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tv   Early Start with Christine Romans and Dave Briggs  CNN  June 23, 2017 2:00am-3:01am PDT

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former director comey. president trump says he did not record your oval office conversations. but is it too late for trump to reverse the damage? good morning, everyone, and welcome to "early start" on the longest friday of the year. i'm dave briggs. >> no, no, no, the summer was yesterday -- >> but this the longest friday -- oh -- >> of the year. enjoy all the daylight. a longer happy hour, my friend. >> longer hours at the pool. i'm alison kosik, july 23rd. more controversy for the lawmakers this morning. only this time it's not the house trying to replace and repeal health care, it's the senate as gop leaders attempt to get a health care bill passed in a matter of days. the version unveiled by majority leader mitch mcconnell now meeting pushback from the rank and file with just two republican votes to spare. four senators say no. four more say they've got concerns.
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>> ten other republicans refusing to commit saying they want time to review a bill that was under lock and key until yesterday. of course, the entire democratic caucus totally opposed. on the policy front, the senate bill mostly mirrors the house version, but some key changes here. more on those in a moment. first, our coverage begins with ryan nobles. >> reporter: good morning from capitol hill where senators haven't really had all that much time to digest this 142-page bill. if the early reviews are any indication, this is going to have a difficult time being passed and being passed quickly. mitch mcconnell, the senate majority leader, could have a problem on both sides of the political spectrum. there's a group of moderate senators voicing concerns about the bill. this group already a little queasy after the house bill that was passed a month ago. he also has a problem on the far right, as well, as a group of four republican senators have said that they cannot support
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the bill in its current fashion. among them senators rand paul and ted cruz. >> you have to be honest with people, and it has to be paid for. if we're not going to pay for it and keep a lot of stuff that was in obamacare, i think we can do better. my hope is not to defeat the bill but to make the bill better. >> it's not enough just to pass a bill with obamacare in the title. we've got to have legislation that fixes the underlying problem. >> the key to getting an agreement, to getting a bill can pass is we need common sense reforms in the bill that lower the cost of premiums. >> reporter: this group of four conservative senators have said that they are willing to negotiate on this bill. the timeline here is very brief. we have yet to hear from the congressional budget office. they're expecting to weigh in sometime at the beginning of next week. mitch mcconnell has said that he wants the bill passed before the fourth of july recess. if you look at the calendar, that likely means that this bill needs to head to the floor sometime before next friday if they have any realistic possibility of getting it passed
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before they head home for summer break. back to you. >> ryan nobles, thank you, sir. as to whether the white house can get reluctant republicans to sign on, here's what president trump had to say. listen -- >> i think that they'll probably get there. we'll have to see. you know, health care's a very difficult situation. if you look, the clintons tried to get it. and after years and years, they couldn't do it. obamacare was murder for them to get. and now it's failed. it's virtually out of business. obamacare is a disaster. we're trying to do something in a very short period of time. >> and obamacare's namesake weighing in. president obama himself posting a statement on facebook saying this -- "the senate bill unveiled today is not a health care bill. simply put, if there's a chance you might get sick, get old, or start a family, this bill will do you harm. small tweaks over the course of
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the next couple of weeks under the guise of making these bills easier to stomach cannot change the fundamental meanness at the core of this legislation." let's bring in cnn political analyst david drucker, senior correspondent for the "washington examiner." good morning. thanks for being on extra early this morning. that perfectly promote your piece in the "washington examiner" about how democrats are attacking this bill, using that word "mean" that president trump used. the question isn't about democratic opposition to you. it's republicans, can they possibly get those four or two of the four involved, supporting it, without losing some of the moderates? >> that's going to be the challenge here. colonel colon mitch mcconnell is a crafty legislator, tax tikz. he understands the -- tactician. he understands the pressure points. i wouldn't underestimate his strategy. my question is can they do this in a week. i tend to think that eventually mitch mcconnell will get the 50
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votes he needs that would allow vice president mike pence to make the tie bre-breaking vote the senate. it may take time. the reason i tend to think they'll ultimately get there is because there is a lot of pressure on republicans back home. every state is a little bit different. from the conservative grassroots, there's a sense that obamacare should have been repealed months ago. i don't necessarily think that's realistic. i think they've been on a rather fast timeline. a lot of republican voters figure they've had seven years to figure this out, they've got a republican house, a republican senate, and the white house. what is taking them so long? that is a competing pressure with trying to get a bill that is going to make everybody happy and solve the underlying problem they hear about, which is my insurance is costing me too much. my deductibles are too high, and i don't have as much access to quality insurance that i would like. >> clearly obamacare has its big
