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tv   American Morning  CNN  October 7, 2011 6:00am-9:00am EDT

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the president defending a controversial loan to a green energy company that went belly up and may have cost a top energy department official his job. they're paying attention now. i'm carol costello. the wall street protesters picking up steam. people in our cities picking up the cause and now they're on the president's radar on this "american morning." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com good morning, everyone. it's friday. friday. october 7th. ali's off today. >> did you notice ali was off? mr. new york yankees' fan. >> that's right. carol, who won? >> i think it was the detroit tigers. i actually e-mailed ali last night after the tigers won. i said, yeah, tigers, that's all i said because i didn't want to send him over the brink of doom. he e-mailed back, yes, the
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tigers won, period. >> that's our boy. ali will be back monday morning and hope you'll all have a great weekend. a lot is happening. first, a top energy official is out even after president obama defended a controversial $535 million government loan to a california solar panel company that eventually went belly up. the solyndra drama continues. >> reporter: continues, and will for some time. the president when asked about that, jonathan silver, the man who has been heading up the loan program, which, of course, is the controversial part of this program, because of a guaranteed loan that was given to that solar panel company that president obama visited, and that went belly up in august, that's really what all of this stems around. well, he has resigned, and to listen to the department of energy we're hearing from
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secretary steven chu, he's saying jonathan silver, the man who testified before congress about this controversy recently. he was already leaving, had been told in july before news broke of solyndra filing for bankruptcy that he would be going into the private sector. so you're hearing from sort of the executive branch this was already going to happen, but you're hearing from republicans who have been very critical of this program, they're sort of drawing some causality here. that's up for debate right now. meanwhile, president obama defended the decisions that were made by his administration for this half billion dollar loan yesterday during his news conference. here's what he said. >> now, we knew from the start that the loan guarantee program was going to entail some risk. there were going to be some companies that did not work out, solyndra was one of them, but the process by which the
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decision was made was on the merits. it was straightforward. >> reporter: and president obama has said previously that you have 20/20 hindsight, certainly, but he was defending yesterday this loan guarantee program overall saying that overall it had been a success, but certainly, guys, this has been an issue for the administration undermining definitely the president's emphasis on renewable energy and now you have republicans, despite jonathan silver resigning, saying that it's not going to be enough to satisfy them. >> and the white house saying that 20/20 hindsight is always perfect, except the bush white house declined to extend a loan to the same company. is that right? >> reporter: yeah. one of the issues here -- and there were warnings. one of the things we realize as documents have come out that there were warnings that were going to some of the president's top advisers, there were concerns, even from people who had an interest in the solyndra,
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in this was a company dealing with about $100 million in assets, yet this was a loan for more than $500 million. i think one person advised a white house adviser, that, you know, that's good for us, but i'm wondering sort of why you're doing this. a lot of people said there were red flags that were missed, but what we're hearing from president obama, defense of the program overall, that this has been going on for weeks and is expected to continue. >> thank you, brianna dealer. biehler. the movement has gone national. the message spreading like the hottest viral video and people aren't laughing any more. >> it started out like a joke. >> how are they not like the tea party? some of them you know, smoke, and have pants made out of pot. >> reporter: it's swelled into a nationwide movement, mostly peaceful, but certainly p.o.'d.
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>> we got sold out. >> reporter: and ready to eat the rich. >> this is the zombie march. this is the breakfast. >> reporter: from 1,000 protesters on wall street it's gain momentum and spread to tens of hundreds of people from new york to los angeles and dozens in between, even across borders and oceans. people are angry they're running second place to profits. >> we want jobs, and we want them now. >> reporter: that the quality of life plunged while the rich get super rich and the taxpayers bail them out. >> politicians can be bought. political influence can be bought through political donations. >> reporter: in los angeles, protesters took over a bank of america and were arrested. and in philly, thousands broke out in their battle cry. we are the 99%. it has some big wigs on wall
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street looking out their windows, and now the white house is paying attention. >> obviously, i've heard of it. i've seen it on television. i think it expresses the frustrations that the american people feel, that we had the biggest financial crisis since the great depression, and that's going to express itself politically in 2012 and beyond until people feel like once again we're getting back to some old-fashioned american values. >> reporter: still getting organized ain't easy and it's too early to say whether these protesters will become a political force, a tea party from the left. same frustrations from the other side. but there's plenty of time until next november. >> 24/7, if necessary, 365. we're planning on snow. we're planning on summer heat. >> one unwanted affect of all of this, the protest is actually costing taxpayers money. the new york commissioner, new york city police commissioner,
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ray kelly saying its cost his department $2 million in overtime already, and that tab will likely rise in the coming days. it's nobel week culminating with the nobel peace prize in oslo, norway. awarded to three women. ellen johnson sirleaf, leymah gbowee and tawakkul karman. liberia's ellen johnson sirleaf is the first elected in all of africa. the laureate dedicated this to the arab spring activists. men told for years not to neglect prostate cancer screenings, now cnn learned a task force is about to recommend just the opposite, that men not get screened for the disease. cnn the senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us from atlanta.
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elizabeth, who's making this recommendation? this is is confusing. >> reporter: it is. the same group that told women in their 40s not to get mammograms. we talked about it many times on the year. a huge brouhaha. now the same group is telling men not to get prostate cancer screening saying the screening does nor harm than good. in other words, men are finding cancers that are so small they never would have caused them problem, but then the treatment they then feel compelled to get is causing them problems. so the u.s. preventive task force is set next week to recommend a derating for psa screening. carol? >> okay. so what's a guy to do? what are you supposed to do? armed with this new information? >> reporter: you know, carol, it's a very difficult decision for a man whether or not he wants to get screened, because on the one hand, there is a chance that he's going to find one of these relatively unusual fast-growing cancers that could kill him, but there's a much
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bigger chance that he's going to find a cancer that never would have caused him any problem, and if he treats that cancer, he could become impotent, incontinue nei incontinent and really could kill him. before he goes forward with screenings, if you screen about 1,400 men you'll find 48 men with cancer but only preventing one death, because those other 47 cancers are small and nerve worry have caused the man any problems to begin with. again, if you choose to treat those cancers, you can cause a lot of problems and, carol, the problem is, doctors have a really hard time discerning those fast-growing dangerous cancers from the slow-growing cancers. we're just not there yet. >> have to sit down with your doctor and really discuss this. i'm just thinking -- i want my husband to have those tests ask
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right? christine is here nodding her head, too, but then you think, what if they find one of those small cancers and what sort of decision will we as a couple have to make? >> reporter: that's exactly the question you should be asking, is what kind of a decision will we as a couple make? you have to think into the future, go to cnn.com/thechart. was a dude to do? the questions to go over with your doctor. not a slam dunk whether or not to have the screening. >> i'm going read it in the commercial break. elizabeth cohen, thank you very much. >> a catchy title "what's a dude to do." cnn.com. and pulling the plug on the monday night football theme after hank williams jr. referred to hitler while talking about president obama. our "talk back" question, was espn right to part ways with the performer? and one man's amazing race. we'll introduce to you an athlete who's planning to run where no man has run before. you won't believe it.
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welcome back to "american morning." he's run more than 10,000 miles raisin money and awareness for a variety of causes. now athlete and philanthropist jonathan prince set his sights a bit higher, you might say. >> you could say that. now training to become the first athlete to complete a mile run -- on the moon. he's doing it for the cause. an exclusive. is this even possible? >> definitely possible. had i talked to both of you about it, you looked at me like i was crazy. it's not my goal. not my goal. but it is a goodell and we'al a what happens. jonathan prince talks about his
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goal, says he has the mean, the method and the training to run where no man has run before. skeptic s said it couldn't be done. >> one small leap for man, one giant leap for mankind. >> reporter: not only did astronauts take the leap, they took a history making golf swing. >> the shot here. >> reporter: more than 40 years ago. now one earth-bound athlete is making another milestone. >> feels like a dream, like living the dream. >> reporter: jonathan prince's dream, run a mile on the moon. >> i can't help but star gate and wondered about the possibility of running the first mile on the moon. >> reporter: he's finished ambitious runs in the past. in 2005 from los angeles to new orleans raising more than $100,000 for victims of hurricane katrina. his new goal, raise awareness in space travel while inspiring
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students to aspire in math and science. >> it's the current and future generation and they're not yet born to go beyond. >> reporter: the question is, how to get there. >> the finalisto liftoff "atlan" >> able to build rockets funded on their own and sell trips. >> reporter: first training. >> reach 100, to 120 miles a beat. >> reporter: you have me beat probably by about 120 miles. >> the buoyancy, everything. reprogram everything i thought i knew about running. >> reporter: over the next few years he'll run wab space travel at a national iaerospace researh center in pa panchts currently training the generation of folks that are not the astronauts.
