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tv   The 2000s  CNN  July 21, 2019 12:00am-1:01am PDT

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20 years. >> you want answers? >> i think i'm entitled. >> you want answers. >> i want the truth! >> you can't handle the truth! going into 2000, it was a cultural shift for television in terms of the way people reacted to it and the stories they could tell. >> you see the bar get raised and raised and raised. >> it's an abstract. >> not abstract enough. >> there's so many opportunities in television, so many platforms. >> i don't think dramatic series television has ever been stronger. >> i hate you all. >> go! >> in the end, what we regret most are the chances we never
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took. ♪ this is the week when the major broadcast networks unveil their fall lineup of shows. and every executive in hollywood shows how well "the sopranos" is
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doing on cable, which is a network problem. >> i think hbo altered it alone because there were no commercials. >> we are so dependent on sponsors. there's so much we can do in terms of violence and sex. >> we're just sanding offer t t edges of what what is interesting. >> i think hbo is looking at the world and going, okay, how can we matter? for quite a long time, movies and boxing were the bread and butter of hbo. >> people watch a show because you're partly a [ bleep ]. >> what we've learned through the larry sanders show or oz is that we could do series television. >> there's something in the air. and it ain't love. >> "oz" was cutting edge in what it was willing to share with the audience. >> hit me, hit me! hit me in the face.
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>> complicated characters, complicated issues, and the way it was presented was so unique. >> sentence, nine years. up for parole, six. >> what they were doing at hbo was exactly what the network wasn't doing. they were breaking barriers. >> you get to the somethisopran of a sudden, the villain is the hero. >> there's some eggplant. >> i told you, i'm not ugly. >> the sopranos was david chase's invention about this mob family, something people hadn't seen before, the idea that a mobster is seeing a therapist. >> whatever happened to gary cooper? the strong, silent type. that was an american. he wasn't in touch with his feelings. he just did what he had to do. once they got gary cooper in touch with his feelings.
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>> you have strong feelings about this. >> every decade, you get somebody like peter faulk as columbo, somebody you can't imagine afterwards. >> i think it's supposed to be a mafia story. >> it's about every day life. >> did you know an italian invented the telephone? >> alexander graham bell inwas italian? who invented the mafia. >> what? >> the sopranos took the mystery out of being a mobster. ♪ i'm a fool to be doing your dirty work ♪ ♪ oh, yeah >> and it was somehow more mundane than we guessed it would be and yet every bit as riveting as "the godfather." >> the debate raged at hbo about
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whether you could have a guy like this as your lead. and david chase was adamant that you have to, this is who he is, and he was right. >> can you assure me that tony soprano isn't going to become a sensitive, nurturing, mellowing man? >> yes. >> oh, good. >> oh, my god. >> it's all right, be home in a couple hours, don't worry. >> i'm graduating tomorrow! >> carmelo was a wife and mother. i think first and foremost, as long as she was going to church, she felt like, all right, i've taken care of my soul. she goes home to her husband who's got blood on him. there was no way to reconcile the two things. towards the end where their marriage is falling apart. >> i used to [ bleep ] your husband. >> you have made a fool of me
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for years with these whores. >> her performance in that fight is stunningly good. >> because she's jealous! >> it mattered to people what this couple was going through, and i remember feeling a real sense of responsibility about that, and giving the weight to the scene that it deserves. >> what? >> you know what i don't understand, tony? what does she have that i don't have? >> suddenly, here's this tv show that everyone's talking about, but you have to pay to watch it. you know, that's how good "the sopranos" was. people were paying just to see that show. >> "the sopranos" came along and completely reestablished what the bar was. i honestly couldn't quite believe that television was communicating something that you might only see in the darkest moments, inaccurate moments in