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issues, many are saying these bills, not just the senate version but the house, as well, they have their issues, as well. you look at the political consequences for so many of these senators, you know, you look at just the overhaul of medicaid, that factor in the senate bill, 20 senators represent states that went ahead and incorporated the medicaid expansion into their states. 18 of them, 18 of those senators are up for re-election in 2020 and 2022. there's trouble if they vote for something constituents can't get behind. >> right. republicans understand that full well because they've been profiting off obamacare for the last three election cycles. they've seen what happened to democrats. i think what people -- what a lot of republican voters may forget or not understand is that when democrats pass the obamacare -- passed obamacare, they thought eventually it would all work in such a way that voters were going to be very
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happy with it and that democrats would be rewarded by being re-elected and winning more seats than they had to begin with. it didn't pan out that way. republicans are acutely aware of that, which is why this has been at times a difficult process for them because they don't have -- they're not under any illusin that the voters are going to rush out and embrace them for this, especially if heading into the 2018 midterm elections, their primary, immediate concern, the health care system which does need to be fixed isn't doing better than before they passed about the bill. >> it's interesting that they've slowed down the medicaid cutbacks, if you will, to after the 2020 election. enough on the politics of it. how about the policy of it? a full screen showed that the surcharge for letting your coverage lapse is now gone. the mandate is now gone. the chief argument against obamacare is that insurers are fleeing the market.
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many americans left with no options. how might this senate policy bring back insurers into the market especially given what we're seeing on our screen right there? >> look, what insurers want is stability. they want to know that they're going to be able to make money by insuring people. i mean, they've found the instability in the current market problematic. part of that is the fact that they don't have faith that the current administration will do what's necessary to buck up the obamacare system. if you create a playing field that they can all depend on, then you have a good chance they will -- >> sorry to interrupt, but with no mandate and no punishment for letting your coverage lapse, isn't that a disaster for an insurer? >> not necessarily. people want to have health insurance before there was a mandate. it's a -- it's something that a lot of people need. you don't -- i mean, i'm giving you an argument here. obviously there are two sides to
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this. some people believe without a mandate you don't have healthy, young americans in the system that enables the health care system to pay for older people and sick people at rates that are not unfair and punitive. one of the reasons why the obamacare market never worked as envisioned is that the penalties for not having insurance under obamacare were never enough to get the young and healthy into the system in the numbers that were projected. and that has been part of a problem. >> so let me switch gears quickly. not only health care made the headlines but the fact that president trump -- >> no tapes. >> what tapes? >> there are no tapes. >> tapes? >> how is this going to backfir backfire? >> look, i think that the president's impulsiveness in trying to corner his adversaries may have gotten the best of him at this point. and they eventually needed to say some being this because it
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was an issue that -- to say something about this because it was an issue that wasn't going to go away. in the special counsel investigation and also in the congressional investigations in the house and senate intelligence committees, people were asking for tapes. people wanted to know what the contents of the tapes were. if a president does record in the white house, those tapes belong to the american people, not to the government. this is something they had to resolve. i think the way in which it is damaging to the president is the that it bothers him that we're discussing the russia story again and that the idea that he's being looked at, his campaign at least is being looked at as possibly concluding with the russians who we all know meddled in the 2016 election. why are we talking about it this morning? because of the tapes issue. why did the tapes issue arise? because the president said he had tapes. i think when james comey called his bluff we were always going to get to this point. either he was going to have to