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jonathan is at the forefront of leading this any industry. >> reporter: prince received funding he needs from donors and sponsors, and hopes to blast off by 2016. until then, the 31-year-old continues training. you must have heard from the people that's the nice thing to say, nice goal, but no way, no possible way? >> skepticism is part of human nature, but at the same time, kennedy had a dream to you know, go to apollo with a mission. it's important to put massive action behind your dream. >> reporter: whoa. in addition to his training, prince will speak to students around the country encouraging them to learn more about science and space exploration and a lot of folks are hearing about what he's trying to do mission, including bono. apparently bono told him he was so inspired by what he wants to do, he wants to create and write a song about his whole mission and his goal.
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so -- we'll see. >> "shoot for the moon." you know? somebody shooting for the moon. >> reporter: literally. >> finding people inspired for him to be able to do it. >> space travel is really where the future is. that's what we're going to be seeing. we're going to see a lot of private companies trying to do a lot of things like thas. >> science, engineering and math, going around and talking to kids about this is an added bone es. >> terrific. thank you so much. as are the detroit tigers. >> is that why rob is awol this morning? >> supposed to be dressed in a red sox uniform, because he lost the bet with me. >> we might have to wake him up this morning. >> let's wake him up just to wake him up on a vacation day. thought he could sleep until 10:00. not so much. >> good morning, jacqui. >> congratulations to the tigers and all the fans.
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sorry about it, yankees, but how many trophies do they have? >> yeah. a bet in baseball, right, in the american league, and the best in baseball -- they're not anymore. >> money can't buy you anything. isn't that right? >> that's right. don kelly. i mean, don kelly in the minor leagues. hit a home run in yankees stadium. 27 years old. jim leyland talked about kelly and started crying. it was fantastic. >> for carol, sunny and 80 degrees for the next three months i. know. right. great in detroit, though, great across much of the east but it's the nation's midsection that's seeing the lousy weather today. extremely windy from the upper midwest all the way down to the gulf coast. the strongest winds here across parts of minnesota and the dakotas. gusting as much as 50 miles per hour. so high fire danger here today. it's really going to be affecting a lot of your travel. it all has to do with the cold front in the nation's midsection. we will see occasional showers
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and thundershowers, some severe in the western great lakes. on the back side, very cold. talking about snow. yeah. how much? a couple feet of it before all is said and done between, you know, what happened yesterday and as we head into today and into early tomorrow. temperaturewise, ahead of it it's nice and warming talking 80s across the plains and the east coast looks really, really great. if you have plans to get out leaf peeking, inspiring you, so gorgeous. from the vermont area they're at peak to near peak in the higher elevations and in the valley areas, midstage. a lot of sunshine. get out there. no rain in the forecast for the northeast. a little rain, though, down in south florida, although you don't see a lot of color down there this time of year. just wanted to mention, everybody else -- >> thanks, jacqui. now's your chance to "talk back" on weren't of the
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questions of the day. was espn right to part ways with hank williams jr. he doesn't care. he was hopping mad and out of there anyway. on his website he blasts espn for stepping on the toes of the first amendment and adds, me, my friends are out here. don't let them kick them in the -- because you're fire and here's why. >> you mean where john boehner played golf with president obama? >> come on. come on nap would be like hitler playing golf with netanyahu. they're the enemy. >> who's the enemy? >> ah -- obama! and biden. are you kidding? the three stooges. >> it's a free country. it's not like hank jr. chairs the republican committee. here's what "the view" said. >> he's a musician. i think of all the football players and musicians that have take an misstep or done something, and what kind of standards are we holding, folks,
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to when we say, oh, no, you can't say -- listen, man, that's not a good thing to do. so instead we pull. >> kind of sounds like what happened to the dixie chics? remember? natalie mane said the chic was ashamed of president obama because of his stance on iraq, and while they weren't fired, they were blackballed by not only many country music fans but the country music establishment. the "talk back" question today, was espn right to part ways with hank williams jr.? facebook.com/americanmorning. i'll read your comments later this hour. up next, the latest from the michael jackson death trial. why lawyers for the king of pop's personal physician are launching an attack on the l.a. county coroner's office. plus one l.a. woman not just complaining about bank of america's new $5 debit card fee, she's doing something about it. find out what she did that has a lot of people talking this morning. it's 22 minutes past the
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were back. "minding your business." all about the big september jobs report released in about two hours from now showing maybe 65,000 jobs added to the economy in the last month. unemployment expected to stay steady at 9.1%. can the market stay straight? right now u.s. markets down after overseas markets turned lower as european leaders try to solve that region's debt crisis. every day a little progress or a little slipback that decides which way the european markets go. a dozen banks taking a hit after credit agency moody's cut think rating. the reason moody's says it believes the u.s. government may not support its banks if they ultimately need a bailout poring over details of a leaked government proposal designed to limit the kinds of risky trading that played a part in the
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financial crisis called the volcker rule, weren't of the most controversial elements of the dodd-frank financial oversight law. a mortgage rates never cheaper. the after 30-year fixed rate loan down to 3.94%. the first time in history that mortgage rate has fallen below 4%. though the rates have done little to boost home buying. the nba's credit rating could be cut if the season is cancelled because of a rating dispute buy players. it watch listed the rating because there's a strong likelihood that the ongoing lockout will result in missed games. "american morning" will be right back after this quick break. where do you go to find a super business? you know, the ones who do such a super job,
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did is 30 minutes past the hour. here are your top stories -- the head of the energy department's loan program is out. jonathan silver oversaw the flam supported dozens of projects including the solar company whose bankruptcy could cost the country hundreds of millions of dollars. the departure was announced in july before celindasli solyndra 11 filing. and popping up from new york to los angeles. even an occupied sister protesting washington, d.c. president obama weighing in for the first time saying the demonstrators are giving a voice to those frustrated with the
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financial system. and three women are sharing this year's nobel peace prize. two from liberia. president ellen johnson sirleaf. the second woman is leymah gbowee and the third, tawakkul karman from yemen. they won the prize for the safety of women, women's rights in participation in peace building. sirleaf is the first democratic elected female president in africa. the jobs report in just two hours. right now 14 million americans are out of work. head over to christine. where can they find a job? christine? >> right. one of those 14 million, you're thinking what job should i look for? what industries are hiring? we told you before, there are 3 million job openings now. it's matching those openings with the skills and talents of the people looking for work. here's a look at seven jobs in high demand today, even in this stagnant economy. the first one is retail workers. no real surprise here, i'll tell you. the average pay, $25,000 a year.
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you won't send a kid to college on that, but retailers are looking to hire half a million temporary workers with the holidays coming up, according to the national retail federation and they often hire them full-time after the holidays. an area they're hiring right now. how about this, commercial truck driver. the average pay is better. there is training required. if you can pass the commercial license test, you can drive a truck. your license depends on the class of vehicle you know how to drive. estimates say looking up to 400,000 more drivers over the next few years. next one, showing you a wrench. industrial engineer. 73,823 dollars. what's required, a bachelor's degree at least. sounds hard it is. electrical and manufacturing companies are fighting tooth and nail for people with these skills. these are people you can look at at a car factory, for example, figure out ways to streamline
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eefficiency. average pay, $85,430, if you know how to write software, chances are, you'll be able to find work. the labor department expects strong growth in this sector over the next few years. three more to go. this one is a registered nurse. average pay is good here. sorry. got this little thing on there. training is required. don't forget. so many baby boomers needing medical care, the labor department says the need for registered nursele leswill gro % perce perce2%. be careful, though. some hospitals are actually cutting back. others are growing. depends where you are. professional cook. what? we're talking top chef-type professional cook.
