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tv   Early Start with Christine Romans and Dave Briggs  CNN  May 30, 2017 1:00am-2:01am PDT

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a full agenda awaits president trump and his team at the white house as the administration fights back against growing questions about ties to russia. >> an adviser at the center of those questions, jared kushner, laying low. now the white house claiming kushner's secret back-channel request on the kremlin. and german chancellor angela merkel not backing away from her suggestion europe must go it alone. what does it mean for the u.s. relationship with germany and the european union? good morning and welcome to "early start." i'm christine romans. >> i'm dave briggs. welcome back, my friend. >> thank you! nice three-day weekend and i'm back, rearing to go.
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>> are you fired up like the president? back and ready to take on a full agenda? >> i will not be having a press briefing, but other than that. >> we look forward to spicy being back. it is tuesday, may 30th, 4:00 a.m. in the east. president trump back in the oval office and trying to return to the country's business after a long holiday weekend and an even longer overseas trip. some key issues on his very full agenda -- whether to pull out of the paris climate accords and the search for a new fbi director. the president also weighing a strategy going forward for afghanistan that could include more troops, a decision all the more significant after president trump's first visit to arlington national cemetery as commander in chief. >> the president also weighing whether to shake up his team. sean spicer is set to brief the media, as we mentioned, this afternoon, amid questions about changes to the press office. it will be the first time since the president left for his nine-day trip that any white house official has briefed in front of cameras and the first since penetrating questions began to swirl about senior
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adviser and first son-in-law jared kushner. jeff zeleny begins our coverage from the white house. >> reporter: christine and dave, the white house is back in business after the long holiday weekend and after the president's first international trip, they are still desperately trying to change the subject from the russia pivot, but that unlikely. this is consuming the white house, at least in responding to it. jared skukushner is telling associates he is willing to talk to the fbi, he's willing to talk to members of congress about those back-channel communications he was trying to set up with russian officials. they say it was simply something that they were trying to offer to do to sort of build the connection with the russian government here, but so many questions about that because they were acting at the time as private citizens, but they were members of the transition. coming up, there are some key
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agenda items the president has on his desk he wants to act upon. first and foremost, is he going to withdraw or keep the u.s. inside that landmark climate agreement agreement? he was lobbied last week at the g7 summit in sisry. european leaders urged the president to stay, but most people here at the white house would be surprised if the president would decide to stay in the landmark climate agreement, but it raises the question, if the u.s. pulls out of this agreement, what does it do to its standing on the world stage? what does it do to the rest of the president's agenda? also, the president is facing a decision on afghanistan. when will he act on his military commander's recommendation to send more u.s. troops to afghanistan? that certainly was made even more poignant as he visited arlington national cemetery on memorial day. those are two of many issues facing the white house, but the russia investigation is still dominating things here inside the west wing. christine and dave? >> sure is. jeff zeleny, thanks.
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part of the president's plan to push back against all the russia suspicions and allegations could involve two former members of his campaign staff, ex-campaign manager corey lewandowski and former deputy campaign manager david bossie, both spotted at the white house last night, mentioned as possible players in an outside rapid response team working closely with the white house war room. bossie may also be in line for a position within the trump administration. >> investigators are trying to figure out exactly why jared kushner met in december with a russian banker with links to vladimir putin, what the point of that meeting was. that's according to "the new york times." cnn has already reported kushner met with russian ambassador sergey kislyak, seeking to engage further with russia. kushner was then told to meetgo of a russian bank under sanction by the u.s. >> and the white house pushing back on reporting kushner tried to set up a secret back channel with the russians by blaming the
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russians, claiming it was their idea. the source tells cnn's gloria borger the russian ambassador asked kushner if the russian military could talk to michael flynn about syria. a source says kushner did not say he would arrange it and it never was arranged. >> for the time being, expect kushner and his wife, ivanka, to keep their heads down. administration officials tell cnn both are laying low and focusing on their work, unfazed by all the scrutiny. the administration claims ivanka trump is not involved with the war room currently being established, even though she was seen at the white house with the president's personal attorney, mark kassewitz. >> cnn also learning jared and ivanka have told friends they will continue to evaluate whether they plan to remain in washington, d.c., something they discussed before the news broke about kushner's request for this private back-channel communication to moscow. >> we're told they're going to re-evaluate, you know, how long they're staying in d.c., maybe every six months, maybe not exactly every six months, but you know, their future in d.c.
