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tv   Reliable Sources  CNN  September 24, 2017 8:00am-9:00am PDT

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cultures, modern problems ind d indeed. that's all for our show this week. thank you for joining us. we'll see you next week. hey, i'm brian stelter. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. this is "reliable sources," our weekly look at the stories behind the stories and how the media really works and how the news gets made. right now exclusive new details about trump versus the nfl. this was the scene just a little while ago, the ravens/jaguars game in london. we see many players and their coaches and the jaguars team owner all standing and kneeling in solidarity, linking arms together in response to president trump's criticism of
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the nfl, specifically of the players who have been protesting the national anthem in order to call attention to oppression, police brutality and injustice. this was the scene in london. we are expecting more of this in the coming hours at football games all across the united states. it's the day's big story and we have exclusive new information about how the nfl's responding. right now dante stalworth and christine brennan are here. but first, is president trump trying to distract from his own failures by attacking the nfl? if so, are journalists just playing into his hands? that's an issue that we all talk about behind the scenes. but a lot of people think that's what's happening. this distraction question is always with us when it comes to president trump. you stray, strays into it at a rally or an angry tweet. this can trigger hours and hours
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of news coverage. on the one hand, how can it not? this is a u.s. president this weekend saying protesters should be fired. he is further sowing division, yes sometimes on racial lines. so, yes, this is a huge story, if he is doing it to change the subject. and think of all the things he might want to change the subject from. the gop's health care bill is on life support. the candidate he is backing in alabama may well lose the race on tuesday. and of course the russia investigations loom over everything. what does trump do? he curses, literally. he curses, and he even brings out his old "apprentice" catch phrase. >> wouldn't you love to see one of these nfl owners when somebody disrespects our flag to say get that son of a bitch off the field right now. out. i he's fired. he's fired! >> we thought about bleeping when he said that word. some shows have, some shows haven't. my feeling is if you object to the language, you should write
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to the white house, not cnn. obviously trump is embracing this fight with the nfl, repeatedly tweeting about it all weekend long. he also disinvited nba champ steph curry and the golden state warriors from their traditional white house house so he's got a fight with the nba as well. there is undoubtedly a racial side of this story. even if it is a distraction, so to speak. who trump chooses to criticize tells us a lot. this story is ultimately about patriotism, it is about the right to protest, it is about what it means to be an american. and the subtext, the awkward subtext, is a question we asked a few weeks ago on this program -- is president trump a racist? is he making racist appeals to his supporters? if he's not racist, why do so many americans believe that he is? and how is that going to affect the rest of his presidency? that right there is a big, big
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story. but at the same time, there is a balancing act to do here with russia and north korea, and iran in the news and puerto rico without power, devastated by hurricane maria. the challenge for us in this newsrooms is to find time, room and space for all of it. we'll start with the nfl, then get to other news. former nfl player daunte stallworth. christine brennan, sports columnist for usa "today" and a cnn sports analyst. and our own coy wire, used to be an nfl player, now our cnn spoerts corresponde sports correspondent. coy, what are you expecting to hear later today? >> first, brian, let me say how significant i believe in his first game since president trump urged nfl owners to fire or suspend any nfl player who kneeled during the anthem in protest of ashl injracial injus see to date the large ness number of players kneeling to the anthem in the game that's underway right now in london.