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average pay, $38,000, $39,000. hot kmod commodities and hotels. constant jobs in this sector. not as many as nursing or retail, but if you've got the knack, check out with your local culinary schools see what demand is like. and accountant. ali velshi's favorite job. tons of people are grad weighteding from business schools with degrees in accounting right now. these jobs are hard to fill because they're often very specific for each state and industry. monster says online job postings for these jobs up 12% in the past few months. for more information on this, see all of this at cnnmoney.com. ali's favorite is accountant. mine, an engineer. both were liberal arts majors, what do we know? >> you know a lot. great information. >> thanks. >> thanks, christine. are you tired of being nickelled and dimed by your bank? probably the very same thing
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your tax dollars helped bail out. molly was so angry that bank of america was going to charge her $5,000 just to use her debit card that she delivered the bank a petition with 153,000 signatures. >> thousands of people right now, an extra $60 a year to a company they just bailed out with their other than tax money is not okay. i don't want to be at bank that isn't going to have a response to over 150,000 people signed on. a week now since this petition was set up and they haven't said anything. >> molly's mad. we'll talk to her at 7:40 eastern. she took matters into her own hand. did an online petition. expected to get maybe 5,000. but 152,000 people, brought it to bank of america there in washington, d.c., demanded to see the manager. the vice president of that bank came out and took the petition. >> interesting. >> will it make a difference, though? >> i don't know. the company says they're being transparent and have given you
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time to make a choice. you don't want the fee. >> well, molly's walking. congratulations. you're finally texting and proud of yourself, right? your thumbs are flying. so why are your kids rolling their eyes every time you send them a text? you're not cool, mom and dad. up next a much-needed lesson? texting etiquette, for the above 30 crowd.oday since 1894, ameriprise financial has been working hard for their clients' futures. never taking a bailout. helping generations achieve dreams. buy homes. put their kids through college. retire how they want to. ameriprise. the strength of america's largest financial planning company. the heart of 10,000 advisors working with you, one-to-one. together, for your future. ♪ i know what works differently than many other allergy medications. omnaris. omnaris, to the nose. did you know nasal symptoms like congestion
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welcome back to "american morning." so you're finally texting? it's taken a lot of us grown-ups a long time to get onboard. you may think you're cool. the kids are cringing. turns out, we've got a lot to learn about texting etiquette. especially if you're above maybe 40. that's why our next guest wrote this book called "when parents text." thanks for joining us this morning. >> thank you. >> so let me ask you. you started asking people, give us the craze jest examples of parents and kids texting each other. what did you find? >> it's results have been overwhelming. so we started a website maybe 11 months ago now, and we get hundreds and hundreds of
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submissions every single day. >> give a few. all sorts of different texts from parents. there's pretty funny ones like this one. this one is about a dad gift guide. okay? me. hey, what do you want for christmas? dad, remington 1187 premier shotgun. me, lol. okay. what else? dad. hair. >> that's pretty funny. of course, beginner parents working on the idea are getting texting out. is this way for parents and kids to finally understand each other? used to always complain, oh, my son never calls. my daughter never calls. i never talk to them. they're never busy. no excuse anymore? >> it's bringing kids and parents together. when i mom grew up, my mom didn't know what she was doing ever, because no way to contact her. now text, what are you doing? your kids respond? >> what's the appropriate way? parents think they're hip and young and connected, and really they're kind of off kilter, aren't they? >> we want to encourage that behavior.
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i'll say to my mother, you're doing a great job. >> you don't mean it? >> no, i mean it with all of my heart. >> we really do. we love texts or parents and we love when they text us. it's great. sometimes it can be a long text. it's like a honey. today the weather is very nice. it's not a letter. >> get a lot of those. paragraphs. >> what is it doing for the parent/child relationship? i would say a teenage or college-aged child and then the older parents? >> well, we think that it's actually bringing parents and their kids closer together. >> how come? >> because it's allowing them to communicate in the area where everything's equal. able to communicate with each other throughout their day and in their own language. in the beginning we found that parents were struggling with technology, with these auto correct and things like that. now parents are actually understanding the technology and
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using it as a parenting tool a. good way to keep tabs. no excuse, i couldn't find a phone. you can contact your kids all the time now. can we pull up the lasagna one. i love this one. okay. so there's this one, i guess this one on page 14 where they say, the mother says, my fingers are saying words. this is amazing. also this one from the mother saying, we're having lag at mary ann's and scott's. the kid respond lag? the mom responds, lasagna. you can't abbreviate lasagna. the mom, okay. deciphering their text is a little, entertaining i would say. >> really. i mean, that is so funny to me want to use that. parents are making their own language and it's great, and we really enjoy it. we have a glossary section in the back that has information of what parents have brought to texting and it's amazing. >> so lag, we hope, will now be a commonly known abbreviation.
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>> perhaps a new thing in the dictionary. it's going to put a new definition next to it. one thing i will say about parents and kids is that, look, i feel like anybody under 30, they have an institutional knowledge how to use this technology. you don't need a user's guide, you figure it out. for everybody else, it's really new stuff and slower and clunkier and funny and entertaining to watch those people evolve. isn't it? >> yeah. trying to explain to someone what a hash tag is -- >> super hard. >> my mom say that no idea. how do you use twitter? how? i don't even want to explain to you how to use twitter. >> what is liking something on twitter jr. i can't explain. >> and explaining about baby boomers. she told me the kind of technology you use and how you use it defines how fast and innovative you are and what kind of worker you're going to be. we're making fun of people being clunky with it, employers and everyone judges you how you use
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your social media. interesting. >> really important. i hope our book brings a little information to parents as well. >> center an entertaining book called "when parents text." thank you, ladies, for joining us. have a wonderful weekend. carol? >> that was a fun conversation. i loved that. it's 44 minutes past the hour. beam me up, scotty! classic line from the classic "star trek" series. turns out no one actually said that on the show. william shatner's new book interview with ali velshi just ahead. ford fusion hybrid emerges as the clear fuel economy leader over camry hybrid. kimberly? the fusion hybrid holds a 10 mile per gallon advantage in the city over the toyota camry hybrid. uh... that's not good. i would like 10 more miles. he's going to have a a lot to think about, kimberly. and there you have it....fusion hybrid. with best in class city fuel economy.
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46 minutes past the hour. here's what you need to know to start your day. a resignation at the energy department after that solar energy company received a $535 a million loan and then went belly up. jonathan silver who oversaw the agency's loan program is now stepping down. republicans say the resignation will not stop their question, however. america's longest war now a decade old, ten years ago today "operation enduring freedom," the war around al qaeda in afghanistan began. and influential task force, about to recommend men under 75 forgo prostate cancer screening say the too many tests for follow-up procedures that can be expensive and sometimes risky.
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the death of steve jobs led the publisher of his biography to move up the release day to october 24th. the book titled simply "steve jobs" robertscketed to amazon's best-seller list in the hours after jobs' death. and being chaired by three women for the nobel prize. ellen johnson sirleaf along with tawakkul karman of yemen and leymah gbowee. recognizing their work for the safety of women worldwide and their work in women's rights. president obama appointing shakira, the colombian born entertainer on excellence for hispanics, she'll be at the white house today. that's the news you need to start your day. "american morning" back after a break.
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at the age of 80, shatner is still going at warp speed. that's right. hard to believe, he's 80. a spoken word artist and his new book reveals how he did it called "shatner rules." your chance to understand the shatnerverse. critics who say he won't turn down anything. >> saying no is easy. no, i won't go there. no, we won't go to that place, eat that, take that adventure, no, we won't read that book, know, we won't entertain a new idea. why? saying yes opens opportunity.
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>> reporter: saying yes for william shatner led to memorable roles in the tv series "star trek," "t.j. hooker" and "boston legal." at the age of 80, still one of the busiest actors in hollywood. >> i'm 80. how old are you? >> 46. >> how come we look like we went to high school together? >> reporter: in the past year alone appeared on comedy central's roast of charlie sheen, released an album "seeking major tom" and now a book, "shatner rules." starts with a rule in chapter 6, good to bury a hatchet so your former co-stars won't find it and use it on you, and you go into great detail about the acrimonious relationships you had with some co-stars from "star trek." >> i don't want to give it more import than it has, especially in my life. i devote a chapter of that, in essence of tongue and cheek,
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because one actor in particular was held, held a sense of animosity towards me. it's been 45 years. i think i've seen him three times. >> reporter: for many people, you will always be captain kirk, but what roles have you really liked and felt really brought everything out in you? >> think about me in acting, as i enjoy the art. acting is moment to moment, as life should be. so if i can hit a moment, i'm gratified, and am so -- and so it's the last thing i did. if i hit that moment, it makes it the best for me. >> reporter: you haven't shied away from anything anyone's ever said to you that's not good. a lot of great stuff said about you, but it seems you've taken every criticism anyone's leveled and explained why you did what you did in life or why something happened. when you look back at your very full life, what impression would you like people to have. >> what i can say is that this moment in time, my 80s year, in
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this moment in time, i am so happy, that to voice any regret whatsoever would be -- i say to you that anything bad that's happened to me in the past has only been the steps on the j journey that has led me to this moment. >> reporter: that seems spiritual. have you always had this view of life? >> probably not. probably not in the very beginning. it's hard to come by, but as you rise from your bed at the age of 80 and you're looking at death straight in the face, wondering what that's going to be like, i wonder about that, and i wonder how to die and what people have said about dying before, and it's an interesting subject
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ideally. >> wow. >> tell you, working makes you young, if you love what you're doing, because look at how vibrant he is. he's 80 years old and working so much and clearly -- >> thinking about dying. i guess we all have to think that. >> true. >> but he looks fantastic for 80. energetic. maybe you're right. that's the secret too keeping your energy at an older age. >> i'm intrigued an the controversy of the actor he talked to three times in the past -- >> i can't say why they were hiding. >> makes me interested in reading that chapter of the book. >> much more of the interview coming up in the 8:00 hour when the talk turns to politics. >> oh. let's talk. let's talk about something else right now. we asked you to "talk back" on weren't of the questions of the day. was espn right to part ways with hank williams jr.? from kenneth, the first amendment has nothing to do with
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it. espn has not to do vitriolic speech. about a company not wanting to offend people by calls this a free speech issue, hank williams showing how one-sided he sees thing. i believe it was wrong for hank williams to be dropped. how many people would have jobbed if nobody could say? next thing, told what we can and cannot say in our own homes. from ann, absolutely. we as a nation are better than hank williams jr. finally, maybe, there will be consequences for some of the mean and uncalled for language out there from the part of our country that cannot stand the thought that a smart black man is the leader of our nation. keep your comments coming. facebook.com/americanmorning. we'll read more on "american morning." ahead next hour, fed up with fees. she cut up letter debit card, got 150,000 signatures and is trying to stick it to bank of america. she has tight say and will join us live. >> i can't wait.