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is something they're evaluating out the time. >> understandable, given the spotlight they are under constantly. >> but people close to her say she wants to shepherd through this paid family leave that made it into the president's budget that she does have priorities she's focus ede and keeping her head down to do those. german chancellor angela merkel giving weight to her view that europe can no longer rely on the u.s. the way it once did, restating her concern about u.s. reliability at a speech in berlin, one day after saying her eyes have been opened by her experience at nato and g7 meetings with president trump. >> translator: we are convinced tra trans-atlanticist, and because we know they are, we know the relations are important for us all, resting on mutual values and interests, particularly when we are in times as we are in now of intense challenges. the last few days showed me that the days where we could completely rely on others are over.
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>> trans-atlanta crist. >> yes. germany's foreign minister taking a harsher town, saying "trump has weakened the west," accusing the u.s. of standing against the interests of the european union. helping us sort through european reaction, senior international correspondent frederik pleitgen in london for us. good morning to you, fred. how is this all being received in europe? do they agree with merkel? >> reporter: well, i think a lot of countries agree, dave. there is a lot of frustration here on the side of the atlantic, especially after president trump's visit to europe, both to the nato summit in brussels, but also then to the g7 summit in italy as well, and some of the things that he said about trade, where he said that the germans were "bad" for exporting so many cars to america, but then especially on defense as well as far as nato is concerned, not really making a full commitment to other nato partners. that certainly was something that was eye-opening. and you heard angela merkel use the word trans-atlanticist, which she might use because
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she's a physicist, very intellectual, but she says she remains committed to the nato alliance. however, the germans are saying that they're not sure with this white house this place right now, whether they can fully rely on america to be there for them, dave. >> it's interesting because the biggest exporter of cars for the united states happens to be a german company. those cars are made in the united states with american labor, so it's one of those things that is so confusing about the criticism that president trump has about trade with them, with germany. for merkel, though, this sort of talk is pretty unprecedented from her, isn't it? >> reporter: yeah, it certainly is. i've covered angela merkel since the year 2000, since she was an opposition leader in berlin, and she is someone who really chooses her words very, very carefully. so, she must have heard things from president trump while he was in europe that really were eye-opening and disillusioning to her. so, to hear her speak that way, even though she is right now sort of in an election campaign, but she's so far in the lead
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that she really wouldn't need to use any inflammatory rhetoric, so, this is something she's certainly thought through and certainly something that could change the trajectory of german politics towards the united states. >> her proponents certainly seem to agree with her and her comments. what does this mean in merkel's remark plays out in policy? what are the practical implications here? >> reporter: one of the things i could could happen is there could be what many call a reorientation here in europe, more of a partnership, for instance, with france, even deeper than before, more european politics, rather than looking towards the united states. and the other thing with the germans especially, because they are a big exporting and trade nation, they could really try and foster even deeper ties with countries like china, with asian countries, where they already do have an industrial partnership. they could try and deepen those if they feel that the u.s. isn't reliable anymore, but what christine said is absolutely correct. german carmakers created some 110,000 jobs in america making
