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tv   American Morning  CNN  May 6, 2011 6:00am-9:00am EDT

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a lot going on overnight. let's get you caught up. it's more than historic, it is epic, maybe a 500-year flood. thousands on the run. what could be the worst mississippi river flood ever and it's unfolding right now. he was plotting until the day he was dead. i'm kiran chetry. a new alert from homeland security after they got a look at bin laden's personal files. i'm christine romans.
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oil prices take a dive. a sign, perhaps, that you're fed up with prices at the pump and those high gas prices are hurting the economy. it may start to trickle down on this "american morning." >> good friday morning. it is may 6th. busy one, indeed. welcome to "american morning." >> we're watching the river, the mississippi today, new concerns for a lot of people living along the flood plains. >> and new details from that cache of intelligence from the bin laden compound we're watching. >> giving up some information. >> they knew it was going to happen. we have new information on it today. a threat pulled right from osama bin laden's files. >> the homeland security department issued an alert about rail security in the united states. a law enforcement source says al qaeda was plotting to attack trains. >> one possible date mentioned, 9/11/2011. jeanne meserve will have more in a moment. there are incredible new details on operation neptune spear. we now know that was the name
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given the secret mission to take out osama bin laden. "the washington post" reports cia spies monitored bin laden's hair for months from a safe house in abbottabad, pakistan. >> new video from the night of the assault on bin laden's compound. this video is actually taken by a neighbor. it shows his three-story house in flames. also today, president obama will be traveling to fort campbell, kentucky, to personally thank members of the u.s. navy s.e.a.l. team that took down bin laden. >> yesterday he was at ground zero meeting with family and fire fighters. >> we're getting a clearer picture of what happened in the final 38 minutes of the hunt for bin laden. a u.s. official tells us the raid was launched after the cia spotted a tall man doing prison yard walks around the compound. the first man killed was bin laden's courier. he also fired the only shot at the s.e.a.l.s. >> the s.e.a.l.s moved into the main house where they killed the courier's brother and found bin
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laden and his family. no other shots were fired. a congressman who was briefed on the raid told usa today there was concern bin laden may have been wearing a suicide vest and the house was rigged. >> so many ways that could have gone badly and they pulled off that operation. jeanne meserve joins us live from washington with more on this as we're talking ability what some of this intelligence gleaned on the threat of american railways. >> a notice has gone out to state and local law enforcement and rail sector advising them that in february of 2010, members of al qaeda discussed a plan to derail railroad cars by putting ob sta calls on tracks. a u.s. official tells me they specifically talked about doing this on bridges or over valleys, presumably to maximize the possible catastrophe. i am told that it does not mention any specific city or rail system. and that the plotters did discuss doing this to coincide with the anniversary of the 9/11
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attack. u.s. officials are at pains to emphasize that this was aspirational, not operational. there was no indication that anybody was dispatched to carry this out and at this point in time, there is no information that indicates that osama bin laden himself had signed off on this particular plan. now in addition, there was some other material found in this house which gives a more general sense of what al qaeda was interested in doing, specifically, we're told that al qaeda talked about targeting big cities, new york, d.c., los angeles, and chicago, in addition they talked about hitting on specific dates, not just september 11th as was mentioned in the rail alert, but also july 4th, christmas and the opening day of the u.n. that would be the opening day of the general assembly when world leaders from all around the globe are gathered in new york city. tom ridge, the former secretary of homeland security, was asked about the rail alert last night. here's how he put it in perspective.
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>> it's a head's up, it's a warning. i don't think it's necessarily actionable but it's appropriate to send this information out to those responsible for that infrastructure. they just wanted to remind people there's still a potential target, take notice, but use the information that we have, but don't make any changes now, there's no necessity for it. >> it's worth noting that terrorists have repeatedly hit at rail systems and when word went out that osama bin laden had been killed, many systems around the u.s. did ratchet up security knowing full well that if there was retaliation, it might be aimed at them. many experts and officials are saying that this alert on rail security is likely the first of many that are likely to go out as a result of the great volumes of materials seized at the compound where bin laden was killed. >> thanks very much for that. we'll stay on top of this with you. in the meantime the other question is, even if they were planning this, we've made major strides in terms of blocking terrorists from coming into our country after 9/11, how would
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people have actually gotten here to pull that off or would they try to use people already in this country? >> that's something that paul cruickshank discussed with us the other day, there's been more of a sense of people planning and financing things in the united states. >> the lone wolf as he called it. >> that's why he says there's a short-term danger for security in the u.s., maybe there are these plots under way right now, especially -- >> somebody is going to rush to carry out. >> osama bin laden's wife is talking and tells pakistani interrogators she did not leave that walled in compound for five years. she says she also lived with eight of bin laden's children and five people from another family. the woman charged navy s.e.a.l.s, shot in the leg during a raid, according to u.s. officials. pakistan took her into custody after navy s.e.a.l.s lost a chopper and were forced to leave without her. >> apparently she's recovering in a pakistani hospital and say she'll be returned to her country of origin. >> to the south where we are seeing a 500-year flood of the mississippi river this morning. rising waters are not expected
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to crest for at least another week or so in many places. >> this epic flooding is forcing thousands to leave their homesp in in eastern arkansas, mcclelland, gregory and cotton plant are under a mandatory evacuation. state police and the national guard helping hundreds people get to higher ground. this is what parts of interstate 40 looked like. we told you they were shutting down major stretches. this is why. the nation's third longest east/west freeway and a trucking artery that cuts through arkansas. >> a stretch is closed between the towns of hazen and brinkley. truckers are spreading the word to avoid this highway at all costs. >> bumper to bumper, stopped for ten minutes at a time. it took me two and a half hours to get 32 miles from brinkley to here. >> i've never seen anything like this. i've been four hours, gone maybe 40 miles. >> you can't fight mother nature. she's going to play whatever she's going to play.
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>> and she's playing for sure. further east in memphis, tennessee, floodwaters are threatening hundreds of homes right now. emergency officials going door to door in some neighborhoods asking people to leave. mother nature when she's mean is always a woman, have you noticed that. >> when it's all good it's a he. emergency officials in tennessee predicting nearly 3,000 properties in the memphis area could be impacted by flooding if the mississippi crests at 48 piece this weekend, that would be the river's highest level since 1937. right now it's approaching 46 feet. david mattingly is live in memphis for us this morning. good morning, david. what is the situation around you? >> well, this is a slow motion disaster, but make no mistake about it, this river is inching up by the hour and it is not done yet. not by a long shot. here in memphis, this is all that's left of a river front park. this is now under water. this water approaching record levels. we're expecting to see a peak here in memphis, possibly some
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time around wednesday. that's going to be close to the 1937 level of that disastrous flood. there's a big difference now between what they have to work with here and what they had back in '37. now they've got flood walls and levees all over the place. they're expected to keep most of the city dry. but they're still being very careful. there's a couple thousand properties they've identified as being vulnerable here. they're looking at this water backing up into the tributaries into the rivers that flow into the mississippi here, close to memphis. those properties are the ones that are the most valor inble right now. what they're looking at is a couple thousand properties. the word is going out today to those property owners, to some of them, saying this is the time to start packing and making plans. don't wait until this river is in your front yard to decide to leave. they want to make sure everybody has enough time to get their belongings out and to get to safety. but again, this water moving very slowly, so officials had the luxury to make plans, to make sure that they get everyone
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out of the way in time. again, they're just watching this river inch up by hour here on the banks in memphis. they think that it's going to stop just short of that record they had back in '37 and had a great deal of confidence in the levees they have here, but nevertheless, they've asked for a lot of volunteers to show up today to fill up sand bags. those sandbags to be used at government buildings and hospitals just in case they need them, in case there's a problem with one of the will everybody yees. they say they have a great deal of confidence in the levee system and they make sure those levees hold and they're going to be keeping a very close lie on them. >> all right. we'll be following that and check in with you throughout the day. we want to show you a look at the flood zone from the upper midwest as far south as louisiana, the risk is extreme. that is the danger area here. rivers flowing over levees, tributaries backing up. everywhere you see blue --
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>> a flood watch. >> causing a crisis or about to. reynolds wolf is in the extreme weather center. >> that's a lot of ground to cover. certainly a huge mess for those folks. looks like the worse is going to be picking up in places downstream, in parts of the mississippi valley. let's back up and show you what we have in terms of just some of the satellite footage. this really tells the story of what's been happening. first and foremost, go back in time to april 29th of 2010, you see how things normally look on the mississippi river. this is not a draught situation, not flooding, this is how it's expected. look at the recent photos we go to april 29th of 2011, things beginning to build up along the mississippi. as we zoom in towards i could roshgs the water of the mississippi river spilling its banks cutting off through parts of the floodways, parts of the lakes and meandering portions of the mississippi river filled up. same due west of cairo. the problem we're going to be dealing with, more flooding,
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more expansive flooding downstream, when you look at these numbers as we get into may, may 20, may 22, may 23rd, from vicksburg, looks like it's going to be 14.5 feet above flood stage. all these above flood stage. nearly 18 feet along the red river landing and baton rouge about 12.5. as we wrap things up, one thing to share with you, we have a frontal boundary pulling from the west that may bring some rainfall in the days to come, but today's shower activity along the mississippi river should be confined farther to the north and thankfully towards the great lakes. things relatively dry in the southern half. that's a look at your forecast. let's pitch it back to you in new york. >> thanks, reynolds. >> disturbing delivery, 25 different schools in d.c. getting sent envelopes with white powder inside, raising huge concerns. we're going to tell you what it ended up being. >> a proposal to try to get people to conserve gas. how about taxing people by how much they drive. a tax by the number of miles you drive. we'll discuss that. >> you're going to love this
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one. the replacement costs of all those things that the mom does in the house or the mr. mom. $61,000 a year. want you to weigh in on this. interesting study about the value of the stay-at-home mom. aaah! [ airplane engine whines ] [ grunts ] [ dog barking ] gah! [ children shouting ]
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all is doing nothing at all. save up to 65%. call 1-800-sandals. . new this morning, a disturbing delivery to dozens of washington, d.c., schools. officials say 25 schools received envelopes filled with a white powder yesterday, some of the schools were evacuated. tests on the substance, however, discovered was not toxic. all the letters were postmarked from texas, the fbi says it may be part of a similar pattern happening across the country. the post office is take something extra screening precautions as a result. gamers, you can relax. sony says playstation will be up and running in the next few days. sony's chief executive blogged updates on the network's cyber attack that shut down the sony
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servers last month. the breach sparked fears of stolen credit card and personal information. sony says it's launching an identity theft insurance policy and plans to reimburse users without network access. >> not just the gamers. i keep reminding everybody, i can't watch a movie on netflix because i use my playstation network to do that. i'm reading a lot more. you can't get taxed any more, you can, thehill.com is reporting an idea the government would tax drivers by the mile. the budget office suggests they would be using an electronic system to see how -- >> that's going to go over well in this country. >> the white house says it is an early draft, that it's not a formal proposal. the interesting thing, a similar proposal was floated in the beginning of the obama presidency and at the time a spokesperson robert gibbs says this does not represent the views of the president and is in no way administration proposal. >> you're taxed on the gas. by definition -- >> if you use more gas to pay more tax.