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also of great significance, the owner who donated $1 million to president trump's inaugural committee locking arms in a show of solidarity with his players, head coaches as well. i have talked with players around the league, and i have one player who tells me that he believes his owner will be down on the sidelines with the team in a show of support for players who are standing up against racial injustice in america, just as we see khan doing that for the jacksonville jaguars. one man told me, perhaps jokingly, perhaps not, he wouldn't be surprised if we see an entire team kneeling during the national anthem today. also interestingly, while we expect to see more players than ever kneeling during the anthem today, one team told me and an nfl source says, that his team is not going to change anything because they feel that while president trump's words were meant to be devisive, they want to unite and they do not want to let anyone's words deter what they have been doing for this
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season. >> on unity, a little bit of news here from the nfl. tonight the network is going to broadcast an ad that i think we can put on the screen. a one-minute ad that was produced for the super bowl. it is all about unity. this ad was not going to be shown again but the nfl has decided to dust it off and air it during sunday night football because they want to make a statement essentially in response to president trump, without bringing up his name, without showing further division. they want to have a message about unity, about the power of football that brings people together. christine, what do you make of the nfl's strategy here trying to tip toe on a very complicated tight rope? >> brian, if there's one group of people in this country that might have more of a mega phone than donald trump, it is probably the nfl. certainly at least on every sunday as the line from the movie concussion, they own a day of the week. it would be amazing. but is it possible that the nfl, roger goodell, has said, listen, we're going to shoulder this, we're going to take this on and
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try to move forward when you've got a president who's being so divisive. his venom with that speech, extraordinary. and bringing it all right not own into our culture and politics but now into sports that intersection we talked about before, sports and culture. well, the nfl is very comfortable now moving into that intersection, almost as a peacemaker of some sort. at least that's what we're seeing with roger goodell's comments yesterday which were very strong. the union i think was very strong and now this. and i think it is a smart move because the nfl has an incredible power to reach people. and i think that with trump, another interesting part about this, the kneeling has been going on and the divisive nature of people on both sides of that issue, even though colin kaepernick was peaceful about it and giving $1 million to charity while he's doing it, i wonder now if. kneeling is more now about trump, an anti-trump kneeling, than it is about those important issues of race that we've been
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seeing for over a year. so many twists and turns in this story. >> celebrities, ceos, now athletes deciding whether to take a stand against president trump or not. daunte, is that what the protests are going to be today, kneeling against president trump? >> i know a lot of guys that were initially in support of colin kaepernick and some guys like malcolm jenkins who's done a lot off the field in the community to meet with members of congress actually i was blessed to be able to accompany him and anquan boldin once. he never kneels but he holds up a fist. that's another form of a peaceful protest. so i think the fact that a number of guys were immediately responsive to what the president said in alabama on friday night, that shows you that players weren't going to back down. but when you look at the whole reason why this thing started from the very beginning is to bring forth a lot of attention
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to a situation in police communities -- or communities, policing, that needs to be addressed. so my biggest fear is that this becomes a shouting contest between donald trump and the nfl. i think we should give back to -- i applaud the players that are kneeling for whatever their purpose is. it is your first right amendment, whether i agree with it or not, it doesn't matter. but i think that those players, they obviously do have a right, but now they have been galvanized, they've been e inspired to do more, that they feel the president of the united states is trying to bully them into silence. >> donte, do you feel this attack against the nfl is racist? i hear you sighing. it is really a difficult issue. >> yeah, i don't sling that word around lightly. but i do think that when you look at the president's own actions, not what we think of white supremacy or what we think of racism, but you look at his
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own actions, his lack of condemnation to white supremacists screaming jews will not replace us. white supremacists extremists are causing a lot of violence in this country, and yet the trump administration decided to defund some of those boots that are countering the white supremacists extremistextremist. his own actions sew what or who he is. his own actions speak for themselves. >> let me ask two quick media questions. one on the television coverage today, coy, the broadcast networks don't normally show the national anthem live, do they? but today we hear cbs and fox will be showing these protests live? >> we saw it from the london game, brian, they showed the entire anthem. you are right, you don't normally see that high litted but i think it helps to ignore
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this situation. >> it is a news story now. >> absolutely. christine, what about coverage of this more broadly? do you find as a columnist that trump is changing the way sports writers cover sports? >> oh, absolutely. we talked about jamele hill last week and that whole issue. well, if there was ever any doubt that politics and sports are mixing and that trump and sports are mixing, well, trum addtrump added that in alabama. he's just presented the most amazing journalistic platter to sports journalists. i've said before that there are places where you can go on these issues, whether it be the u.s. women's open golf that donald trump hosted, a man who brags about sexually assaulting women hosting the crown jewel of women's golf in july. obviously some of the concern of protests and how trump's dreadful reaction to charlottesville. those things i have written and said, i would never have said or talked about those kinds of issues with other presidents, not because it is political but just because of the news value.