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900,000 cars, so this could potentially be a big deal for america as well. >> fred, let me ask you, dave forwarded me this unbelievable opinion piece from under ash spieg spiegel, where the editor in chief said president trump needs to do, here are the seven ways to do it, and haase hurting the world. is some of this maybe angela merkel reflecting what the media and what the elites in germany think about donald trump? >> reporter: i think partially. one of the things i think you notice in europe is there is some division. there are certain countries where president trump is very popular and other countries that are trying to make it work, for instance britain who's voted for brexit to leave the european union, looking for closer ties to america. but many elites in europe are downright scared of this new white house, who believes that some of the things are dangerous for free trade but also for defense especially as well. so, she might be echoing some of that, but she also is someone obviously very much her own
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person, her own thinker. one of the things i've learned is she's dealt with very flamboyant leaders in the past and she usually tries to find some way to make it work. she's very analytic and she certainly isn't someone who's driven by emotions. so, i'm sure she'll try to make it work, but at the same time, she will be very realistic about what she feels this white house is all about and what that means for europe. >> all right. thanks so much, fred pleitgen. great analysis. >> thank you, fred. hundreds of u.s. companies say their business will suffer if the president quits the paris climate deal. 195 countries signed that landmark accord, including the u.s. the plan reduces greenhouse gas emissions starting in 2020, but if america withdraws, companies like microsoft, nike, l'oreal, say the u.s. will lose its competitive edge. that's because they can't cash in on the new markets for clean tech, but oil firms like chevron and exxonmobil, they back the paris deal. the exxon ceo urged the
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president in a letter to keep a seat at the negotiating table, but energy company support is a strange move. the accord favors the cleaner natural gas they produce over coal. they say natural gas is the primary reason for coal's decline, even though the president called the climate treaty a bad deal. in an op ed, ted cruz encouraged him to fulfill his promise to rip up the treaty, writing that it drives up energy prices, devastates our industrial base and bolstering our rivals. everyone reaffirmed the agreement and the u.s. did not, stating it was reviewing its policies. trump tweeted he would make his final decision this week. but remarkable. the president said the paris deal will kill jobs and american energy, it's bad and not competitive. the very companies who stand to be affected say, no, no, no, please stay in, mr. president. >> yeah. you hear that maybe he wants to rework this deal, but that's a negotiation with the entire world -- >> 195.
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>> not an easy renegotiation. an interesting couple of days ahead. what made a texas lawmaker say this about one of his colleagues? >> a very stupid comment. he's a racist. he's a bad person. >> why immigration nearly made lawmakers come to blows in the texas state legislature, next. (quiet chatter) (soft gasp) (record scratching) ( ♪ )
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mattress firmness? enter sleep number... she likes the bed soft. he's more hardcore. you can both adjust the bed for the best sleep of your life. save $700 on the temperature balancing i8 bed. go to sleepnumber.com for a store near you. welcome back on this tuesday. near brawl erupting during the final regular session of the texas legislature. >> it was like sports, a little. >> take a look. it was like sports, very, very heated sports. hundreds of people packing the capitol rotunda on monday. they were protesting a new state law that bans sanctuary cities and punishes local governments that don't comply with immigration rules and detention requested. boy, did things get heated when republican house member matt rinaldi announced he called i.c.e. to report protesters who were holding signs that read
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"i'm illegal and here to stay." >> he says he was then assaulted verbally and physically by lawmakers, admiting he threatened to shoot one democrat in defense. it was all too much for this lawmaker. >> the guy made a stupid comment. he's racist. he's a bad person. we're not going to allow people like that to get away saying things like that because they think nothing's going to happen that. >> democrats deny assaulting rinaldo and i.c.e. say they never received a phone call about the protesters. >> turn down the temperature. you can expect a lot of suspensions, fines and helmet-throwing jokes after fireworks in san francisco. giants pitcher hunter strickland, bryce harper of the nationals, he gets plunged and here comes harper. he got hit by a 98-mile-an-hour fastball, so he throws the helmet. you saw he missed by about six, eight feet. then they go at it, they charge the mound. you see the drawl ensuing, harper landing a few blows.
