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tv   Early Start with Christine Romans and Dave Briggs  CNN  June 20, 2017 1:00am-2:01am PDT

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tripadvisor. the latest reviews. the lowest prices. otto warmbier just passed away. he spent a year and a half in north korea, a brutal regime. we'll be able to handle it. >> the u.s. vowing to hold north korea accountable after the death of an american college student detained more than a year. otto warmbier's family is in mourning. lawmakers are seething. how will the white house respond? senate democrats vowing to bring business to a crawl. while you were sleeping, they weren't. this is over the republican secrecy on health care. now gop leadership is demanding a vote by late next week. and a big special election
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in georgia seen as a referendum on the first months of the trump presidency. can democrats nab the costliest house race since 1969? >> the money is flowing there. i'm dave briggs. >> i'm christine romans. north korea facing outrage after the american college student otto warmbier has died less than a week after his release from pyongyang. his family believes he was tortured into a coma. his passing quickly sparking anger, outrage, sadness in washington. senator john mccain, a former prisoner himself, not mincing words. he says this -- "let us state the facts plainly. otto warmbier, an american citizen, was murdered by the kim
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jong-un regime." >> high-level talks between the u.s. and china begin tomorrow in washington. there's growing pressure on president trump to take a harder line with beijing to help rein in north korea. listen to the president's reaction to warmbier's death. >> otto warmbier has just passed away. he spent a year in north korea. a lot of bad things happened, but at least we got him home to be with his parents where they were so happy to see him even though he was in very tough condition. he passed away a little while ago. that's a brutal regime, and we'll be able to handle it. >> what does the president mean by "handle it"? we'll go live to seoul and paula hancocks. good morning to you. what options does the united states really have here? >> reporter: pretty much the
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options the u.s. has always had, and not great options. the option of sanctions, putting more pressure on north korea. for that the united states needs china, of course it's going to be crucial at that meeting in washington with the u.s. secretary of state tillerson, the defense secretary mattis meeting their chinese counterparts. will they put more pressure on china to try to counter the north korean threat? bear in mind it's difficult to see exactly what the u.s. can do when they still have three americans detained in north korea. there are two academics. one businessman, korean americans who were still being held in north korea at this point. you also have a number of south koreans being held, a canadian. it's very difficult to get any access to them. still dealing with the swedish embassy to try and gain access to those three. of course, that is a priority now, as well, as otto warmbier and his family, to try and get those three out. we understand that they have been pushing for that.
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secretary tillerson saying it's a delicate situation. it's a balancing act. if they put more pressure on china, they're asking china to do more when it comes to the nuclear program that north korea has. it's an awful lot that they're asking for. you see there is real anger, not just in washington and the u.s. but around the world and shock that this situation has been allowed to happen. i've spoken to a number of north korean watchers. they say nobody would have expected this. they were blind sided that the north korean regime could stoop this low. >> we are seeing tour groups stopping trips to north korea. that, of course, minimal impact. thank you. and the grieving family of otto warmbier releasing a statement that reads, "it would be easy at a moment like this to focus on all that we lost. future time that won't be spent with a warm, engaging, brilliant young man whose curiosity,
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enthusiasm for life knew no bounds. we choose to focus on the time that we were given to be with this remarkable person. when otto returned late on june 13th, he was unable to speak, unable to see, and unable to react to verbal commands. he looked uncomfortable, almost anguished. although we would never hear his voice again, within a day, the countenance of his face changed. he was at peace. he was home, and we believe he could sense that." funeral arrangements for warmbier have not yet been announced. democrats holding the senate floor late into the night, demanding republicans go public with their plans for repealing and replacing obamacare. the democrats' speeches overnight, more than theatrics -- more theatrics than lawing as they try to -- than lawmaking as they try to get republicans to draft their health care bill. chuck schumer calling it "the greatest miscarriage of legislative practice that he's seen during his decades in
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congress." >> when you do a bill in dark of night, things happen that no one knows about. there are unintended consequences that only a thorough vetting can reveal. when you do things in the dark of night, there are individual accommodations that are made that are going to look ugly when they become public. so the only consolation we on this side have, small consolation that it is, is the political blunder that our colleagues on the other side of the aisle are making. >> the democrats' coordinated effort to hold the floor last night won't stall any work on the gop health bill. we're learning that republican leaders are taking real steps toward a vote and soon. let's bring in phil mattingly on capitol hill for more. >> reporter: dave and christine, if you talk to senate democrats they recognize this is an urgent moment in their effort to try and derail republican efforts to