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now this? i think we have ensured that this is the story of the football season. i have no idea the twists and turns, of course none of us do. but there is no doubt that this is one of the biggest sports stories and cultural stories we've seen in some years. again, donald trump just handed it over to us and as journalist w s we need to do our job and move forward with it from here. >> nfl ratings have been down massively -- that's not true. ratings are done modestly. if anything, there's going to be more interest in the games today. do you believe the ratings might increase because of all this interest? >> brian, as a former nfl player, i can say i don't normally believe it. i don't tune in to nfl games too often, i get away from them when i can. but i'll watch today. i want to see who, how many were going to stand up and show support for their fellow players who are standing up against racial and social injustice. look, our country has a rich history of athletes activism.
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i think these are significant times. you can go back to tommy smith, jesse owens, jackie robinson, muhammad ali, kareem abdul-jabbar. donte, i know you have been in the room with some of the men i just mentioned. this feels like that, a momentous time in our country where athletes are using their voice and their platform to create positive change when they can. >> thank you all for being here. later on this hour, did jimmy kimmel help kill the health care bill? we'll talk to late night expert bill carter about that. plus, an exclusive interview with senator mark warner talking about the scrutiny of nfacebook and the ads linked to russia. we'll get into that. plus, the ongoing russian investigations not just involving facebook but many other facets. carl bernstein is here. after the break.
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nausea, and abdominal pain. stay ahead of ibs-d with viberzi. hey, welcome back to "reliable sources." when a late night comedian suddenly is talking about health care, people pay attention, including lawmakers. that's one of the lessons from this week. you will remember when senator bill cassidy, co-sponsor the of the graham/cassidy bill to repeal and replace obamacare said if any new replacement should pass the "jimmy kimmel" test. he got criticized and he responded like this. >> i see these comments from these angry people o who say what qualifies you to talk about this stuff, you are a comedian, go back to being not funny.
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i'm not qualified to talk about this. but i think people forget bill cassidy named this test after me. am i supposed to just be quiet about that? health carekacare is complicate. it is boring. details are confusing and that's what these guys are counting on, that you'll be so overwhelmed with the information, you just trust them to take care of you. >> that's jimmy kimmel talking about this all week long an his late night show. this was deeply personal for him because of the health emergency that his newborn son recently experienced. so what about the kimmel effect? did he help kill the health care bill? let's get into it with bill carter, late night expert, author of two books about the late night world. now a cnn media analyst. in washington, sara clip, a senior policy correspondent at bot. what is the status of this graham/cassidy health care bill? >> i think it is very much on life support right now. senator mccain came out against it late on friday.