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thrown under the solar
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panel? a top energy official is out. republicans saying it's the first casualty of the solyndra scandal. running at the bulls. wall street protests picking up steam, spreading way beyond lower manhattan. the other 99% demanding to be heard. president obama now responding. a health atlaert will affect every man out there. new guidelines for prostate cancer screenings. is the government about to tell you it isn't worth it? then this -- >> fed up with fees. a woman cutting up her bank of america card. 150,000 and counting joining her cause, and she's here live and not happy. on this "american morning." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com good morning, everyone. it's friday, october 7th. ali's off today. welcome to "american morning." >> go tigers! i just had to say it. first up this morning, you can now feel that it's becoming something bigger.
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wall street protesters will be out again today to begin week four. now the protest is nationwide, and people aren't laughing so much anymore. many are wondering whether this can be harnessed into a political force at the polls. >> reporter: it started out as a joke. >> how are they not like the tea party? some of them you know, smoke and have pants made out of pot. so call them the thc part. >> reporter: now it's swelled into a nationwide movement, mostly peaceful, but certainly p.o.'d. >> we got sold out. >> reporter: and ready to eat the rich. >> this is like a performance art piece. the corporate zombie march. >> reporter: i see the money hanging out there. >> right. this is the breakfast. >> reporter: from 1,000 protester on wall street it has gained momentum and spread to tens of thousands of people from new york to los angeles and dozens of city in between, eve ain cross borders and oceans. the people are angry that
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they're running second place to profits. >> we want jobs! we want jobs and we want them now. >> reporter: the quality of life has plunged while the rich get super rich and the taxpayers bail them out. >> politicians can be bought. political influence can be bought through political donations. >> reporter: in los angeles, protesters took over a bank of america and were arrested. and in philly, thousands broke out in their battle cry. we are the 99%. it has some big wigs on wall street looking out their windows, and now the white house is paying attention. >> obviously, i've heard of it. i've seen it on television. i think it expresses the frustrations that the american people feel that we had the biggest financial crisis since the great depression and that's going to express itself politically in 2012 and beyond until people feel like once again we're getting back to some
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old-fashioned american values. >> reporter: still, getting organized ain't easy and it's too early to say whether these protesters will become a political force, a tea party from the left. same frustrations from the other side. there's plenty of time until next november. >> 24/7, if necessary, 365. we're planning on snow, planning on summer heat. >> one unwanted affect of all of this, the protests are actually costs taxpayers money. the new york city police commissioner ray kelly said it's cost his department $2 million in overtime already and that tab will only rise in the coming days. all right. this morning the jobs report for september will be released. economists expect the u.s. added only about 65,000 jobs, a majority of the new jobs expected verizon workers following a two-week strike, and unemployment is expected to stay at 9.1%. here's a first. the interest rate on a 30-year
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fixed rate mortgage has now fallen to 3.94%. that's the first time it's ever dropped below 4%. however, these low rates have done little to boost home buying in part because the housing stock market still in a very tough spot. a top energy official is out even after president obama defended a controversial $535 million loan to the california company solyndra that eventually went belly up. brianna keilar at the white house. tell us more. >> reporter: jonathan silver, carol reeshgs voosigned, headin guaranteed loan program for companies like solyndra, very much embattled. he testified before congress recently and, of course, on this lender controversy, solyndra right now under investigation by the fbi to see if there was perhaps an accounting fraud there. solyndra filed for bankruptcy in august leaving taxpayers on the hook for the loan that it had
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received from the federal government, $500 million. but, you know, the department of energy, the secretary, steven chu making the point this was already in the works and there isn't a cause you can draw from the controversy. let's take a look at the timeline so we know how the loans went and had he came onboard. the final loan approval for solyndra was actually in september of 2009. silver wasn't appointed until november later that year, and it was may 2010 when president obama went to visit solyndra to promote renewable energy. february 2011. this was when silver was in this position, and the loan for solyndra was restructured. so that they could continue to operate, and it was august, the very end of august, august 31st when solyndra filed bankruptcy. meantime, president obama defending this loan program overall. listen to what he said yesterday. >> now, we knew from the start
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that the loan guarantee program was going to entail some risk by definition. there were going to be some company thoat did not work out, solyndra was one of them. but the process by which it was made was on the merits it was straightforward. >> reporter: you're hearing from secretary chu, this was already in the works, silver alerted him he woulds received for the private sector and cnn confirmed he went to work the think tank in washington. a lot of republicans reading this as silver being the fall guy and that it's not going to be enough to satisfy them as they continue to pursue this issue. >> so they're still going for an investigation into this? >> reporter: that's right. they're sort of looking into -- some of the warnings, certainly, that some top administration officials, top advisers to the president, received some concern certainly among some people at
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the office of management and budget about just kind of whether the approval process was ad hoc, and we've seen some e-mails revealed lately that draw concerns about some warnings that perhaps were not heeded. you heard president obama yesterday kind of saying, you know, looking back on it, that obviously there were inherent risks but overall he said, not just solyndra but for a lot of different companies, he was sort of touting that it was successful. >> brianna keilar reporting live from washington. thank you. this year's nobel peace prize is being shared by three women. two from liberia. president johnson ellen sirleaf, and tawakkul karman of yemen and leymah gbowee recognizing safety of women and for women's rights. ellen johnson sirleaf the first democratically elected female head of state in africa and the yemeni laureate deg nated it to
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arab spring activists. america struck back. the united states and nato launched "operation freedom" in afghanistan in retaliation for the september 11th attacks and as you know, the battle continues to this day. it is now america's longest war, 2,732 u.s. troops have made the ultimate sacrifice in afghanistan. pakistani officials say the doctor suspected of helping the u.s. target osama bin laden will be charged with treason. he's accused of setting up a fake vaccination program so the cia could collect dna samples from people at bin laden's compound. bin laden was killed in a raid by u.s. special forces at the pakistan compound back in may. the u.s. has repeatedly asked pakistan to release the doctor. congresswoman gabrielle giffords joins vice president biden and dozens of others to mark the retirement of her husband from the u.s. navy. mark kelly enlisted in 1967 as a
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pilot until joining the space program. part of four shuttle mission, the last one coming in may just a few months after a gunman wounded his wife and killed six others in a shooting rampage in tucson. and britain's prince harry coming to america for combat training. a british army captain arrives next week to attend a helicopter training course at bases in california and arizona. a group of 20 students taking part in this training. talk sports now. shall we? fear the fangs. that's right, the detroit tigers knocked the yankees last night. a hush fell over the stadium. first inning, kelly, bringing in a run, a 2-0 lead with back-to-back homers. the bombers had their chances. you know what? a-rod -- a-rod could not come through. ooh. you're outta there. struck out with the bases loaded in the seventh inning, two out in the ninth.
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tigers holding on for a 3-2 victory and prove to the a.l. championship against texas that starts tomorrow night. ah. >> you should be a sports anchor. showing your allegiance too freely. >> i would be bad. i know. at least i'd be honest about it, right? this may sound familiar. the federal government about to give a u.s. solar company hundreds of millions are dollars in guaranteed loans backed by you, the taxpayer. didn't work out so well for solyndra. so why are we trying it again? harvard take as hit. no longer at the top of its ivy league. so what's the world's number one yanked university now? >> trinteresting. drivers so spooked, they called the cops to report a gruesome car wreck. don't mean to laugh, but it is almost halloween. you're watching "american morning." it's nine minutes after the hour.
