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tv   New Day With Alisyn Camerota and John Berman  CNN  May 31, 2019 5:00am-6:00am PDT

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barr this morning is defending his actions in a new interview. the attorney general says the justice department sparred with robert mueller over the legal analysis in his final report. listen to this. >> we annualized the law and the facts and a group of us spent a lot of time doing that and determined that both as a matter of law many of the instances would not amount to obstruction. >> as a matter of law? >> as a matter of law. we didn't agree with the legal analysis, a lot of the legal analysis, in the report. it did not reflect the views of the department. it was the views of a particular lawyer or lawyers. so we applied what we thought was the right law. >> barr says he felt that mueller could have reached a conclusion on obstruction even if justice department guidelines say that a sitting president cannot be indicted.
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as for mueller's final warning that russia systematically interfered in the 2016 election barr said, quote, there is an increasingly robust program, end quote, in place to prevent it from happening again in 2020. laura jarrett is live in washington with more on this very revealing interview. >> the attorney general once again this morning trying to explain why he felt the need to issue that four-page memo laying out what he believed were the special counsel's principal conclusions ahead of actually releasing the report. a move that barr has taken on a lot of heat for in recent weeks. take a listen to how he described it. >> i was just trying to state the bottom line and the bottom line was that bob mueller identified some episodes, he did not reach a conclusion, he provided both sides of the issue and his conclusion was he wasn't exxon rating the president but he wasn't finding a crime, either. >> but of course mueller did
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explain for us earlier this week why he didn't reach that decision, why he decided he couldn't go there, and it was really fundamentally about fairness for the special counsel, he believes if you're not going to actually indict someone, then you cannot unload derogatory information about somebody when they can't essentially challenge it in court. obviously reasonable minds can disagree. the attorney general obviously has a very different take on mueller's sort of dereliction of duty there in his view, but the special counsel believed his hands were tied. alisyn? >> very interesting to see all of this and to hear from him finally. thank you, laura. let's bring in david axelrod, nae malika henderson and john avalon. david axelrod what did you hear in now finally the first time us hearing bill barr's response to robert mueller's first public testimony? >> look, i don't think he
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particularly cleared things up. basically what he said was mueller handed it to us and we decided when we know earlier this week mueller explained he thought this was a matter for congress, that the doj rules prohibited hem from reaching a conclusion or at least from acting on an indictment. as laura said he thought it was unfair to move forward with a conclusion when they couldn't act on it. there is really a difference between the two of them. this is why people want mueller to testify to help clarify his thinking on this and he has made it clear that he feels he's said the last word on this. i'm not sure congress is going to sit for that. >> and nia, it seems to me at the end of this week where we heard from robert mueller for the first time, william barr is operating in a shrinking space. he went from being the one in his own words presenting the principle conclusions of the mueller report, that was way back in march, to now basically saying i disagree with the
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fundamental thinking behind the mueller report and its conclusions. it's a very different place and he's been forced into this corner i think by mueller's public statements. >> you're exactly right. i think in some ways he himself, barr, forced mueller's hand to really, i think, come out and sort of clarify what those 400 pages went, what the sort of interpretation was, why mueller acted the way he acted. bill barr along with the president and the president's allies for those two months very much filled that vacuum with their in some ways spin, in some ways misleading interpretations of what mueller's words were. no you you have mueller -- now you have barr having to come back after you had mueller in that very sort of restrained by the book law and order statement that he made earlier this week about eight minutes and so now you have bill barr really in the role that donald trump wanted him to be in and wanted sessions to play as well, sort of as a pitbull defending the president there and saying, well, look,
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this is basically a legal matter. sort of a legal difference of opinion and mueller went one way and barr is saying that his department, his lawyers, went another way. reminds me of his testimony before the senate when he talked about the report being his baby, right? and so, you know, he's taken that baby back from mueller and spinning it in a way that i think will -- the president will certainly like because that, of course, is his audience. it's the audience of one. in some ways in listening to him i'm reminded of rudy giuliani who was sort of the president's public lawyer, but he's much more careful in terms of the way he speaks than rudy giuliani was. >> good point. john, should i interpret your heavy audible sigh as frustration? >> yes, that is a fair interpretation. the body language classes you've been taking -- >> just the audible. >> i'm sorry, let's take a step back here for a second. in what world is bill barr going