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both benches would clear. this was the first time harper had faced strickland since hitting two home runs off of him in the 2014 playoffs. what's getting lots of attention again, the most entertaining part of the brawl, harper's helmet toss. whoops! it missed, again, by six, eight feet. now, strickland did not miss with that pitch, but boy, was harper inaccurate with the helmet throw. i don't think he meant to hit the pitcher with the helmet throw. do you think he meant to? >> i can't tell if he was trying to throw it away or at him. whatever's going to happen, he's going to comfort him because he didn't slow down. i think the helmet is the inconsequential part of the whole thing. >> but that is what is getting all the attention online is how bad harper missed with the helmet toss. i'm just safely saying he did not intend to hit strickland. >> i have a question. your kids play baseball. >> yeah. >> what do you say to your kids when they see something like this? >> well, there's a lot of talk
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online that this is bad for baseball, we should clamp down on this. eh, not really. it's not so bad. the attention given on the sport -- bryce harper's great for the game. some people hate the attention he's brought to it because he's so bash and cocky and does things like this, but that's making young kids watch. i'll take the bad with the good. >> all right. officials in manchester still looking for a critical piece of evidence more than a week after that deadly terror attack. we're live in england with why this blue suitcase is so significant. we danced in a german dance group. i wore lederhosen.man. when i first got on ancestry i was really surprised that i wasn't finding all of these germans in my tree. i decided to have my dna tested through ancestry dna. the big surprise was we're not german at all. 52% of my dna comes from scotland and ireland. so, i traded in my lederhosen for a kilt. ancestry has many paths to discovering your story. get started for free at ancestry.com.
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are asking the public's help in tracking down this hard-sided, blue-rolling suitcase. that was what the bomber was seen with leading up to last week's blast. >> an official telling cnn investigators are still not sure whether the suicide bomber at the concert actually built the bomb himself, calling it the key question in this investigation. meanwhile, this morning manchester is returning to its normal life step by step, little by little. for more on that, mohammad lila is in manchester. now we have this image of the blue rolling suitcase and the image behind you of the people still paying their respects. >> reporter: well, good morning, christine and dave. that's right, people here are still continuing to come to the square, although we're coming off a long weekend here in the uk, so people are now back to work. the crowds are a little bit lower than they normally would, but the biggest development in the case is police have released this image of a blue suitcase, calling it a distinctive suitcase, and they're hoping it
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might jog people's memories. the reason why they're looking for it is because they believe the main suspect in the case, salman abedi, was carrying that suitcase days before the attack and wheeling it around in manchester, in the city center. they don't believe it was used in the attack. there were explosives in a backpack that detonated at the manchester arena, but they're looking for that suitcase because they believe it may have more clues about the suitcase and why abedi was seen with it in the city. all this comes as the city is slowly, very slowly starting to get back to normal. the main train station, which is called victoria train station, which was attached to manchester arena, had been closed for the last week. this morning it opened in a small ceremony with the mayor there. the idea behind it was to show the city of manchester, the uk and the world that they are back and open for business and slowly returning back to normal. >> mohammad lila, thank you so much for that, as manchester
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gets back to work. thank you, sir. all right, ahead, can the white house escape the russia probe as it tries to reclaim its footing after a long foreign trip but a series of untimely links to russian officials? incredible bladder protection in a pad this thin, i didn't...