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>> the arguments of supporters of this, i'm not saying i support it, this is their claim, more fairly distribute how much you use bridges and infrastructure you would be charged how much you use it. >> doesn't paying tax on gas achieve the same thing? unless you happen to be just driving around your farm. >> we've pushed you into the corner. >> come on, kiran, why is this a good idea, kiran? tell us why you think my privacy should be invaded and people should be taxing my driving. >> i'm still teetering on the edge of the easy pass, okay. if i didn't need to get over the gw bridge quickly i don't know if i would have that thing. >> here's a story we found fascinating this morning. informal survey by a group called insure.com they've put a price on all the work that a mom does at home, whether she's a working mom or a stay-at-home mom. >> how much is all of that worth? what is your mom worth? >> from the laundry to the cleaning chaufer. >> decorating the house, to all that stuff. >> it's worth a lot. >> how much is a second pair of eyes in the back of her head
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cost? that's what i want to know. apartment hunting, rents are climbing fast, how much and what you can do maybe to get ahead of it in signing a lease. >> 19 minutes after the hour. >> decorating the house, to all >> 19 minutes after the hour. >> decorating the house, to all >> 19 minutes after the hour. hey!
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usaa. for insurance, banking, investments, retirement and advice. we know what it means to serve. let us serve you. 21 minutes past the hour. minding your business, stocks tumble and oil prices fall below $100 a barrel. a huge decline for all sorts of commodities as investors brace for this morning's all-important april jobs report. the dow is down 139 points yesterday, the nasdaq and s&p 500 were also down. after 44 straight days of going up, this morning gas prices are down, but not by much. according to aaa the national average is now $3.98 a gallon. and as i mentioned the april jobs report out at 8:30 eastern this morning. and economists predict employers added 185,000 jobs last month. that would be down slightly from the jobs created in march. the unemployment rate is expected to remain unchanged at 8.8 %. demand for apartments is
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igniting a sharp rise in rent. according to researchers, rent is expected to jump between 4 and 5% this year. that's the biggest increase in four years. coca-cola counting down to its 125th birthday. to celebrate coke is throwing a party in atlanta's centennial park. the first coca-cola was served on may 8th, 1886, at a pharmacy in atlanta. we're back in 60 seconds. you go next if you had a hoveround power chair? the statue of liberty?
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so what is a mom worth? how much time do we have? carmen wong ullrich is minding
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your business. this interesting look if you had to pay for everything. >> that the mom did in the home. >> moms are worth a lot. we know that. >> just in time for mother's day. >> a little bit, the dollar signs and amounts. insure.com has a mother's day n ind index. looking to put a price tag on what moms do at home because research has shown life insurance for women is 69% of the coverage for men. much of the thinks is stay-at-home parents don't have income to replace but the reality is what a home-based parent does is worth money, a lot of money. child care alone runs on average 10,000 to $30,000 a year. how much is what mom does worth overall? if you hired a professional, instead of mom, to perform some tasks here's what it would cost you annually. that chauffeuring to and from practices, almost $7,000, right? help with homework that's if you hired a tutor, $7,000. shopping for the family, if you hired someone to shop for you, about $1500 a year.
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now, fixing up the house, this is interesting, this is just making it pretty, about $1,000 if you hired an interior decorator. cleaning the house, $5,000 a year. now so they added up all these costs together and the total annual costs or worth of what mom does, which i think is low, is about $61,000. >> that's not value added. that's just literally replacing tasks with someone else. >> what they do with the hourly wage or cost of hiring someone to do it. >> i know there's going to be a lot of guys and dads writing say wait a minute, we do this too. >> the whole point is what you're doing is worth something and it's a value. no matter who's staying at home, it's worth something and you should be insured to replace that costs. >> if both people and the couple work it shows how valuable all those things is. you're juggling and treating who's going to be responsible for. >> an extra $60,000 of value that's getting done for what you don't think about. >> it's about insurance and
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being insured even it if you're a stay-at-home parent. to pay for the cost of replacing that. >> thank you. happy mother's day. >> you too. we want to get your thoughts on this. e-mail us, tweet us, go to our blog or find us on facebook. we'll be reading your comments, what do you think, cnn.com/am, tweet us @cnnam or facebook at cnn. where the water is where it's going to go. >> and one of osama bin laden's wives says she didn't leave that compound in abbottabad, pakistan, for five years. we're going live to pakistan, more information coming out from that treasure trove. it is 27 minutes after the hour. " "i really like you." "i love you." "i will always love you." and sometimes a gift says, "you mean more to me than anything else in the world." life insurance from new york life
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good morning. epic flooding, the mighty mississippi overflowing its banks this morning, threatening to flood millions of acres of farmland. the city of memphis under the gun right now. emergency officials now going door to door, asking people to leave on this "american morning."
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and we're crossing the half hour right now. yes, we are watching as people have described sort of a slow-motion disaster unfolding. it affects so many towns, so many areas up and down the mississippi. the problem is that even though you're seeing this epic flooding right now, it's not going anywhere. this problem is not going anywhere. >> it's getting worse. it's a xcombination of two terrible things, farmland, valuable important famland where we go so many of our crops, and major met toe poll tan areas. >> the spine of the united states, the mississippi iver, that has been harnessed by a series of locks and dams and levees for years and years and when something like this happens it's intricate engineering to figure out what has to be flooded and what doesn't. you have mayors and engineers with different ideas about the best idea to do. >> how much control you have over it. even if you are doing these controlled explosions over these
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areas, what happens after that isn't known either. the economic impact huge. >> barges that are in slews that are stuck. barges carry grain and the like, stuck in slews, clogged with trees and the like. it's a mess. >> first we want to get you updated on the latest, new intelligence uncovered from osama bin laden's own files. the homeland security department is now issuing an alert about rail security. this comes after a law enforcement source says al qaeda was plotting to attack trains in this country, certain dates mentioned, 9/11/2011. the cia was on to him months ago. "the washington post" reporting that u.s. spies set up a safehouse where they were watching bin laden's compound and actually tracking the terror leader in pakistan through every step of his daily life. it's being called one of the most sensitive intel operations ever. we're learning more about the final night of the mission to kill bin laden. u.s. officials say only one shot was fired at navy s.e.a.l.s as
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they swooped in to get bin laden. there were fears that bin laden could have rigged his body with a suicide vest or that the compound itself was booby-trapped, even though osama bin laden did not have a gun. now to the south, here in the united states, what we were just talking about and showing you those pictures. they're watching a disaster unfold in slow motion. the mississippi keeps on rising and by the way, getting wider as it rises. the epic flooding is forcing thousands of people to leave their homes. >> the other tributaries flowing backward because of the pressure from the mississippi. three towns facing a mandatory evacuation order this morning in eastern arkansas, mcclelland, gregory and cotton plant. look at interstate 42, it's the interstate 40 i should say, the third longest east to west freeway. a major trucking artery that cuts through the heart of arkansas. a large stretch had to be closed again yesterday because of the flooding. >> and i-40 remains shut down for several miles in both directions this morning as well.
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according to the arkansas highway department, truckers are spreading the word, find a way to avoid it if you can. >> it ended up just being bumper to bumper, stop for ten minutes at a time. it took me two and a half hours to get 32 miles from brinkley up here to bald knob. my back feels terrible. i had to stop here and get out. it was miserable. especially since we didn't expect it. >> in memphis, tennessee, floodwaters are threatening hundreds of homes right now. emergency officials are going door to door in some neighborhoods and asking people to leave. >> there's a threat of severe flooding all along the mississippi river this morning. reynolds is joining us now to give us a real look at how serious this is. those areas that are in imminent danger of flooding and those areas this could extend to. it's quite a big piece of this country. >> a tremendous part of this country. i heard i believe christine mention earlier, this is the spine of the country and that's a perfect way to put it. this is a major mode of transportation for people in this country for many, many years, obviously. you've got some of your best
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farmland in this area as well. a lot of people live here, and unfortunately things are going to get worse farther down river. what we don't need is more precipitation. we don't need one more drop of rainfall. thankfully looks like it will cooperate over the next couple days. look at these computer mod else that shows some of the heaviest precipitation, a little bit of light precipitation over the next five days or so, from about st. louis, maybe north of paducah to minneapolis. heavier precipitation farther out to the west and in portions of the ohio valley. that is some good news that we're going to get a break in terms of the weather. problem is, though, you still have that huge wall of water that's slowly going to be entering it ways down into the southern half of the mississippi getting closer to the delta. when that happens we can expect may 20th, may 22nd, may 23rd, things beginning to crest in places like vicksburg, about 14 feet above flood stage, 16 feet above flood stage in natchez. baton rouge the same situation. the flooding in memphis has been
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horrific this live camera we have, this live shot, will show you the situation gets grim. the pyramid there in memphis. beale street for the time being, things look great there. closer to mud island, the situation is very dire. we can expect things to get a little better in memphis as we make our way through the next several hours and days with more flooding, massive flooding again, heading farther downstream. that's the latest on this story. keep a sharp eye on it, let's pitch it back to you in new york. >> you said i mentioned the spine of the -- i have to say i quoted you on that, reynolds. you were the one that said it. >> sounds -- >> tweeting each other. >> sounds smarter when she says it. it does. >> smart stuff, reynolds, thank you. >> whatever it takes. >> he said whatever it takes. >> takes more than just that. with the royal wedding and death of osama bin laden dominating the headlines for the past ten days the disaster relief efforts in alabama have some ways fallen off the radar. certainly not if you're there and living through it.
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that's why some of the biggest names in country music want to come out and help. hank williams jr., keith urban, tim mcgraw among the headlines performing at a 90-minute benefit concert next thursday night going to air on cmt, country music television, at 9:00 p.m. eastern all the proceeds go to the american red cross disaster relief fund for alabama. you can donate $10 right now to the red cross relief fund for the alabama tornado relief by texting 90999 or for other ways to help you can head to our impact your world site, cnn.com/impact. all right. the u.s. raid deep in pakistan territory, to kill bin laden, has put a strain on relations between the two countries. bin laden was hiding in a compound that was only footsteps away from pakistan's military academy, a force the united states helped fund. the chief of pakistan's military admitting there were shortcomings in tracking bin laden but he slammed the raid and basically warned the u.s. don't do it again, saying, quote, any similar action violating the sovereignty of
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pakistan will warrant a review of the level of military/intelligence cooperation with the united states. here at home, lawmakers are questioning whether pakistan has the tools and the desire to really fight terror. >> this relationship won't be salvaged unless pakistan gets its house in order and unless we are clearer amongst ourselves about what we can and cannot expect from pakistan. >> this week's dramatic killing of osama bin laden was found by our forces near islamabad in a well-populated area, close to pakistan's military academy, have raised questions about pakistan's reliability. pakistani officials have been accused of being complicit or incompetent, but in either case, some critics say, it's time for us to wash our hands of the whole country. >> cia director leon panetta
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shown here at langley during the bin laden raid, he has said pakistan was either involved or incompetent, neither he says is a good place to be. >> nick paton walsh joins us from abbottabad, pakistan, with new information on what is going on there right now. nick, there's certainly a great deal of curiosity about all the information and stuff we're gleaning from this compound. what have you got? >> absolutely. i think one thing i should point out immediately, a breaking piece of news, there has been a drone strike in the tribal areas again, a key one, this time, the first since the operation against bin laden. eight militants killed, we're told, by a total of four missiles. i think it's important to point out, getting into a rhythm now, talking about the relationship between america and pakistan. and it really appears that each time the pakistanis ask the americans to curtail their drone operation the american response is simply another strike. we've heard those noises in the last few days, really, from pakistani officials, suggesting perhaps less operations by
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americans here. obviously with the exception of the bin laden one. i think this drone strikes suggests the conversation is simply taking place through the drone strikes almost, ali? >> nick, we're getting some information that you've found one of osama bin laden's bills that can tell us a little bit about his existence in this house? >> absolutely. yes. this does, from what we can make out, this does appear to be the last gas bill sent to bin laden's house. we've obtained it from local sources here. it has on it the name, the alias of one of the brothers supposed to be renting the house there and perhaps building it, bin laden's family appears to be using gas mostly in winters months. it says the meter was installed in 2007, which might suggest that he actually lived from the compound from around about then. no proof bin laden was there, perhaps it was set up for his family or for these what zeerry brothers. another thing we're hearing from government official here is that
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there was an outstanding tax bill about 60,000 pakistani in connection with that property for local property, about $700 or so. obviously tax evasion is pretty common here in pakistan. it wasn't paid isn't an enormous surprise. you might argue if they paid it that could have drawn attention to the compound, ali. >> nick, thanks very much. it's interesting information. we certainly -- there doesn't seem to be any lack of hunger for how osama bin laden lived, who was there with him, this new information about his wife saying she was there for five years. nick paton walsh digging through that. between what he's finding out there and what the fbi is finding out with the stuff that has been transported from the stuff to quan ittyco, it really is almost -- it's going to be a more interesting story than even the killing of osama bin laden. >> the fact that the wife didn't leave the house for five years, she said. >> unbelievable. >> that there was intelligence and surveillance of osama bin laden actually walking the grounds almost like a prison
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yard walk. you can't leave. he's walking, doing exercise all youth side, all that fascinating to put it together. >> it absolutely is. we're going to be talking more about energy independence. if our country was completely independent of middle east oil, would it end al qaeda? interesting -- >> interesting theory. jim acosta joins us live after the break. >> don't forget to weigh in on our question of the morning. we want to know what you think about this. insure.com says the value of the family-related tasks that mom performs, versus say paying professionals, outsourcing it all, $61,436 a year, tell us what you think, e-mail us, tweet us, go to our blog, find any of us our facebook. we'll be reading your comments later in the show. you're watching "american morning." we're quick after a back break. >> or something like that. we'll be right back. ♪ [ male announcer ] humble beginnings are true beginnings. they're character-building beginnings.