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cinema. >> you look at the year that "american beauty" won the oscar which is the year that "sopranos" debuted and immediately after that, the two mediums die verged. >> i know what i'm supposed to do, but i'm afraid to do it. >> movies became focussed on big tent pole things that can bring in as much of an audience as you possibly can, meanwhile, tv started going smaller and more interior and saying all right, we want to tell stories for grown-ups that don't get the best audience but get a passionate one. ♪ i'll be home for christmas >> i had an idea of doing a show about death. >> are you smoking? >> nope. >> yes, you are. i heard you. >> i'm not, no, i'm not. >> look, forget you'll give yourself cancer and die a slow
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and horrible death, you should not be stinking up that new hearse. >> she said i'd like to do a show about a family that ran a funeral home. and something in my head just went click, what a brilliant idea. >> i'm quitting right now. i promise. okay? i'll see you tonight. ♪ i'll be home for christmas >> alan ball comes up with a show with a perfect structure. each episode starts with the death of a character, and then that character's death is dealt with in a local family funeral home mortuary. >> excuse me. >> this was one of my first, and maybe it was my first binge
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show, which was long enough ago that it was all on somebody had recorded it on a vcr. >> have you been watching mrs. romano? >> yeah. i'm watching her all night. are you thinking what i'm thinking? >> casket climber. >> i want to go with you! i want to go with you! >> a whole new level of something going on, on television. it was grittier than most shows you've ever seen before, and yet something magical about it. >> i think what our strategy at hbo was in terms of audiences, not everybody has to watch a show. but, if we have different shows for different people, there is something that makes you want to come back and sign up, month after month. maybe you don't watch "section in t
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""sex in the city"", but maybe you watch "entourage." there's something for you to make it worth signing up again and again. let them move the way they were born to in new pampers cruisers 360 fit with its ultra stretchy waistband.. and adaptive 360 fit new pampers cruisers 360 fit they use stamps.com all the services of the post office only cheaper get a 4-week trial plus postage and a digital scale go to stamps.com/tv and never go to the post office again.
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who could have possibly guessed a show abocould be the of the summer. >> it was the first reality
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format. i started to really understand what the show is going to be about the first 20 minutes into day one. >> see what we got. there might be a blow tortorch there. >> richard hatch was sitting in a tree, lecturing what they should do as a group. and underneath him was this woman, sue, a truck driver. >> i'm a redneck. i don't know corporate rules at all. and corporate rules ain't going to work out here in the bush. >> he walks around naked quite a bit. i think it bugs some of the guys. >> it's a game, call it mach developian, sure. >> we had no idea that richard hatch would be the best thing to ever happen to survivor.
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>> all around the country, people were on the edge of their seats, waiting for the first swiev survivor to be announced. >> "survivor" sort of legitimized the genre. simon fuller came into my office, and his vision was one long audition. ♪ like a virgin ♪ touched for the very first time ♪ >> i've never, ever heard neg like that in my life. ♪ she bangs, she bangs >> thank you. what was that? that is what you think we're looking for? >> the network was saying we don't think we can put simon on the promos. >> no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no. >> he'll scare little girls, and we think, that's our audience.
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>> one of the worst auditions i've ever heard in my life. >> without him. it was a big fight. of course we got him on, and that sparked the show. >> well, here they are. the judges have made their choices. now, america, it's all up to you. >> "american idol" reunited the family odd in front of the tv. >> 9-year-olds to 90-year-olds, it's not like it hasn't been done before, but the way they could manipulate drama, the way they could find stories, that was the core of making the show successful. >> this is the weakest romance i've ever seen. this romance is pathetic. was there a romance? >> i think we just decided we were meant to be very close friends. >> very close friends. >> i've had some very close friends, too. >> me too. >> cost me a lot of money.