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repeal and replace the affordable care act. why? mitch mcconnell has made clear, the senate majority leader, that he wants the senate to vote on that repeal and replace plan before the july 4th recess. that means next week. i'm told a vote likely to come on thursday if things continue to progress. that is exactly why on monday you saw senate democrats take to the floor and start to register objections. what will those entail? trying to slow down senate business. nothing can move forward in the senate without every senator agreeing for just that to happen. that's exactly what the senate democrats are going to try and stop from happening. that means floor business, committee hearings, all sorts of things that they want to do to try to gum up the works a bit. guys, the most interesting element is there is still no bill. republicans haven't come to agreement on some of the key outstanding issues from the medicaid expansion to the scope of the cutback of the obamacare regulations, structure of the tax credit, where they stand on abortion funding. all of those issues are expected
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to be worked out this week. i'm told from gop sources that mitch mcconnell will at some point tell his colleagues, tell the members of his conference, many of whom are very different ideologically when it comes to health care, that it's time to make a deal. there's no more talking, no more negotiating. everybody needs to come to an agreement. that vote is happening, at least that's the plan at this point. they need a bill first. we'll see when they actually get to that point and how long senate democrats can try and hold things up in the meantime. dave and christine? >> see that white house briefing yesterday? >> no. i missed it. >> was there a briefing? no, i didn't hear it. i didn't see it either. >> no. looks like a move is imminent in the white house press room even though that's not being used much lately. press secretary sean spicer may be bumped to a new role. his latest briefing came off camera with no video or audio recording allowed. and more than a week since the last on-camera briefing. white house officials believe the messaging operation needs a reset with cnn and the mood in
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the west wing has soured. >> that's what they're telling us. a source says all of the president's advisers have tried to convince him to stop tweeting about the russia investigation. how's that going? without success. sources say the president is frustrated he can't execute his agenda. he seems agitated, exhausted, even -- even disengaged at briefings. all of this no doubt on the mind of any press secretary job. what's next for sean spicer? >> reporter: press secretary sean spicer is move to a different role leaving an opening in the briefing room. he may shift into a role that oversees the job of press secretary and communications director. spicer's tenure at the podium has been filled with controversial moments from the first day of the administration. yesterday he held an off camera, no-audio briefing that barred reporters from recording any of his comments. despite restrictions, he could not answer whether the president has any recordings of his
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conversations at the white house. spicer said that he may have an answer to that by the end of the week. of course, they said that last week. >> my colleague, jim accost ai got to game him two thumbs up and a high five for how he handled things yesterday. he was visibly frustrated and made a really good point. if you were going to a city council meeting and you were trying to, you know, tell the people of your town what was happening and the inner workings of the meeting, you would have more clarity than you do at the white house. that's really, really the sense -- >> the struggle for house and senate republicans is they want us to stop emphasizing these tweets, right? that's all we have. we don't have press briefings. that's all we have. he's the president's secretary of everything. now we're finally hearing his voice. >> we are here to improve the day-to-day lives of the average citizen. that's a core promise, and we are keeping it. >> that's what the voice of
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jared kushner sounds like. finally making it heard. what he told technology leaders next. she's nationally recognized
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...to help protect yourself from a stroke. talk to your doctor about xarelto®. there's more to know™. good morning, everyone. sill son valley may clash with the president over climate change and immigration, but white house agrees they need updating. >> painful, outdated technology. yet we have the greatest people in technology that the world has ever seen right here with us in this room. >> it's so true. that disconnect is so odd and true. some of the great minds at the tech meeting, heads of apple, amazon, ibm, and google parent alphabet. the agenda was updating tech infrastructure. many saw the meeting as an opportunity to broach more sensitive subjects. think immigration, think