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show him or say it didn't exist. >> even in stopping this ridiculous reality show, he insince yates that perhaps the -- insince yates that perhaps the intelligence recorded him. this makes me head hurt. we'll talk to you in 30 minutes about what the president said about robert mueller and the special counsel ahead. next, iraqi officials say mosul may be liberated from isis very soon, but is that overly optimistic? we're live in the middle east next. i doni refuse to lie down. why suffer? stand up to chronic migraine with botox® botox® is the only treatment for chronic migraine shown to actually prevent headaches and migraines before they even start. botox® is for adults with chronic migraine, 15 or more headache days a month each lasting 4 hours or more. it's injected by a doctor once every 12 weeks. and is covered by most insurance. effects of botox® may spread hours to weeks after injection, causing serious symptoms. alert your doctor right away as difficulty swallowing, speaking, breathing, eye problems, or muscle weakness
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>> reporter: absolutely. you have so many challenges that come after the liberation phase. you have the rebuilding, and i asked iraq's president about this last month, how much they thought that was going to cost them. they said that they believed that the destruction, whether it's mosul or other parts of iraq by isis and the fighting is phenomenal, and they really can't put a price tag on that now. and of course, then there's the issue of rebuilding trust between the different communities and making sure that that sectarian divide that allowed for the rise of isis will not allow the environment to see another terror group emerge yet again in iraq and capture territory like isis about. if you look at what is going on now, you hear optimism from the iraqi prime minister, something we've seen in the past, saying that we are going to see this declaration of liberation and victory in the next new days. and you would expect to hear something like that as iraqi
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officials are trying to keep the morale of their troops and also the population high after this really long and bloody battle. the fact of the matter, it is a tough fight ahead. we are talking, as you mentioned, about the old city of mosul in the western part of mosul. and this is a very difficult, complex, urban environment. narrow streets and alleyways. it is heavily populated. iraqi forces have had a difficult time. they can't move with their vehicles in there. they have had to move on foot, meeting so much resistance, booby traps, snipers, and car bombs that isis has planted. and of course the main concern as they move forward into the old city is the civilian population. estimates of 100,000 to 150,000 civilians. >> so much to contend with before they even take hold of mosul. thank you very much. so one remarkable record.
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apparently set in the battle for mosul. a canadian sharpshooter hit an isis fighter from more than two miles away. the canadian special operations command confirmed the sniper took the shot from a high position. that nearly ten seconds, lapsed from trigger to target. canada's "globe and mail" first reported the shot saying it disrupted an isis attack. stunning. the 2017 nba draft in the books. the top picks, big trades. shol andy scholes breaks it down next. garfunkel (instrumental) is that good? yeah it's perfect. bees! bees! go! go! go! [ girl catching her breath } [ bees buzzing inside vehicle ]
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big night at the nab draft down the road from us. many youngsters realizing their dreams as well as, well, one dads who stole the show. >> the event of the week -- i guess besides trump saying he doesn't have tapes. >> yes. >> i had to tape this, andy scholes, five hours of dvring because my son couldn't watch. yes, one of the highlights of the nba calendar. there will be a lot of teenagers in the nba next year. 15 freshmen selected including the number-one overall pick, markelle fultz out of washington. he's heading to the philadelphia 76ers. he had a cool custom suit. a dozen pictures of his family and friends inside. and fultz was rocking shoes basically made out of basketballs. the lakers selecting hometown kid lonzo ball out of ucla. all eyes lonzo's dad lavar.
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he predicted a long time ago that his son would one day play for the lakers. and lavar had a new prediction for us last night. >> i'm going to tell you what -- lonzo ball is going to take the lakers to the playoffs his first year. come see me when he does. i'll have another hat on to say "i told you so." >> when lavar left the building, he was showered with boos but was still nice enough to throw out his big brawler brand lakers hat to all of the fans. just a nice guy. i'm out here and look who a run into -- i run into this guy here. man, get up off me -- you got on a wool suit, bro. it's hot out here. >> that was dwyane wade and jimmy butler together in paris. i'm guessing wade was not as happy watching the draft. the bulls trading butler to the minnesota timberwolves for zach levine, chris dunn, and the right to swap picks. butler reunited with his former
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coach, tom thibodaux, in minnesota. wade, the elder statesman, now on a rebuilding bulls team. the 26th pick, the portland trailblazers selected caleb swanigan out of purdue. an amazing story. he went from a 6'2", 360-pound eighth grader living in a homeless shelter in utah to now an nba player. he says his tough upbringing only going to help him in the nba. while some feel pressure on the court, he's dealt with real-life pressure. basketball is fun for him now. dodgers and mets last night. this ball heading for the seats. you got to check out this dad -- he leaps up and makes the one-handed grab while holding his baby. look, guys. mom is not pleased about the situation. she immediately grabs the child back and acts like, what are you doing? the guy, though, just like, what, look, i caught the ball while holding my deadbeat.