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welcome back. 44 minutes past hour the now. cia director leon panetta said it, bin laden is dead, but al qaeda is not. some experts are now saying it's america's addiction to foreign oil that has actually fueled the terror network and they say that energy independence could actually strike a fatal blow. >> it's an interesting -- it's a really interesting connection. jim acosta is following this for us, he's live in washington, good morning, jim. >> good morning, guys. the death of osama bin laden does not change the fact that america's still addicted to middle east oil and counterterrorism experts will tell you that addiction not only keeps gas prices high, it helps al qaeda. the man behind the wheel of this new electric car can't stand the sight of a gas station. >> how do you like the car? >> i like it a lot. >> reporter: that's because former cia director james woolsey sees the nation's addiction to foreign oil as its
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achilles heel and the war on al qaeda. on every fuel-efficient vehicle he drives, woolgsy posts this bumper sticker, bin laden hates this car. >> there we go. >> reporter: he points to past appeals made by bin laden for jihadists to bring chaos to the middle east. the push up gas prices and hurt the american economy. the only solution, woolsy says, is to break the region's dominance of global energy supplies. >> so we really in the interest of everybody, need to undermine oil's strategic role, even if they have a monopoly of oil, they don't have a monopoly over transportation. we need to break that link. >> and so you want to stick it to these guys? simply put? >> absolutely. >> reporter: instead, americans are the ones feeling stuck. at a congressional town hall in florida. >> my gas bill for my three vans in the last three months have
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gone up hundreds of dollars a month. >> reporter: small business owner eileen gaines explains how the bill to fill up her commercial vehicles stopped her from hiring a new employee. >> had the gas prices not gone up you would have been hiring? >> i would have hired someone two months ago. i need that much help right now. >> we have to produce more ourselves. >> reporter: the republican senator rubio like many in his party wants more offshore drilling. >> figure out a way to become more efficient in our use of energy and figure out how to produce more domestically. >> this pops open when you press a button. >> reporter: for james woolsey plugging a car into your house isn't just going green. >> i think it would be a very embracing message. it would say that the united states will get its act together. >> reporter: sending one more signal to al qaeda that they're running on empty. but there are no quick fixes to america's addiction to oil. for example, millions of new electric cars would require countless new charging stations across the country and experts say new domestic oil drilling
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would only impact gas prices years down the road. i should mention james woolsey drives one of the chevy volts. he would tell you, that yes, you have to plug your car into your house to power the electric side of that car, but it still has a gas tank in it that will keep that car going for miles and miles, but that is not a solution for everybody. it's going to take years to solve this problem, sghis increasingly it's going to become a solution for more people with gas at almost $4 a gallon. if we keep getting threatened by this, the fact is, some people will start to say, it will just be easier to budget for spending less on gas. >> if you buy an energy efficient car when gas is $4 a gallon you're not going to trade it in when it goes back up. >> i'm not sure i fully buy -- i love what woolsey is doing, i love the idea of alternative energy. i'm not sure i fully buy all the dots all the way to al qaeda. we'll see. >> a quick break. our top stories are coming up,
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clug clueding the flooding in the middle east. it's 48 minutes past the hour. we're adding new cell sites... increasing network capacity, middle east. it's 48 minutes past the hour. to improve your wireless network experience. from a single phone call to the most advanced data download, we're covering more people in more places than ever before in an effort to give you the best network possible. at&t. rethink possible.
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plunging nearly 1,000 points in 20 minutes, there's concerns whether markets around the world are prepared to handle a similar event. following last year's crash the s.e.c. expanded circuit breakers. the mississippi river continues to rise. flooding farmland and forcing thousands of evacuations in arkansas and tennessee. the mississippi is not expected to crest until some time next week. just 9% of people in a new survey say they keep track of their daily calorie intake. when it comes to deciding which foods and beverages to buy, their priorities are taste, price and then health. new york may become the first staip state to ban indoor tanning for anyone under the age of 18. lawmakers point to a study that says people who use tanning beds are 74% more likely to develop melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. the suburban chicago house made famous in "the home alone" movies is on the market and can
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be yours for $2.4 million. slide down staircase is included. you're caught up on the day's headlines. back in 60 seconds. .
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welcome back. it's about eight minutes to the top of the hour. picture this, going to sleep with your typical american accent or canadian accent and waking up sounding like a brit or an eastern european. >> it happened to one woman in oregon. jeanne shows us her accent change. >> reporter: before karen butler went to the dentist her regular american accent sounded like this. >> hi, this is karen, sorry i can't come to the phone at the
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moment. >> reporter: after being sedated to have her teeth pulled, we're not pulling your leg, she sounded like this. >> you talk to young girls they think it's a very pretty sound. i want an accent like that. just go see my dentist. >> reporter: some say she sounds irish or english or eastern european. >> now you open your mouth and everybody goes, what's your problem? >> reporter: she's from toledo, oregon, and never been to any of those foreign places. there's nothing fake about this, it's a medical condition called foreign accent syndrome, very rare, fewer than 100 known cases. for instance, a florida woman named judy roberts who had a stroke and went from sounding like this. >> we've got fabulous things. >> reporter: to this. >> i felt like i was going bloody crazy. >> reporter: doctors believe foreign accent syndrome is usually caused by some sort of brain injury or stroke, but it didn't affect karen's sense of humor, even when it first happened a year and a half ago. >> i sounded more like i was
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from drensle. >> reporter: her daughter insisted mom record ring tones, i want to suck your blood. >> i want to suck your blood. it's my mom calling. >> reporter: after 27 years of marriage. >> kind of exotic like you had a new wife? >> no. >> you never miss her old american self? >> she still is her old american self. just her voice has changed. >> reporter: it doesn't sound changed to karen. she doesn't hear her new accent until you play it back. >> one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten. >> i sound german. >> reporter: things can get weird when someone calls who knew karen before her accent changed. >> hi, this is karen. >> reporter: now they don't believe it's her answering the phone. >> hello, this is karen. >> reporter: she's a tax consultant and her voice over the phone shocked one of her clients. >> she calls her mother right away quick and says, somebody is impersonating karen. >> reporter: one thing about
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acquiring a new accent overnight. sometimes even your own husband can't understand you. >> i did want to buy some -- >> you want to buy some push carts? >> not push cart. a postcard. >> postcard, cnn. >> push cart. >> reporter: cnn, new york. >> the relationship, right, after all those years. >> what a strange thing. where do you think that comes from? these accents -- they're not native born. >> i'm no brain scientist. we should get sanjay and his brain to tell us this. you get bombarded by this stuff -- >> she's just absorbing something. >> the other thing jeanne wrote to us, the funniest thing, she used to be shy, almost a wall flower and now because of her accent people are always asking her where she's from. open up a whole new world, talk to more people. when she gets stressed out it sounds more australian na irish. >> her husband seems cool. answered a question as the husband should. she's just the same she is.
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>> want to buy a push cart? a threat pulled from bin laden's files. the next target in the war on terror. peter brooks joins us on the war after bin laden. coming up to the top of the hour in just four minutes. ♪ [ male announcer ] in 2011, at&t is at work, building up our wireless network all across america. we're adding new cell sites... increasing network capacity, and investing billions of dollars to improve your wireless network experience. from a single phone call to the most advanced data download, we're covering more people in more places than ever before in an effort to give you the best network possible. at&t. rethink possible. in an effort to give you the best network possible. ♪ ♪
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good morning. 7:00 here in new york. epic flooding the mighty mississippi overflowing its banks this morning. threatening to flood millions of acres of farmland and cities. memphis, in fact, under it right now. emergency officials now going door to door asking people to leave on this "american morning." good morning. it's friday, may 6th. welcome to "american morning." so much we're following today, including the latest details of what's happening in pakistan and also in the midwest in the south where this flooding is just massive. >> speaking of the situation in pakistan, right now we're
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finding out more about a threat that was pulled right from osama bin laden's files. >> the homeland security department here in the united states issued an alert about rail security. a law enforcement source says al qaeda was plotting to attack trains in the u.s. >> there was one possible date mentioned, 9/11/2011. jeanne meserve will have more on that in a moment. there's incredible new details on "operation neptune spear." we know that was the name given to the secret mission to target osama bin laden. "the washington post" reports cia spies monitored bin laden's lehrer for months from a safehouse in abbottabad, pakistan. >> new video from the night of the assault on bin laden's compound. this was taken by a neighbor. it shows his three-story house in flames. >> president obama will travel to fort campbell, kentucky, to personally thank members of the u.s. navy s.e.a.l. team that took down bin laden. yesterday he was at ground zero meeting with families and firefighters, families of 9/11 victims and fire fighters.
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>> meantime we're getting a clearer picture of what happened in the final 38 minutes of this massive hunt for bin laden. a u.s. official tells us the raid was launched after the cia spotted a tall man doing prison yard walks around the compound. the first man killed was bin laden's courier. he also fired the only shot, we're told, at the s.e.a.l.s. >> they moved into the main house where they killed the courier's brother and found bin laden and his family while no other shots were fired. a congressman who was briefed on the raid today "usa today" there was concern bin laden was wearing a suicide vest and the house was rigged. >> jeanne meserve joins us live from washington and has more on the latest possible threat on america's railways. how concerned are homeland security and others worried this was in the early stages? >> they are stressing this was aspirational, not operational. no indication of any imminent threat to rail in the united states. but here's what they are saying. they sent out information to
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state and local law enforcement and the rail sector yesterday saying that within those materials that were seized at bin laden's compound they found a document which indicates that in february of 2010, al qaeda was discussing the possibility of hitting rail in the united states, specifically derailing trains over bridges -- on bridges or over valleys, presumably to maximize casualties. they say that no specific city or rail system was mentioned in this information, but they did talk about staging these attacks to coincide with the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. the tenth anniversary that's coming up in september. but it does not appear, officials say, that any higher ups in al qaeda, including osama bin laden, had signed off on this plot, but they were concerned enough to send out the information to the sector so they would be aware. in addition to those specifics, officials tell me that they have
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found material there which indicates al qaeda was still interested in hitting major cities in the united states, specifically new york, washington, d.c., l.a., and chicago were all mentioned. in addition, they talk about hitting on specific significant dates, not just the september 11th anniversary as is mentioned in the rail information, but also july 4th, christmas, and the opening day of the u.n. general assembly when all the world leaders would be assembled in new york city. last night, the former homeland security secretary, the first homeland security secretary, tom ridge, appeared on cnn. here's a bit of what he had to say about the rail notice. >> it's a head's up, it's a warning. i don't think it's necessarily actionable but it's appropriate to send this information out to those responsible for that infrastructure. they wanted to remind people there's still a potential target, take notice, but use the information that we have, but don't make any changes now. there's no ness itty for it. >> reporter: a lot of rail systems in the country had
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already stepped up security after the news that osama bin laden had been killed. they're well aware rail has been a repeated target of al qaeda and other terrorist groups. they knew to be on alert already. there's widespread expectation in addition there will be more of those kinds of notices and alerts sent out as officials continue to sift through the volumes of material that were seized at bin laden's hideout. back to you. >> making sense of what that intelligence means. thank you. the other interesting thing, our security has changed here in this country since 9/11. stricter immigration, obviously it there are more checks and balances in place. we're going to be talking to peter brooks, deputy secretary of defense at the heritage foundation, could they pull this out if this was found in the mother lode of intelligence, could they have pulled it off. >> we'll talk about the question of pakistan warning the u.s. not to come and do these things again, otherwise they'll reconsider their relationship to us. >> there was a drone strike this morning. >> we're following that story closely.