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to be more deferential -- mueller should have been more aggressive to the president and he had the right to do and mueller is the one going to be exhibiting enormous restraint when it comes to indicting a president. that doesn't smell the smells test. mueller had been working with rosenstein for a long period of time, rosenstein would have known almost certainly that mueller was operating under an assumption, a construct, a constraint based on the office of legal counsel opinion that a sitting president couldn't be indicted. legally he said constitutionally and as a matter of fairness, therefore, this would not have been a surprise or frustration to rosenstein and then barr when he came in the door. so let's just basically reality check that fact. yes, you know, mueller is in the position of being the last boy scout. he was playing it really by the book. the idea that barr was egging him on saying you could indict if you want torques go ahead, do it, just isn't rooted in reality based on public statements. >> let's play more of the interview. we're hearing some of this from
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william barr for the very first time this morning. this is what he says about the justification for his latest investigation of the investigators. >> what evidence, what makes you think i need to take a look at this? >> like many other people who are familiar with intelligence activities, i had a lot of questions about what was going on and i assumed i would get answers when i went in and i have not gotten answers that are satisfactory. in fact, have probably more questions and that some of the facts that i've learned don't hang together with the official explanations of what happened. >> what do you mean by that? >> that's all i really will say. things are just not jiving. >> this is so interesting to me as a political matter, david axelrod, because you see this struggle between robert mueller making a public statement saying this is what we should be focused on, russia attacked our electoral system and now you see the president and the attorney
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general saying i really want to focus on the genesis of the investigation into the russian attack. >> yes, this is the fundamental month. the one thing everybody seems to agree on about the mueller report is that russia attacked us. that was what the intelligence community and law enforcement was investigating. they uncovered what -- what was alleged, so the genesis of this was real. i mean, the report confirmed it and barr is insinuating somehow that this was untoward. it just doesn't -- you know, barr is doing what the president wanted him to do, he wanted his roy cohen, he wanted the ag to go his lawyer and it really feels like that's what he's doing. >> john, we just had jim baker on who was one of the original investigators and he said that part of the reason that bill barr may be feeling so confused is because all of the original investigators are gone. if there's ever anything that is confusing to him or a discrepancy he can't go to them
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directly to ask them. i suppose he could pick up the phone. >> he could pick up the phone. >> and call them, but maybe he's waiting for the inspector general report to come out. either way there are answers out there. they are happy to answer them. >> and this is not an ex fire standard, you don't have to deep:i go in too deep here. again, russians were trying to influence our election on donald trump's behalf. does that rise to the level of concern for our law enforcement during election, yes or no? and if that question is tough for you imagine a democrat candidate was in that positio, i think you would hear a very different tone. while bill barr is going to the dick cheney school with the gravelly tone he's clearly still feeding the president. >> stoking the fire behind him. >> well played. >> we have some brand-new sound coming in from the attorney general where he talks about whether he has any regrets over taking the job. listen. >> so you don't regret taking the job? >> no.
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no. in many ways i'd rather be back to my old life, but i think that i love the department of justice, i love the fbi, i think it's important that we not in this period of intense partisan feeling destroy our institutions. i think one of the ironies today is that people are saying that it's president trump that's shredding our institutions. i really see no evidence of that. from my perspective the idea of resisting a democratically elected president and basically throwing everything at him and, you know, really changing the norms on the grounds that we have to stop this president, that's where the shredding of our norms and our institutions is occurring. >> well, i do wonder, then, why he launched the investigation if he already has reached a verdict on the genesis of the report. he says the shredding of norms apparently was the investigation. >> right. you know, he had these other
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questions about whether or not he thinks it was treason. he didn't flat out say no. he essentially said not in the legal sense of the word. i don't know if there's another sense of the word. treason, again, i think he is showing that he is president trump's lawyer. and this idea that, you know -- of course he doesn't regret taking the job, he basically campaigned for the job. he had this whole memo, you know, talking about the investigation and why he thought it shouldn't happen. his idea of executive powers being very expansive. so, yeah, he is in exactly the position he wants to be, he's always going to defend this president, he's always going to appoint someone else in terms of blaming them. you saw that there with this idea that somehow the president himself isn't shredding institutions, shredding the norms. we see the president do that every day, whether it's his activity on twitter or whether it's the way he characterizes our national intelligence agencies and taking putin's side over the side of intelligence agencies and that community.
