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tv   World Business Today  CNN  October 6, 2011 4:00am-5:00am EDT

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your time is limited so don't waste it living someone else's life. don't be trapped by dogma, which is living with the results of other people's thinking. don't let the noise of other's opinions drowned out your own inner voice. and most important have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. hello, welcome to cnn's continuing coverage of the legacy of steve jobs, i'm nina dos santos in london. >> and good afternoon from outside the apple store here in central hong kong, i'm andrew stevens. >> brave enough to think differently, bold enough to believe he could change the world and talented enough to do
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it. that was steve jobs in the words of the u.s. president barack obama. today people around the world are mourning the death of apple's legendary co-founder, jobs was just 56 years old when he died of pancreatic cancer on wednesday. he leaves behind an astonishing legacy of innovation and invengs that has radically changed how we communicate. why? because steve jobs made it easy and enjoyable. steve jobs wasn't just the co-founder and creative leader of apple, he was also its public face and its public voice. from the 1970s when he established apple jobs was there to announce its latest products, and to inspire its fiercely loyal fans. here's a look at steve jobs through the years in his own words.
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>> today, for the first time ever, i'd like to let mcintosh speak for itself. >> we think a lost them are going to get into the hole. we'd like to say they're going to get there through the garage door. people will bring them home over the weekend to work on something, maybe someday they'll buy a second one to leave at home. >> the strangest thing about apple it hasn't had a good consumer product. here's one of the best consumer brands in the world and they haven't had a compelling product under $2,000 and the i-mac is
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incredibly sweet. this $1,299 product is faster than the fastest pentium ii you can buy. you can buy a 400 megahertz pentium ii and this thing smokes it. the market hasn't had anything this powerful and this cool looking. >> what is ipod? ipod is an mp3 music player. it has cd quality music. and it plays all of the popular open formats of digital music but the biggest thing about ipod is it holds 1,000 songs. this is say quantum leap because for most people it's their entire music library. this is huge. >> the coolest thing about ipod is your entire music library fits in your pocket.
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>> i've got a pocket right here. this pocket's been the one that your ipod's gone in traditionally. the ipod and the ipod mini fit great in there. ever wonder what this pocket's for? i've always wondered that. well, now we know. because this is the new ipod mini. >> today apple is going to reinvent the phone, an ipod, a phone and an internet communicator. an ipod, a phone. are you getting it?
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these are not three separate devices. this is one device. and we are calling it iphone. and the question has arisen lately, is there room for a third category of device in the middle? something that's between a laptop and a smartphone? of course we've pondered this question for years as well. the bar is pretty high. in order to really create a new category of devices, those devices are going to have to be far better at doing some key tasks. and we call it the ipad. and what this device does is extraordinary. you can browse the web with it. it is the best browsing
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experience you've ever had. it's phenomenal to see a whole web page right in front of you and you can manipulate it with your fingers. it's unbelievably great, way better than a laptop, way better than a smartphone. for 2010, we're going to take the biggest leap since the original iphone. and so today -- [ applause ] today we're introducing iphone 4. the fourth generation iphone. stop me if you've already seen this. believe me, you ain't seen it. you've got to see this thing in person. it is one of the most beautiful designs you've ever seen. hey, johnny. [ applause ]
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i grew up here in the u.s. with the jetsons and "star trek" and communicators and just dreaming about this, dreaming about video calling. and it's real now. good morning. thanks for coming. thank you. thank you. we're going to introduce today ipad 2, the second generation ipad. it is an all-new design. it is not a tweet design, it's
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not got marginal improvements. it's a complete new design. the first thing is it's dramatically faster. one of the most startling things about the ipad 2 is it is dramatically thinner. not a little bit thinner, a third thinner. and that is ipad 2. as always, i'd also like to thank everyone's families, because they support us and let us do what we love to do. so thank you very much to our extended families out there who make it possible for us to work our tails off making these great products for you. >> throughout this hour here on "world business today" we'll be taking a look, an extensive look
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at the legacy of steve jobs. an adopted child, a college dropout and technological visionary. our reporters are monitoring this story from every corner of the globe. jim bolden will join us live from outside the apple store here in london. eunice yuhn will be with us and david mckenzie will be joining us from nairobi. he'll tell us how steve jobs has inspired entrepreneurs across kenya. >> it's amazing watching that steve jobs footage, nina, how many quality products came off that apple production line under the watchful eye of steve jobs. here in hong kong certainly the news has been everb rating around the city. this is the midday edition of