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i'm -- while holding my baby. i'm a hero. mom did not see it that way. did not see it that way. >> that's a remarkable grab. left handed -- >> impressive. >> with the bobble and not dropping the kid. remarkable. >> multitasking at its best. >> i think he's still in trouble. >> you're right. sometimes we dads can multitask, too. thank you. the senate's republican leader says it's time to get the obamacare repeal done. >> we've been discussing all the elements of this endlessly for seven years. everybody will have an adequate time to take a look at it. >> but is one week really adequate time? we'll look at the proposal and the pushback within his party. can you love wearing powerful sunscreen? yes! neutrogena® ultra sheer. unbeatable protection helps prevent early skin aging and skin cancer with a clean feel. the best for your skin. ultra sheer®. neutrogena®.
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behind the senate's health care plan. can the party build support after the bill was met with early pushback? welcome back to "early start," i'm alison kosik in for christine romans. >> i'm dave briggs. a sense of deja vu for republican lawmakers this morning, only this time it's not the house trying to hammer out a deal to repeal and replace obamacare. it's the senate -- working to balance the demands. moderates and conservatives as gop leaders attempt to get a health care bill passed in a matter of days. the version unveiled by majority leader mitch mcconnell. now meeting pushback from the rank and file with just two republican votes to spare, four senators say no, they can't support it now. four more say they have concerns. >> ten other republicans refusing to commit saying they want time to review a bill that was basically under lock and key until yesterday. and of course the entire democratic caucus is totally opposed to it. on the policy side, the senate
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bill most leave mirrors what you see in the house version. there are key changes. more in a moment. our coverage first gifts with cnn's ryan nobles. >> reporter: good morning from capitol hill where senators haven't really had all that much time to digest this 142-page bill. if the early reviews are any indication, this is going to have a difficult time being passed and being passed quickly. mitch mcconnell, the senate majority leader, could have a problem on both sides of the political spectrum. there's a group of moderate senators voicing concerns about the bill. this group already a little queasy after the house bill that was passed from a month ago. but he also has a problem on the far right, as well, as a group of four republican senators have said that they cannot support the bill in its current fashion. among them, senators rand paul and ted cruz. >> you have to be honest with people. it has to be paid for. if we're not going to pay for it and we're going to keep a lot of the stuff that was in obamacare, i think we can do better than
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this. my hope is not to defeat the bill but to make it better. >> it's not enough just to pass a bill that has obamacare repeal in the title. we've got to have legislation that fixes the underlying probl problem. the key to getting an agreement, to getting a bill that can pass, is we need common sense reforms in the bill that lower the cost of premiums. >> reporter: this group of four conservative senators have said that they are willing to negotiate on this bill, but the timeline here is brief. we have yet to hear in the congressional budget office. they're expecting to weigh in sometime at the beginning of next week. mitch mcconnell has said that he wants this bill passed before the fourth of july recess. if you look at the calendar, that likely means that this bill needs to head to the floor sometime before next friday if they have any realistic possibility of guesting it passed before -- of getting it passed before they head home for summer break. back to you. >> okay. thank you very much. let's bring in cnn political analyst david drucker, senior
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congressional correspondent for "the washington examiner." good morning. thanks for joining us this morning. >> good morning. >> so this seems to be quite the uphill battle. i'm talking about, of course, health care in the senate specifically. the math just not adding up. you know, the senate needs 50 votes. already you're seeing defectors. four senators saying no, four more saying they've got concerns, and that's not even mentioning the others that have big concerns. what do you think senate leadership has to do to get these other legislators in line to vote for this measure? >> i think the first thing we need to wait for is the congressional budget score that will project how many people will be insured or not with this bill, how premiums might be affected. then as members, as republican senators review that information, you're going to start to see movement either toward the bill, away from the bill, or i think i could support
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it with these sorts of changes. there is going to be a robust amendment process once it gets on the floor. under the reconciliation rules which is allowing the republicans to avoid a democratic filibuster, you end up with hundreds of hamilton being proposed in an open -- hundreds of amendments being proposed in an open amendment provides. we call it a vote-a-rama. there are competing forces here. the more pragmatic republicans are concerned about what this is going to do for coverage and coverage protections. the more conservative republicans that want to see a more aggressive repeal of the obamacare regulatory regime are focused on that aspect as a matter of philosophy, but also on the premiums issue. they believe the only way you begin to reduce premiums is by repealing obamacare aggressively. this bill in its current form doesn't do that. >> and that of course rand paul's chief argument. kind of ironic that mitch mcconnell's memoir is entitled "the long game," and here he is