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that means there are two no votes. senator mccain and senator rand paul who have been against it for some time. the republicans can only afford to lose two votes. we've seen interviews on the sunday shows so far where senator collins and senator murkowski are looking pretty negative. so it feels like a long shot, but then again a deadline could be quite motivating. i would not rule it out until we get past the september 30 deadline. >> collins is coming up on state of the union an hour from now. i heard the idea that jimmy kimmel is responsible for the defeat of this legislation or pending defeat. how true is that from your perspective? >> i think he is not responsible but he is a big contributor because he put a human face on it. as he said, this is a very complicated thing. it is interesting, all these organizations come out against it. i mean all of them. every medical organization, all of them. that didn't seem to be getting any traction until kimmel started underscoring that. he's talking about his own kid. everyone watching can think,
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gee, what about my kid? that hits home in a way that it doesn't hit home in a way people start about premium costs. i think his personal impact is the big factor. >> what does it say about our society that an entertainer can have so much impact? >> well, he has a voice. think about this. there were hurricanes going on. all kinds of other news going on and regular media wasn't covering this the way they would have if it were the sole story. you have a guy with a big national audience talking about it. that's very significant. i think the other media was sort of catching on. when they did it, they started following him. that brought the story forward i think. >> was there any blowback from inside abc or the current company, disney? nor jimmy kimmel to make jokes? >> no, i don't think there was any blowback at all. anybody who knows jimmy knows he's sincere. this isn't something he's doing for ratings or attention. or for his show because it's not
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funny. >> that's my point. nbc doesn't call up and some point and say, jimmy, lay off the health care debate? >> to say to a guy whose kid has been through this, i couldn't conceive of that. i don't think iger disagrees with him. >> isn't that the story, liberal hollywood is weighing in. >> he's very much in this camp, for sure. >> let's look at fact checks of this health care bill. an interesting graphic from politifact describing some of the claims that jimmy kimmel was making about the bill. sara, is it true that jimmy kimmel was sort of more accurate when it came to describing it bill than fuactually some of th gop senators? >> yeah, i think he really has been. i've been covering this closely, i've done multiple interviews with senator cassidy. think when you look at a lot of key claims on coverage, for example, it is certainly true, politifact couldn't verify that 30 million people would lose coverage but it is nearly certain some number of people lose coverage. that's the opposite of what senator cassidy said here on cnn
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where he claimed that people would actually gain coverage. there's very little animalysis support that claim. and pre-existing conditions, another key flash point. i think kimmel is more accurate and in line with the experts. he's not a health policy expert, right, but those of us who spend a lot of time looking at this, we have looked at this bill and we don't think that people with pre-existing conditions would be protected as they are now. they could face higher premiums and fewer benefits if graham/cassidy became law. i've been covering health care for about a decade and i found that kimmel has generally gotten his facts right on this. >> there has been reporting an confirmed by a kimmel spokesperson that chuck schumer and other opponents of the bill were in touch with kimmel. i wonder in that had something to do with the bill. >> yeah, i think he certainly has the democrats cheering for him. i think bill made a good point that it was a little hard for this issue to get traction especially with all the hurricane coverage.
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>> what is that like for you as a health care reporter? were you kind of screaming going, look what's going on here! >> yeah. last minute i'd be in makeup and they'd say, sorry, we're doing hurricane coverage today. but it's gained traction and i think that's emboldened republicans. but i think bill is right, that kimmel really increased the coverage. he has a massive platform, much bigger than most of us health policy reporters. so he really brought the national focus to it. >> it was a negative message, butpositive message be shared by anybody of his stature. a quick break. when we come back, a conversation about facebook and how it says it plans to turn over thousands ever ads that were secretly bought by russian accounts trying to sway the election. is disclosure enough? senator mark warner is standing by, exclusively for an interview
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anonymous facebook accounts linked to russia spread propaganda through facebook and other social networking sites targeting american voters before election day. those ads were in some cases pro-trump and anti-clinton. facebook ceo mark zuckerberg is starting to come to terms with what happened. he has provided information to special counsel robert mueller and he is about to hand over data and ad and information to kong as well. here is some of what zuckerberg said in a facebook live interview earlier this week. >> when someone buys political ads on tv or other media, they
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are required by law to disclose who paid for them. we're going to bring facebook to an even higher standard of transparency. >> no more anonymity, he says. zuckerberg says facebook will make sure you can see who's buying political ads. is it a campaign targeting your mom on facebook but not you? you'll still be able to see the ads and find out how people are being influenced. but senator mark warner -- the lead democrat on the senate intelligence committee, wants to make sure this becomes law, not just voluntary by facebook but enforceable by law. warner and fellow democrat any klobuchar want to keep facebook and others to keep political ads. >> senator, thank you so much for joining me. >> thank you, brian. >> facebook says it's going to go ahead and voluntarily implement this kind of exposure. that's what mark zuckerberg announced two days ago. is that enough voluntary disslodi