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the other story we're following in the united states is the mighty mississippi, still rising, epic flooding, not using that term loosely, epic flooding in the south is forcing thousands to flee their homes. >> in eastern arkansas, there are three towns that are under mandatory evacuation orders this morning. there you see them, cotton plant, mcclelland and gregory. state police and the national guard helping hundreds find higher ground in the three towns. you take a look at interstate 40, this is the nation's third longest east to west connecter freeway. it's a major trucking artery that cuts right through arkansas. you see parts of it. a 23-mile stretch had to be closed again yesterday because the roadway was flooded. >> large sections of i-40 remain shut down in both directions this morning. truckers are spreading the word to avoid the freeway at all costs. >> ended up just being bumper to bumper, stop for ten minutes at a time, it took me two and a half hours to get 32 miles from brinkley to bald knob.
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>> i've never seen anything like this by far. i've been four hours, gone maybe 40 miles. >> you can't fight mother nature. she's going to play whatever she's going to play. >> she's going to play so they're using their gps to avoid this part of the country. in memphis, tennessee, floodwaters are threatening hundreds of homes right now. emergency officials predict nearly 3,000 properties in the memphis area could be impacted by flooding if the mississippi crests at 48 feet this weekend. that would be the river's highest level since 1937. right now it's approaching 46 feet. >> y were mentioning the towns adjacent or abutting big rivers in this country have the high water mark on important buildings in the city and many places there will be a new high water mark. david mattingly is in memphis this morning. a slow-moving story and won't peak until next week. >> that's right. inch by inch, this river is on the move. we're at 46 feet right now. expecting a couple of more feet
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to crest some time possibly on wednesday here in memphis. we're seeing records being set to the north. we're seeing high water marks expected to the south of here. very close to a record here in memphis. and this is what 46 feet above flood level looks like. this is a city park, believe it or not. you see the trees that are in the water. you see this big lake here behind me. that's actually a parking lot where people come to park and enjoy this green space during the day, during the week. right now, it's all just under water. and the thing about this flood, it's very slow coming in, very slow coming up. it's going to be very slow to leave as well. they're looking at this, having an impact possibly until the end of may before all of the water is actually gone. and the big problem they're looking at, because they have so many flood walls and levees here at the river, they're seeing problems in the tributaries of the rivers that empty into the
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mississippi. that water backing up and causing problems for communities along those tributaries. so here in memphis, they've put out the call for volunteers to start filling sandbags as much as possible right now. they want to be prepared just in case there's any problem with the levees and they start seeing any sort of leaks or spills that they don't anticipate right now. they have a great deal of confidence those levees are going to hold, but because this is moving so slow, they have a lot of time to prepare, and they want to make sure they stay out in front of this big flood. >> all right. david, thanks very much. we will stay on top of the story. you're just in one place. memphis is a big deal, a highly populated area but there are so many of these towns along the rivers that are getting affected by this along the mississippi. david mattingly for nous memphis, tennessee, right now. >> thanks. we're talking about new information seized from bin laden's compound in pakistan yielding, perhaps, some information about some terror threats that were in the works. we're going to be speaking with peter brooks, a former assistant secretary of defense, now at the
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heritage foundation, of just how realistic it is that al qaeda could have, in fact, pulled any of that off here in the united states. >> it was debate night for the gop, the first big gop debate, but the news really from this debate is that most of the front runners weren't there. we'll tell you what happened and what didn't happen. >> we're about an hour and 20 minutes away for the jobs report for april. a lot of people worried that we may be bucking our trend of having gained lots of jobs. we'll find out live at 8:20 a.m. we'll give you a preview. 8:30 a.m. it is ten minutes after the hour right now. ♪
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13 minutes past the hour now. holed up in a compound in pakistan for five years, time spent plotting moves in, perhaps, his reign of terror. a law enforcement source says al qaeda was plotting to try to attack trains here in the united states. homeland security department has issued an alert about rail security. joining us now from washington, our d.c. bureau is peter brooks, former deputy assistant secretary of defense and senior fellow with the heritage foundation. thanks for being with us. >> good to be with you. >> now assessing that information as we've talked about at quantico. the fbi taking a look at a lot of those files seized from the safehouse. new information showing that al qaeda was at least aspirationally planning new attacks on trains, at least four u.s. cities, new york, washington, l.a. and chicago. what do you think? do you think they could have carried these out? >> certainly possible.
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they've looked at there have been plots in the past against washington and new york metro systems. you know, kiran, we've had as many as 40 plots against the united states since 9/11 and some of those have resulted in deaths since what happened at ft. hood a few years ago when an army major killed about 15 people and injured 30. we cannot become complacent about this. this is something they've been thinking about. they look at anniversaries, soft targets where a lot of people will gather and we have take these seriously. now i think al qaeda wants revenge and they want to show as an organization, that they're still viable and they're going to -- i think they're going to try to lash out in some way. >> you mentioned mad nadal hassan and the christmas day bomber and faisal shahzad who attempted to set off the car bomb in times square. we're not talking about a large-scale attack, lone wolf, perhaps people inspired by but not necessarily directed by al
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qaeda. i mean, could a 9/11-style attack or even in this case, a large scale attack on the rail system still be carried out today successfully, plotted in pakistan and carried out here in the u.s.? >> >> i think it could be. we've made it much more difficult for them. i would say we're safer today, especially with osama bin laden silenced, but we're not safe you don't know how these things develop. a lone wolf attack is probably the most dangerous things we have to worry about. the times square bomber came one park away from potentially killing a lot of people. if that square had been very busy and the explosives gone off, could have killed a lot of people. >> you're right. i'm not trying to diminish it at all. i'm asking about the whole sending of the 19 hijackers could that happen today. this was also really interesting the cia reportedly had the safe house in abbottabad, they say they were actually spying on bin laden's compound, building up
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human intelligence before the attack. were you surprised to hear they had assets that close to bin laden? >> not really. but it's fabulous. it's fabulous we're able it to pull that off because there's always a chance of being detected. could have tipped off osama bin laden and he could have escaped. i would have thought we used satellites which you can look inside the compound but you can't see everything. it's a really tribute to the spy craft, the trade craft, of our intelligence forces that they were able to put people on the ground close to that compound and we just can't thank them enough for being able to pull that off. >> that is amazing from the united states' point of view and our intelligence point of view but seems to make it already shaky relationship, this questionable situation between whether pakistan and the u.s. are true allies, seems to also bolster, you know, pakistan's claims, they're upset about this situation, obviously, but one of the things that was interesting, the chief of pakistan's army issued a pretty combative statement saying if the u.s. ever tried a similar commando
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operation in our country it would put the whole relationship in doubt. how much is saving face, how much is true? >> that's a very good question, kiran. they're feeling a whole slew of emotions right now, embarrassment that osama bin laden, which they had said for many years was a -- the idea that osama bin laden was in pakistan was basically a western conspiracy theory and he turned out to be there. embarrassment, a little nationalism, some pushback. there's going to be a lot of tough talk going on between pakistan and the united states in the days and months to come. the thing that pakistan needs to realize, kiran, is the fact that they are as much under threat from this terrorism and extremism as we are. the it taliban, al qaeda, you know, the hakani network. if we fail in afghanistan, they're going to have much bigger problems. they've been riding this tiger of extremism for some time and when they try to dismount i think the tiger is going to look at them. think about the president of
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pakistan, his wife, brenenazir bhutto, killed bay terror organization in that country. they have to get out of this feeling of denial and move forward with us in dealing with these terrorist groups, not only populate their country but some of the countries around them. >> you wrote a very interesting column about why it would be shortsighted to try to say we should cut off our relationship with them and our support for them financially when it comes to fighting terror. i urge people to see that because it's interesting. peter brooks, thanks so much for joining us this morning. great to have you. >> we're going to be minding your business after the break. 18.5 minutes after the hour. announcer: naturals from delicious, real ingredients with no artificial flavors or preservatives. naturals from purina cat chow. share a better life.
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you know some people criticize the data wongs that love to look at the monthly jobs report. what we need to gauge if jobs are being created. >> data wongs i love that. that's you. >> it is actually. it's carmen as well. but it's also look -- >> i prefer nerd. >> but look, this is the number that shows what all of you have been telling us, it's hard to get a job, no matter what. >> reality and what people are feeling, they see it, sense it, feel it. we got the jobs report for april going to be released at 8:30 a.m. today but the expectations are as such, economists are saying that about 185,000 jobs look to be added, mostly from the private sector. this is a big, big drop from the month before, which was over 200,000. the unemployment rate remains unchanged at 8.8%. and a new cnn opinion research poll just came out this morning,
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your opinion of economic conditions in the country today is pretty dire. 82% of respondents said we are in poor economic conditions, 18% saying somewhat good. these are the same percentages we have been seeing consistently since september 2008. now, why? the poll also found, this is very similar, too, 38%, thislogical tops, unemployment the most important issue, 38% of americans say, 28% saying the federal budget deficit, 21% rising gas prices and also housing costs are a culprit here in terms of our mood. >> the job is the engine of your personal economy. >> if the checks are not there, you cannot pay the bills, this is the most important thing. folks who have jobs are afraid and this is going on three years of losing what they have. >> and how do these natural disasters factor in? a lot of talk about the economic impact of what's going on with the mississippi river flooding, some of the casinos shutting down for three to six months, money not coming in and a
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disaster. >> look whaeps what happened in new orleans as well. this is a huge economic impact and has a ripple effect if across the nation. >> the markets had a wild ride. >> the dow down over 1%, 140 points, nasdaq down almost 14 as well and the s&p down as well. futures this morning, people are looking positive now so they're going up. >> yesterday they were worried about the worst for the jobs report. this is how wall street works, boys and girls. one day this way -- >> we should tell you we had a surge in the value of the dollar yesterday, a big increase, very big drop in the price of oil. >> silver. >> commodities. >> silver -- >> why silver and not gold? >> silver is actually something you use. gold used for jewelry and as a hedge. silver is -- >> we use gold. >> just a little. >> lots of commodities. >> below $100 a barrel. that's 11% move in a week. a big decline for oil prices. >> not a dull day. >> i know. it's a roller coaster, going to be another one today. thanks, carmen. as kiran was saying we have
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the epic flooding in the south. thousands of homes are being threatened in memphis. we've got dramatic pictures of that. david mattingly is on the ground there. we're going to be speaking to some people from on the ground in memphis to see how they're preparing to get out of their homes. it's 25 minutes after the hour. [ male announcer ] in 2011, at&t is at work, building up our wireless network all across america. we're adding new cell sites... increasing network capacity, and investing billions of dollars to improve your wireless network experience. from a single phone call to the most advanced data download, we're covering more people in more places than ever before in an effort to give you the best network possible. at&t. rethink possible.