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the newspaper. jobs is gone. that's the headline, a picture of steve jobs which was on the home page of apple today. that's how i found out, when i logged on through my apple, that's how i found out about steve jobs passing. here we are, if i can get the camera in to show you the backdrop. this a very new apple store. as you can see, it is packed. a lot of people have come down here to be in the apple store on such a momentous day. that's partly true. it's also -- the store has been like this pretty much since it opened less than two weeks ago. it is a huge business here. not just in hong kong but right across china and asia. this is the fifth store to open in china. as you see, certainly no shortage of customers. i was down there a couple hours ago, three hours ago. it was only one hour after the store had opened. i was talking to the staff and
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some of the customers down there asking them about what they thought about it. interestingly, i met a couple people who didn't know the news. they were visibly shocked, wow, is that really true, about the death of steve jobs. five or six had not one, two, but throw or four or five apple products and they were browsing for more. i also spoke to the staff who told me, which is classic steve jobs, classic apple, we can't comment. steve jobs always liked to keep very tight control of his products, on the message that came out of apple. that still goes on to this day, nina. as you see, a lot of people down there, there is an enormous amount of interest, enormous amount of buying power for apple products, not just here but pretty much across the region. >> well, andrew, steve jobs brought us the ipod, the iphone,
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the ipad and many more pioneering products. we'll be taking a look at the business legacy of the man who touched so many millions of people. let me tell you about a very important phone call i made.
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as with all medicare supplement plans, you can keep your own doctor and hospital that accepts medicare, get help paying for what medicare doesn't... and save up to thousands of dollars. call this toll-free number now. your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. don't be trapped by dogma which is living with the results of other people's thinking. don't let the noise of others opinions drown out your own inner voice and most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. they somehow already know what you truly want to become. everything else is secondary. >> another memorable speech by steve jobs to students at america's stanford university back in 2009. we'll have more on the apple co-founder's death later on this show, let's first take a look at how the markets stand. the european stock markets had
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some pretty solid gains yesterday. they started out the day with green arrows as you can see more or less across the board. cac 40 up 1.75%. in frankfurt, apple's share price was down about 3% just a short time ago. later today we have juan claude holding a meeting today. volumes pretty thin before the interest rate decision. the markets recovered in asia, they recovered quite a bit of lost ground on thursday. investors digesting the news of steve jobs passing. shares of samsung electronics rose by more than 1.5%. lg which makes lcd panels for ipads was up more than 6%. let's have a look at how the markets settled as a whole.
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the kospi finished higher for the day, the nikkei was 1.6% higher. the shanghai composite actually is still closed to the chinese golden week holiday. but the hang seng did return from a day after posting a big gain of more than 5.5%. when it comes to australia, that was also higher. shares of resource companies as you'd expect have been jumping there. hbp billetin was up as well. the futures markets, dow jones industrial average at the moment poised to start the day up about 0.5% higher. the other two markets, their futures currently trading about a third of a percent higher at the moment. how steve jobs' death will
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affect apple is yet to be seen. right now his death is still being mourned. apple's co-founder steve wozniak spoke to cnn's piers morgan. >> what do you think he'd like the legacy to be. >> giving mankind the most useful, helpful tools we've ever had in our history, the ones we not only use but we love. we come to love like a human being. very, very important step in getting those computers to real human beings. >> the company's board of directors issued a statement saying, quote, steve's brilliance, passion and energy were the source of countless innovations that enrich and improve all of our lives. the world is immeasurably better because of steve. tributes have been pouring in from across the technology
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industry today. earlier the co-founder of twit.tv, leo la porte was pragmatic yet heartfelt on jobs's passing. that's when he spoke to cnn's wolf blitzer. >> we were so prepared for this, we knew it was coming yet it's still such a shock and so sad. i'm really trying to focus on celebrating his life. this is a guy who lived his life exactly as he wanted to. it was said that steve exceeded every goal he ever set for himself. he's a guy who lived his dreams and changed our lives as a result. i think there was something inside him that drove him to exceed. he didn't care what other people thought. he cared about making great stuff. and he succeeded. every step of the way. he stumbled occasionally, made mistakes, he wandered in the wilderness after being fired at app apple, yet he kept coming back. i think it was his extraordinary drive who made him the man he
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does. >> the rivalry between apple and samsung has been no secret. but that was put aside when the news of jobs' death spread. samsung's ceo said steve jobs introduced numerous revolutionary changes to the information technology and was a great entrepreneur. his spirit and accomplishments will forever be remembered. and other rivals like the bosses of the blackberrymaker research in motion said steve jobs was a great visionary and respected competitor. richard quest joins me here in our london studio. will apple be the same after steve jobs passing? >> the problem they've got is exactly the problem of those tributes. they can't have their argument both ways.