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disclosure by facebook? >> i'm glad facebook has finally stepped forward. ten months ago i started raising this issue. ten months ago facebook was saying, that's crazy, there was no russian interference, there was no russian involvement. we've seen now there was dramatic russian involvement, both in terms of paid advertising, as well as these so-called fake accounts and we still don't know the total number of fake accounts. i don't think we know the full extent of the russian advertising. i'm glad that facebook has finally stepped forward. i wish they would have stepped forward much earlier. we will be -- proof of how thorough facebook will be in the coming weeks. we have not received any of their information yet. they will disclose that to us next week. we want to try to find a way then to make some of the those ads and other information public. because at the end of the day this is really about the public's need to know, both the source of the content that's coming at them from a political
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context, and to be assured that a series of individuals are liking a certain story or liking a certain account, that those individuals are actually who they represent themselves to be, not russian agents, for example. >> but forgive me for being skeptical here. if i set up a facebook page called make america great again and i never mention donald trump in that group, is facebook going to call that political or not. there are a lot of questions about how to even define political ads. >> brian, you are exactly right. we recognize the absolute need to protect individuals' privacy. that's got to be one of our tenets. but there is also this requirement, i believe, around disclosure so that if you're for or against a candidate or for or against a cause, you ought to be able to see the content that's being launched against you, particularly if it comes from a foreign source. >> also i'm wondering, is disclosure enough. mere disclosure does not seem to be enough to deter bad actors. have you thought about going further beyond regulation to restrictions against political
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advertising on social networking sites? >> listen, social media is transformative. over half of america looks at their facebook account every day. they use it on a regular basis. i would like to start with a light touch. i'd like to start and make again this iterative. we probably won't get it 100% right at first. >> so warner wants co-sponsors for this legislation. that's what he's seeking. what about the bigger issue? the ongoing investigation into the connection between russia and the trump campaign? i asked warner if he has any evidence of coordination. >> listen, i'm not going to draw any final conclusions until we hear from all the witnesses, until we hear all the stories. it is a problem though, brian, and i share, i know, your and some of the viewers' frustration. every week there is a new thread to follow or new revelation
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coming out. i wish folks in the administration would be a little more forthcoming, so if they say there's nothing there, if there's nothing there, they ought to be as forthcoming as possible and move past this. there seems to be aen awful lot of unusual, to say the least, of people affiliated with mr. trump and russians, and clearly the russians were trying to influence the campaign and, as we know, had information that was discrediting to hillary clinton. >> when president trump says this is a hoax, over and over again, he said it every single month since march. what does that do to your investigation? >> well, president trump's refusal to acknowledge what happened, he's basically rebutting the conclusions of all of his intelligence agencies, he's rebutting the presumptions and conclusions of all the top officials that he appointed. >> does he gain something by saying this every time is. >> i'll leave that to bob mueller and his investigation.
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what i do know he is doing is he's not making our country safer because we don't have any one kind of whole of government out of the white house leading the charge for make sure that our state election systems are fully protected, that how we make sure that we have tighter cyber security around our political parties. someone actually from the white house should have been leading this effort to work with these social media companies to, in effect, be more transparent. the fact that the president hasn't assigned anybody to take on this task and his continual refusal to acknowledge what is accepted as fact by all the intelligence community, i frankly think does our country a great disservice. >> what do you believe the media's role should be here? we've seen coverage of this on a daily basis. there are so many threads, it is a little bit overwhelming. >> people get numb to this because it is hard to follow all these names and all these connections. you've got mr. manafort, the meetings where the russians were
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trying to meet with mr. trump junior. you've got all of these combinations with general flynn. the fact that the number of people who have had either be fired or recuse themselves because of connections with russia and this administration is, again, unprecedented. i think your job though to skke on us, press us, similarly when we've got these new issues about how we bring transparency to social media. we've got to -- frankly, we've got to work through this. there is no previous playbook on how we get this right, how, as you mentioned earlier, you've got a private company. do you really want that private company doing all of the screening? that's an appropriate question. but on the other hand, if they have access to all of the information, the truth is, facebook and google and some of these social media companies probably know more about you and me than the united states government knows about you and me. they have this trove of data and in many ways we are going to have to work on them, because no one else has the same kind of access to information that they
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have. >> senator, thank you so much for being here. >> thank you. you can read my full story on this and all of the coverage on reliablesources.com. hear carl bernstein's blunt assessment of the russia probe after the break.