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across the half hour, here's a look at your top stories. still covering the latest on this epic flooding that's taking place in the country's midsection and south forcing thousands to evacuate their homes. in arkansas sections of interstate 40 still shut down in both directions. the floodwaters choking off one of the buggies e trucking arteries in the country. record flooding is expected all along the river as far south as louisiana. an alleged plot already uncovered in osama bin laden's own files. the homeland security department
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has issued an alert about rail security in the united states. a law enforcement source says al qaeda was plotting to attack trains. they mentioned a number of possible dates including the anniversary of 9/11 this year. gas prices are down this morning, after 44 straight days of going up, according to aaa the national average is $3.98 a gallon. oil prices plunged yesterday, down to below $100 a barrel. maybe, maybe -- >> maybe the acceleration in gas prices will slow down. >> maybe. >> i don't know that we're not going to get to $4 as a national average. >> yeah. >> back to our top story, the flooding crisis unfolding along the mississippi river from the upper midwest down to the gulf of mexico. here's a map we had earlier today to show you of areas under flood watches or warnings right now. you see it stretches up and down our nation. people in harm's way in many places. rivers flowing over their levees, homes being evacuated or the floodwaters are about to hit. >> when you look at that, it looks almost like the great lakes. i mean --
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>> it's unbelievable if you looked at it on a map. >> this cnn i-report sent to us from steven gibson in memphis, parts of the city as we've been showing you are under water. about 300 people are in shelters this morning and the flooding, this is clear. we've been hearing this from everybody. it is expected to get worse before it gets better. one big area of concern in tennessee is mud island. the mississippi is so swollen it's causing the wolf river to flow backward and spill over it banks. >> joining us live from memphis, radio talk show host ben ferguson, a mud island resident, who has been warning people of memphis about the rising waters. ben, welcome to the program. i mean give us a sense of what it's like to be there in the middle of this disaster? >> yeah. well it's eerie. you know it's eerie when you go on the radio when osama bin laden has been killed, we'll get to that in a minute but let's get to the flooding. something i never thought i would say. for people here it's probably
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the eeriest things i've seen. we've seen flash flooding, tornadoes, hurricane damage, this is something we know it's coming, about a foot a day, the mississippi river, and there's nothing you can do to stop it. everybody, for example, here on the island we're technically not like in a flood plain as they call it. none of us have flood insurance. you call to ask about it, we don't offer that to you. it's on your own dime if you take on water. that's what's concerned so many people, they feel like they live in an area they thought they were safe, not offered flood insurance and you see this water rising, coming at your house. >> that's the other question as well. how rare is this? what we're seeing this year, what we're seeing along mud island and some of those places, this is a very atypical spring? >> oh, this is something living in memphis almost my entire life, we never seen anything. you look behind me, that's a parking lot and the river is supposed to be about 100 yards behind me where it normally is. this is something people enjoy for recreation. they're walking their dogs down
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here on saturdays. you will see people playing ultimate frisbee and football. people are trying to decide what do i do for the next couple weeks? our biggest concern, even if our houses are okay, we may not have access to our house because of flooding, because once it does peak, they're talking two, two and a half, maybe three weeks of high water, you may live literally on a desert island where you can't get out by car. that's something that changes your entire perspective on life. >> what's the long-term or short-term economic effect on memphis? >> well, i mean, huge. there's so many people here that actually work down in tunica, mississippi, the casinos there. some of those could be closed for six months. you see a lot of people here that were going to go out -- this is our biggest tourism time with memphis in may, barbecue fest, is going to have to be moved by a football stadium instead of by the river. it's changed so many different dynamics of people's lives. and the neat thing is, you're seeing a phenomenal job of the community coming together, so many church groups have come out
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for help. you even saw an alliance last week, where you had one large tunica casino, harrah's, give all their food to a shelter and a church. that's not a marriage you see every day a casino and clutch joining together to help people. >> can i ask you about this notion of the mississippi getting so strong, the tributaries are moving backwards. it sounds like an apocalypse, but that is happening, the mississippi so strong, so much force, rising, that it's backing up the tributaries. are you seeing that there? >> you know, we actually, there's a harbor behind us, where we are, and we boat every weekend and one of my best friends and i, we went out on the wolf river and you're watching a river that is always flowing with a four or five-mile-an-hour current going in the opposite direction because the mississippi has come up so high that it's literally pushing these back and that's where -- i guess you say the tragedy is happening. just yesterday, we have an airplane, airport by our house, that is flooded because the levee failed and they're saying
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it could be five to six feet under water, all the planes had to hurry up and take off, they took off a couple days ago. as you see this you have a river going the wrong direction flooding neighborhoods, businesses, and homes and the worst part is, it's not going down any time soon. >> we understand public work staff, your dad in law enforcement, law enforcement trying to answer these calls. what are they telling people to do at this point? >> yeah. it's really, what we've tried to do is everybody has been saying look, you know this is coming, it's as one person described it, like watching a slow death, you know it's about to happen, you have time to prepare, get it planned. get an emergency plan. make sure you have plenty of drinking water and food. if you're going to stay, know when to say i'm not staying any longer. the volunteers have been great. the information has been great. and the best thing is, they've set up a website which has been awesome, staysafeshelby.us. see down to your street if you are going to probably get flooding or not. people have been able it to prepare. the problem is, the long-term
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effects of when the water comes in, it is not leaving in the next day or week or see ven couple weeks. >> it's going to be ant icky summer, you have to endure it and the cleanup after and people trying to rebuild. we'll keep a close eye on that. ben ferguson, thanks for joining us. we appreciate your insight on the ground. >> we've all covered hurricanes and it's fair to say one of the worst things after the hurricane is the flooding. it's so destructive and so hard to -- you don't get the same -- it doesn't feel the same as the hurricane. you don't get the same attention for it, people say it's a flood, when a river floods like that it's a big deal. >> floods in '97 and floods in 2001, floods recently where you still have houses that are boarded up, people haven't rebuilt. >> staysafeshelby.u.s. where you can check on your area and towns. people need all the information you can get. >> you remember the name amanda knox. you may not know exactly who she is or why she's been in the headlines for the last three and
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a half years. knox is an american convicted in italy for allegedly murdering her college roommate but the questions still linger, did she do it? this weekend in a cnn special investigation, drew griffin looks at her case. he joins us now from atlanta. drew, the family, amanda nox's family says she is innocent. >> absolutely, ali. when i was assigned this story, i thought just another family pleading for their innocent kid, right? then i took a close look at this case against amman anda knox an questions turned towards the italian police and the one prosecutor who appears to seek convictions based on his instincts. >> reporter: almost immediately after police say she confessed to her crime, amanda knox recants. she tells her parents she broke under stress. in court she would tell jurors how a police officer struck her from behind, how she was denied water, food, a translator.
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and how, she says, under pressure by police, she was asked repeatedly to dream up, imagine scenarios for how it could have happened. in a rare interview, the prosecutor of amanda knox, juliano me nene agrees to sit down for an extensive on-camera discussion of the evidence. it was a interview he later appeared to regret. >> nobody hit her? >> translator: no, absolutely not. >> was she asked to imagine scenarios? so she's lying? >> translator: absolutely. you either see the person or not. i can't ask a person what he or she imagines. this question would make no sense. >> reporter: that's not all that wouldn't make sense. because it turns out virtually everything amanda knox told her interrogators the night of her so-called confession, was a lie.
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amanda knox in this statement told police she was in the house the night of the murder and saw her boss, night club owner patrick and meredith, go into meredi meredith's room and heard screams. amanda's statement adds, i am very confused. i imagined what could have happened. police aparentally didn't bother to check the facts about him. they immediately arrested amanda, raphael and patrick for the murder of meredith cur cher. announcing to the public, case solved. giuliano said to us, the moment he laid eyes on amanda and raphael, they were involved in the murder. prior to the forensic investigation, prior to everything, really, your intuition or your detective knowledge led you to amanda knox
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and raphael? >> translator: after the first few weeks, we were convinced because of the behavior of the two people and especially amanda, that they were both involved in the crime. >> reporter: but almost immediately after the arrests, mignini had a problem. the third suspect, patrick la mum ba, had an airtight alibi. he was in his crowded bar that night, could not have been involved. then the actual forensic tests came back. >> when i looked at it, i was horrified. >> we spent three hours entire viewing that prosecutor -- interviewing the prosecutor going step by step the evidence that he presented to the jury that convicted amanda knox. i think you will be shocked. you will be shocked at how little evidence was actually presented against amanda knox. >> without giving away the special, tell me this, in the --
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at the time of her trial and verdict, people were very stuck in their corners on this. there were those who thought she was innocent and those who thought she was clearly guilty. in the time since that has happened, since her conviction, has much opinion been swayed one way or the other? for all intents and purposes this trial has continued outside of court? >> that has been the biggest problem for amanda knox. the tabloid press has gone wild with this story and has polarized people. so many people in italy still believe she's guilty and you ask why and they will tell you, she's got evil eyes. that was what we got a lot of. but the tide is beginning to turn. the knox case is under appeal at this moment. and if you actually go through the evidence which is what the new trial jury is going through now, it's, again, you don't want to give away the story but seems scarce. >> we will watch it with you drew. catch drew's special "murder
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abroad, the amanda knox story" sunday night at 8:00 eastern here on cnn. you know drew and his team do fantastic work, but the thing that's going to be important about this, i think most people have heard about the amanda knox story, it was hard to discern what was news and rumor and what was -- >> tabloid and just tabloid. >> and the amazing part about what was allowed at trial, as evidence in some cases was conjecture and rumor. >> i would be interested to hear the whole story from drew. let the debates begin. gop holds its first presidential debate last night, but it was remarkable for, i guess, the cast at this event. some of the biggest names being bandied about were not there. tim pawlenty was and many say he was sort of the top billing. who was there and who wasn't. and energy independence. something we talk about a lot in the united states. would it help defeat al qaeda? jim acosta has a very interesting story on that. it is 42 minutes after the hour. ♪
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there's still 18 months to go before the 2012 presidential election, but the debates have started. in fact, fox news sponsored the first gop debate last night in greenville, south carolina. >> but the gop front runners, romney, huckabee, trump, palin, nowhere to be found. some of the lesser-known candidates did show up. while there was some praise for president obama for taking out osama bin laden, it didn't last. >> he did a good job and i tip my cap to him in that moment, but that moment is not the sum total of america's foreign policy. he's made a number of decisions related to our security i don't agree with. >> the decision he made with osama bin laden was a tackle decisi decision. the strategic decision was made already by president bush to go after him. >> it's not clear what the mission is. that's the bigger problem, it's not clear what the mission is, not real clear to the american
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people what our interests are and then thirdly, it's not clear what the road map to victory is. >> we went to afghanistan to get him and he hasn't been there. now that he's killed, boy, it is a wonderful time for this country now to reassess it and get the troops out of afghanistan and end that war that hasn't helped us and hasn't helped anybody in the middle east. >> you can check out the latest cnn opinion research poll conducted before the news of bin laden's death broke. you can see that mike huckabee leads the gop field with 16%, donald trump, mitt romney, sarah palin, newt gingrich, ron paul, all of them are within six points of him in double digits. >> all right. there is speculation that america's addiction to foreign oil has given life to al qaeda. a theory out there, i guess you could say. some terror experts say becoming energy independent would help deliver the end to al qaeda.