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i'll tell you. >> "apprentice" has its lasting affects even today. donald trump becomes a star. >> you're fired. >> all of it sort of reality show fake. people who worked on it came forward and said you know we kind of made the whole thing up, and then it sells. and then there's just this explosion. you interested in tattoos? weight loss? plastic surgery? >> breast augmentation, tummy tuck, facial surgery. >> i don't look like me! >> substance abuse? flipping your house? that's a big one. there's literally a reality show for everyone now. >> and if you have to fill 40 hours of television with scripted shows, it costs you an arm and a leg, you'll be out of business. because those scripted shows most likely will do no better and probably worse than the reality show did. >> aimed at gay viewers and
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women. and so you know, you have "queer eye" for the straight guy. and project runway. >> their isis is a search for tt big fashion designer. >> it was not an instantaneous hit. we had this crisis, is anyone going to want to sit around watching people sew? bravo played three or four episodes over the christmas holidays, and all of a sudden it just caught on like wildfire. >> make it work. >> people have come into runway. and top chef. and they know this can change their lives. >> one of you is about to win the title of top chef. >> rock 'n roll! >> and the osbournes. it was fun. you know the whole idea of the guy who bit the head off of bats being domestic and his wife and teenaged kids, that's what sparks this movement of we can
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put celebrities on tv and let them do what they do. >> i've always heard that people hang out at walmart. >> why? what is walmart? >> of course that reaches its peak or maybe depending on your opinion, with the kardashians. >> i hate you all. >> welcome to my family. >> there's something about watching someone who's maybe slightly like yourself but more obnoxious. >> you are so evil. >> there's a lot of baggage that comes with us, but it's like louis vuitton baggage, you always want it. >> or they're more of a disaster. >> prostitution, whore, [ bleep ]. >> you stupid [ bleep ]. [ bleep ]. [ bleep ]. >> there's something about watching that and going, yeah, god, at least i'm not that. >> i look over, and i see like hair being pulled and all this [ bleep ], and like oh, my god, how do i get in.
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>> people ask, why are people asking that reality show. why are they watching the show? because they're entertained. you're never going to meet someone that's going to say to you, you know, i was watching the bachelor last night, i loved it, but i wish i was watching a great drama. >> karen. >> i thought you'd never ask. >> you don't have to call it a guil guilty pleasure, it's a pleasure, something you enjoy watching. it cob a documentary, a sitcom, i think great tv comes in many forms. do you want me to go first or do you want to go first, brea?
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you can go first. audible reintroduced this whole world to me. so many great stories from amazing people. it makes me want to be better. to be able to connect with the people's stories that i'm listening to. that's inspiration. it's on during my commute, it's on all the time. doing the dishes. working out. while i'm in the car. at bed time. an audible listener is someone that wants to broaden their mind. people who are tired of listening to the radio, or music. to hear her speak those words. it was incredible. it was unbelievable. with audible originals, there's something for almost every taste in there. everything you ever wanted to hear. i signed up for getting a credit every month, and i started exploring books that i normally wouldn't read. our ability to empathize through these stories, with these stories, can be transformational. it's my own thing that i can do for me. see what listening to audible can do for you. just text listen5 to 500500.
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i don't want to mess this up again. >> me neither, we're done being stupid. >> okay. it's you and me, all right? this is it. >> this is it, unless we're on a break. don't make jokes now. >> by the time "frasier" and "friends" went off the air, there was a feeling that the multi-camera format, filmed in front of a studio audience was getting kind of tired and getting kind of stale. >> you guys play the most important part, the live, studio
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audience. >> now there is no form of television which makes as much money for the networks as multi-camera tv shows. >> we write a four-camera show. we write it, direct it, perform it and rehearse it like a play in front of a studio audience. when someone gets a laugh on that stage they actually hold, as you do not in real life, as you do not in single camera. you are holding for that laugh. >> it's an abstract. >> not abstract enough. >> you've done an amazing job. >> it looks like something, though, what does it look like? >> if you get close, you can even touch it. >> i'm fine. >> we started studying what phil
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rosenthal was doing with "raymond", and he was embracing the very best of what the genre could do, which was interesting characters. he provided me with a very, very loud reminder that i didn't need to fix anything. didn't need to knock any boundaries or walls over, i just need the to embrace what was there. ♪ men, men, men >> i had been in so many shows that had failed spectacularly that i became known as the show killer. ♪ men, men, men >> that's not a great thing to be known as, in show business. >> on the sly, i had him come in and read for me. and he was brilliant. >> how much is a hooker? >> what are you going to do with a hooker? >> well, i'd like to pay her to have sec wix with me. >> how much are you looking to spend? >> welsh l, as you know, i'm a
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of a bargain hunter. >> they don't stock hookers at the 99 cents store. give me a number. >> what could i get in the $200 range? >> crabs. and car jacked. >> i have an enormous sense of pride to have done a multi-camera sitcom that people took to their hearts for 12 years. >> let's start with first position. do you know first position? >> is that like missionary position? >> that was the longest a sitcom had been on broadcast television in the history of broadcast television at the time. i think "big bang" is going to beat it, but still, that's amazing. >> two people talking is the essence of four-camera sitcom.