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on the one hand you can't have a great visionary, an innovator, a man who was the creative force whom they tell us, nothing actually happened with one of their products without steve jobs giving his approval to it. it is entirely his creation in that sense. you can't have that and at the same time say, well, actually the company will continue to be as great as it always was. that's their problem. >> he was famously demanding as a boss. >> that's right. >> perhaps even to the point of micromanagement. >> they said he had the final say-so on every bit of design, every bit of technology, every bit of style. if that is correct, then you ask yourself, quite rightly, who takes over that role? who puts the apple dna in the
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future? and if it is a collective entity, apple should be able to come through with more products. it's not going to be easy. the apple without steve jobs will not be the same company. they've seen what it looked like before. and that is they're going to see obviously for much sadder reasons what it's like again. >> hey, richard, andrew in hong kong. i just wanted to get your thoughts on a hypothetical question. when they come, if they come to carving the faces on the mt. rushmore of business titans of u.s. corporate history, will steve jobs face there be? >> absolutely. i don't think anybody would doubt it because only in corporate life those chief execs, those visionaries that people know the names of and can actually talk about are few and far between. and you obviously, whether it's a walt disney or a steve jobs or a bill gates, there are very few
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people that ordinary, everyday individuals can relate to that can link a company with a product with a consumer. and it was that ability to put the three together that actually made it so successful in the case of apple. >> so richard, coming back to us here in our london studio, who will fill the gap in the market then? >> it's far too soon to say there's a gap. you're talking about in what sense? >> in the sense of innovation. >> that is far too soon to say at apple. we don't know. we don't know. apple will no doubt claim, they will claim from the roof of the loudest volume once the morning is over, that there's a pipeline of products. they will also have to hint that they all had steve jobs imprint of approval on them. this company has to be seen not next year, not this year, but
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five years down the road. >> it's amazing how much apple's products affect our daily lives in the workplace. >> i'm only going to tell you this story once. when i was hopelessly on this channel, when they launched it, i was against it, what use was it, blah blah blah. however, i always said steve jobs knew there was a kitchen corner where i would want to sit and do my e-mails, my banking, my morning news reading. and that was his brilliance. >> i have to add as a disclaimer to our viewers, if anybody's been in a meeting with richard quest, he is always accompanied by his ipad to keep constantly informed and on the news. many thanks for that. the yougroundbreaking motio picture company that it created as well.
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jim bolden is at the apple store on regent street in london. he joins us with reaction and some of the people who have grown up in this apple world, jim. >> reporter: that's right, nina. it's interesting, really. can't think of a better place to get reaction than here in front of one of the hundreds of apple stores opened behind me. someone laid flowers here at the door and a person came by with an apple, took a bite out of it and left it right there as a tribute to steve jobs showing the symbol of apple. of course we have been asking some people this morning what they think. with me is ben killner, a customer of apple. we found you inside the store. at your age, your generation, what does steve jobs, what does apple mean to you? >> they're fantastic products. they look beautiful, they work well. and my sort of memory of steve jobs -- of apple mainly is the product mainly but then waiting for new products, seeing steve
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jobs on stage, in his jeans, giving the world fantastic products. >> the key things for me around apple, the products usually met the hype, didn't they? >> they do. my mac pro has lasted seven years. it may be a little slow now, because i need a new one. >> once you see something like an ipad there was a lot of questions ipad may not work, for instance, or be that successful. then people saw what you could do. >> my sister's boyfriend has won and he absolutely loves it. he thinks it's exactly what he needs. he reads from it, watches movies. and i think he to a certain extent, does sort of depend on its day-to-day operation. >> thank you very much. some of the reactions here if front of the apple store. nina, back to you. >> okay, jim bolden there
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joining us from around the corner actually at the apple store on london's regent street. andrew? you're watching a special edition today of "world business today." looking at the life and times and the legacy of steve jobs who died this day. we'll be getting reaction from around asia next in the show. we'll be in beijing. first up we'll be joining alex who is in tokyo. stay with us. for medicare or wi, there's no time like the present to consider all your health insurance options. does medicare alone meet your needs? would additional coverage be better for you? well, now is a good time to take a look at an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. get started by calling for your free information kit and guide to medicare. as you probably know, medicare only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you.