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encryption. silicon valley has been a vocal critic of the president's policies. for example, the travel bans and decision to leave the paris climate deal. tesla ceo elon musk even quit his advisory role to the president. he was not at the meeting. most large tech companies, the idea is they can't afford to sever white house ties. the risk is greater if they're not at the table than if they are. the federal government is a huge customer for many. and several stand to reap billions, tens of billions from tax reform. another headline from this event -- you know the so-called secretary of everything, jared kushner? he has finally spoken on camera. he opened the meeting explaining how business sensibilities will help modernize this government. >> we are here to improve the day-to-day lives of the average citizen. that's a core promise, and we are keeping it. together we will unleash the creativity of the private sector to provide citizen services in a way that has never happened
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before. >> that is probably the first time many of you have ever heard his voice. despite his very prominent role, he is in the background. he doesn't appear on television. it's rare to hear him -- >> it's remarkable, is it not? >> secretary of everything. >> that we've had such an integral part of the white house having never been heard -- i don't remember anything quite like this. >> we heard him yesterday. >> it was fascinating to hear. >> let's be honest, everyone is all for modernizing technology in the government. anyone who's ever interfaced with this government -- >> you listen to the things he said, he's talking about floppy disks and technology that dates back 20, 30 years in the government. georgia voters going to the polls today in a special congressional election. the race for the open seat in georgia's sixth congressional district seen nationally as a referendum on the trump presidency. polls show republican karen h n
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handel and john osoff running neck and neck in the most expensive race in history, and it ain't even close. georgia sixth -- up until now, the definition of reliably republican, in gop hands since 1979. we get more from cnn. >> reporter: on this election day in georgia's sixth district in the northern suburbs of atlanta, neither campaign comfortable with where they stand as this could be a race decided by a few thousands votes. early numbers give both camps reason to be optimistic because 140,000 people cast their ballots before today. more than double the number of voters who voted early in april, and that includes 36,000 who didn't participate in that election. no comfort here. optimism, yes, but also reason for both camps to be tense as the vitriol in this campaign has picked up in the final days,
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including this attack ad. >> left is endorsing and applauding shooting republicans. when will it stop? it won't if john osoff wins on tuesday. >> reporter: both candidates have denounced the add from the principal pac, an organization that supports conservative leaders. it's not just the attacks on the airwaves that we've seen in the lead up to this election. jon ossoff traveling with a security detail. and karen handel and her neighbors receiving threatening leaders and a white powdery substance. it turned out to just be baking soda. karen handel told me she couldn't sleep with the image of men in hazmat suits in her home. stakes are high in georgia's sixth. back to you. >> they are. and welcome aboard. here's a great assignment. >> yeah. >> you'll be up late tonight. you know, there's a lot been made about all the money in here, especially republicans making a big deal about the $23 million or something that ossoff
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has raised. we're told of the money outside the district, outside the state, it's -- most of the donations are under $200. they seem to be smaller donations. we'll see. >> it's a fascinating race. and it's not clear who needs it more because democrats need a win. they've been losing these specials. they need a win. it's a -- reliably republican district. it's hard to know what to make of it. we'll make a lot of it tonight. >> reliably republican is re-lublican -- >> do i do that? re-liblican. we just coined the term. as if the u.s. and russia didn't have enough issues, moscow with a threat to u.s. fighter jets. it stems from the shootdown of a syrian warplane.
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russia is now threatening to treat american fighter jets as targets after the u.s. shot down a syrian warplane over raqqah. the white house says it is working to keep the lines of communication over with the kremlin in order to avoid any conflicts. the president's spokesman, sean spicer, says the escalation of hostilities among factions in the region is not helping. what does this mean moving forward? let's go to moscow and jijill doughter doughterty, a former cnn moscow bureau chief. let's be clear, we're talking about syria, we're talking about a place where you have u.s. warplanes, russia warplanes, competing factions on the ground, some backed by the assad regime, some backed by the u.s. and it is a potential mess if
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you have russian and american warplanes targeting each other. >> reporter: right. what the russians are trying here, i think, is to tell the u.s. to back off because the u.s. has been supporting its allies. these are fighters on the ground that it considers moderates. and what they're trying to do is kick out isis from raqqah. you're right that all of these groups, the iranians, russians, syrians, americans helping the moderate fighters are all co-leco coalescing in the same area. the russians are angry because the united states shot down a plane. what are they saying? stay out of our area. do not come in with any planes. but they're not saying specifically -- here's where it gets complicated, they're not saying specifically we will shoot down american planes, they're saying we will consider you targets.