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welcome back to "american morning." when the solar panel maker solyndra went bankrupt this summer, american taxpayers found themselves on the hook for more than $500 million in guaranteed government loans. >> weeks later another u.s. solar company is set to receive a fatter check for nearly three quarters of a million dollars backed by you, the taxpayer, again. this company insists it's the real deal. here's casey wian. >> reporter: remote mines town in nevada peaked during the early 1900s silver boom and the last mine shut down in 1947, they struggled. the historic hotel once nevada's tallest building closed 12 years ago, but locals say their future is bigger than ever. jobs are coming thanks to natural resources, the sun.
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>> solar energy facility, where the large towers, about 600-foot, 650-foot tower will be built here in the middle of the facility, and then that tower surrounded by a field of mirrors, about 17,000 extremely large mirrors that focus the sun's energy at the top of this tower. >> reporter: reflected sunlight will be collected by a receiver and turned into 1,000 degrees, combined with water and turned into electricity starting in 2016. construction began in september. the entire project hinged on help from the energy department. still reeling from the collapse of another solar company, solyndra. last week solar reserve received final approval for a $737 million federal loan guarantee to finish this project. that's $200 million more than solyndra received before it filed for bankruptcy. thethey say they have little in
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common with solyndra. providing enough electricity for up to 75,000 homes. >> our financing is based on electricity projects. solyndra, managered facility manufacturing tv panels. >> reporter: the panel manufacturers have been crippled by competition from china. solyndra was further hurt by a bad technology bet. companies in other segments of the solar industry say they're being unfairly tarnished by solyndra's collapse. how confident are you as the ceo of this company that american taxpayers are not going to be left on the hook for the money received in federal loan guarantees? >> very comfortable. it's a good invest by the u.s. government in jobs and in technology. >> reporter: but an investment some say is misplaced. >> these industries, solar tvs, solar thermal and other alternative energy producers have really an economic
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disadvantage and continuing to invest in the current alternatives for energy production is not likely to yield big payoffs. >> reporter: the chinese, have payoffs, we can try to compete or withdraw from the market and let everybody else leez that market. >> reporter: back in town, residents welcome the project, hotels booked solid and a spa reopened. >> a lot of hard work and a big relief knowing the deal came through. >> reporter: two other solar backed projects worth nearly $3 billion have been delayed as solyndra casts its shadow over solar. casey wian in nevada. casey wian reporting. is that a tear we hear in the hallowed halls of harvard? the ivy league university is no longer the world's most prestigious university according to a british higher end magazine. it is now second. if that's not bad enough,
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harvard must share the honor with stanford. oh, whoa. who came in at number one? it was the california institute of technology, caltech, and princeton made the top five. >> tough to be tied for number two. >> i went to kent state and i'm fine. >> iowa state. a country road in north carolina scared someone into calling the cops. take a look for yourself. >> oh! >> there's half of a fake dead body sticking out from underneath a tractor. it's really a lawn mower. one car going 50 right by it called 911 to report a gruesome accident with a lawn mower. all in good fun, before the police wasted their time in the end. >> pretty good, though. you didn't see this coming on the gps. zombies ahead another halloween prank in tulsa, oklahoma.
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someone hacked the electronic sign and there weren't monsters looking to eat your brains. >> all right. it's about 18 past the hour. rob marciano is off today. jacqui jeras is in the extreme weather center. for some reason, rob hasn't been calling in. we were wondering if he was going to call in. we haven't heard anything from him. >> when you get a break this early time of the day -- >> i don't think that's it, jacqui. i think he's a sore loser because the tigers beat the yankees last night. >> i do know rob and that perhaps he'd be a little -- yeah. >> on a day off, he doesn't want the carol victory lap. >> he's going to wear that boston red sox uniform. you can call him. i'm not waking him up. >> we already did. >> you're so funny. i'm happy for you, though, carol. great to fan who got the outcome they were looking for. right jt how about the weather? are you getting the outcome you're looking for heading into the weekend? it's friday, friday, friday. a lot of people want to go out
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looking at the leaves this weekend. unfortunately, the leaves may be blowing across the branches. wind a big story from upper midwest down to the gulf coast. the worst of it here, though, a high threat of fire danger. winds gusting up to 50 miles per hour making it rough on the roadways especially for the drive home later tonight. ahead of a strong cold front bringing showers and thundershowers. a few could be severe later today. the threat of high winds as well as hail and an isolated tornado can't be ruled out. gorgeous ahead of it, high pressure in control. a great weekend all around the east coast with the exception of florida. a high risk of rip currents and you may see a low developing he bringing heavy rain. on the back side of the front, dealing with the snow. this has been the first biggy of the season. over a couple feet into the high country. temperaturewise, cooler than normal across much of the west. staying nice and warm in this bubble across the plains with 80 degrees temperature and out on the coast, things looking cooler out there.
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overall, things looking great. really, the mississippi river eastward,en joy the weekend. going to be awe some. >> the best gift of all. was espn right to part ways with hank williams jr.? the question of the day. williams doesn't care, he's so hopping mad he was out of there anyway. he blasted espn for stepping on the toes the first amendment. we're outta here. don't let the door kick you in the -- you're fired and here's why. >> you mean when john boehner played golf with president obama? >> come on. come on. that would be like hitler playing golf with net raw hanya. they're the enemy. >> who's the enemy? >> obama. are you kidding? the three stooges. >> it's a glfree country. it's not like hank williams
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shares the republican party. >> here's whoopi goldberg. >> he's a musician. all the athletes that have done a misstep, what kind of standards are we holding folks to -- oh, no. we can't say, listen, man, that's not a good thing to do, so instead we pull. >> right. kind of sounds like what happened to the dixie chics. remember? natalie mane says the chic was ashamed of president b because of his stance on iraq, and while the chics weren't fired, per se, they were blackballed by not only many country music fans but by the country music establishment. the "talk back" today, was espn right to part ways with hank williams jr.? facebook.com/americanmorning. facebook.com/americanmorning. i'll read your responses later on in the hour. still to come, the propofol that killed michael jackson had fink printers on it belonging to his prnl physician, dr. conrad murray. we'll tell you why that didn't
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stop conrad murray's attorneys from going on the defensive. and taking action against the bank's new $5 fee for debit card users. what's she up to? hmm. you'll find out.
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welcome back. "minding your business" this morning. today it's all about the big september jobs report released about an hour from now. economists expecting to show we added 65,000 jobs in the month. unemployment expected to stay at 9.1%. can the markets make it four straight days of gains? right now u.s. stock futures are down after overseas markets turned lower as european leaders continue to try to solve that
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region's debt crisis. a duz's european banks taking a hit this morning after the credit rating agency moody's cut their rating. the reason moody's says, it believes the uk government play not support its banks if they need a bailout. the average 30-year fixed rate down to 3.94%. the first time in history the rate has fallen below 4%. that's the good news. the bad news, the percentage of americans who own their home has seen its biggest drop since the great depression. according to the census bureau, home ownership fell to 65.1% in april of last year. that's down about a percentage point since 2000. the nba's credit rating could be cut if the season is cancelled because of the labor dispute with players. the credit rating agency fitch says it watch listed the league's triple a-plus rating because of a strong likelihood the lockout will result in missed games. parents took advantage of the back-to-school sales.
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sales at a number of companies jumped 5.1% last month. the biggest increase since may. don't forget, the very latest news about your money, check out the all-new cnnmoney.c cnnmoney.com. "american morning" will be right back after this break. arey and economic growth. north america actually has one of the largest oil reserves in the world. a large part of that is oil sands. this resource has the ability to create hundreds of thousands of jobs. at our kearl project in canada, we'll be able to produce these oil sands with the same emissions as many other oils and that's a huge breakthrough. that's good for our country's energy security and our economy.
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i'm a wife, i'm a mom... and chantix worked for me. it's a medication i could take and still smoke, while it built up in my system. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these, stop taking chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of depression or other mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chantix if you've had a serious allergic or skin reaction to it. if you develop these, stop taking chantix and see your doctor right away as some can be life-threatening. if you have a history of heart or blood vessel problems, tell your doctor if you have new or worse symptoms. get medical help right away if you have symptoms of a heart attack. use caution when driving or operating machinery. common side effects include nausea,
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trouble sleeping and unusual dreams. my inspiration for quitting were my sons. they were my little cheering squad. [ laughs ] [ male announcer ] ask your doctor if chantix is right for you.