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welcome back to "reliable sources" where every day we're trying to keep track of the drip, drip, drip of the russia investigation. it was reported this week that special counsel robert mueller is asking the white house to provide documents related to trump actions as president, not just pre-campaign and pre-election day, but issues recently. that request includes, quote, 13 areas in which investigators are seeking information, including statements about former fbi director james comey made in the presence of russian officials, also the firing of michael flynn, and a meeting at trump tower with donald trump jr. as you recall, he sought to get damaging information about hillary clinton from russian
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individuals. there is a lot to talk about here, a lot to unpack, including the story about paul manafort this week as well. let's bring in carl bernstein. carl's always the person i want to hear from when we are talking about these investigations. of course one half of the famed woodward and bernstein duo, now a cnn political analyst. what do all these various threads add up to in your mind, carl? >> two things. first, that robert mueller -- the special counsel, is looking at the conduct of president donald trump, members of his family, especially jared kushner, also his closest campaign aides in terms of their dealings with russia, ethnorussians during the campaign before, and in business. there is a much larger context that now informs the whole investigation, and that is the
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conclusion in the american intelligence community under donald trump -- not under obama -- that now is certain that the russians were very, very effective in undermining the campaign of hillary clinton in specifically helping donald trump. and we keep hearing the word collusion, which is not a legal term. what mueller is focused on is something quite different than the simple idea of collusion. it is whether or not donald trump and those in his campaign, and perhaps his family and business associates, knew that the russians were trying to help his campaign. and if they knew that, why didn't they blow the whistle on the russians? did they try to cover it up? are they continuing to try and cover up that knowledge? that's the real question, not this word "collusion" which trump and the white house keep trying to focus on and say, no, no, we didn't collude.
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did they know the russians were trying to help donald trump. that's the big question, among others, including the possible obstruction of justice that the investigators are looking at. >> you're hearing this from reading all these stories and piecing it together or from sources directly involved? >> both. let me tell you something about sources here that i think readers and viewers of these accounts that are so prevalent in the past few months need to understand. there are more than 21 lawyers involved in this case representing people in the white house, around donald trump, around his campaign, around his family. and they have had dealings with mueller. and it is very possible from exhaustively talking to these lawyers, and people in the white house, and in the intelligence community, to get a much clearer picture such as i've just given of what mueller is looking at. he has a sprawling investigation
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going in obstruction of justice, possibly by the president, involving the firing of comey, in to whether or not trump, his family or aides knew anything about the russians trying to help their campaign. if so, did they try to cover that up. this gives a little more clarity. and to build on what mark warner just said -- and i think warner could tell us even more about this -- the russians were deadly effective in how they bought this time from facebook and others. one example that i can give -- and i believe mr. warner knows about it -- certainly others on the hill know about it -- is that the russians bought ads to keep front and center in wisconsin and other states the issue of black lives matter, understanding that if they kept going ahead and pushing this idea, this controversial notion of black lives matter, being crucial to the presidential election, two turn out certain white voters in opposition to
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hillary clinton and in favor of donald trump. so there's this sprawling canvas in front of us, and that is incidentally one reason why trump is so assertive in his tweets -- >> calling it a hoax, you mean? >> yeah. calling the investigation a hoax. >> i think he's inoculating his fans don't believe a word of it. >> he's trying to make the conduct of the press the issue. he says that the enemy of the people was the press. even more so two appear than isis. he believes we're the enemy, which of course is absurd. just as in the watergate case they tried to make the press the issue but not like trump has. these investigators are closing in on him, his family and his aides. if indeed there's nothing there and it is a hoax, then why has