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get a 4 week trial, plus $100 in extras including postage and a digital scale. go to stamps.com/tv and never go to the post office again. the paris climate deal, the search for a new fbi director, troops in afghanistan, and perhaps a staff shake-up. plenty to do as the white house tries to get back to business. meantime, the russia probe still the dark cloud hanging over this white house. now the west wing is set to blame jared kushner's secret back-channel request on the kremlin. and german chancellor angela merkel standing behind the suggestion europe can't rely on the u.s. what's in store for american ties with berlin and europe as a whole? some suggest that maybe it's time that europe start taking some self-responsibility and not
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going it alone, but we'll get into this later on. welcome back to "early start." i'm dave briggs. >> i'm christine romans. thanks for joining us. president trump back in the oval office today trying to get back to the country's business after a long holiday weekend and an even longer overseas trip. key issues on his very full agenda, whether to pull out of the paris climate accords and the search for a new fbi director. the president is also weighing a strategy going forward for afghanistan. that could include more troops, a decision all the more significant after president trump's first visit to arlington national cemetery as commander in chief. >> the president also weighing whether to shake up his team. sean spicer set to brief the media this afternoon amid questions about changes to the press office. it will be the first time since the president left for his nine-day trip that any white house official has briefed in front of cameras and the first since penetrating questions began to swirl around senior adviser and first son-in-law jared kushner. jeff zeleny begins our coverage from the white house. >> reporter: christine and dave,
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the white house is back in business after the long holiday weekend and after the president's first international trip. they are still desperately trying to change the subject from the russia investigation, trying to make a pivot, but the chances of doing that are probably fairly unlikely. the deepening russia investigation is still consuming the white house here, at least in terms of how they are going to respond to it. now, jared kushner, the president's son-in-law and senior adviser, he is telling associates he is willing to talk to the fbi, he's willing to talk to members of congress about those back-channel communications he was trying to set up with russian officials. they say it was simply something that they were trying to offer to do to sort of build the connection with the russian government here, but so many questions about that because they were acting at the time as private citizens, but they were members of the transition. coming up, there are some key agenda items the president has on his desk he wants to act upon. first and foremost, is he going to withdraw or keep the u.s. inside that landmark climate
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agreement? he was lobbied last week at the g7 summit in sicily. european leaders urged the president to stay, but most people here at the white house would be surprised if the president would decide to stay in the landmark climate agreement, but it raises the question -- if the u.s. pulls out of this agreement, what does it do to its standing on the world stage? what does it do to the rest of the president's agenda? also, the president is facing a decision on afghanistan. when will he act on his military commander's recommendation to send more u.s. troops to afghanistan? that certainly was made even more poignant as he visited arlington national cemetery on memorial day. those are two of many issues facing the white house, but the russia investigation is still dominating things here inside the west wing. christine and dave. >> jeff zeleny, thanks. investigators are trying to figure out exactly why jared kushner met in december with a russian banker who has links to vladimir putin. what the point of the meeting was.
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that's according to "the new york times." cnn already reported kushner met with russian ambassador sergey kislyak, seeking to engage further with russia. kushner was then told to meet with sergey gourcuff, the head of a russian bank under sanction from the united states. >> also this morning, they're ready to push back on reporting kushner tried to set up a back-channel with the russians, pushing back by blaming the russians, claiming it was their do. a source tells cnn's gloria borger that they asked to talk to michael flynn about syria and the source said kushner never said he could arrange it and it was never arranged. >> for the time being, expect kushner and his wife, ivanka, to keep their heads down. an official tells cnn they are both laying low and focusing on work, unfazed by the scrutiny. the source claims ivica is not involved with the war room established, although she was seen at the white house with the
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white house personal attorney mark kassewitz. >> cnn has also lernth jared and ivanka have told friends they will evaluate whether to remain in washington, d.c., previous to kushner's request about a back-channel to russia. german chancellor angela merkel giving weight to her view that europe can no longer rely on the u.s. the way it once did, restating her concern about u.s. reliability at a speech in berlin one day after saying her eyes had been opened by her experience at nato and g7 meetings with president trump. >> translator: we are convinced trans-atlanticists, and precisely because we are, we know transatlantic relations are of immense importance for us all. they rest on mutual values and interests, particularly in times as we are in now of intense challenges. the last few days showed me that the days where we could completely rely on others are over. >> germany's foreign minister taking an even harsher tone,