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>> jim acosta is following this, live in washington. if you connect the dots from al qaeda to america's energy independence, it's an interesting theory, how does it work out? >> right. you know, i mean one of the original reasons for osama bin laden's fatah against the united states was our presence in the middle east. he said repeatedly over the years, that he thought the united states was stealing middle east oil. he thought that the way to destabilize the united states was to attack oil interests in the middle east, so there is a connection. the death of osama bin laden doesn't change one thing -- america is still addicted to foreign oil. and counterterrorism expert says that only keeps gas prices help, it helps al qaeda. the man behind the wheel of this new electric car can't stand the sight of a gas station. >> how do you like the car? >> oh, i like it a lot. >> reporter: that's because former cia director james woolsey sees the nation's addiction to foreign oil as its
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achille's heel on the war on al qaeda. on every fuel-efficient vehicle he drives, woolsey posts this bumper sticker, "bin laden hates this car." >> there we go. >> reporter: he points to past appeals made by bin laden for jihadists to bring chaos to the middle east. to push up gas prices and hurt the american economy. the only solution, woolsey says, is to break the region's dominance of global energy supplies. >> so we really in the interest of everybody, need to undermine oil's strategic role, even if they have a monopoly of oil, they don't have a monopoly over transportation. we need to break that link. >> and so you want to stick it to these guys? simply put? >> absolutely. >> reporter: instead, americans are the ones feeling stuck. at a congressional town hall in florida. >> my gas bill for my three vans in the last three months have gone up hundreds of dollars a month.
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>> reporter: small business owner eileen gaines explains how the bill to fill up her commercial vehicles stopped her from hiring a new employee. >> and so had the gas prices not gone up you would have been hiring? >> i would have hired someone two months ago. i really need that much help right now. >> we have to produce more of it ourselves. >> reporter: the republican senator rubio like many in his party wants more offshore drilling. >> we have to figure out a way to become more efficient in our use of energy and figure out how to produce more domestically. >> this pops open when you press a button. >> reporter: for james woolsey plugging your car into your house isn't just going green. >> i think it would be a very embracing message. it would say that the united states will get its act together. >> reporter: sending one more signal to al qaeda that they're running on empty. but there are no quick fixes to america's addiction to foreign oilg. if you have millions of new electric cars would require countless new charging stations
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there are two sort of flaws in that. one is ethanol. we saw what it did to the price of corn. the other question is, u.s. demand has not moved the needle on oil prices in years. it is not demand coming from the u.s. >> it is china, emerging markets. >> that's your personal economy there. if you are able to save money because you are not buying gas. >> if you can buy a car that
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consumes less gas, your saving money too. >> it is the infrastructure as well. they need to have places where you can charge up your electric car easily in cities. >> and gas stations that do it. one of the things that you sometimes do when you visit a gas station is use a bathroom. >> and? >> that's the last thing you would want when you are using that bathroom is defective toilet paper. this university is suing over defective toilet paper. in what way it can be defective? >> we are going to tell you after the break. 52 minutes after the hour. when we come back, everything you need to know about defective toilet paper. where do you go to find a super business? you know, the ones who do such a super job, they're backed by the superguarantee®? only superpages®. wherever you are, wherever you're going,
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you may be flying by the seat of your pants or following a plan, but take it from me. with hertz, you'll always find your way. hertz. we're at the airport and in your neighborhood. the gas™ or the brake, which one are you ? go to hertz.com. >> 53 minutes past the hour. a lot going on. the headlines, an alleged plot uncovered from osama bin laden own files. he was plotting to attack trains possibly on 9/11/2011 or the fourth of july. epic flooding threatening homes, thousands in the south. arkansas, parts of interstate 40 still shut down in both directions. a major east/west thruway. the mississippi is rising and the flooding is expected all along the river as far south as louisiana. in a little more than 30
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minutes, the labor department releases its april jobs report. economists surveyed by cnn money predict employers added 185,000 jobs last month. coca-cola counting down to its 125th birthday. to celebrate, coke is throwing a concert tomorrow at atlanta's centennial olympic park. the first coca-cola was served on may 8th, 1886 at a pharmacy in atlanta. you are caught up on today's headlines. american morning will be right back after this.
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according to the commercials, you can feel the
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difference between single-ply and double-ply but can toilet paper be defective and dangerous. they are suing saying the paper failed to disperse properly and caused the toilets and sewer lines to be clogged. the school says it flushed more than $40,000 worth to pay for plumbing repairs. there you go. we were concerned this morning, is how is toilet paper possibly defective. >> everybody when we were discussing, nobody thought of that idea, that it was clogging the plumbing. everybody was thinking about other things. often times, the first ones into some very tough situations, whether it is in policing or the military are dogs. >> dogs have been used in war zones and hot zones. one went with the navy s.e.a.l.s to get bin laden. we are going to be talking about canine heroes. ♪ [ male announcer ] in 2011, at&t is at work,
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naomi pryce: i am. i'm in the name your own price division. i find empty hotel rooms and help people save - >> - up to 60% off. i am familiar. your name? > naomi pryce. >> what other "negotiating" skills do you have? > i'm a fifth-degree black belt. >> as am i. > i'm fluent in 37 languages. >> (indistinct clicking) > and i'm a master of disguise >> as am i. > as am i. >> as am i. > as am i. >> well played naomi pryce.
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i'm ali velshi. the documents found inside bin laden's house triggered new alert about security. mississippi rivers still rising. i'm kiran chetry. thousands have had to flee their homes and by the time this is all over, it could turn out to be a disaster for the ages. i'm christine romans.
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whether you are heading to work or just hoping for work, everybody has a stake in the jobs market. what it means for the economic recovery, for your economic recovery on this "american morning." . >> welcome to "american morning." a great deal going on across the country. we are carefully watching this flooding that's going on. >> this jobs report coming out in 30 minutes from now. they are expecting to add 185,000 but that's still not enough. >> not the pace at which we need. let's hope we at least get to that. we will be talking about that in detail this hour. >> a reminder that the war goes on after bin laden. the homeland security department has issued an alert by rail security. it says al qaeda was plotting to attack trains, one possible date mentioned, 9/11/2011. >> it came right from bin
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laden's files that were recovered by the navy s.e.a.l.s after the raid on the compound that killed him. other information shows that al qaeda was still interested in targeting washington, new york, los angeles and chicago. >> other possible target dates were july fourth, christmas and u.n. opening day when world leaders are gathered in new york. the first homeland security talked about this new threat with john king. >> it is a head's up, a warning. i don't think it is actionable. i think it is appropriate that you sent this information out to those responsible for that infrastructure. they wanted to remind people there is still a potential target. take notice. use the information we have. don't make any changes now. there is no necessity for it. >> also new this morning, osama ben lad den's wife is talking. she is in pakistani custody and tells interrogators, she did not leave her walled-in compound for five years. the woman charged navy s.e.a.l.s and was shot in the leg during the raid, according to u.s.
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officials. pakistan took her into custody after navy s.e.a.l.s lost a chopper and were forced to live without her. they are reportedly refusing to give her up. today, president obama will travel to ft. campbell kentucky to thank members of the u.s. navy s.e.a.l.s team that took down bin laden. for the south where floodwaters have thousands fleeing and the mississippi is not expected to crest for another week. state police as well as the national guard helping hundreds of residents evacuate in eastern arkansas. there are three towns under mandatory evacuation right now, mcclelland, gregory and cotton plant. residents are told to get out. >> further east in memphis, tennessee, floodwaters are threatening hundreds of homes. they predict nearly 3,000 properties could be affected by flooding if the mississippi crest 48 feet this weekend. that would be the river's highest level since 1937.
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right now rs t, the river is approaching 37 feet. >> give us some sense of where things stand right now because this is a slow-moving type of flood. is there a sense of urgency there? >> reporter: there is a sense of urgency. even though this flood is moving inch by inch, this river is still on the move. a high watermark being set all up and down the river. memphis is one very large city working very hard to hold back a very large flood. city parks already flooded and water creeping closer to houses by the day. people of memphis watch the rising mississippi river and wonder. >> how high will the water get? who is most at risk? which land sits lower? >> the mississippi river floods of 2011 are expected to break records to the north of memphis this weekend and then continue setting high watermarks as far south as baton rouge.
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the river is expected to crest in memphis at 48 feet above flood stage. the highest it has been in generations. memphis hasn't seen that much water since the disastrous floods of 1937. city officials tell me the river rose all the way to here, where i'm standing, which is four blocks away from the river banks. there have been big changes since to keep the river back. a system of flood walls, gates and levees developed since the 1950s should keep the city dry. it is a system that's never been hit with this much water. >> they have never been tested. all of the subject matter experts are telling us, we can have a high confidence level. >> reporter: army corps of engineers blowing levees to divert floodwaters into missouri farmland slowed the water's arrival downriver. a call has gone out to
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volunteers to fill sandbags for government buildings and hospitals. the hope is they won't be needed. right now, the big threat around memphis is actually in the tributaries, the rivers that flow around memphis into the mississippi river, because this river is rising. it is pushing water back up into those rivers. communities along those tributaries and properties along those tributaries are going to see some flooding. officials today are going out, making calls, knocking on doors and letting people know in the problem areas that it is time to pack up. don't wait for this river to get into your backyard before you make a decision to leave. >> very smart, because it happens so fast. we talk about the slow but when it is rising and when it takes your home, it happens in what seems like a split second. david mattingly, thanks so much. there are a lot of people, as we said, along the mississippi river, that are in harm's way. this is the map for the potential of flooding. >> these are places in danger.
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>> watches or warnings. you see what it looks like. it stretches throughout the entire country's midsection from the upper midwest all the way down to the gulf of mexico. thousands of people in homes are threatened. everywhere you look, you see blue rivers flowing over levees, evacuations being ordered or the floodwaters, as we said, potentially, could hit. >> they seem more like lakes, almost, when we see these reporters and the live shots, there is not a river flowing behind them but massive water. >> rob marciano looked like he was standing on the shore of the lake. reynolds is with us following this in the extreme weather center. you guys are right. you touched on something. if you are not used to seeing that area, it does have a serene appearance where rob was the other days ayou mentioned. we are going to go back in time and give you an idea of how things look forward and how they look now and what we can expect in days to come. april 29th of 2010, here is the mississippi valley, parts of the ohio river and the wabash and
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black river thrown in for good measure. things are as they should be. april 29th, you see things beginning to fill up. the river swelling the banks along parts of the mississippi. as you zoom in in places like cairo, you can see it really spilling the banks, a few of the oxbow lakes filling in. what we are going to see is more of this make its way downstream, natches and baton rouge at 12.5. these are all estimates, forecasts. they have been wrong at times. there is a chance it could be higher or lower. for the time being, it looks pretty dire to say the least. that is a quick snapshot of the forecast. >> can i ask you a quick
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question? >> you can ask me anything. >> we have been told by everybody, our own reporters and others, that it is going to crest in some cases, next week, maybe next wednesday and it will take a long time to drain. is there anything that can happen in the environment that can change that? >> that could cause conditions to be worse. >> or better? >> worse if you have more rainfall. if you have a lull that develops in the gulf of mexico and parks over parts of the delta. what we need is a nice dry trend of weather. things are bad as they are. we need a little bit of a very calming effect on the atmosphere. that looks like that will be the case. at least we have that going for us. >> the hard thing is, as you are saying, we are reporting on this nd aseeing it and wondering, is there any way to make this better and turn back time. you have to sit here and know they are saying it might not go down until june. that's tough to hear. >> that's very true. we need to keep in mind. i don't want to sound like i am being callused to the people being affected by this. it is heart-wrenching to watch
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this. much of of this is forming on what is called a flood plain. this is supposed to happen. you are supposed to see it in this part of the world. we don't want any cost to human life or property. this happens to be a flood point. >> before we bottled it up with dams and levees, it used to meander and turn and spill. >> that's what created the rich farmland. >> we have wildfires and tornadoes and flooding in parts of the mississippi valley. the disaster relief efforts for tornado-ravaged alabama have fallen off some of the radar screens. some of the biggest name ns country music want to help out and put it back in there in the public conscious. hank williams jr., keith urban, tim mcgraw, will perform a 90-minute benefit concert next
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thursday night, live on cmt. the proceeds will go to the american red cross relief fund for alabama. you can donate $10 by texting 90999 or for other ways to help, you can logon to cnn.com/impact. you can visit our impact your world. >> you had me thinking last year, the grand ole opry flooded. >> tim mcgraw and kenny chesney were trying to get attention to that cause. it has been a rough couple of years for that area. a leading conservative voice in the house, republican, mike pence, made it official yesterday, he once split with gop governor, mitch daniels, who called for a truce on social issues. former olympian, carl lewis, back in the race for a new jersey state senate seat. a federal appeals court issued an injunction allowing his name to appear as a democratic
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contender for now. the case will go back to new jersey federal court to decide whether he meets the residency requirements to run. >> do you think they are going to pull rahm emanuel's transcripts? you won't see donald trump driving the pace car after all at the indianapolis 500 later this month. his selection came under fire because of his birther remarks. the donald backed out of the indy race on his own telling race officials he appreciates this honor but time and business constraints will make it impossible for him to attend. >> he has been busy. >> plus the wind blowing through your hair as you ride through the track. he likes to keep his a certain way. this is one of those stories where do not change the channel when i say this. there has been a major, major day on the markets yesterday you need to know about. the cost of everything going up, all those commodities, they took a big hit. oil went down, silver. the dollar got stronger. we are going to tell you how this all matters to you when we come back. >> it is continuing this morning. it looks like a bubble bursting
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in the high prices. amazing, a 15-year-old girl from new jersey, heading to harvard in the fall, turning down 13 other schools who wanted her. what's her secret? tell you coming up. 12 minutes past the hour. mom!