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so, you know -- >> but barr has seen no evidence of that. >> no evidence. again, this goes to his credibility which i think has been at issue for the last many months. >> that's a great point. in fact, that is what we should talk about because many people don't know that they can trust whatever bill barr says because once you read the mueller report how different his summary was. also, john, it's interesting that he says that he saw no evidence of obstruction in the instances that robert mueller laid out because many legal analysts including, we should say, those on fox tv said that that would have constituted obstruction for any other american were he not a sitting president. >> he's basically saying mueller is a bad lawyer and the consensus of most prosecutors is wrong. also he keeps repeating this line that there was countervailing evidence against cases of obstruction on an equal basis throughout the report. that's just not the case. the fact he's condemning hyper
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partisanship when he's been acting the way he has on behalf of the president, talks about shoring up these institutions when he has been undermining credibility because he has been acting like the president's lawyer is truly troubling. >> all right. on that note, david, john, nia, thank you very much. there are literally no words left. the dictionary could not keep up with this year's national spelling bee competitors. for the first time ever eight super spellers were crowned champions and they broke the dictionary. we will talk to all of them coming up. >> so nearly half of the democrats running for president think congress should begin impeachment proceedings against president trump. our next guest is not among them. we will speak to 2020 candidate michael bennet next. red with t-mobile for business. with va video connect, powered by t-mobile, vets can speak to their doctors from virtually anywhere, and get the care they deserve,
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i love the department of justice, i love the fbi. i think it's important that we not in this period of intense partisan feeling destroy our institutions. i think one of the ironies today is that people are saying that it's president trump that's shredding our institutions. i really see no evidence of that. from my perspective the idea of resisting a democratically elected president and basically throwing everything at him and, you know, really changing the norms on the grounds that we have to stop this president, that's where the shredding of our norms and our institutions is occurring. that's attorney general william barr insisting that the people investigating president trump are the ones who have broken the norms, not the president himself. joining me now is presidential candidate senator michael bennet from colorado. he believes the start of the impeachment process now could mean that democrats would lose
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in 2020. we will get to that in a moment, senator, but i want to ask you about what we just heard from the attorney general. it's fairly remarkable. he is saying that in the issue of norms it is those who are questioning what happened, investigating the russian attack on the united states in the 2016 election, they are the ones that have been breaking the norms. what's your response? >> i think he's totally wrong about that. i mean, this is a perfect example of why the separation of powers that the founders set up for our country is to important. congress has a very important job to provide oversight here. his observation is that the president is not destroying our institutions falls in the face of half of a term of attacking the free press, attacking the independent judiciary, attacking the department of justice, attacking our intelligence agency. we never have seen this in a president before. >> you asked for the attorney general to step down. do you stand by that? >> yeah, i do, because he lied
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what was in the mueller report and that's why a lot of the american people still don't know what was in that report. >> you worked in the justice department for a period of time here. in terms of the legal analysis of whether the special counsel could say that the president committed a crime, do you think that he had the power to do so? do you think that robert mueller should have weighed this there? >> i don't know, but i have -- as everybody did before this bizarre moment in our political history -- i have tremendous confidence in bob mueller, he shoots straight, has a reputation over decades for having called it the way he saw t for having applied the law to the facts. i know that is the view of the people. the men and women who work in the justice department who are true patriots in this country. so i'm willing to rely for the moment on his interpretation of the law. i am not willing to rely on his conclusion that he doesn't want to come testify to congress. i think it's critical for bob
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mueller to testify to congress and that his report be unredacted so that the american people can see all of what's in there. >> again, you have said, including with our dana bash last night, that you think that the president probably committed impeachable offenses, yet you don't want to start an official impeachment inquiry. is that for political expedience if you feel that he might have committed impeachable offenses -- >> there's nothing politically ex peed yant about it. we need to protect this republic from high crimes and misdemeanors by the president of the united states. just as if in watergate we have the responsibility to have a process that the american people can follow -- that can follow and reach a conclusion about what happened. i think it would be foolish for congress to go down the road of impeachment knowing that the senate was going to exonerate the president or acquit the president and then have the president run for office saying