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saying president trump has "weakened the west," accusing the u.s. of standing against the interests of the european union. want to sort through the european reaction here. senior international correspondent frederik pleitgen is in london. and fred, how is all of this being received by the europeans? do they agree with angela merkel? >> reporter: well, i would say most of them do agree with angela merkel. looking to france, for instance, similar comments came from the french president as well. the brits take a little bit of a different view. they're just leaving the european union in the next two years, so they're looking for closer ties with america, but most of the continental europeans probably feel the same things. and one of the interesting things that angela merkel said, for instance on this climate deal that jeff zeleny was just talking about, she said in the g7 countries, so the biggest economies in the world, there's basically a 6-1 situation right now where all of them want to have the climate deal continue, but the u.s. still isn't sure about its position, so that's one thing. then you have nato, where obviously president trump last week made some comments that
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really a lot of europeans didn't want to hear. on the one hand saying that the u.s. was paying too much, europeans were paying too little, but at the same time, they were missing a full commitment that the u.s. was committed to the security of european nations. and i think that's really what prompted angela merkel to say what she said. and so, there certainly is a lot of frustration in europe about some of the things coming out of the white house. >> an interesting story in the "wall street journal," an opinion piece, fred, this morning. essentially, the last line, "the atlantic alliance may even benefit from more such candid talk by both sides." is there any sentiment that maybe some self-reliance on behalf of europe and germany, it's time for? >> reporter: yeah, you know what, i think that to a certain extent might be true. one of the things that is certainly a fact is that many european countries have been spending far too little on defense. as far as america is concerned. but also as far as they themselves are concerned, the commitment they've made as well. you take, for instance, a
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country like germany, which by far is the largest economy in europe, they're supposed to spend 2% of their annual budget on defense. right now they're at 1.2%, and they keep saying they can't really boost defense spending that much that quickly, but it's one of the things that has led to frustrations not just with the u.s. but with other countries as well. so, certainly from a defense perspective, there is some merit to some of this, what the "wall street journal" calls candid talk, but at the same time, if you look at trade, for instance, where the germans are saying, look, we're creating so many jobs in the u.s., while at the same time, obviously, there is a lot of import and export between the two countries, they really felt that that part of president trump's comments were quite unfair to them. >> right. >> fred, i should add, that "wall street journal" piece also said president trump's lack of basic knowledge about the trade economics -- >> and a german company employs thousands and thousands of people and german automakers employ 100,000 people or more in
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the united states. what does this mean for europe, and by extension, the u.s. in terms of that remark from angela merkel, if it were to play out in policy, fred? >> reporter: well, i think it certainly will play out in policy, but i'm not sure how big the long-term effects are going to be, christine. on the one hand, angela merkel said she was committed to the transatlantic alliance, but at the same time, she said right now with this white house in place, it really is unclear to the europeans where they stand. so, one thing that i think you will see is you will see a lot more orientation by european countries towards themselves, towards strengthening european ties, especially now with the brits also leaving the european union. you'll see that axis of paris and berlin really trying to deepen their relations. and at the same time, i think you'll see countries like germany, but france as well, really trying to up their cooperation with asian countries as well. the germans have been doing it for a long time. they actually have, strangely, a pretty balanced trade with china. if you look at the monetary value of things. so, that's already been going on and it seems as though they could boost that a lot, if
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indeed they feel that the u.s. isn't reliable anymore. >> interesting. frederik pleitgen live for us in london. great insight. we really appreciate it. all right, it took a few days, but president trump now condemning last week's fatal, racially charged train stabbings in portland. the president tweeting, "the violent attacks in portland on friday are unacceptable. the victims were standing up to hate and intolerance. our prayers are with them." that coming from the potus account, not the president's personal account. two men were killed, another was wounded by a suspect who was aiming hateful remarks at two female passengers. one of the women was wearing a hijab. the victims died while trying to intervene. just a heartbreaking story. >> good samaritans trying to stop a dangerous situation and they lost their lives. all right, a record 107 million americans have auto loans, but a new report shows growing concern that many people can't really afford them. the report found the largest subprime auto lender, santander,
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only checked the incomes from 8% of applicants. subprime, of course, refers to people with poor credit. by comparison, san tender's main contender checked 64%. this mirrors practices that led to the home loan crisis and creates uncertainty over whether customers can make their car payments. however, mortgages account for a tinier portion of the economy, but still something to watch. this is more bad news for the auto industry. rising inventory, declining prices and low sales may signal that its seven-year boom is over. sales have been on the rise since 2010 but fell for the first four months this year. we'll see the latest report this week. automakers report may's new car sales thursday. i love to watch car sales because it is such an important barometer of the health of the economy. when you can buy a car, it shows you have confidence in your job, in where you live, you have confidence that you can make that paycheck. when so many people are buying cars and they haven't even checked how much money they make and they're buying on incentives or buying on credit, that starts to get a little worrisome.