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trying to force in one-sixth of our economy remake in a week. from the politics to the policy of it. you talked about trying to bring premiums down. trying to bring insurers back in the market and make health care more affordable. what about the policy of it? does it answer the chief challenges left over from obamacare? >> well, it depends on who you talk to. the critics of the senate bill on the right argue that it doesn't in this regard. that without repealing more robustly a lot of the coverage protections and regulations about how health care functions that exist in the affordable care act, you're not going to have the kind of market situation where premiums go down because you're going to have a broader array of coverage choices that will make it more affordable for young and healthy people to buy insurance, to motivate them to buy insurance because the prices will be better. on the other side, there's a
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concern that if you do that you could end up with states that don't have the same conditions as pre-existing conditions as other states if certain states have waivers or things like that, that you're not going to have protections having to do, you know, with whether you can keep your kids on your insurance as adults and things that people do like about the law. this is the argument and the debate that they're having. we saw it play out in the house until republicans compromised among themselves. i think the real question for mitch mcconnell is not so much can we get this done, it's going to get it done by the end of next week before we go on a one-week recess before the month of july. i tend to think he can get there. i don't know if he can get there in a week. >> we didn't get just the big reveal with health care. we finally look at this bill -- we got a big reveal on whether or not there are tapes, tapes of course concerning the conversation that president trump had with former fbi director james comey in the white house. we found out via twitter that
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there are no tweets. there are no tweets -- this is an ironic twist in the scenario. you look at donald trump's tweet from, when was it, in may. it set off the series of events that actually put a special counsel in place because james comey sort of took the lead and released memos. that created a spot for special counsel. and then we fast forward to yesterday when we heard president trump address this. >> should he recuse himself? >> he's very, very good friends with comey which is bothersome. but he's also -- we're going to have to see. we're going to see in terms -- look, there has been no obstruction. there has been no collusion, there has been leaking by comey. but there's been no collusion, no obstruction, and virtually everybody agrees to that. so we'll have to see. >> call me crazy, but i don't think there's anybody donald trump can agree with to be the special counsel on this
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investigation. >> no, and i think the comments were very interesting. i think one way to look at it is that he sort of is setting up the foundation to eventually relieve mr. mueller of his duties, although i think that would be a mistake. and it's unclear that he would actually go that far. i just think with this president you can't put it past him. the root of his problems really stem from the fact that he fired comey, and the way that he fired comey -- i think there was a way to do it that would have made this whole thing a lot different. but the president, you know, when he feels wronged, when he feels like he's being treated unjustly, he speaks his mind. he acts impulsively. and you know, a lot of his supporters would say it served him well. that's how he ended up as president of the united states. i think as president, it has not served him as well because he's gotten himself into hot water, and we end up discussing topics that he claims he doesn't want discussed because he doesn't think they deserve airtime. but he is the one driving the news cycle on the issue of the
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special counsel, the investigation, russian meddling, not everybody else. >> time and time again, just unforced errors. he's bringing this upon himself. david drucker, thank you very much for helping us on a friday. >> thank you very much. >> read his piece in "the washington examiner" now. thank you, sir. have a good friday. >> thank you. facebook ceo mark zuckerberg knows his company has helped divide americans. >> today a lot of society is divided, right. and so it's pretty clear that just giving people a voice and connecting people isn't enough. we also have to do work to help bring people closer together. >> we're going to tell you how the company plans to bridge the gap. a cnn exclusive next. my business was built with passion... but i keep it growing by making every dollar count. that's why i have the spark cash card from capital one. with it, i earn unlimited 2% cash back on all of my purchasing. and that unlimited 2% cash back from spark means thousands of dollars each year going back into my business...
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facebook has been accused of helping divide americans.