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an entire town evacuated after a train derailment sparked an inferno there. pictures from our affiliate. authorities are evacuating the entire town. a major train derailment that left tanker cars exploding according to officials and local residents. the town of about 800 people located about 8 miles south of princeton. this is in illinois. 115 miles west of chicago. >> the real danger here is what these cars are carrying. apparently they're carrying ethanol and, of course, ethanol
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when it's burning gives off a vapor which could be dangerous to people. why they evacuated those 800 people. started out with one car on spread and spread because of chemicals in the other cars and explosion after explosion after explosion. this thing happened at 2:00 a.m. eastern time. it's been going on a long time. finally got the town evacuated and hopefully can figure how to put out chemical fires. those are the toughest to extinguish. >> the town, 115 miles west of chicago. 8 miles from princeton, illinois. you can see pictures. it's dark there, 6:30 in the east there. people getting up this morning to what is going to be an inferno for several hours now. wall street protesters entering their fourth week today, popping up all over the map from new york to los angeles. even in couped washington, a sister protest in washington, d.c., president obama weighing
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in for the first time saying the demonstrators are giving voice to frustration in the financial system. and supporting dozens of projects including the solar company that could cost the taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars. jonathan silver's departure announced in july before solyndra's chapter 11 bankruptcy filing. four women awarded the nobel peace prize. ellen johnson sirleaf then leymah gbowee and tawakkul karman from lemon recognizing their fight in the fight for women's rights. ellen johnson sirleaf the first democratically elected female head of state in africa. and libya's deposed leader moammar gadhafi is still tries to exert power. blasting the ruling transitional council and gadhafi questions the legitimacy and urges the
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libyan people to take to the streets in protest of its new leaders. planning to charge a doctor suspected of helping the cia track down osama bin laden with treason. the doctor allegedly set up a fake vaccination program to collect dna samples from people living in bin laden's compound in pakistan. >> certainly a strain on the relationship between the u.s. and pakistan no question. during day eight of the michael jackson death trial, lawyers for dr. conrad murray finally got a chance to go on the offensive and did everything they could to discredit the investigation conducted by the l.a. county coroner's office. here's randi kaye. >> reporter: in the hours after michael jackson died investigators scourrd the bedroom of his rented mansion for clues to what killed him. elissa fleak of the investigators office found 12 bottles of the powerful anesthetic propofol in the bedroom and told the jury one of them was empty. >> did you locate on the floor a 20 millimeter bottle of
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propofol? >> yes, i did. >> and where was that located? >> on the floor next to the left side of the bed. >> and was it empty but for a few drops of fluid as it is here today? >> correct. >> reporter: the coroner saying jackson died of acute propofol intox case, his doctor, conrad murray, denies charges of manslaughter. in court the jury learned murray's fingerprints were found on a 100 milliters bottle of propofol that prosecutors say led to jackson's death. the bedroom looked more like a pharmacy. all the medications fleak discovered ald found a syringe, i.v. stand and bag with propofol in it. on cross, the defense tried to make her investigation look sloppy showing he didn't note propofol was inside the i.v. bag in her report until nearly two years after jackson's death. >> in fact, the very first time
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that you note d that there was propofol bottle in an i.v. bag was the 29th of march, 2011? >> in case notes. >> yes. >> yeah. >> isn't that right? >> yes. >> reporter: the prosecution case hinges on the fact that propofol was inside the i.v. bag which would mean jackson could not have taken the fatal dose himself, as the defense suggests. the defense pressed on. attempting to show fleak made more mistakes, touching a syringe she found in the bedroom without wearing gloves. >> this syringe has your fingerprint on it. >> yes, it does. >> right? >> reporter: investigator fleak took heat for not mentioning the i.v. bag in her original
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reports. >> would you consider that a mistake? >> i described something in date later on i didn't include it in the general initial narrative. was it a mistake? i could have described it more in detail. >> you could have described it at all. right? >> in the initial report? yes. >> reporter: on the stand wednesday a computer forensic examiner who analyzed conrad murray's iphone. on it, a recording from may 10, 2009 of michael jackson sounding wasted and slurring his words. in a portion never before played in court, jackson was speaking of his love for children and his own unhappy childhood. >> i love them because i didn't have a childhood. i had no childhood. i feel their pain. i feel their hurt. >> reporter: then suddenly silence, and dr. murray's voice.
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>> sleep. michael jackson wanted it so badly, it killed him. randi kaye, cnn, los angeles. testimony in the michael jackson death trial continues today. be sure to check out our sister network hln for your source of complete expert coverage. just ahead on "american morning," how do you feel about your bank? >> i'm finished, and i'll probably move on to a credit union. i knew other people would be fed up with it, too. >> kind of like she feels about her bank. coming up next, we'll meet a woman so fed up with fees that she cut up her credit cards and debit cards looked right at the cameras and decided to fight back. it's 37 minutes past the hour. which provided for their every financial need. [ thunder rumbling ] [ thunder crashing ] and then, in one blinding blink of an eye, their tree had given its last. but with their raymond james financial advisor,
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they had prepared for even the unthinkable. ♪ and they danced. see what a raymond james advisor can do for you.
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it is 40 minutes past the hour. welcome back and good morning, new york city. sunny, 48 chilly degrees but later it's going to be beautiful. a high of 67. that goes for much of the east kee coast and the middle of the country. very happy today. welcome back, as i said. higher fees and more of them. that's what's most likely coming to a bank near you, but one
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customer is not just complaining, she is taking action. joining me now, molly catchfeld a former bank of america customer. welcome, molly. >> thank you. how are you doing, carol? >> doing great. had you a checking and savings account with bank of america and when you heard about that $5 debit card fee you said, enough. why? >> yes. because i'm 22 years old. i work two part-time jobs, and i don't have $60 a year to give to bank of america, and i knew that thousands of americans would feel the same way. >> so you started this online petition a week ago. this morning we checked. it has close to 200,000 signatures now. did you expect anything like this? >> you know, i'm not surprised by it at all. i mean, given the food of omood country i think people are ready to sign on and make things happen. >> you marched into a washington, d.c. branch of bank of america and presented them with 152,000 signatures. >> yes. >> what was the bank's reaction?
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>> they didn't really have a lot of reaction. i think they were a little taken aback, but it was kind of just a normal transaction. i went in. i gave them the petitions. and then i closed my bank account. that was kind of it. >> didn't you want more? i mean, didn't you think somebody would say something like, we're really sorry and thanks for this petition and we'll send them straight up to the ceo? >> i was hoping for that, had my fingers crossed but trying to be realistic. that didn't happen, but that's all right. i think they'll get there. >> do you think the people who signed your petitions are bank of america customers and do you think they will leave the bank? >> i think most of them are, absolutely and thousands have left the bank already. >> so bank of america didn't have a comment specifically on your petition, but the bank's ceo, brian moynihan, told cnbc that customers like you should just understand that the bank has a right to make a profit. i mean, bank of america lost
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money last year. so they have a right to make a profit. they're a private company. they have to make up the money somewhere. when you hear that from mr. moynihan what do you think? >> people have a right to stand up for what they believe in and make things happen. >> you did that. closed your account. where are you taking your business now? >> probably to a credit union. i need to do a little research first, but that's looking liked direction i'm headed in. >> the most interesting part of your story, you're working two jobs. working really hard, but by taking action against bank of america and coming up with this online petition, you discovered a new passion. >> yeah. absolutely. i mean, i've already -- you know, i've always been kind of an activist, and this was just a really exciting, awesome way to kind of channel that energy. >> okay. so if people want to sign your petition, give us your website. >> they go to change.org. a wonderful platform and right there on the front page. >> all right.
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molly, thanks for joining us this morning. appreciate it. >> thank you so much. i would suggest bankrate po bankrate.com. some waive their own fees. small banks. a few direct deposit, a a few online bill pay ps might be a way to waive fees at other places. way to go. and credit unions are not for-profit. today's "romans' numeral," 15-1. here's a hint. we should rename it someone else's "romans' numeral." we're america's natural gas
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and here's what we did today: supported nearly 3 million steady jobs across our country... ... scientists, technicians, engineers, machinists... ... adding nearly 400 billion dollars to our economy... we're at work providing power to almost a quarter of our homes and businesses... ... and giving us cleaner rides to work and school... and tomorrow, we could do even more. cleaner, domestic, abundant and creating jobs now. we're america's natural gas. the smarter power, today. learn more at anga.us.
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it's 46 after the hour. here are your headlines, told to get out after a train derailed and at least three tanker cars exploded. the fire is still burning now in the town where about 800 people live. 115 miles west of chicago. the train was transporting ethanol. right now, u.s. stocks are set to open lower after a three-day winning streak. right now investors are waiting for this morning's september jobs report that comes out in less than an hour. that report is forecast to show the economy added 65,000 jobs last month and economists expect unemployment rate to stay steady at 9.1%.