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it's a direct threat, but it's also an implied threat. then the other thing that is just as important, they are saying, the russians are saying that they will temporarily -- i should say they will suspend, they're not even saying for how long, they will suspend this deconfliction, let's call it a hotline, a communications mechanism between russia and the united states, that's supposed to prevent any type of collisions in the air between russia and the united states. the question is, is this real? is it bluffing? would they actually shoot down an american plan? nobody can really say that at this point. it would seem that the russians would not want to do that. that would be hugely provocative and very dangerous. the situation is dangerous, christine. precisely because you have planes in the air and no understanding of what could happen even accidentally. >> i mean, it's a hornets nest,
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no question. rife with potential for further conflict. we hope that cooler heads will prevail on all sides. thank you for that. i mean, when the u.s. shot down that plane, that russian jet over the weekend, you just knew -- >> syrian -- >> sorry, syrian, my gosh, yes, you knew that that was going to be a new high point in the tension. >> so much of the thawing of the u.s./russian relations in the trump administration. the world is waiting to see how the white house will respond after the death of otto warmbier. senator john mccain says the american was murdered by north korea. we're live with what the president could have in store for pyongyang.
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otto warmbier has just passed away. he spent a year and a half in north korea. a brutal regime.
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and we'll be able to handle it. >> we'll be able to handle it. the u.s. vowing to hold north korea accountable after the death of an american student detained more than a year. otto warmbier's family this morning in mourning. lawmakers are seething. how will the white house respond? senate democrats vowing to bring business to a crawl. this over republican secrecy on health care. now gop leadership is demanding a vote by late next week. and did you hear about the big special election in georgia today? it is seen as a referendum on the first months of the trump presidency. can the democrats nab a seat that's been reliably republican since 1979? >> fascinating. >> it is. a lot of money in that race. welcome back to "early start." i'm kchristine romans. >> i'm dave briggs. up first, north korea facing outrage over the death of otto
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warmbier. the american college student has died less than a week after his release by pyongyang. his family believes he was tortured into a coma while held in captivity for 17 months. warmbier's passing quickly sparking anger in washington. senator john mccain, a former prisoner himself, making his anger clear. he says, "let us state the facts plainly. otto warmbier, an american citizen, was murdered by the kim jong-un regime." >> high-level talks between the u.s. and china begin tomorrow in washington. and there's growing pressure on president trump to take a harder line with beijing to help rein in north korea. listen to the president's reaction to otto warmbier's death. >> otto warmbier has just passed away. he spent a year and a half in north korea. a lot of bad things happened. at least we got him home to be with his parents where they were so happy to see him even though he was in very tough condition. he just passed away a little
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while ago. that's a brutal regime, and we'll be able to handle it. >> so what does the president mean by that? by "we'll be able to handle it"? let's go live to seoul and bring in paula hancocks, good morning. >> reporter: hello, christine. that's the question everyone on this side of the world is asking, as well. what exactly did president trump mean "we will be able to handle it"? there are still the same options today as there were yesterday, potentially strengthening sanctions against north korea, encouraging or putting pressure on beijing to try and put more pressure on north korea. of course, china is north korea's main trading partner,al ally, and without their support would be hard to survive. with the high-level talks in washington, the white house and
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united states could be putting more pressure on china to try and do more. of course, they're in a fairly tricky situation because you have to remember there are still three americans being held in north korea. there are two academics working at the pyongyang university for science and technology. there is also a businessman who north korea has accused of being a spy. he has been convicted and sentenced to hard --. it's a very -- to hard labor. it's a very tricky situation to find themselves in at this point. interestingly, we are seeing the tour group that otto warmbier was on. pioneer tours will no longer accept u.s. citizens on their tours to north korea. the u.s. state department still saying they strong ly advise against traveling to north korea. the tour groups themselves are going to alone. other groups saying they're reviewing the policy, as well. clearly a difficult situation for them. >> and i think a new low really for the regime in pyongyang.