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he had been acquitted. but i do think we should start the process of getting mueller up there, having him testify, having other people testify that we think are important to this investigation and let's make a judgment. one other they think i wanted to say is i hope people go back and use this as an opportunity to go to youtube and watch the watergate investigation because it will break your heart to see republicans and democrats together, members of congress putting party completely aside to follow the facts where they led them. to lead an investigation of the fact. they actually developed a factual record and worked together to get to a point where president nixon had to resign. that kind of bipartisanship, that kind of commitment to our institutions is lost in america today. we cannot be lost forever. we've got to turn this country back over to the next generation, just as that
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watergate generation turned it over to us. >> i'm running out of time and i want to get you on two other issues here. there was an article in the "washington post" about bipartisanship today, part of it has to do with joe biden talking about whether or not we should be reaching out the democratic party should be reaching out to republicans, we being him in this case. you were asked directly whether democrats should vote for joe biden and your response was, i don't think we need to go backward. we need to go forward. what do you mean p by that? do you think that supporting joe biden is going backwards? >> well, i certainly don't mean any disrespect for the vice president, i have tremendous affection for him and i'm grateful for his service, but i do think it's time to go forward. i think it's time to go forward from an era where america invaded iraq, i think it's time to go forward from lousy bipartisan deals that actually didn't advance the interests of the country. i think it's time to go forward from a tyranny by the freedom caucus and mitch mcconnell in the congress. i represent a state that's a
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third republican, democratic and independent and i believe it's my responsibility to represent everybody in my state, no matter what party they are in, but the particular kind of tyranny that the freedom caucus has resented is one that can't be compromised with. they have not compromised with anybody for ten years. mitch mcconnell is impervious to give and take unless he's taking everything which he is almost all the time. i'm tired of losing to climate deniers, i'm tired of losing to judges. >> i want to get you on one last thing. on the spirit of compromise you've been critical of senator ted cruz in the past. over the last 24 hours he and representative alexandria ocasio-cortez have come to an agreement on a lobbying ban. that if you serve in congress that you cannot ever lobby in the future. this is something you havebeen a big proponent of in the past, so despite your differences with senator cruz, is this something you're willing to work with him on? >> i'm delighted to hear that the two of them want to do t i've had that bill for ten years
quote
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in the congress and for years i couldn't get a co-sponsor because it seemed like everybody wanted to be a lobbyist after they left. so i am so glad they're coming in, it's a decade later, but glad to have them now. the reason for the bill is that if you look at members of congress who retire over half of them become lobbyists in washington, d.c. it creates a view in the american people that we've gone to washington to get rich, we're not focused on the american people's business. i actually don't think that's why people go to washington, but i do think it's important to recognize that worry in the american people and i think it's the least a member of congress could do which is give up their opportunity to be a lobbyist for the privilege to serve as a member of congress. i'm glad to have ted and alexandria ocasio-cortez working on this legislation as well. that's a powerful duo. >> senator michael bennet, thank you for being with us. appreciate it. >> thanks for having me. when baby sabie as she's
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called was born she was the smallest surviving baby in the world. now hess home. she was released from the hospital this week. we will speak to her doctor and the nurse who cared for her next. ♪ goin' down the only road i've ever known ♪ ♪ like a-- ♪ drifter i was ♪born to walk alone! you're a drifter? i thought you were kevin's dad. little bit of both. if you ride, you get it. geico motorcycle. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more. s... s...u... s...u...v... these letters used to mean something. letters earned in backwoods, high hills, and steep dunes. but somewhere along the way, suvs became pretenders, not pioneers. but you never forgot the difference,
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now to an incredible story of survival of the world's smallest baby, she was born at just 8.6 ounces. little sabie as she is being called a believed to be the tiniest baby on record. her mother experienced severe pregnancy complications but sabie did not have many of the medical issues associated with micro premies.