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wall street protests spreading across the u.s. eve ton canada and australia as they enter their fourth week this morning. president obama saying demonstrators are giving a voice to those frustrated with the financial system. three women's rights activists have won this year's nobel peace prize. two are from liberia, the country's president, ellen johnson sirleaf and leymah gbowee and tawakkul karman. they will share $3 million and also share a place in history. an influential tax force recommending men forgo prostate screenings, saying it flags too many patients for jofollow-up procedures that can be expensive and sometimes risky. and knocking the yankees out of the playoffs, the red sox. propelling them to a game five
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victory in the alds. the news you need to start your day. "american morning" is back after the break.
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good morning to our friends in washington. sunny skies. 53 degrees. i don't know what that stuff is blowing in front of the camera. i'm sure nothing harmful. later today sun with a high of 73 degree. this morning's "romans' numeral" a number in the news today, 15-1. technically makes it the roman statistic of the day. the 1991 chicago bears regular season record. we bring it up because da bears are finally going to the white house. president obama will welcome the
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1985 super bowl champs this afternoon. they are his home team. right? and they never had a chance to meet then president reagan after they won 25 years ago. >> about time. that explains it. >> a question for you, carol. who would a fight? ditka or god? >> god. >> trick question. ditka is god, if you're from chicago. >> look how young they look. >> i know. i think the lions, the detroit lions play the chicago bears on monday night football. >> oh, really. that's exciting. anyway, so -- >> detroit could be 5-0. sorry, da bears. i'm irritating this morning. >> that was romans' numeral which is actually a sport stat today. >> and i loved it. am house call right now. one that could impact every man out there. men have been worn for years not to neglect prostate cancer
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screenings. a task force is about to recommend just the opposite that men do not get screened for the disease. cnn senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us from atlanta. so, this is just confusing. >> it is confusing. i'll try to lay this out for you. remember the group, ladies, that said two years ago that women in their 40s shouldn't get mammograms. probably remember that story. the same group is telling men not to get screened for prostate cancer. they say the screening actually could lead to harms and those harms outweigh any benefits and in a nutshell, here's the reason why. most prostate cancers are very small and very slow growing and will never cause a men any problems at all. most of the time you'll catch those kind of cancers and you'll treat it and that treatment can cause problems. it can make a man incontinent and impotent and even kill him. some of the surgeries actually, there is a chance you could die from the surgery.
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that's why this group is saying they don't think men should get the psa test. >> but, you know, elizabeth, some men say their lives were saved, just like many women when that other ruling or recommendation came down and said, wait, if my life was saved by the screening, then it was worth it. >> this is where this gets sticky. there's no question that some men's lives were saved by the screening but far more men whose lives were ruined or were really harmed by the screening. so, there's this real balancing act going on. let's look at some numbers going on. not romans' numerals. they looked at 1,400 men that were screened. 48 of those men were found to have cancer but only one death were prevented because the other 47 men had cancers, again, that never were going to cause a problem. but that one man whose death was prevented, boy, was he glad he was screened. those other 47 men probably not so glad that they were screened. >> what age group are we talking
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about? >> right. many time the men that get screened are in the 50 to 70 age range. this group is saying they don't think anyone should be screened. plenty of people, including urologists who really disagree with this. they say this is a tremendous mistake and that men should continue to get screened depending upon their family history starting at various ages. >> it's funny. i argue with my parents about this because their feeling is, you know, we're in our late 70s now, so, why bother getting this anyway? >> it's a slow growing -- isn't prostate cancer generally a slow growing disease? >> most of the time it is a slow growing disease. your parents would say, most doctors would actually say they're right. no reason for a man to be screened after age 75 because if he does have prostate cancer, something else will probably kill him give on the age that he is. ladies, this is a really important point here, medical science is not good at figuring out which cancers are going to be slow and which are going to
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be fast. they are going to find these little cancers and most of the time they're going to be slow and never cause a problem. what we need is a test to discern one from the other. we don't have that test right now. >> just as confused about prostate cancer screenings as women are about mammograms. >> well, i have some guidance here. what you can do, if you go to cnn.com/thechart. you'll see a blog that has a link to a story that i did. what's a dude to do. that tells you all the questions you need to ask. each man will make a different decision on this one. chat with his wife and his doctor and make the right decision for him and that column will help. >> we asked you to talk back this morning. the question for you, was espn right to part ways with hank williams jr.? this is from robert. i think espn is taking a political stance and did not like the comments williams made. maybe we do not agree with his position, but he clarified it and it did make sense. i think espn is making a mountain out of a mole hill
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maybe to enhance the ratings of monday night football. i don't think they need to do that. those ratings are phenomenal. this from tomas, hank williams, jr., is an american like the rest of us. he retains the freedom of speech and the freedom of expression regardless of whether people choose to agree or not. this from angela, the freedoms we have, including free speech, come with responsibility. we are responsible for what we put out into the world. freedom to say what you want means you should be willing to take the consequences that come along with your words. so many people wave the flag of freedom without recognizing the power of those freedoms and the responsibility that comes with that power. keep the comments coming. facebook.com/americanmorning. we'll read more later on "american morning." and we'll have top stories when we return, including that big jobs report. is anyone hiring? which categories, where i'll tell you that. it's 55 minutes after the hour.
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the president takes a stand in favor of taxing millionaires. i'm carol costello, that money
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used to pay for his jobs plan, but as you may expect, republicans do not like it. a brand-new snapshot of the economy. i'm christine romans. in just a few moments the government's new jobs report. will it be welcome news? we'll break it down and show you where, if anywhere, there is hiring on this "american morning." and good morning to you. happy friday. it is october 7th. ali velshi, the yankee fan took the day off because he was too heartbroken. >> go detroit. an entire town in illinois told to get out, to evacuate after a train derailed and at least three tanker cars exploded. the fire's still burning right now. this is the town of taskila. 115 miles west of chicago. the train was transporting
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ethanol. the jobs report for september will be released in just about 30 minutes. economists expect the united states added only about 60,000 jobs. unemployment in this country has really been a thorn in the president's side since he took office and yesterday a defiant president obama kept pressing congress for his jobs bill even though the prospects look pretty bleak. >> we will just keep on going at it and hammering away until something gets done. and i would love nothing more than to see congress act so aggressively that i can't campaign against them as a do nothing congress. >> the $447 billion bill is due for a vote in the senate next week. president obama also insisting that any senator who's thinking about voting against his jobs bill needs to explain why. joining me now is republican
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senator john baraso of wyoming. good morning, senator. >> thank you for having me on "american morning," carol. >> you heard the president yesterday, he said republicans have to explain themselves. but, in your mind, have republicans already done that? >> well, absolutely. you know, a lot of democrats who don't support the president's proposal either. we asked for a vote on the senate floor twice this week and harry reid, the democrat leader of the senate blocked the vote on the president's own jobs bill. the president is out there saying, vote for it. and the democrats in the senate don't want a vote because they don't want to have to support it. they realize this is just stimulus 2. the first stimulus failed. the president promised if you pass that stimulus that the unemployment rate would stay below 8. instead, it went to over 10. we still have 14 million americans looking for work. this is not the way to get the economy going. >> still, senator, we have no action in congress and that
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really frustrates many americans. let me just run this by you because yesterday, you know, we all talk about this as not the time for political gainsmanship and we all say that, but last night when democrats were trying to pass this china currency bill, republicans wanted to add an unrelated amendment on the president's jobs bill and, of course, democrats blocked that by establishing new rules and that set off this tizzy in the chamber. i mean, isn't this exactly the kind of gainsmanship the president was talking about? >> thiblocked two amendments i wanted to bring. we want to not export jobs and construction jobs and cement jobs to china. they blocked that. it was completely relevant and another one i wanted to do was have a jobs impact statement on all pieces of legislation, just like we have environmental impact statements to see how different -- and they blocked that, as well. so, we need to get. >> but the real reason behind it was to debate the president's jobs bill right on the spot. kind of like threw a wrench the
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into china currency bill, which has some bipartisan support. >> the president said pass my jobs bill now. he said it every stop along his trip. along the way. every time the republicans try to bring his jobs bill up for a vote, the democrate ess block i. they don't want to vote for this either. the president said, explain it. i'd invite the president to come to my home state of wyoming where i can explain it to him and my constituents and the democrat senator from the state north of wyoming. he has opposed it, as well. bipartisan opposition to the president's plan of borrowing and spending and overregulating and threatening tax increases. that's not a way to get the economy going. i want to make it easier and cheaper for the private sector to create jobs and the president continues to find ways to make it harder and more expensive for the private sector to create jobs. >> senator, you are right, democrats do not like the way the president liwants to pay fo