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i mean, to have this young man for so long -- and from the family doctor, it sounds as though he had been -- had been in a coma for months and months, and finally returning him. just a new low for pyongyang. you wonder what the white house will do, what new set of circumstances the white house will consider here. thank you for keeping us up to speed on that. the family of otto warmbier releasing a statement in the hours after their son's passing which reads, "it would be easy at a moment like this to focus on all that we lost -- future time that won't be spent with a warm, engaging, brilliant young man whose curiosity and enthusiasm for life knew no bounds. we choose to focus on the time we were given to be with this remarkable person. when otto returned to cincinnati late on june 13th, he was unable to speak, unable to see, and unable to react to verbal commands. he looked very uncomfortable -- almost anguished. although we would never hear his voice again, within a day the countenance of his face changed. he was at peace.
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he was at home, and we believe he could sense all that." funeral arrangements for warmbier have not been announced. >> all right. 37 minutes past the hour. democrats holding the senate floor late into the night. while you were sleeping, they were up past midnight demanding that republicans go public with their plans for repealing and replacing obamacare. the democrats' speeches overnight, more theatrics than lawmakering as they tried to spotlight the secretive process republicans are using to draft their health care bill. senate minority leader chuck schumer calling it "the greatest miscarriage of legislative practice" that he's seen during his decades in congress. >> when you do a bill in the dark of night, things happen that no one knows about. there are unintended consequences that only a thorough vetting can reveal. when you do things in the dark of night, there are individual accommodation that's are made that are going to look ugly when
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they become public. so the only consolation we on this side have, small consolation that it is, is the political blunder that our colleagues on the other sides of the aisle -- other side of the trial making. >> the democrats controlled the floor last night. now we're learning that republican leaders are taking real steps toward a vote and soon. for now, phil mattingly on capitol hill. >> reporter: if you talk to senate democrats, they recognize this is an urgent moment in their effort to try and derail republican efforts to repeal and replace the affordable care act. why? sources tell me mitch mcconnell has made clear the senate majority leader, that he wants the senate to vote on that repeal and replace plan before the july 4th recess. that means next week. i'm told a vote likely to come on thursday if things continue to progress. and that is exactly why on
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monday you saw senate democrats take to the floor and register their objections. what will those entail? trying to slow down senate business. nothing can move forward in the u.s. senate without every senator agreeing for just that to happen. that's exactly what senate democrats are going to try and stop from happening. that means floor business, committee hearings, all sorts of things they want to do to gum up the works. guys, the most interesting element of this is there is still no bill. republicans haven't come to agreement on some of the key outstanding issues. from the medicaid expansion to the scope of the cutback of the obamacare regulations, the structure of the tax credit, where they stand on abortion funding. all of those issues are expected to be worked out this week. i'm told from several senate gop sources that mitch mcconnell will at some point this week tell his colleagues, tell the members of his conference, many of whom are very different ideologically when it comes to health care, that it's time to make a deal. there's no more talking, no more negotiating. everybody needs to come to an agreement. that vote is happening, at least that's the plan at this point, they need a bill first.
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we'll see when they actually get to that point and how long senate democrats can try and hold things up in the meantime. >> thanks, phil. looks like a move is imminent in the white house press room even though the press room's not been used much lately. press secretary sean spicer may move to a new role. his latest briefing came off camera with no video or audio recording allowed. and more than a week since the last on-camera briefing. white house officials believe the messaging operation needs a reset. cnn was told the mood in the west wing has soured. >> a source says all of the president's advisers have tried to convince him to stop tweeting about the russia investigation to no avail. sources say the president is frustrated. he can't execute his agendas. and seems agitated, exhausted, even disengaged at briefings. all this no doubt on the minds of anyone being considered for the press secretary job.