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founder mark zuckerberg knows this and is responding to his company's roam in creating this -- role in creating this so-called filter bubble. he gave an exclusive interview to cnn telling tech's lori seigel that's why facebook's original mission needs to change. >> i used to think that if we work to give people a voice and help people connect that that would make people better by itself. i think that those are important things to do, and we're still going do them. now i feel like we have a responsibility to do even more. today a lot of society is divided. so it's pretty clear that just giving people a voice and connecting people isn't enough. we also have to do work to bring people closer together. >> let me ask how you do that. technology to a degree has always promised to help us discover and to help us learn. there's also the question of is information being hijacked and
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spread, how do you remain a place of authenticity and for real discourse? >> people are connecting over something they have in common. if you want to engage on issues that you disagree on, right, things that society is divided on, first thing that you need to do is connect over your common humanity. that could be something as simple as we both have families or that we both like a tv show together. bringing people together and creating communities is, i think, a lot of what we can do to help create more civil and productive debate on the bigger issues, as well. >> zuckerberg says he has just the tool for the job -- facebook groups. he says they'll connect communities and not just individuals. i can't stand all the politics clouding my feed. >> politics is where the fake news started. it's where hatred has snowballed. i hope -- >> why he's not on facebook much -- hope he finds a way to calm it down. let's see what's coming up
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on "new day" with my friend, allisisyn camerota. >> i have found -- being optimistic. if you and i can do it, dave, anybody can. >> happy friday, my friend. what have you got? >> you, too. we have a very big program this friday. we have all of our uber smart analysts and reporters on to help us parse through what's in the senate gop health care bill and what it means for everyone out there. and then of course we have the latest chapter in the tale of the tapes, the 40-day odyssey that the president took us on about whether or not he had audiotapes. we have of his top counselors, kellyanne conway, here on all of that. and news of the day -- and helping me will be this man, david gregory. chris is on assignment today. david is preparing with his
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oatmeal and will have energy as a result. >> i like the team. university alums -- i'm a third -- >> my gosh, kmocommon humanity. we bring it full circle. >> kellyanne conway on and cuomo off, you guys -- >> we'll do the best we can. >> we'll be looking forward to it. thanks. see you in a bit. i don't know if you noticed but uber is in a crisis. but a competitor told not to gloat. [vo] what made secretariat the greatest racehorse who ever lived? of course he was strong... ...intelligent. ...explosive. but the true secret to his perfection... was a heart, twice the size of an average horse. afi sure had a lot on my mind.
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eliquis treats dvt and pe blood clots. plus had less major bleeding. both made eliquis right for me. ask your doctor if switching to eliquis is right for you. what's the best way to get v8 or a fancy juice store?s? ready, go! hi, juice universe? one large rutabaga, with eggplant... done! that's not fair. glad i had a v8. the original way to fuel your day. i love how usaa gives me the and the security just like the marines did. at one point, i did change to a different company with car insurance, and i was not happy with the customer service. we have switched back over and we feel like we're back home now. the process through usaa is so effortless, that you feel like you're a part of the family. i love that i can pass the membership to my children, and that they can be protected. we're the williams family, and we're usaa members for life. call usaa today to talk about your insurance needs.
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the nba draft in the books. and no real shocker. number-one pick, 76ers use it on markelle fultz. the sixers hoping the washington point guard will help turn around the franchise. it's four straight years with a top-five pick and still not there. minutes later with the second pick, the lakers taking ucla guard lonzo ball. like clockwork, ball's outspoken
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dad stealing the spotlight from his son. lavar bragged lonzo will help lead the lakers to the playoffs in his first season. coach luke walton saying the bold pricks will only make ball's -- bold prediction the only make ball's rookie year more challenging. and duke's standout jason tatum, had the number-one pick, traded down to the sixers for a future first rounder which they are accumulating by the masses. a major trade went down as the bulls ship all-star jimmy butler to the twafimberwolves. they're swapping first-round selections. the t-wolves team looking awfully good for the future. the secret service says it is aware of an eyebrow-raising comment actor johnny depp made about president trump at a film festival in the uk. roll it. >> when was the last time an actor assassinated a president? [ cheers ] >> i want to clarify -- i'm not
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an actor. [ laughter ] i lie for a living. >> depp's joke is an apparent reference to john wilkes booth who assassinated president clinton -- >> wow. sorry, that is -- president lincoln. >> wow. sorry, that is hard to swallow. the secret service saying, "for security reasons, we cannot discuss specifically nor in general terms the means and methods of how we perform our protective responsibilities." depp quickly under intense criticism from all quarters apologizing. conservative host laura ingram just one voice calling him the pothead of the caribbean. johnny depp jokes about assassinating donald trump -- walk the plank, captain jack. that is his most successful franchise. it's a disney franchise. how are they going to like those comments? >> i misspoke. i meant to say lincoln, not clinton. we'll move on from here. >> john wilkes booth, 1865. no walking this back to -- you