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five months ago i had a liver transplant, so i now have the liver of a mid-20s person
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who died in a car crash and was generous enough to donate their organs. and i wouldn't be here without such generosity. >> apple's co-founder steve jobs died on wednesday after a long battle with cancer. he's being remembereds is a visionary who changed the way people interact. he pioneered the personal computer and the mouse and was the driving force behind the ipod, the iphone and the ipad. steve jobs was 56. and tributes continue to pour in for the apple co-founder from some people who have him to thank a lot for their success. in particular, facebook founder mark zuckerberg. and the u.s. president barack obama has said, steve jobs was
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brave enough to think differently, bold enough to believe he could change the world and talented enough to do it. andrew? >> nina, i just want to show you the scene again. here we are in hong kong. behind me is the apple store. you can see probably just how busy it is. it's crammed to the rafters there as hong kong snaps up more apple products. i was talking to people who were expressing their sadness and shock of the passing of steve jobs. they were all down there really buying and buying hard. it just gives you an idea of how much apple has seeped into the consciousness of asians pretty much around the region, too, not just here in hong kong, which is obviously an open market and open to all sorts of influences as well. eunice yoon is in beijing. china has been one of those places where apple has really, really caught on. i'm sorry.
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i'm just hearing that we're having problems with communications getting to eunice. we'll go back to eunice as soon as we can to talk about the massive uptake of products in china as well. there are four stores there. two in beijing, two in shanghai. the china stores are the leaders for apple group in both the turnover, the traffic going through the stores as well as the actual turnover in those stores as well. so that gives you an idea of how popular apple is in china. i believe we can go back to eunice now. we've restored communications there. i don't know if you heard, i was saying how popular the apple product has become in china. the first question to you, yes, the product is popular but how well known was steve jobs himself in china? >> steve jobs was known very, very well here. in fact he has a cult-like following just as he does in other parts of the world. in fact he has a nickname, chow
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by chu which translates to master of jobs. he's been seen as an innovator of technology. we talked to customers who said they were saddened by his passing. >> translator: he made great contributions to the world because he created apple and gave so much of us a chance to enjoy these high-end gadgets. >> translator: i hold very high regard for him. he did a good job giving us one nice product after another. >> reporter: there are many people at the stores that we went to and, of course, even more at another store where there were some people paying their respects by laying down flowers and also leaving some cards. one card had actually read we miss you, we love you and thank you for what you gave us. as you said, a lot of people
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here very much touched by steve jobs and very happy with the products that he was able to deliver over and over again. andrew? >> eunice, there are two sides to this story, particularly in china, the consumer side which you talked about and also the producer side. china was such an enormous producer, maker of apple products, wasn't it? >> definitely. it still is. if you look at your ipod or your iphone and just flip it around you could actually see the evidence right there of this very close relationship between china and apple. it says designed in california and assembled in china. that's really the close relationship and in fact another way in which jobs was able to touch so many lives here in china. not only on the consumer side but also on the manufacturing side. there are hundreds of thousands of people who work in factories that make products for apple. so these people have really been
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touched and have been able to get a job because of steve jobs. andrew? >> all right, eunice, thanks so much. eunice yoon joining us live from beijing where apple products are well and truly entrenched in the national consciousness there. nina? andrew, from the very start, steve jobs believed that technology should be easy to use. and that accounts for much of apple's popularity. in africa apple products are not widespread but apple's influence is changing the way people think. cnn's david mckenzie joins us live from an internet cafe in nairobi. he is in fact coming to us live from his own ipad. the fact that you're able to join us via your ipad in nairobi is testament to how steve jobs and his company have changed the world. >> reporter: that's right.