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>> light being ing is not reall issue. there's no music that's going to help the scene. it's hopefully good words with good actors. >> it must be humbling to suck on so many different levels. >> big bang had this weird hurdle, it seemed, of not only are you fighting the natural fight that every show does about getting an audience, trying to stay on the air and keep your job, yada, yada. >> make way for the fastest man alive. >> oh, no, see this is why i wanted to have a costume meeting. >> then you're in a genre that's passe. >> obviously, we didn't go away, and i believe very strongly that the multi-cam, the way they're shot in front of a studio audience. you hear the other people laughing, i think it ignites something that's innate in all
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of us. it's very primal, i guess, that desire to gather as a group and hear a story. >> hey, lorne, look. >> live from new york, it's saturday night. >> everybody has their favorite "saturday night live," and it's usually the one that was on when they're in high school. the people in high school in the 2000s won the jackpot. >> you're amazing. >> because over the course of that decade, you see some of the most extraordinary people come through that show. >> we should mention that although the waters above appear calm, below the surface there is a frenzy of activity. >> one of the hallmarks of snl is you need somebody to play the president. and will's w was stellar. >> it went this way! >> will ferrell's george bush
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was sort of a loveable dummy. >> how about a lifesaver here. >> while you're at it, can i get those antlers, too? >> there you go, son. >> i like these. >> and of course, more cowbell was also a ferrell high point. ♪ >> cowbell was fantastic, not only because it's a great concept but because will really gets to be will. >> the last time i checked, we don't have a whole lot of songs that feature the cowbell. >> i got to have more cowbell, baby. >> i'd be doing myself a disservice and every member of the band if i didn't perform the hell out of this. >> it's my birthday! >> because there's is a strong group of women who play off each other really well. >> what are you, part indian? are you cherokee? look at those cheekbones, are
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you sioux? sioux? a little sioux? you in chippewa? >> i believe diplomatsy should be the cornerstone of any foreign policy. >> and i can see russia from my house. ♪ i like water falls ♪ i like butterflies ♪ i like oregano ♪ i like chasing cars >> you are seeing creativity and wacky left field things that you wouldn't have seen before. >> one. ♪ cut a hole in the box ♪ two ♪ put your junk in that box ♪ three, make her open the box ♪ that's the way you do it ♪ it's my [ bleep ] in a box ki. could there be another around the corner? or could it turn out differently? i wanted to help protect myself. my doctor recommended eliquis. eliquis is proven to treat and help prevent another dvt or pe blood clot... almost 98 percent of patients on eliquis
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didn't experience another. ...and eliquis has significantly less major bleeding than the standard treatment. eliquis is fda approved and has both. don't stop eliquis unless your doctor tells you to. eliquis can cause serious and in rare cases fatal bleeding. don't take eliquis if you have an artificial heart valve or abnormal bleeding. if you had a spinal injection while on eliquis call your doctor right away if you have tingling, numbness, or muscle weakness. while taking eliquis, you may bruise more easily... and it may take longer than usual for bleeding to stop. seek immediate medical care for sudden signs of bleeding, like unusual bruising. eliquis may increase your bleeding risk if you take certain medicines. tell your doctor about all planned medical or dental procedures. what's around the corner could be surprising. ask your doctor about eliquis. you can go first. audible reintroduced this whole world to me. so many great stories from amazing people. it makes me want to be better. to be able to connect with the people's stories that i'm listening to. that's inspiration. it's on during my commute, it's on all the time.