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what's next for sean spicer? jim acosta with more. >> reporter: white house press secretary sean spicer appears to be moving into a different role in the west wing, leaving an opening at the podium in the briefing room. white house sources tell us spicer may be shifted into a role that overseas the job of press secretary and communications director. spicer's tenure at the podium has been filled with controversial moments from the first day of the administration. yesterday he held an off camera, no-audio briefing that barred reporters from recording any of his comments. despite the restrictions, spicer could not answer whether the president has recordings of his conversations at the white house. spicer said that he may have an answer to that question by the end of the week. of course, they said that last week. >> i got to tell you, jim acosta yesterday, it was interesting how he had to handle a tough situation. all these press people in there were like, wait a minute, we can't run the video? we can't run the audio? what is this? at a city council meeting this would not be cool. you know, it's the white house. >> talked about having a question from a russian reporter and when jim's not allowed to
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ask a question. >> right. >> particularly would rub a white house correspondent the wrong way. >> if you're sean spicer, how difficult is it to try to be the voice of the administration when the president himself could tweet ten minutes later and undermine the message? or how do you even know what the message is? so many times we heard from sarah huckabee sanders and sean spicer "i don't know," "i don't know what the president thinks." >> you wonder how much communication there is between sean spicer. whomever takes the job will have to stipulate we actually have to communicate. whether than laura ingram or not, that's the name you keep hearing thrown out there. >> we'll see. 43 minutes past the hour. it may be the largest leak of voter information in history. the data of almost 200 million americans was exposed. that's more than half of the u.s. population. the source -- a republican national committee contractor. the information -- accidentally made public during a security upgrade. it was left unprotected for two days. we're talking the data of names,
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birthdays, voter information, even social media posts. the information is now password protected, and the rfrnc said i cut ties with the contractor. this incident proves any political party can be hacked. the president has tweeted that the rnc has stronger defense than democrats. the democratic national committee was hacked during the 2016 campaign. 200 million voters. wow. a lot of -- >> time something is done about that. can the democrats steal a congressional seat that's been red for nearly four decades? it is a huge special election today in georgia. we're there next. if you have medicare
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georgia voters, good morning. you're going to the polls today in a special congressional election -- the race for the open seat in georgia's sixth congressional district, seen nationally as a referendum on the trump presidency.
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polls show republican karen handel and the republican, jon ossoff, running neck and neck in what's becoming the most expensive house race in american history, georgia's sixth. until now the definition of reliably republican has been in gop hands since 1979. since the era of bellbottoms. we get more now. >> reporter: on this election day in georgia's sixth district, in the northern suburbs of atlanta, neither campaign comfortable with where they stand as this could be a race decided by just a few thousand votes come tonight. early voting numbers do give both camps reason to be optimistic, though, that's because 140,000 people cast their ballots before today. that's more than double the number of voters who voted early in april. and that includes 36,000 who didn't even participate in that election. so no comfort here. optimism, yes, but also reason for both camps to be tense as the vitriol in this campaign has picked up in the final days, including this attack ad.
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>> left is endorsing and applauding shooting republicans. when tell stop? it won't if jon ossoff wins on tuesday. >> both candidates have denounced that ad from the principled pac, an organization that supports conservative leaders. it's not just the attacks on the air dwawaves that we've seen in lead up to the election. jon ossoff traveling with a security detail as threats against him have intensified. and karen handel and her neighbors receiving envelopes in their mailboxes last week that included a threatening letter and white powdery substance that turned out to be baking soda. karen handel told me on that thursday she couldn't sleep with the message of man in hazmat suits in her home. the stakes are high tonight in georgia's sixth. christine, dave, back to you. >> they are indeed. the way u.s. elections are conducted could be in for some big changes. the supreme court has agreed to take up a significant
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gerrymandering case, redistricting, if you will, and could for the first time impose limits on how the lines are redrawn. the justices will decide whether republicans in wisconsin actually violated the constitution by reconfiguring state electoral maps. back in 2011, allegedly to reduce the influence of minority voters. the court said too much partisanship and the drawing of electoral maps is illegal. it has never defined how much is too much. the case will be heard once the court's october session convenes. and this is massive. holds implications across the entire country. and it is huge in terms of who owns the governorships and the house races and shapes our politics. >> it does. the high-powered help desk summoned to the white house. that's kwai a help desk. technically -- the white house tech stocks, moving markets all the way to record highs. that's on "money stream" next.