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after 44 straight days of going up, gas prices are actually down. cold comfort if you are paying way more. according to aaa, national average down to $3.98, which is where it was when we started. >> oil trucks also taking a bigger hit than that, down 8% yesterday. that is the biggest one-day drop they have seen since april of 2009. >> oil prices are down to $96 and change. >> all sorts of commodities
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losing their luster, hot for months. in addition to oil dropping below $100 a barrel. silver, which has industrial applications as well as being silver, it has been on a terror this year. it is down about 8%. >> oil is down almost 30% this week alone. that's the biggest one-week drive. >> oil is down how much? >> silver, silver. the dollar went up. when the dollar goes up, because all these commodities are priced in dollars, the price of the commodities go down. >> it was across the board. >> i am still interested when they say gold is a hedge against a weak dollar. why did gold go down? gold has been on a tear. all these other commodities are used. a lot of complicated stuff in there. it is worthy of understanding, because a lot of people will have gone to their financial
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planers or read on money.com or other places about what's going on in commodities. good to know that what goes up can burst. >> it can come down and it came down hard and fast. >> we also have a jobs report 15 minutes from now, 13 minutes from now, the april jobs report will be released. economists predict employers added 185,000 jobs in april. that's down a little bit from what they added in march. the unemployment rate, however, is expected to remain unchanged at 8.8%. we'll have more of a discussion about that in about 13 or 14 minutes. >> this is really cool. harvard, a symbol of academic success and prestige. new jersey girl accepted to the ivy league school. guess what? she is only 15 years old. her name is sahila ibrahim. she turned down 13 other colleges, mit, she is basically an academic marvel, fluent in three languages.
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she is an accomplished tron boneist and an athlete. >> if you are passion nat about what you do and i am passionate about most of these things, especially mat and see ins. kids should try to listen to their parents most of the tile. they know what they are doing. >> i love that she likes math and science. >> kids should listen to their parents. she wants to become a research scientists and study. >> she is well-spoken. i am sure she wrote beautiful essays for all these colleges. >> the only down side is, do you get to enjoy your childhood? you are going to go to harvard and be there two years. >> she will enjoy the rest of her life, much better than everybody else. >> the same thing with child actors and everybody else. she is going to be 15 years old. is she going to be able to have fun in college? >> i bet she loves what she does, learning, studying. >> i can't relate to that.
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i wasn't in her category. >> great story. we will be getting a lot of your feedback and we are going to read some back to you. >> the replacement cost of a mom, $61,000. the replacement costs of the task at home that mothers do, $61,000. we are going to read back some of your thautsz youghts you sen in this never-ending loop. it is 20 minutes after the hour. building up our wireless network all across america. we're adding new cell sites... increasing network capacity, and investing billions of dollars to improve your wireless network experience. from a single phone call to the most advanced data download, we're covering more people in more places than ever before in an effort to give you the best network possible. at&t. rethink possible. [ airplane engine whines ] [ grunts ] [ dog barking ]
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gah! [ children shouting ] [ grunts ] [ whacking piñata ] [ whacking piñata, grunting ] and my dog bailey and i love to hang out in the kitchen. you love the aroma of beef tenderloin, don't you? you inspired a very special dog food. [ female announcer ] chef michael's canine creations. chef inspired. dog desired. at usaa, this is our executive committee. this is our advisory board. our field research team. and our product development staff. we know military lives are different. we've been there. that's why our commitment to serve the financial needs of our military, veterans, and their families is without equal. and why, we'll always be there for you... both here... and here. usaa. for insurance, banking, investments,
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retirement and advice. we know what it means to serve. let us serve you. mom! [ male announcer ] you know mom. mom! [ male announcer ] we know diamonds. and with an extra 10% off storewide now through saturday, we'll make this mother's day one she'll never forget. that's why only zales is the diamond store.
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next time you hit the road, you might want to get hit with a new taxi. the hill.com reports that the government is tossing the idea around. >> you said a new taxi. >> tax. i was reading that thinking that doesn't make sense. good thing this is a taped show. can we start again? a new tax. the government's idea is tossing around the idea of taxing drivers by the mile. the congressional budget office suggested. >> i don't like the whole idea. suggested using a electronic tracking system. the white house said it is an early draft, no the a proposal. tracking cars and charging them for the mileage they drive. >> we already pay a tax. that's how much gas we use.
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>> this would perhaps in some way be in place of the gas tax. so, basically, you pay by the mile. as ali pointed out, where is the incentive to drive fuel efficient vehicles. if you pay by the mile, it doesn't matter if you drive a hummer or a prius. >> this is an all together bad idea all around and i didn't even present the story properly. there is really nothing good for me. >> the last thing you want is a new taxi. >> thankfully, i have two other anchors here. we know moms are priceless but what if you had to put a price on all that mom does at home? insurance.com crunched the numbers and they said, if you hired a professional, instead of mom or dad, if you are a stay-at-home dad, to do all of the following things, this is what it would cost you. first of all, driving, $6,000 per year. what if you had to pay somebody the annual cost of having a housekeeper there -- this is homework. i'm sorry. if you had to get a tutor for all the time you help the kids with the homework, that would be
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$7,000. $1500 is if you had to pay somebody to do all of the shopping, the groceries, the errands and another $1,000 to keep the house in order. that's nearly $800 to have somebody finding out what your kids are up to. that's another one. turns out, this is $61,436. >> a lot of you on facebook and twitter are telling us, a lot of guys are saying, it is a lot more than that. my wife does much more. which is really good sucking up, guys. other guys are saying things like this is sexist. guys do a lot of stuff. come on. we are trying to value all of those things together. we want to know what you think about this. you can e-mail us, tweet us, go to our blog. find us on facebook. $61,436. we are going to find out about gabrielle giffords. how is she doing? she was supposed to be at that launch. they had to scrub it and delay it. we will find out how she is
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doing and the efforts to help her heal. it is 25 minutes after the hour. upgradable to 4g lte and access to the fast growing apps in android market. it's everything the tablet should be. starting at $599. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] with amazing innovation, driven by relentless competition, wireless puts the world at your command. ♪ [ woman speaking chinese ] thank you. do you have an english menu? no english. [ speaking chinese ]
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[ gasps, speaks chinese ] do you guys like dumplings? i love dumplings. working with a partner you can trust is always a good decision. massmutual -- let our financial professionals help you reach your goals. mom! [ male announcer ] you know mom. mom! [ male announcer ] we know diamonds. and with an extra 10% off storewide now through saturday, we'll make this mother's day one she'll never forget. that's why only zales is the diamond store. by giving me huge discounts on rooms hotels can't always fill. with unpublished rates. which means i get an even more rockin' hotel, for less. where you book matters. expedia.
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her recovery to a near fatal gunshot wound to the head has been pretty remarkable. how did gabrielle giffords survive? what are the challenges going forward. >> our good friend, dr. sanjay gupta met with her doctors for a cnn special this weekend called "saving gabby giffords." it is remarkable, thinking about how to survive from a gunshot wound but one specifically to the head. most people wouldn't have thought there would be survival or recovery. >> they would have good reason to think that. only about 10% of people survive. that's a statistic you have to keep in mind. what allows someone like her to survive, all the various things that worked in her favor at the time. that's what we tried to look at specifically.
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here is how we think things unfold. the bullet was fired from a glock 199-millimeter semi-automatic handgun entering from the front left side of the congresswoman's for head traveled the entire length of her brain and exited the back. it is wa a focused wound, meaning the damage was concentrated to one area of the brain. >> she was exceedingly lucky. >> when i saw the trajectory of where one hole was and where the other hole was, i was like, oh, my gosh. >> because it was so far apart. >> it wasn't a little skifing thing. it went through a lot. >> it wasn't a glancing shot. >> a couple things to keep in mind quickly. when they talk about not being a glancing shot, this bullet went through and through. you want the energy of a bullet to dissipate into space, not into someone's head. it was on the left side of her head. we know, clearly, that if a
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bullet crosses the midline, the chances of a meaningful recovery or survival are much more diminished. >> you had a chance to spend some time with her doctors as well to find out how much they believe she will regain in terms of function. will gabby giffords be the same gabby giffords two years down the road? >> i think the way most doctors answer that question and some of the details are still unknowable. i think she won't be the same gabby giffords. she will not return 100%. the rehab doctors recognize that. will she be able to return to congress? a lot of people say she may be able to. one of the doctors said, i voted for her before. i am going to vote for her begin. that was his response. i also said, consider bob woodruff, many days in a coma, you see him on television news. he is not the same but able to do the job. >> some of the personality and word recall and memory but she is doing very well oversaul. she is getting the strength back in the right side and her speech
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as well. >> that's amazing. >> we will be watching your special. >> thank you. >> tell me what you think. >> i am very fascinated about this. this is riveting people to know she is getting through it. >> who better to do it than sanjay who knows who are about the brain than most people. he will have much more 7:00 eastern time on sunday night right here on cnn. you will be able to tweet live in sanjay during the program. some of the great questions and comments that will come up. our top stories right now. first, we have new numbers. new employment numbers out by the bureau of labor and statistics. we have in you word that we have just received in al qaeda, an alleged plot already uncovered. cnn has confirmed from al qaeda that they are confirming osama bin laden's death. it has been acknowledged by al qaeda. for those who are wondering why
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al qaeda hasn't said anything, they are now confirming that osama bin laden is dead. this wasn't something of question to most people. there have been some people saying they are not entirely sure, either they wanted confirmation, that discussion about the photographs but the bottom line now is al qaeda is saying that osama bin laden is dead and that should take care of any remaining questions about this whole matter, if there were any remaining. >> the significance was, would they deny it? would they say this didn't happen? that was one of the big concerns for proponents of releasing the photo of bin laden. we have the second piece of breaking news for you and that is the employment situation summary. christina, i know you were on the phone about this. what's the result? >> we know the unemployment rate ticked up to 9%. the economy added 244,000 jobs, which is more than wall street had been expecting. we knew they were expecting something like 185,000 jobs. a lot came in the private
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sector. 260,000 jobs in the private sector, give or take. so that is far and away wiping out the losses that you are seeing in government jobs. february was also revised upward. so that shows a little more momentum than we thought. two other things that we found interesting, the long-term unemployed dipped a little bit and discouraged workers. those are people that dropped out of the labor force, because they can't find a job. that also dipped. retail jobs at 57,000. auto dealers added 5,000 jobs. still digging through the reports but that's the headline. >> health care continues to improve. employment and leisure. where the losses were were government. this is a substantially better report than what everybody was expecting. >> we bring in carmen ulrich, she is watching are money. if they added jobs, why are we seeing the unemployment rate creep up? >> private workers is one thing. how many discouraged workers is a big factor, we are up to 9%.