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she kept astounding her doctors with her progress. with err happy to report that she is now a healthy infant and at home with her family after five months in the hospital. joining us now two of her nare givers. we have dr. paul woez neek and nicu nurse devin coal from sharp mary hospital. dr. wozniak explain what it's like to first see sabie as you guys called her, that's not her name, but sabie after you delivered her and what your thoughts were. >> i take care of just the babies not the mom, so when the baby was delivered the obstetrician handed me the baby and then there's a whole team in the delivery room for just sabie. i must admit we were astonished at how small she was, it was smaller than we expected. >> can you give us a sense because, you know, i had -- i
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had two -- i had twins, i had 3 two premies and i remember the doctor around me sand said your baby will be about the size of your husband's shoe. i had a bigger baby obviously than sabie. so can you put it into context for us of what she looked like when she was firstborn? >> she was so much tinier than we expected. i mean, she was so small that we had to -- when we went to weigh her, we have these fancy expensive beds and when we went to weigh her in the delivery room we tried several times and it wouldn't record. so we brought her down to the neonatal intensive care unit and weighed her on an old fashioned scale where you put the white paper in and that and learned later that the beds cannot weigh any baby less than 300 grams. >> she was 8.6 ounces, i mean,
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under one pound. she weighed about as much as an apple we're told. i mean, things have miraculously worked out, but that day when she was first handed to you did you think she was going to survive? >> honestly, no. and i had the opportunity to talk to her mom and dad before delivery and we went through the fact that sabie was going to have a very rough time, may not make it out of the delivery room alive. if she did have a good heart rate, which she did at birth, it was wonderful and we tried to put a tube in her windpipe to help her breathe, she's so small it may not pass and then there would be nothing we could do, but fortunately the tube did go in easily. >> devin, what was it like to care for a baby that small? >> you know, it was an incredible opportunity. when i first met her -- you look
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in these beds and you could barely see her in there. i would say we treated her as we would with every micro premie and she rocked it, she did awesome. i look back at her milestones and we are just -- we are very proud as caregivers and proud of her family and it was an honor for me and along with, you know, many others who took care of her. >> oh, my gosh, you are an angel. my husband and i went our babies were in the nicu for 32 days, we would go in every morning and be like who are these people? they are so much better than the rest of us. you guys are such angels on earth. i want to play for you what sabie's mom had to say about all of you nicu nurses. let's listen to this audio. >> we just want to say, oh, my god, i love emma, kim, michelle, devin, you know, all -- we had so many nurses, but her primary nurses were just -- they became friends. i don't want to cry.
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you look at all those signs they made, you know, i would come in and it's like happy birthday, mom. it's just -- i'm so grateful for them. >> she wanted to express her gratitude. how does that make you feel? >> it's really awesome. i mean, we love our jobs and we're very passionate about what we do. primary care nursing especially really builds a bond with the family and the babies and you get to know them and they do, they become your friends. like, you know, her mom was saying, we really do become friends. almost like family. we call and check in on the babies and want to know how they're doing kind of as if it was our own. >> doctor, i don't want to paint too rosy of a picture because it
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can be a long road. it can be a long road ahead for a premie and for a micro premie. what are the long-term effects do you think physically and even mentally for saybie? >> sure. fortunately saybie did not have any of the major complications of a premature baby, especially the micro preery. she had no bleeding to her brain, she never had any infection, she coal rated her feedings. all that is excellent. she does have some visual problems and did have surgery on her eye, which is very, very common at 23 weekers. she will probably wear glasses, which isn't a major complication. but we will have to watch her very, very closely at her nine month follow-up appointment for these high risk babies. every six months up and through her primary school years because what we're looking for is any
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worse visual issues, hearing, motor issues, developmental. anything that we can intervene early to make better. sometimes we don't even see problems until the babies -- then kids at this point -- start school and then you pick up subtle learning disabilities. so she's going to be monitored extremely closely. >> of course she is. she will go in for lots of visits and the early intervention is so important. dr. wozniak and devin thank you for all you do and for bringing this story to us. >> thank you. >> thank you so much. >> that was awesome. that will put a smile on my face for the rest of the day. can you spell history. >> that's what our next guests made last night when all eight, all eight of them right there were crowned spelling g -- spelling bee champions. >> you can't even spell spelling
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bee. >> we will talk to you all in just a second. stay with us. -♪ just like any other family ♪ the house, kids, they're living the dream ♪ ♪ and here comes the wacky new maid ♪ -maid? uh, i'm not the... -♪ is she an alien, is she a spy? ♪ ♪ she's always here, someone tell us why ♪ -♪ why, oh, why -♪ she's not the maid we wanted ♪ -because i'm not the maid! -♪ but she's the maid we got -again, i'm not the maid. i protect your home and auto. -hey, campbells. who's your new maid?