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know, we've seen laura, the kathy griffin thing, the shakespeare in the park. this -- this type of stuff is just got to stop. >> stick to acting. stay away from politics. >> good idea. let's get a check on cnn's "money stream" this morning. global markets looking mostly lower this morning after wall street closed mixed. the dow and the s&p 500 closing lower as bank stocks fell in preparation of their annual stress test. the nasdaq popped as health stocks rose more than 1%, jumping after the senate unveiled its health care bill. crude prices rebounded half a percent. right now, we're seeing futures higher. qatar airways wants to buy a 10% stake in american airlines. american ceo doug parker is not happy about it. however, he told employees in an e-mail that american can't control who purchases its stock. qatar would own $808 million worth if the deal goes through. the world's biggest airline has been at odds with qatar airways. it claims the state-run company
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enjoys government subsidies and that allows it to expand in the u.s., hurting jobs. qatar denies this, but it's one reason u.s. carriers want the trump administration to review current aviation agreements. it was a mass exodus of top executives at uber, the company is in the middle of a crisis. a rival ride-sharing company, lyft, is saying don't gloat. the founders of lyft sent out a memo saying this -- "the faults of our competition tonight do anything to deliver a better experience for our customers. uber has faced one p.r. crisis after another. that's wound up creating an opportunity for lyft. it's raised $600 million in funding this year and saw an uptick in new passenger signups. >> competition's good for all of us. i like both apps. fantastic. >> me, too. longest friday of the year. we thank you for joining us on it. >> i'm alison kosik. thanks for being with us. >> i'm dave briggs. "new day" starts now. have a wonderful weekend, we'll see you back here on monday.
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obamacare is a disaster. it's dead. >> the way this bill cuts health care is heartless. >> give us a chance to fix this system. >> we can do better than this. >> senate republicans are trying to con americans into thinking that they are fixing problems. what they're doing is causing new ones. are there tapes? >> you're going to be very disappointed when you hear the answer. don't worry. >> he has known for weeks that there were no tapes, and yet he strung the american people along. >> does the president regret the tweets? >> i don't think so. >> a reality talk show host. this is not designed to be entertainment. this is "new day" with chris cuomo and alisyn camerota. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. this is "new day." friday, june 23rd, 6:00 in new york. chris is off this morning.
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david gregory joins me. >> who doesn't love a health care debate in the middle of summer. >> your beach read? >> i had to take it to china in orders to finish it. >> fantastic. here's our starting line -- the senate health care bill is facing resistance from all sides. four gop senators publicly saying that they oppose the plan. mitch mcconnell will have to turn two of them by next week to get his bill passed. and former president obama is slamming the bill. he calls it "a massive transfer of wealth from the poor and the middle class to the rich." meanwhile, president trump coming clean this morning, admitting in fact that he didn't tape those conversations with now-fired fbi director jim comey. so was the president's dubious claim just a bluff or an attempt to intimidate the former director of the fbi? and president trump once again dismissing the russian hacks as a "big hoax" that came in a tweet. you'll be surprised to know the
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trump white house facing serious questions about accountability and transparency again this morning. we've got it covered. we want to begin with cnn's suzanne malveaux live on capitol hill with the battle over health care. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, david. well, it is now up to the senate side, lawmakers heading to their home states, to go back to face their constituents, the voters, to explain why their health care version is a better version than what they've had before. so far with all negotiations and the compromises, no one seems to be happy. >> this current draft doesn't get the job done. >> put me down as a solid undecided. >> i think we've done a pretty good job at keeping our promises. >> reporter: senate republicans split over their party's new health care proposal. four senators already saying they cannot vote for the bill as it currently stands. the legislation was designed to appease moderates and conservatives, but it's upset members of both camps. >> it keeps the pre-existing condition, keeps the regulations, and then
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we are not fixing obamacare. >> i cannot support a bill that is going to result in tens of millions of people losing their health insurance. >> i think that they will probably get there. >> reporter: the senate bill eliminates obamacare's individual mandate, keeps insurance protections for preexisting patients but allows states to drop essential benefits which can mean skimpier coverage and fewer options for patients including those with preexisting conditions. it phases out medicaid expansion starting in 2021, reduces income based tax credits, cuts obamacare taxes and eliminates planned parenthood funding for one year. >> little negotiation but it will be very good. >> reporter: president trump announcing that he supports the bill despite promising not to cut

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