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donald trump tried to undermine, demean and obstruct, not necessarily in terms of legal obstruction of justice, these investigations for six months at every turn. he's done everything he can, as have those around him, to keep these investigations from succeeding. >> carl bernstein, thank you so much. we'll talk again soon. before we go to break here, one note about attacks against press freedom. much more severe, much more severe than in the united states. this is in turkey, an ongoing assault against journalists there. the turkish president recently tried to convince the audience at the bloomberg global business forum that many of the estimated 150 journalists jailed in his country are actually terrorists. >> translator: most of those you say in prison aren't journalists. most of them are terrorists. most of them have had their names involved in many bombing incidents. some of them have been involved in robberies. there are even some who they
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caught robbing. saying i am a journalist doesn't make a journalist. most of them are like that. but, unfortunately, when they say i'm a journalist, those on the outside count them as journalists. >> sickening words from erdogan. his explanation is insulting and we have to keep saying so over and over again. ♪ and suddenly make it all seem worthwhile? ♪ ♪ well it's you girl, and you should know it. ♪ with each glance and every little movement you show it. ♪ you're gonna make it after all. ♪ it takes a long time to get to the top... you're gonna make it after all. ♪ but with america's best you're gonna make it after all. ♪ bumper-to-bumper limited you're gonna make it after all. ♪ warranty, the all-new volkswagen tiguan will be there every step ♪ ow! ♪ of the way.
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ing what welcome back to "reliable sources." there was a whole lot of criticism of him and the emmys for having him there. later in the week, he gave some interviews saying he regretted berating the porters over the
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inauguration crowd size and he says he has never intentionally lied to the american people. here with me is cnn analyst bill carter. first the spicer story, none of the big television networks are willing to hire spicer has a talking head. why is that? >> he has no credibility. frankly what you really have to have is credibility. and for him to say he never intentionally lied flies in the face of what he said. he doesn't know how to swim, but every pond he wanders by he wanders into, and then he gets in over his head. he goes on tv and he tries to rebuild hiss image. and then he tells a reporter friend of his, you better not -- i just don't think he has the
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k50i67 kind of appeal that even reporters want to hear on fox. >> and oprah debuts on 60 minutes, she's trying to ignite the country with her segments. >> she's a fantastic individual figure and has a great following and it's a great forum for her. and she still wants to have a forum and stay within the public discourse, because she doesn't have the daily show with an audience. megyn kelly is starting too. >> tomorrow morning on nbc. >> what i think about megyn sounds like she's trying to be oprah. the format is like a throw back, instead of doing something more contempora contemporary, in her ads, her promotions, she talks about unifying the nation. i can't believe that people would look to megyn kelly about it. >> you're not very bullish with
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her new show? >> she's very glamorous and appealing, but i don't think that's morning television, she has to connect with people like she's their best friend. the format will be a lot hard for her. the model she can have is diane sawyer. before we go, three examples of journalism making a difference this week, arguably the biggest story of the whole week was trump's u.n. general assembly speak calling kim jong-un rocket man. sources say that some u.s. officials wanted trump not to attack north korea's leader personally. but trump did it anyway. next a political investigation exposing hhs secretary tom
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price's proclivity for flying on private jets. now the department's inspector general is reviewing the matter, and price says he'll stop flying private until the review is over. and one reporter in particular, "new york times" ken vogel spotted two of trump's lawyers at the next table over. they were in public, sitting outdoors, so vogel went ahead and listened in on the conversation. the two were loudly discussing the legal team's problem. he use what he heard and did more reporting. but here's what stood out to me, white house counsel don mcgahn has a couple of key documents locked in a safe. so that's the next challenge for reporters finding out exactly what's in pose documents, i suppose the work never ends.
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on the brink. the latest republican plan to repeal obamacare is one no vote away from failing. >> that was a totally unexpected thing, terrible, honestly, terrible. >> we'll talk to the senator who could derail it. >> there are many concerns that i have. >> how will she vote? senator susan collins joins us live? and

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