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steve jobs and certainly technology companies in general. two years ago the fiber optic cable hit kenyan shores. that's revolutionized things here in kenya. this is an internet cafe in the middle of downtown nairobi, nina. [ inaudible ] they are increasingly connected. they've been inspirational. apple helped push other companies to come up with cheaper alternatives, the smartphone, the tablet. all of these become a crucial technology for your average person in africa. >> okay, david mckenzie, we'll have to leave it there. obviously david's ipad may be
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technologically advanced, we're having a little bit of trouble with getting the signal. we apologize for the quality of the audio and video on that. andrew? >> nina, from the capital of kenya, nairobi, to the capital of japan, tokyo, anywhere you go apple is a very, very well-known brand. let's now go to tokyo. we have reaction in tokyo. alex, japan's an interesting case. japan has always been something of a closed shop. it's got its own way in technology in the not too distant past in many ways. they have very powerful handset makers and have software manufacturers. how big an inpact and inroad did apple make in somewhere like japan? >> it's interesting, andrew,
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someone asked me earlier, in japan do they love steve jobs or -- they might have mixed feelings about him. he has knocked sony off the block along with other competitors. japan is big when it comes to respect. when you look back at the history of a company like sony, they were focused on building great products that would change the way people lived their lives. that's exactly what steve jobs has done. there is a high level of respect for him. he's very much admired and you know, taking in case this apple store that we're at right now, it was the first retail apple store opened outside the united states. it was opened in 2003. what we've seen today, it started out a few people trickling in. most people here in tokyo found out about the news while already at work. they were trading e-mails about it. right now in tokyo it's just after 5:30. people are coming out of the office. this crowd has grown and grown and grown. a lot of media here as well.
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there are people just holding a tribute, just a little while ago, holing up their ipads with a flame in it. again, the ipad and others, another steve jobs creation. people are paying their respects at the apple store here in ginza. >> thanks very much for that, alex zolbert. the apple store is filling up with more and more people. it's about 20 till 5:00 here. you're watching "world business today." we'll be back in just a moment.
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it's indefensible wbl it's archaic. up to 30 million victims can testify that it remains rife around the world. i'm talking about slavery, a millionty billion dollar industry with no legitimate business in the modden world. this week, "world business today" is taking the lead in the cnn freedom project, a campaign to kick slavery and human trafficking to the curb. >> since monday we've been airing an exclusive investigation into bonded labor in southeast asia, which affects, it could be up to millions of people. no one has a clear indication of how many people are involved. deprived young women in cambodia in our investigation are being conned into contracts that promise everything but offer virtually next to nothing. as dan rivers found out when they do arrive from cambodia to
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factories in malaysia, they find it impossible to escape. dan now goes back to london to examine the role that western consumers play in this brutal business. >> reporter: our investigation started in cambodia where a mother pleaded with us to help find her daughter, shinari, trapped in a factory far from home. we tried approaching the employment agency that spirited her abroad only to be briefly locked up ourselves. but in malaysia, we found shinari who told us she's unable to leave until she pays off a supposed debt. now i came to find out how this is allowed to happen in modern day malaysia. come to speak to a labor expert who doesn't pull his punches. >> this is a modern re-inventing labor. >> slavery?
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>> modern forms of slavery, you know. where theoretically these things are not allowed but in actual reality, these things are widespread. we do not have the kind of power to actually stop certain things and power actually belongs to the federal government. >> reporter: malaysia's government declined to be interviewed but a local opposition politician does agree to speak and was candid about who he believes is to blame. >> she's not 21. she's below 18. how could the country issue a passport with this false information? it's just not the private recruitment agency in cambodia but also the cambodian authorities. >> reporter: it's not clear where the false passport came from or if anyone from the cambodian government was involved. the government refused an interview.
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but we were determined to follow the supply chain to find someone who would take action. jcy supplies components to various places, including western digital. shinari and her friends are part of a complex chain, first recruited in cambodia by an agency which in turn passed them to a middleman at this factory which provided labor to jcy, which in turn makes components for western digital. their products are sold on high streets around the world. it's this supply chain which keeps shinari shackled to her job. i've traveled back to london to follow the trail to the consumers. we've come to the heart of lond london's retail electronics business to find out if people care about the conditions of the workers who make the products that are sold in shops up and down high streets across britain. >> it's appalling.