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we were in a german dance group. i wore lederhosen. so i just started poking around on ancestry. then, i decided to have my dna tested through ancestry dna. it turns out i'm scottish. so, i traded in my lederhosen for a kilt. if you have moderate to severe ulcerative colitis or crohn's, and your symptoms have left you with the same view, it may be time for a different perspective. if other treatments haven't worked well enough, ask your doctor about entyvio, the only biologic developed and approved just for uc and crohn's. entyvio works by focusing right in the gi-tract to help control damaging inflammation and is clinically proven to begin helping many patients achieve both symptom relief as well as remission. infusion and serious allergic reactions can happen during or after treatment.
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serious questions surfacing this morning. that deadly u.s. destroyer collision. japan's coast guard now saying it took nearly an hour before the crew of the japanese ship involved in the collision actually reported the deadly incident. that's not what the u.s. says. let's get right to cnn's al aalexandra field. what do we know about the sdr s discrepancy over the events? >> reporter: it will take months, even years before we find out what caused the collision between the u.s. guided missile destroyer and massive container ship in the early hours of saturday. the navy has launched an investigation. the japanese coast guard is also investigating. and at the starting point, we're seeing that there already is a key discrepancy here. in the beginning, both the navy and japanese coast guard agreed
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that the crash happened around 2:20 saturday morning. that's when the cargo ship involved in this mayday distress called. now the japanese coast guard is saying that based on interviews with members of the crew of the container ship, they believe that the crash actually happened about 50 minutes before that. they say it isn't unusual that the crew didn't immediately call for help. they could have been following other safety procedures or trying to navigate in that busy passageway. the u.s. military is holding firm. they believe this crash did, in fact, happen at 2:20 in the morning. why does this matter? both sides will be looking at the precise movement of both ships involved in order to determine how they could have been set on this collision course. this was a deadly crash. the crew of the "uss fitzgerald" numbered in the hundreds. several sailors did not survive the crash. the bodies were found by divers in the sleeping compartments below deck. the bodies of the sailors are being returned to the u.s. there will be, of course,
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memorial services to honor the lives lost. already the sailors on board the "uss kohl" put out their own tribute to those who lost their lives on the "fitzgerald" lining up in formation, forming the number 62 -- a tribute to the "uss fitzgerald." and we're beginning to hear from members of the families of those servicemen killed. the family of shincko douglas saying, "we would like to commends the crew for their heroic efforts to save the ship and many lives. we know now why shing wo was prd to serve with you." we heard that the ship was in danger of sinking. that the crew took immediate and heroic action to get that shift back to port. >> heartbreaking. thank you. 58 minutes past the hour. time for a check on "money stream." as tech leaders were meeting at the white house, shoulder to shoulder, the most important people in the business world
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with the president, sending the s&p 500 and dow to new records. global stocks also higher. the sector fell last week over concerns some companies may be overvalued. some big tech names are still the best performing. they all -- look at that -- all closed higher. meal kit company blue apron could be worth $3 billion. it's going public just as it faces new competition from the amazon/whole foods deal. it's the first meal kit company to have an ipo. the industry woos consumers from supermarkets by delivering fresh ingredients directly but struggles to balance high costs with affordable prices. competition is stiff. and now amazon could enter the fray. the company already sells meal kits through amazon fresh. whole foods' 400 stores will build the largest distribution network of any meal kit service. watch the food fight, ba-dum-bum -- in this space. u.p.s. is planning ahead for
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the holidays. it will charge retailers extra fees to deliver packages. the company's volume doubles during the holiday shipping season. that forces u.p.s. to hire additional workers and extra delivery vehicles. but this year it will add a surcharge to offset the cost including 27 cents for ground shipments, 97 cents for two-day delivery. the fees start thanksgiving week. this move will force retailers to decide if they'll eat the cost or pass them on to consumers. >> all right. "early start" continues right now. otto warmbier has just passed away. he spent a year and a half in north korea. it's a brutal regime. and we'll be able to handle it. >> "we'll be able to handle it," but how? the u.s. holding north korea accountable after a student has died. otto

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