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history was made at the
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scripps national spelling bee last night. what started with 562 spellers at the beginning of the week ended with not one, but eight champions. that is easily the first time that its ever happened in the spelling bee's 92-year run. all eight co-champions join us this morning. congratulations to all of you. we want to start, if we can, with a little bit of a lightning round starting with the bottom left. will you say your name and the last word you spelled correctly. go. >> hi name shatika and i spelled sgolette. >> i'm erin and i spelled aricipolus. >> i forgot the last word i spelled. >> my name is sohom and the last word i spelled was pondolok. >> my naem is ebejay the last word was alama. >> >> the last word i spelled was suslaut.
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>> the last word i spelled was odillic. >> the last word i spelled was buga in. villia. >> i'm chris and the last word i spelled was sernuous. >> i'm 0 for 8 on not being able to spell any of those words but not having heard. >> i haven't, either. christopher, did you know that word that you spelled? >> yeah. >> how did you know that? this is what i never understand about all of you brainiacs, how did you know what words to study to prepare for this? >> i mean, most of us study like language patterns and roots and then like studied additional words to see how like -- to understand them. >> yeah. if you just study roots and patterns and then study the irregular words, then that's really helpful. >> let me tell you something, i
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took etymology in high school, somehow i don't know any of those words that you guys just described. >> they study roots, as one does. it's just absolutely crazy. if i can, i want to talk about the history here. when did you have a sense that this was going to be a different result in the spelling bee? when did you get the sense that the dictionary here was losing? >> when dr. bailey announced that three more rounds and all it was would be octa champs that was the moment i thought all of us could do it. these seven amazing spellers could do it. >> i want to take a wide shot because they decided for the first time ever to give you all the winning pot of gold. what would you guys have thought if you had to split the winning prize money?
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>> honestly after this point it becomes less about the money and more about the lessons you've learned throughout the spelling bee and the great experiences and the memories you make here every week. >> my kids are grounded when i get home. >> how do you spell magnanimous. >> even that i can't. >> christopher, were you pulling for each other? be honest. be totally honest with me, as you get to those last three rounds. >> yes. >> and you hear that the dictionary might be losing here, were you hoping that all of you you would emerge victorious. >> yes. as a speller you know how hard everyone else has worked and you know how much they deserve to win because, you know, you're here with everyone else. you are all finalists in the national spelling bee. >> so you all get $50,000. i mean, that is the winning -- the winning amount of money and instead of splitting it they made the great and right
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decision that you are all going to get it because you all deserve it. abby jay, how long have you studied for this moment in your life? >> i studied four to five hours on weekdays, but when like the competition came nearer i ramped it up and like i studied as much as i could, maybe like an extra one or two hours and like ten hours on the weekends, a little more. it depended on if i had any homework. >> i'm barely awake five to six hours a day, let alone studying spelling. >> first they were slacking, the four to five hours a day then he ramped it up when he got serious is that upped it to ten hours a day. what's in ex? i mean, after you are crowned national spelling bee champion, you guys should start like a road show. the eight of you should go on the road and challenge anyone at anything. >> i honestly don't know what i should do next, but i know that spelling will help me with whatever it is, like if it's
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science, geography, math, just depends on what i do. spelling will -- all the lessons i've learned it will help me throughout my life. >> christopher, what do you want to be when you grow up? >> i'm not sure really right now, but maybe something in environmental science. i'm not really sure. >> this is one thing i have always -- >> i haven't decided. >> that makes sense, you are not yet in high school. >> do you guys judge people who can't spell? because you do it so well. i don't spell well, do you essentially say, you know, you have to step up your game? >> no, because different people have different strengths and weaknesses. >> yeah. >> agreed. >> i think that's a fair statement. all right. i have a challenge for you since you guys, again, beat the dictionary. can you beat alisyn camerota? my co-host here, alisyn, she spells her name in a i would say unusual way. so can you spell alisyn?
