. is it worse to be someplace awful when you're by yourself or someplace really nice that you can't share with anyone? you happy, very happy. >> anthony: yeah. >> woman: opens your heart. >> anthony: for sure. >> woman: but don't tell me what you ate, tell me who you ate with. >> anthony: don't tell me what you ate, tell me who you ate with. yeah. there's something to be said to that. i mean, um, no company at all can make even the best meal sort
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of a tragic comic event. >> all: yamas. >> anthony: good company can make a crap meal taste a hell of a lot better. makes the meal. you know, a lot of countries where they're really, really poor, but they're super serious about food -- >> woman: like where? >> man: like here. [ laughter ] don't go -- don't go very far. [ laughter ] welcome. this is the chevy malibu. it was awarded "most dependable midsize car" by j.d. power. it looks great. wow! what is happening? oh my gosh, it's going up! but the malibu's not the only vehicle that was awarded. this is mind blowing. the chevy camaro, equinox, and silverado hd were awarded most dependable as well. this is extremely impressive.
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there's so many! doing it once, yea, great job, four times, obviously, they're doing something right. absolutely maybe... the skate park today? you can make it gr-r-reat! ♪ kellogg's frosted flakes gives you the sweet spark to go all in and let your great out. they're gr-r-reat! the possibility of a flare was almost always on my mind.
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thinking about what to avoid, where to go... and how to deal with my uc. to me, that was normal. until i talked to my doctor. she told me that humira helps people like me get uc under control and keep it under control when certain medications haven't worked well enough. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal infections and cancers, including lymphoma, have happened; as have blood, liver, and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure. before treatment, get tested for tb. tell your doctor if you've been to areas where certain fungal infections are common, and if you've had tb, hepatitis b, are prone to infections, or have flu-like symptoms or sores. don't start humira if you have an infection. raise your expectations. ask your gastroenterologist about humira. with humira, control is possible. endless shrimp is back at hold red lobster.rks. that means you get to try as much as you want... ...of whatever flavors are calling your name.
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seriously. like new garlic sriracha-grilled shrimp. it's a little spice... ...a little sizzle... ...and a lot just right. and try new parmesan peppercorn shrimp. helloooo crispy goodness. and the classic... ...handcrafted shrimp scampi... ...you can't get enough of? still gonna floor you. it may be called endless... ...but that doesn't mean it'll last.
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>> anthony: where we're going next. >> chris: where are we going next. if you can just sort of -- you don't have to give, no long, no long-winded stuff. you can just blow through the list. >> anthony: got it. buenos aires, which was due to be aired last season, but you will finally see it now. a strange and gorgeous uh, uh -- >> chris: can you -- can you keep this kind of pithy, if you will, and just give me, uh, just -- >> anthony: well, we delve into some deep -- [ laughs ] some deep psycho drama. >> chris: um -- >> anthony: all right. >> chris: just, wait, wait, wait. don't get up yet. just do me, do me a favor, just do one of those, just a read through of the names. just, like, read that list of places for me so i'm gonna edit across. just go down the list but give, give a -- >> anthony: buenos aires. >> chris: you can read, don't
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even look at the camera, you can just, like, read them off. >> anthony: buenos aires. it's summer in the city. we're filming in the dead heat of summer when nobody's in town, and it's got a sad, mournful, empty, totally awesome quality that, of course, i really like. ♪ >> anthony: any excuse to come to japan is a good one. i feel healthier already. for a reason.
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it's awesome. this episode we're going back to japan with masa takayama. >> masa: it's a character. >> anthony: probably the greatest and most respected japanese chef in america. how do i hold a sake cup? >> masa: no, no. that's women. [ laughs ] >> anthony: ten years of drinking sake like a girl. his restaurant masa in new york is certainly the most expensive restaurant in america. >> masa: this. this is from a tree. >> anthony: hardcore. that's so beautiful. >> masa: yeah. >> anthony: and we're going back to japan with him to find out why -- what happens next? where it all came from. and where it's going. ♪ >> anthony: nashville, tennessee. when i planned to do a show here i was saying, "you know,
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everybody does shows about music in nashville." but then we got really, really lucky. ♪ so prepare yourself. this show's all about music and it is filled with the most awesome music ever in the history of the world. maybe even the universe. ♪ >> anthony: sichuan. what happens when america's favorite bad boy chef and upright, three-star michelin french chef, eric ripert, go to china. eric's never been to china before. nor is he used to the elevated levels of, shall we say, heat and spice. >> eric: this is very sweet and
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sticky, but i like it a lot. >> anthony: in fact, his delicate system totally can't handle what he's about to get. >> eric: oh, my god. my sinuses are so open, you have no idea. >> anthony: he's so in for it. >> eric: holy cow. whoa. that spice prevents me to think right. >> anthony: spicy. >> eric: i feel like my face is changing. >> anthony: i take my great friend eric ripert, the french chef, and torture him relentlessly. you know, they always say, "this is a very special episode." yeah, this is a very special episode. >> chris: good? >> anthony: can i get you guys some sandwiches or some cold chicken? >> chris: yeah. that would be -- that would be fantastic.
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>> anthony: when i first went up this river, i was sick with love. the bad kind. the fist around your heart kind. i ran far, but there was no escaping it. it followed me up river all the way. that was ten long years ago. a previous episode of a previous series in a previous life. yet, here i am again. heading up to that same long house in the jungle. ♪

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