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doing the dishes. working out. while i'm in the car. at bed time. an audible listener is someone that wants to broaden their mind. people who are tired of listening to the radio, or music. to hear her speak those words. it was incredible. it was unbelievable. with audible originals, there's something for almost every taste in there. everything you ever wanted to hear. i signed up for getting a credit every month, and i started exploring books that i normally wouldn't read. our ability to empathize through these stories, with these stories, can be transformational. it's my own thing that i can do for me. see what listening to audible can do for you. just text listen9 to 500500.
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welcome to [ bleep ] deadwood. >> david milch said i have a great idea about ancient rome. >> cops in ancient rome in the time of nero. >> because we're already doing this show about rome. >> thieves will be strangled. deserters will be crucified. >> david basically took the underlying theme of his rome show and put it in "deadwood." >> no law at all in deadwood. is that true?
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>> at the time of nero, there was a lot of order and no law. and "deadwood" was a similar environment. >> maybe you don't value keeping your [ bleep ] cuts inside your belly enough. >> those are the days behind us. >> no, those are the days to my [ bleep ] left. >> ian mcshane's character steals the show, lock, stock, and barrel, away from anyone else. you want to go into that saloon and engage him in conversation. then you say to yourself, if i say something wrong, will i get my guts cut out with a bowie knife? he's a fascinating character in that he scares you and attracts you at the same time. that's kind of a rare thing. >> can we see your fangs? >> i always said daddy hated vampires. but we don't. >> i think that "true blood" was an enjoyable beach read with blood all over it.
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>> you could say, it wasn't meant to be taken seriously, it wasn't taking itself seriously, except it was such a big allegory for what was going on with the gay community, with aids, with political backlash. it's like, there's monsters all over. but the scariest, most deadly characters in the whole show are the human beings. >> showtime looked at tony soprano and they said, you want an antihero? how about a mass murderer who is the hero of our show? >> "dexter" is about a blood spatter expert who is secretly a serial killer. >> soon he'll be packed into a
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few neatly wrapped hefties and my own small corner of the world will be a neater, happier place. >> he was raised by a policeman to channel his sociopathic impulses to only kill other killers. so he is a bad guy but also a good guy. i mean, the idea of the show is that you're invited to identify with and maybe even root for a serial killer. >> that's right. >> he kills horrible people. if i were just killing people willy-nilly, i think all bets would be off. >> where's the fun in that? >> in the 2000s, the antihero really rose to prominence. >> my nephew has the same gun. don't point that there. >> nice work. >> and i think they were popular because they were surprising.
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usual these anti-heroes had something about them that was sympathetic. there was a team ime in our wor that had so many mixed signals that i think they developed characters with similar issues. >> all right, all right. >> sure, take my last one. this will help. >> is this cab free? >> are you [ bleep ]ing nuts? >> oh. >> i have heard "nurse jackie" referred to as an anti-hero. she was at the mercy of her addiction, which always got the
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most of her attention, but beyond that is correct i thi beyond that, i think she really cared that there wasn't enough money in the budget for extra blankets. she really wanted to be a good nurse. she wanted to be married and she wanted these kids and to be a good wife and mother. >> why do you always have to work? >> yeah. >> and there was no way she could do all of it. >> mommy! >> edie falco for me can do no wrong. here she is as the female antihero who has her own show. she's the one whose morals are questionable. >> my back, my back! >> she's having an affair. she's stealing drugs. and is she an unfit mother, and all those things. yet you feel for her. i love that women now get to be -- get to be the antihero and not just either the villain or the good girl.