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it would make me think twice. unfortunately when you're going into a shop you're talking to a sales person, who understandably they have a job to do. they probably won't be able to answer those questions. it is appalling. >> the man behind the counter knew nothing about where or how the hard drives were made. so most people don't really ask questions about, you know, how it's manufactured or where or the ethical dimensions of it, really. >> not really. >> they're not that bothered? >> no. >> we showed the investigation to harriet lamm, the executive director of fair trade, which endorses ethically made products. >> we saw a number of young women and tried to talk to one and wondered if these were workers about to leave the job. do you think that could be implemented for the tricks industry? do you think there's potential? i'm not saying necessarily you but a similar organization could do something similar in tricks
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saying this is ethically manufactured? >> absolutely. i'm afraid the kind of abuses your film exposes show the need for that. if companies can't be trusted we'll have to have a scheme where the public can go in and see, yes, the companies have taken responsibility. they haven't said it's someone else, it's someone else, it's someone else. sorry, that's not good enough. they have taken responsibility and it's been independently checked. the fair trade movement started in food. there's no reason why those principles can't apply to any sector of the economy. >> western digital also declined an interview but said in an e-mail they're an industry leader on a labor standards code called the electronics industry citizenship coalition and demand all their suppliers adhere to it. but they add, cnn's recent inquiry accelerated our scheduled audit of a second jcy facility which was completed last week. we reviewed our findings with
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jcy management and are partnering with them to put corrective actions in place. absent effective and sustained improvement, other actions would be taken, up to and including discontinuing our relationship with that supplier. >> reporter: their supplier, jcy told cnn they tried to resolve workers' grievances fairly and employees are free to leave their company at any time. shinari tells us since western digital's corrective actions her pay has increased significantly and her working conditions have also improved. including proper breaks during her shifts. but she is still trying to pay off her debt to the agency and is still unable to get home. this hard drive has come literally halfway around the world from a factory in malaysia to an electronics store here in london. but despite our investigation, shinari and her friends remain stuck in that factory, unable to
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one man who's been touched
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by apple's innovation is "time" asia's fitzpatrick. in the wake of steve jobs' death, our ramny inocencio spoke to him. about how binary code data is being turned into oohs and aahs, all thanks to the iphone. >> when did you first get the idea to use the iphone for art, basically we're talking about turning 0s and 1s into oohs and aahs, right? >> it crept up on me. an iphone is in your pocket. you always have it on you. you can react to the off the cuff photo opportunities. >> what are your favorite kinds of photos? >> i love taking city escapes, an edgy urban environment and
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overlaying it with color, i like the juxtaposition between those two things, make a city look quite paintly, that i can use the device like the iphone, homage to a 19th century painting. a lot of the apps you can use allow you to bring out the romance of an image. it's now the most popular camera on flickr. >> how do you think steve jobs' death will influence the creativity of apple products or the creativity of people around the world in using those products? >> i can't speak to the future but what i can say is just really to underscore how much he's already done. he very famously said that apple was at the intersection of liberal arts and technology. when you look at what he's done for the visual arts, it's apparent how true that is. this was a guy who, you know, did he everything from coe found
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pixar to bring out design icons like the imac. and now with something like the iphone, he's just put so much photographic power into the hands of ordinary people. it's fantastic. i often feel that the next great photograph of the century will not be taken by some established master photographer. it will be taken by some random kid with an iphone. that's a wonderful thing. >> here to stay and grow and evolve even more? >> i would have thought so, yes. >> steve jobs was an adopted child, a college dropout and a visionary and with the release of iphone 4s on tuesday and more products in the pipeline, his vision lives on. now though we want to leave you with part of an inspirational address that steve jobs gave to stanford university graduates back in 2005. listen to this. >> when i was 17, i read a quote that went something like, if you live each day as if it were your
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last, someday you'll most certainly be right. it made an impression on me and since then, for the past 33 years, i have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself if today were the last day of my life, would i want to do what i am about to do today? and whenever the answer has been no for too many days in a row, i know i need to change something. remembering that i'll be dead soon is the most important tool i've ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life because almost everything, all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure, these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important, remembering that you are going to die is the best way i know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. you are already naked. there is no reason not to follow your heart.
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