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with he know if this continues, just adding 200,000 jobs, it is going to take us three years to get back to prerecession employment numbers. this is going to take a very, very long time. you need to add at least 250 jobs a month to maintain. we have fallen back again. we are at 9%. this is going to have a big impact on a lot of things. don't forget. with the storms an everything that has happened in the south, next month may not look so good either. a lot of those folks are going to be filing for unemployment. >> what's your advice for people that look at these numbers every month and say, this doesn't pertain to me or a growth of $244,000, i can't get a job. does this mean something to somebody on the ground of people trying to get work. >> it means a lot. we saw on the cnn poll this morning that the opinion is that the economy is in really poor, poor share. most folks that have a job are concerned about their jobs. we see this in the savings rate. it has continued to grow. credit card balances have continued to go down. people's behavior is reflecting
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the reality that employment is really, really rocky. >> the other thing is these huge differences we see based on demographicings. you still have adult men, 8.8%. adult women, it is lower. african-americans, their unemployment rate is nearly double that of whites. >> and latinos as well. 12%. teenagers, 25%. a lot of us grew up at a time where all teenagers, we all worked. this is very discouraging number as well for younger folks. but, the numbers are better than the analysts were expecting quite a bit more. that's encouraging. >> carmen wong ulrich, thank you. the unsung heroes of war helping and helping in the healing afterwards. we are going to be meeting a special pooch, tuesday. >> he has my shoe. hi, buddy. thank you. can i have that back? i hope you didn't eat the other
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one. it is alittle soggy but no worse for the wear. we are going to be right back with tuesday coming up. so, what's the snapshot discount? it's pretty revolutionary. patented, actually. it takes a snapshot of your good driving habits, so you can save money. like a snapshot? that's what i'm talking about. in a sports car. show it to me. yes! i want to believe it! ooh! fierce! argh! love it. i think we have it. the snapshot discount. new, huge, and only from progressive. [ male announcer ] in 2011, at&t is at work, building up our wireless network all across america. we're adding new cell sites... increasing network capacity,
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40 minutes past the hour. dogs have been fighting alongside u.s. soldiers for more than 100 years. perhaps now more than ever they
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are using dogs in many ways, combat zones, sniffing out explosives and comforting soldiers. >> our next guess is retired u.s. army captain luis montovan. his dog, tuesday, is a psych yacht frick service dog, trained to help people suffering from post traumatic stress disorder. >> he is author of a new book, "until tuesday," a golden warrior that saved him. >> explain to us how you and tuesday became a pair? >> after getting out of the army in 2007 to recover from physical and psychological wounds, it was a very low point for me. dealing with some alcoholism and a myriad of negative effects of post traumatic stris disorder and traumatic brain injury. for a year and a half, i was really in terrible shape and ultimately, in 2008, i learned
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on line via an e-mail that there were programs beginning to pair wounded veterans with service dogs. i didn't know anything about service dogs. so it was like manna from heaven. then, about six months later, in november of 2008, i had the blessing of getting partnered with this boy. >> how is your relationship? what does tuesday do for you and how is it different than, let's say, having a pet? >> well, tuesday, when i got him, knew 80 commands. he was formally trained for two years. now, he knows 150 commands. he is trained to help me physically and psychologically. he can retrieve anything that i ask him to, which helps me because i fractured some vertebrae in iraq. he helps me with balance when i walk, because of the traumatic brain injury. it messes with my equilibrium.
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for ptsd, he will wake me up from nightmares. he helps me get out of the house. i had a very bad case of social gore ophobia. hundreds of thousands of veterans are suffering at home. >> right. so he saved you? >> he saved me. >> he saved my life in that he was enabled to provide me with the independence that i needed to rekindle my hopes and dreams and rerealize my potential to be happy. >> he is helping you on the outside and other veterans like you on the outside. we know that in the theater, there are what, $2800 and c
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canines alongside our soldiers. it shows you the connection we have with dogs. >> absolutely. >> these dogs are working dogs working with the army, marine corps, air force and navy and coast guard. they are doing tremendous work sniffing out ieds, saving countless lives, both iraqi, afghani, american. they do things like perform on raids such as what happened in the case with osama bin laden. they do therapy work for soldiers when they rest. coming back from missions. i know tuesday likes to perform. >> he loves to work. >> exactly. >> are any of you amenable, either of you amenable to being cud ld?
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>> we will try it on me. >> tuesday, tuesday, her lap, her lap. her lap. snuggle. >> good boy. >> how sweet. >> good boy, tuesday, yes. >> will he do it to ali. >> of course. that snuggle command is such a wonderful way to get out of a flashback or to get out of a -- he is giving you kisses. >> sorry. he just got a mouthful of makeup. >> he can't help it if he loves you. good. >> ali is not a dog person. so let's see how this goes. >> okay. let's see, tuesday, go on, go on. >> come here, tuesday. >> go say hi. >> come here, tuesday, come here, buddy. >> tuesday. >> tuesday. all right. >> go say hi. >> look at the camera for a second. we are going to take a quick
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break. >> tuesday is smart. >> here he comes, here he comes. >> we are taking a quick break. tuesday will also be back in just a minute. take a look at the camera. there you go. >> tuesday knows where he wants to be.
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a lot going on this morning. here is what you need to know to start your day. al qaeda now confirming the death of its leader, osama bin laden. a message posted on a jihadist
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forum. a bin laden tape may be on the way made before he was killed. cnn is trying to confirm that statement right now. president obama meeting the man that killed osama bin laden today. he will give a personal thank you to the navy seal team that stormed his compound earlier this week. he will be doing that later this morning in kentucky. epic floods triggering a crisis in the south forcing thousands to evacuate in arkansas and tennessee. the mississippi river continues to rise. record floods are expected all along the river as as far south as louisiana, well into next week. the april jobs report just out. it shows that employers added 244,000 jobs last month. much more than expected. the employment rate, however, also rose to 9%. investigators like what they hear from the jobs report. right now, dow futures up more than 100 points. the nasdaq and s&p also higher this morning. you are caught up with the day's headlines, "american morning" back right after the break.
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>> 49 minutes past the hour. we are checking in with reynolds wolf. >> hi, guys. we have been showing people some graphics that have told the story of how expansive this flooding has been. perhaps one of the best ways, the most dramatic way to convey what is happening is with images. these amazing shots. a series taking from places like paducah and white missouri. that house, an island. tiptonville, tennessee, same thing. people moving their possessions out to higher ground. some people never had that opportunity. there you see in metropolis, a
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stop sign that leads to nowhere. really unfortunate situation. what we are going to see over the next couple of days and weeks is a lot of this water flooding. it continues to mark downstream in places like vicksburg, natches, 18 feet above flood stage before all is said and done. the last thing we need is another dose of heavy rainfall. thankfully, we have rain, not in this part of the world. it should remain dry, a compressing effect on the atmosphere. rain will be limited. the good news. rain in the country. some in the upper plain and great lakes. we take a look at our computer models for the next five days. disappeared. the heaviest rainfall will be limited to parts of the ohio valley and into the northern plains. thankfully, not much at all south of paducah and into memphis and the gulf coast. let's pitch back to you in new york.
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ensure.com, we were telling you about this, we have been talking about it all morning, they are putting a price task that moms perform. >> associated with moms but dads do it too. >> it is mother's day this weekend so they get the shoutout. >> they are saying it is $61,436 a year. we have been asking for your response. >> i love crispy bacon. left for ten days and my family and house were a complete disaster when i returned. i'm much more appreciated now. >> good for you crispy bacon. >> doug says, i agree, why stop with mom, how about the value of dad? motherhood is not about her monetary value, norris father hood. why even ask this question? love is not employment! >> sunday is mother's day. >> it is important to point out that they are saying you should get insurance, because mothers are insured less than fathers.
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>> this is from zach holms on facebook. i think that number is pretty low. does it consider the on-call hours in the middle of the night. absolutely no guarantee on the amount of sleep mom will be getting. >> i love my wife. she is an awesome mother. she is definitely worth more than this stated amount. >> if you had to add on a night nurse, if you can afford one, probably add another -- they do well. >> v peeler says, having a good mom at home is priceless. the chore she does may be worth $61,000. that's only a small amount. >> you can't outsource dollar for dollar someone else doing homework with your kids. a parent doing homework with their kids is much more important. >> i have another posting from doug v. i don't know if doug b is a different person. since family duties are so much more universal in today's society, i would love to see the study extended to cover the value of unpaid workmen do as well. it seems a bit sexist to apply
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it only to women. >> it was not a study but an informal survey, what kind of things do mom's do and what do you think they are worth. >> this is the day ali only reads e-mails from doug. >> moms are priceless. we gave you life. makes me think just how much stay-at-home moms are taken for granted. you cannot put a price on what we moms do! >> this also shows you the value of two, woulding parents trying to share these responsibilities while they are out in the workforce working and trying to do all this stuff. >> i think people that plan it and communicate and divy it up have a better time. >> for all you chumps think that flowers and chocolates are too expensive, look at the $61,000 number. helping total strangers overwhelmed by the worst tornado outbreak in history. it's 54 minutes past the hour. we will be right back. uncer ] in 2011, at&t is at work, building up our wireless network all across america.
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we're adding new cell sites... increasing network capacity, and investing billions of dollars to improve your wireless network experience. from a single phone call to the most advanced data download, we're covering more people in more places than ever before in an effort to give you the best network possible. at&t. rethink possible. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
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it's me? alright emma, i know it's not your favorite but it's time for your medicine, okay? you ready? one, two, three. [ both ] ♪ emma, emma bo-bemma ♪ banana-fana-fo-femma ♪ fee-fi-fo-femma
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♪ em-ma very good sweety, how do you feel? good. yeah? you did a really good job, okay? let's go back to drawing. when disaster strikes, he doesn't ask questions. he just goes in. this week's cnn hero rolled in a small town in georgia dealing with the biggest tornado outbreak in u.s. history. take a look. when a disaster strikes, you don't really know what you are
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going to need. that's why we have packaged up four tractor-trailers loaded with just about every type of cool and gear and piece of equipment. >> we have the generator running. we are going to power up this church. >> we roll those rigs all across this country. we decided to come to ringle, georgia, because it is a small area and they might not have the resources they need. my team has been to several megathunderstorms. when we first got here, we started powering up the shelter, clearing the roads and help save a lot of situations. >> we will have him come in and grab these trees off of these two stones right here. >> they went over and cleared the cemetery. that's why i am able to bury my
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father today. he then came over and offered his services again. >> we just joined with the family members on our hands and knees looking for things. >> some more photos in here. >> we found a wedding picture of my dad and mom. these guys are angels. >> thank you so much for you and your team. >> when we see people suffering and struggling, it is our responsibility to come and help. this is part of being human, to see a need and to do something about it. >> who do you know that's making a big difference in your world? tell us about them. go to our "american morning" blog, cnn/am. >> we hope you have a wonderful weekend. thanks for being with us. happy mother's day!

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