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very interesting statistic. people, their favorite shows, be it "csi", "er". the most faithful fan only watches that show two out of four weeks. >> they had the data to break it
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up that shows that became increasingly serialized would lose viewership over time, because, if the audience misses an episode, then they would be incline the to stop watching it, because they would feel like, i missed one and now i don't know what's happening. >> there had been amazing shows that had been serialized. they never had syndication value, because you couldn't revisit them. but there's almost no better hook. it's like a book you can't turn down. i'm just going to watch a little bit more. >> "24" was set to debut with an assassin blowing up a passenger jet in midair. fox orders this, fox schedules it. 9/11 happens. suddenly, this show, which seemed like this goofy thing about kiefer sutherland chasing after middle eastern terrorists
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becomes the most timely show in america because that's all anyone can talk about after september 11th. >> the name from the series comes from the idea that it's 24 episodes in a season. each ep seisode is one hour in day, and jack bauer just has the worst days. >> we are running out of time. pull the trigger. if you care about me at all, pug the trigger. >> sorry, i can't. >> pull the trigger! >> damn you! >> the commercial breaks in that show were almost welcomed, so that you could catch your breath. >> "24" was really the first big show if you think about it. there were a lot of people in the later years of "24" that would only buy the dvds, and a lot of the subtleties you'd say, my god, this is blowing my mind. i can see it now because i just
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watched three in a row. >> i think "lost" is the first huge had cinematic tv show i saw. i remember gathering at a friend's house to watch. and it was long enough ago and the internet was still young enough and social media was, what, friendster? >> jj abrams' ambition for the "lost" pilot was grandiose. he always talked about it as making a movie every week. i think, when we say the word cinematic, what we really mean is opening it up a little bit more, but also the ambition of an action set piece. >> he was adamant, if you want me to do this pilot, you're going to give me the resource to do did and i'm going to shoot it as a movie, a th and then we ha
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keep that bash up. >> you start out, this is a survival drama. here's these people, their plane has crashed. how are they going to get by, how are they going to find food, et cetera. >> we hunt. >> and on top of that, there's this whole mystery, where are we, why can't we get a rescue signal. why is there a polar bear? what is going on here? >> the show averages more than 15.5 milli 15.5 million viewers each week and there are places where millions of fans can obsess. >> when are you going to answer these mysteries? >> personally, i started feeling hamstrung story wise almost instantly, because we had to do 25 hours of "lost" in the first season, so we started communicating to abc. we're going to run out of flashback stories. >> call it, jack. >> you call it. >> and abc was adamant in saying, no, like the show is a
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hit show. people love the flashbacks, don't worry, you guys are great at it. just keep did up. >> you okay, freckles? >> at the beginning of the third season of the show, we had our characters locked in cages, and lookinack on it now, i think it's metaphorically house how we felt. >> and they said we will let you end the show, and we were like oh, god, thank goodness, and they said after ten seasons. >> it really was a huge boost for the network. they had two shows that everybody was talking about. >> in truth, i spent the day as i spent every other day, quietly polishing the routine of my life, until it gleamed with perfection. >> i have a lot to say about women who go into the iconic roles of wife and mother and are unfulfilled. >> i think the good news it
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brought is women who are not perfect, who are not young are viable. and the fan base was amazing and the, you know, there were tee shirts. i remember going into a store, and there was "i am lynette." >> are you saying i'm a bad mother? >> ma'am, you need to get back in your car, please. >> i am gabby. i am susan. i am brie. >> are you at a bar? >> we stood on the shoulders of those who came before, you know, strong women characters in television, but, in the wake of desperate housewives, a lot more shows with older women came on the air. >> what chadoin'? >> knocked myself out, naked. >> oh. >> and then i fell. so, how are you? do you want me to go first or do you want to go first, brea?
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you can go first. audible reintroduced this whole world to me. so many great stories from amazing people. it makes me want to be better. to be able to connect with the people's stories that i'm listening to. that's inspiration. it's on during my commute, it's on all the time. doing the dishes. working out. while i'm in the car. at bed time. an audible listener is someone that wants to broaden their mind. people who are tired of listening to the radio, or music. to hear her speak those words. it was incredible. it was unbelievable. with audible originals, there's something for almost every taste in there.