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>> and the president came into office really trumping the auto business and the exciting things we're doing domestically. so you hope -- >> maybe he came in just at the peak for autos. >> you do wonder. all right, tiger woods apologizing after a dui arrest in florida. what he says led to the arrest when we come back.
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a near brawl erupting during the final session of the texas legislature. hundreds of people packed the capitol rotunda on monday, protesting a new state law that bans sanctuary cities and punishes local governments that don't comply with immigration rules and detention requests. things got really heated when republican house member matt rinaldi announced he had called i.c.e. to report protesters who were holding signs that read "i am illegal and here to stay." >> rinaldo says he was then assaulted verbally and
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physically by fellow lawmakers, admitting he threatened to shoot one democrat in self-defense. it was all too much for this texas lawmaker. >> yeah, i mean, the guy made a comment, a very stupid comment. he's a racist. he's a bad person. we're not going to allow people like that to get away with saying comments like that because they think nothing's going to happen to them. >> democrats deny assaulting rinaldo and i.c.e. officials say they never received a phone call from him about the protesters. tiger woods apologizing to his family, his friends, his fans, following his arrest monday on suspicion of driving under the influence near his florida home. woods issued a statement to media outlets saying this -- "i understand the severity of what i did and i take full responsibility for my actions. i want the public to know that alcohol was not involved. what happened was an unexpected reaction to prescribed medications. i did not realize the mix of medications had affected me so strong strongly." >> woods adding he expects more from himself and will do everything in his power to make
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sure it doesn't happen again. police in jupiter, florida, say he was arrested at 3:00 a.m. monday some ten miles from home and spent several hours in jail before being released without the 41-year-old woods has been off the pro tour rehabbing from a fourth back surgery last month. presumably, he knows his blood alcohol level will not be a factor in this if he says that. and look how clever the new york tabloids were this morning -- >> same headline. >> oh, wait, matching headlines in "the new york post" and the "daily news," dui of the tiger. >> ouch. >> you hope this is not the final chapter of arguably the greatest athlete of our generation. >> thank goodness he didn't hurt someone. >> that's what you always hope with these cases. all right, in the south, storms and increasing humidity mean heat indexes into the triple digits. let's bring in meeting pedram javaheri. good morning. >> good morning, dave and christine. yes, the soggy perspective here across not only just the south but also around interior new england here going to be the big story as we go through much of this afternoon into tomorrow,
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and the forecast there even into the early-morning hours actually has brought those temperatures up into the middle 70s out of panama city. new orleans sits there at 72 degrees, washington at 67 degrees. and in places like washington, i wouldn't be surprised to see a few storms roll through by this afternoon across that region, but the strongest storms really confined out towards interior portions of new england. that's where about 5 million people are in line for a risk of severe weather, and generally, it is for damaging winds and some gusty winds, not much in the way of say tornadic activity. but look at this, across the south, some very wet weather expected. in fact, some of the wettest weather in the country right there around the southern parishes of louisiana, where over the next two days could see locally up to 6 inches of rainfall come down, but generally a couple inches in the forecast the next several days. beyond that, a warming trend across the south as well. atlanta in the middle 80s. new york city not too bad, around 75 degrees by late week. >> all right, we'll take it. thank you, pedram. the $1,000 stock club is
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about to get two new members. "cnn money stream" next.
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do you think that our president respects the rule of law? >> after going through the raw intelligence, do you share the president's appraisal that the russia investigation is a hoax? >> do you think your call for impeachment is premature? >> are you worried, sean, that you have a credibility problem right now?