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>> it's one l. >> a-l-y-s-o-n. >> no, a-l-y. >> a-l-l-y. >> no, slightly unusual would be a-l-y. i said a-l-y-s-o-n. >> a-l-y-s-s-o-n. >> i'm going to have to ask you for your final answer. >> i love that you're conferring like this. okay. who is going to say it? >> a-l-y-s-o-n. >> i will say it. a-l-y-s-s-o-n. that was our final guess. >> that's a really good guess, it's just a really good guess. that is an unusual way, but it's not as unusual as my way. >> unfortunately that is incorrect. i'm sorry, that is incorrect. >> they could never get it. it's not based on any let molg. >> but spell your name. >> all right, guys, it's
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a-l-i-s-y-n. >> what? >> a-l-i-s-y-n. >> i was closer. >> what chemical names -- >> oh, my gosh. sorry. they broke the dictionary, we broke the spelling bee champion with the name alisyn camerota. guys, congratulations to you. i am in awe of what you do. thank you so much for being with us and we know we will all be working for you one day. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you, guys. now i know my name is somehow connected to a chemical. >> it can't be spelled by the best spellers in the world. >> i like all the effort they put into that, though. >> up next we are going to remember the incredible life of our friend and colleague anthony bourdain. sergio's coffee tastes spectacular. because costa rica is spectacular. so we support farmers who use natural compost. to help keep the soil healthy. and the coffee delicious. for future generations. all for a smoother tasting cup. green mountain coffee roasters.
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high protein. low sugar. tastes great! high protein. low sugar. so good! high protein. low sugar. mmmm, birthday cake! pure protein. the best combination for every fitness routine. his travels opened the eyes, minds and hearts of millions to new places, new food and new people. this week we're sharing an all new book on the life and legacy of our trend anthony bourdain. this book was originally
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published privately as a gift for anthony's daughter and with the family's permission we're lucky enough to share it with the world today, it's called "anthony bourdain remembered" published by harper collins and cnn. this is a compilation of memories from close friends and fans alike giving us an insight into so many people were affected by his work. portions of the proceeds earned from the work are going to anthony's favorite charity the bronx academy of letters and portions are going to his daughter. >> the book is really something special. what's incredible is all of the anecdotes that are shared in the book. they were found in the social media outpouring following tony's death. along with notes from fans across the world the book also has stories from his close friends, ken burns, quest love, josé andres and more. it really does serve to remind all of us of the incredible ways that tony changed lives. there are great photos in here as well illustrating anthony's travels from around the world,
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it illustrates all of the people and the places that he went, the people he encountered during his pretty legendary career. there's this one photo in here, it's become pretty iconic, it's the picture of anthony and president barack obama sharing a meal and deer in vietnam. we were all lucky enough to work with anthony, we all have our own special memories of his time here at cnn. >> we really are so excited to share our memories of anthony and celebrate the impact of his work with this book. anthony's birthday is coming up later in june so his friends invite you to share your favorite memories and stories of anthony bourdain with the #bourdaindaytocelebrate. >> on june 25th we are celebrating anthony bourdain's birthday and we want all of you to celebrate tony's life. >> yes, by cheering to tony anywhere you want with anyone you want and we will be using
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the #bourdainday and cheer to anthony. >> in spanish this i is #bourdainday. cheers. happy birthday, tony. >> happy birthday, tony. >> that's the way anthony would want it for sure. for sure. >> it's a beautiful book and we highly recommend it to everybody. dow futures are pointing to a rough day on wall street after president trump's latest tariff threats so our coverage picks up right after this break. ers. it made me feel like a celebrity. (vo) the network more people rely on, gives you more. like big savings on our best phones when you switch. that's verizon. s... s...u... s...u...v... these letters used to mean something. letters earned in backwoods, high hills, and steep dunes. but somewhere along the way,
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balanceus.org all right. good morning, everyone. i'm poppy harlow in new york. >> and i'm jim sciutto here in washington. we begin to find out in just minutes how big of a bite president trump's latest of many tariff threats will take out of the u.s. economy. stocks are poised for a steep drop, look at those red arrows at the opening bell, over the prospects of another trade war with another of america's biggest trading partners. that is, mexico. >> it's prettiy markable why you would do this in the midst of such a strong economy, maybe he thinks the economy can take it, but what about long term? look, the president who once called himself tariff man is vowing to slap

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