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everything you ever wanted to hear. i signed up for getting a credit every month, and i started exploring books that i normally wouldn't read. our ability to empathize through these stories, with these stories, can be transformational. it's my own thing that i can do for me. see what listening to audible can do for you. just text listen9 to 500500. i got this mountain bike for only $11. dealdash.com, the fair and honest bidding site. an ipad worth $505, was sold for less than $24; a playstation 4 for less than $16; and a schultz 4k television for less than $2. i won these bluetooth headphones for $20. i got these three suitcases for less than $40. and shipping is always free. go to dealdash.com right now and see how much you can save.
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while it's tempting to play it safe, the more we're willing to rex tisk the more alive we a. in the end, what we regret most are the chances we never took. >> there's an old showbiz axiom. you have to get off the statement before someone says hey, you should get off the stage. ♪ all, all that you dream
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>> endings are hard in general, and i think "the sopranos" was able to accomplish this thing that everybody in television is always trying to accomplish, which is do something that no one has ever seen before. ♪ >> tony is meeting the family at a restaurant, and we're listening to a journey song, and watching as one by one the family members come in, and there's these sen sder people lurking around. ♪ strangers >> you're wondering, is tony going to survive this? was tony going to be shot? what was going to happen? >> [ bleep ]. >> you're cutting to meadow parking the car. you know, all these things that are completely normal, but they're imbued with this dread. ♪ don't stop believin'
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♪ hold on to that feelin' >> nothing's happening. they're enjoying a family meal, listening to journey. and it's building, and it's building. ♪ don't stop >> the long black in which everybody says, did i just lose my hbo signal? what's going on there? i thought was kind of like the cord at the end of sergeant pepper, in which nine pianos just hit this long, long major. bong! and it goes on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on. that black was sort of like what the series needed in order to communicate the fact that it is now officially over. >> as for sopranos creator, david chase, he got whacked in the headlines. he got whacked by "the new york post" cartoonist who showed fans getting whacked, and chase literally got whacked online. >> three or four days later we
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were in new york talking to a couple television critics about how amazing it was. and they're like, oh, you know, there's a lot of controversy about the sopranos controversy. nobody knows what it means. they're all discussing whether tony is alive or dead, and we're like those are all the things that make it brill apt. and right then we realize rewe' completely and totally [ bleep ]ed. >> if you've been fortunate enough to be successful, they've gone along for a long ride with you. and, the viewer has a through line for every character and the show that you could never possibly have. >> you know i love you, right? more than anything. >> of course, honey. >> so it is a fool's errand to try and please anyone but yourself when you're writing a
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series finale. >> finales have become increasingly more important. you know, if you don't do a really good finale to a really good series, the series can sort of lose its luster. but "six feet under" comes up request a perfect ending and the show is even enhanced a little bit. the end has the daughter driving away in the car, and music starts to play. it's sia's "breathe me." and she looks up in the rear view mirror. so she's looking backwards. but then the show looks ahead. ♪ ouch, i have lost myself ♪ lost myself
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>> that season ended, and everybody died. and i thought it was brilliant. >> the work on tv is as good as any work that's on a big screen. and so that hierarchy of film and television, i think, has been changed dramatically. partially because of the great work that people did at h bpt o and also because of the work they did at a lot of other places. >> no! >> oh, yeah, you can't sit there. >> why not? >> that's where sheldon sits. >> he can't sit somewhere else? >> oh, no, no, you see in the winter, that seat is close enough to the radiator so he's warm but not so close three sweats. in the summer it's directly in front of a cross breeze, and it faces the television on an angle that isn't direct so he can still talk to everybody but not
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so wide that the picture looks distorted. >> perhaps there's hope for you after all. a standoff over oil tankers. the u.s. tells iran to release the ship its captured in the state of hormuz as britain has a vessel. why donald trump is trying to get a new york rapper out of a swedish jail and what sweden has to say about this. and triple-digit heat. more than two-thirds of the u.s. bracing for sweltering heat. and it is a problem. welcome to our viewers here in the united states and all around the world. hope you're inside in a cool home. we're live in atlanta. i'm natalie allen.

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