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breaking overnight, panama's government announcing the death of former dictator manuel noriega. he had been in intensive care after surgery and a hemorrhage removing a brain tumor. he ruled from 1983 to 1989 before being ousted by a u.s. invasion. he was in prison for corruption and murdering his political opponents before he was hospitalized this year. he was 83 yards old. police in manchester are looking for a critical piece of evidence this morning and they're asking the public's help in tracking down this hard-sided, blue-rolling suitcase the bomber was seen with in the days leading up to last week's blast. >> a counterterrorism official telling cnn investigators are still not sure whether the suicide bomber at the concert
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actually built the bomb himself, calling it the key question in the investigation. meantime, this morning manchester returning to its normal life step by step. for more, let's bring in cnn's mohammad lila in manchester. good morning. >> reporter: well, good morning, dave. you can see behind me people are still coming out to this vigil, although as you said, we're coming out of the end of a long weekend, and so people are going back to work. but as far as the investigation is concerned, police put out images of this blue, distinctive suitcase. they believe the suspect was seen with this suitcase, wheeling it around manchester, in fact, right here in manchester city center in the days and hours leading up to the attack. now, they believe that he used a backpack bomb, in other words, explosives that were stuffed into a backpack, to carry out the attack, but that's also why they want to know what was so important that he was seen wheeling around this suitcase here in manchester. they don't believe that there is any cause for concern in the sense that there are any explosives in that suitcase, but they're asking people if they do happen to see that suitcase to
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not approach it but to call the police and let them know what they see. and this is very important because as you say, police are desperately trying to track down the suspect's whereabouts in the last four days leading up to the attack and they want to know what was in that suitcase and if that could lead them to other potential suspects. dave and christine? >> okay, thank you. 57 minutes past the hour. let's check on "cnn money stream" this morning. global markets and futures mostly lower right now. it is a short week for wall street. markets were closed for memorial day, stocks closed mixed ahead of that holiday, but that was enough for the nasdaq and the s&p 500 to hit new record highs. all three indices gained at least 1% for the week. investors this week will tune in for the end of the strong earnings season, the best since 2011. data, personal income and spending is out this morning, and the may jobs report released friday, unemployment dropped to 4.4% in april, the lowest level since 2007. we'll also be looking for any progress on tax reform. the "wall street journal" with a big story this morning saying, you know, it's faltering at this
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point. tax reform in congress is faltering. all right, two more stocks are about to be worth $1,000 per share. amazon and google parent alphabet could hit that milestone today. on friday, amazon hovered around $999. alphabet topped $996. right now only seven u.s. stocks trade above $1,000 a share. this is just further proof that a few big-named stocks are driving the market. for example, amazon is up more than 1,500% since 2009, but experts warn this makes the market vulnerable of a fall. the biggest stocks in the 500 account for one-third of its gains this year. americans' credit scores hit levels not seen in the recession, and that's great news for spending. the average credit score hit 700 in april. that is the highest since 2005. the riskiest consumers, those with a score below 600, hit a record low. this could be good for economic
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activity. as credit scores rise, lenders will likely make more credit available, and that could boost consumer spending. interesting, right? >> very exciting news. we need something good economic news. >> sure do. >> "early start" continues right now. what's the agenda? it's a full agenda awaiting president trump and his team at the white house as the administration fights back against growing questions about ties to russia. the adviser at the center of those questions, jared kushner, laying low. now the white house is blaming kushner's secret back-channel request with the kremlin. and german chancellor angela merkel not backing down from her suggestion europe must go it alone. what does it mean for the u.s. relationship with germany and the european union? >> i've listened to that sound bite three or four times, trying to grasp what that could mean for policy. >> yeah, she's careful with words, but she certainly meant to send a message indeed. good morning, welcome to "early
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start." i'm dave briggs. >> and i'm christine romans. it is tuesday, may 30th, 5:00 a.m. in the east. president trump back in the oval office today, trying to get back to the country's business after a long holiday weekend and an even longer whether to pull out of the paris climate of course and a search for the new director of the fbi. the president is weighing strategy going forward for afghanistan that could include more troops. a decision all too significant after president's first visit to arlington cemetery. sean spicer set to brief the media this afternoon about changes to the press office. this will be the first time since the president left for a nine-day trip that any official has briefed in front of the cameras and the first time since pen tratd questions began to swirl around jared kushner. jeff

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