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his plans. i want to ask you about these wall street protests. they spread nationwide now. thousands of people are participating. what do you make of that? >> many are being paid by unions to do that. to foment disorder out there. we need to get people back to work. fundamentally, that's what we need to do. the president ignored the job market for the last two and a half years. i'm glad he's starting to pay attention. >> you agree with herman cain, the presidential candidate who agrees these protests were orchestrated and he also believes that these people should not complain about not getting a job, they should go out and find one. let's listen to a bit of herman cain and we'll talk about it on the other side. >> if you are envious of somebody who happens to be rich that you call a fat cat, go and get rich instead of expecting them to walk outside of the office and write you a check. that's not the way america
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works. work for it. >> does mr. cain have a point, senator? >> well, we're a nation of equal opportunity, not guaranteed results. i want to do things to provide more opportunities for all americans. and when the president's plan takes away those opportunities, i don't think that's helpful. i have a whole jobs program that i introduce would a number of different western senators and a jobs opportunity plan for red, white and blue american jobs. it's 20 pages and you can go to that and i would suggest that the president do that, as well. this is the way to get so many americans back to work. >> going back to the protesters and why they're protesting, senator, do you think they have a legitimate frustration? >> well, i think a lot of people in this country that are very frustrated because they can't find work and a lot of it has to do with the policies coming out of this administration. you know, the president inherited a bad situation and his policies have made it worse. >> but, i guess i just want --
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herman cain and you just said that you believe that unions are behir behind these protests. but the unions didn't get involved until weeks later and now a lot of people are co-opting this group and it's growing. but at some point it was organic and the anger was directed at wall street. do you think that the anger is directed in the right place? >> i think people want to work. we have many people around the country that cannot find a job and the policies that make it harder and more expensive for the private sector to create jobs is what's keeping people out of work. we need to make it easier and cheaper for the private sector to create jobs so we have more people working. that will raise the tax revenue coming in to the country and will help us deal with our deficit and our debt. >> thank you, senator, for being with us this morning. we appreciate it. >> thank you, carol. carol, you know, he's right, 14 million americans are out of work. if you're one of those 14 million, you're thinking about
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where can i find a job. today what industries are hiring? there are three million jobs open right now. 3 million. here's a look at seven jobs. seven categories in high demand even now in this economy. the first one is retail workers. average pay here, $25,000 a year, so, you're not going to send a kid to college, but retailers are looking to hire 500,000 temporary workers with the holidays coming up. the major trains often hire these temp workers full time after the holidays. retail workers, there are jobs there. commercial truck driver. we've been hearing about this for a couple years now. maybe 350 tho,000, 400,000 job. average pay better than retail. if you can pass the commercial driver's test. there you go, short term on the job training. next one here industrial engineer. sounds hard, guess what, it is. it takes an education, but the pay is cumenserate.
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manufacturing and electrical companies are fighting tooth and nail for people with these skills. they can look at the manufacturing process in a car factory and figure out ways to streamline things and increase efficiency and increase the bottom line. online job postings are up 28% over the past four months, according to monster.com. here's the next one. software engineer. you hear us talk about this all the time. average pay is pretty good here, too. if you know how to write software, build a mobile app and chances are you'll find work here. the labor department expects very strong goeth in this sector over the next few years. health care, nurses. pay there can be even better than this with more training. with so many aging baby boomers getting older and needing medical care. the labor department expects the need for nurses to grow 22% over the next six years. here's a smaller job category, but interesting nonetheless and hiring. professional cook. we're talking about top chef type people. professional cooks hot
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commodities at hotels and restaurants often swept up by the competition at the drop of a hat. job openings here, not as many as retail and say truck drivers, but they are there. finally, accountant, one of my favorite job categories because of the pay. also because of the flexibility of moving around the country. even though there are tons of people graduating from business schools with degrees in accounting, these jobs are still hard to fill because they're often very specific for each state and industry. monster says online job postings for these jobs are up 12% or so over the past few months. for more information on these industries and job openings, you can go to cnnmoney.com. carol? >> thanks, christine. let's talk about the wall street protests. it's now becoming something bigger. as we enter the fourth week of the occupy wall street movement today, it has gone nationwide. the message spreading and people aren't laughing so much any more. it started out as a joke.
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>> how are they not like the tea party? some of them smoke and have pants made out of pot. so, call them the thc party. >> reporter: now has swelled into a nationwide movement, mostly peaceful, but certainly po'd. >> we got old sout. >> reporter: and ready to eat the rich. >> this is like a peace. the corporate zombie march. >> i see the money hanging out there. >> this is the breakfast. >> reporter: from 1,000 protesters on wall street, it has gained momentum and spread to tens of thousands of people from new york to los angeles and dozens of cities in between. even across borders and oceans. people are angry that they're running second place to profits. >> we want jobs. we want jobs and we want them now. >> reporter: that their quality of life is plunged while the rich get super rich or the taxpayers bail them out. >> politicians can be bought. political influence can be bought through political
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donations. >> reporter: in los angeles, protesters took over a bank of america and were arrested. and in philly, thousands broke out in their battle cry. we are the 99%. it has some bigwigs on wall street looking out their windows and, now, the white house is paying attention. >> obviously, i've heard of it, i've seen it on television. i think it expresses the frustrations that the american people feel. that we had the biggest financial crisis since the great depression and that's going to express itself politically in 2012 and beyond until people feel like, once again, we're getting back to some old-fashioned american values. >> reporter: still, getting organized ain't easy and it's too early to say whether these protesters will become a political force, a tea party from the left. same frustrations from the other side. but there's plenty of time until next november. >> 24/7, if necessary, 365.
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we're planning on snow, we're planning on summer heat. >> the protests are actually costing taxpayers more according to the new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, it cost his department $2 million in overtime already and the tab will only rise in the coming days. back to our breaking news this morning. live picture s right now. an entire town in illinois being told to get out after a train derailed and three tanker cars exploded. >> this is in the town of tiskilwa, about 800 people live here. 115 miles west of chicago. the train was transporting ethanol alcohol which, of course, when it's set aflame it lets the smoke carries these poisonous vapors and that's why the town was evacuated and, of course, chemical fires are notoriously hard to put out and that's why it's taking firefighters so long. >> so, we'll continue to watch that as the sun comes up, you
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can see that fire still burning. it has been burning now for about six hours or so. you know him as know it all postal clerk, oh, yes, cliff claven from the "cheers." his second career as a social activist. getting america's jobless back to work. john ratzenberger join join s u william shatner joins us, too. he has wised up over the years and has some advice on navigating life. we're asking him about today's rough political climate. should president obama channel captain kirk or mr. spock? meet the man who plans to run where no man has run before. the face of the moon. can it even be done? yes, it can. this guy is serious. a cnn exclusive as we jog alongside during his training. it's 13 minutes after the hour.
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so if i didn't know better i'd say you're having some sort of big tire sale. yes we are. yeah. how many tires does ford buy every year? over 3 million. you say you can beat any advertised price on tires? correct. anywhere? yes. like this price? yes. riously? yes what about this one? i'll beat it. this one? s we will. right, i only have one more question for you...this one? (laughing) yeah. get $100 rebate when you buy four tires. 100 bucks! only at your ford dealer. 3 million tires. 11 major brands, fiona's kind-of-nice. i don't know why you're not here.
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and all we need to do is change the way we're thinking about them. a couple decades ago, we didn't even realize just how much natural gas was trapped in rocks thousands of feet below us. technology has made it possible to safely unlock this cleanly burning natural gas. this deposits can provide us with fuel for a hundred years, providing energy security and economic growth all across this country. it just takes somebody having the idea, and that's where the discovery comes from. delivering mail, medicine and packages. yet they're closing thousands of offices, slashing service, and want to lay off over 100,000 workers. the postal service is recording financial losses, but not for reasons you might think. the problem ? a burden no other agency or company bears. a 2006 law that drains 5 billion a year from post-office revenue while the postal service
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it is a perfect day in detroit, michigan. partly cloudy and 52 and, yeah, 58 and partly sunny today but the real news making detroit happy. the tigers beat the yankees. >> oh, they did? i didn't know, carol. >> it was like the greatest game ever. it was a nail biter. so now the tigers play the texas rangers and hopefully they can win the pennant now. this next gentleman has run more than 10,000 miles raising money and awareness for a variety -- he has run 10,000 miles and now athlete and philanthropist jonathan prince has set his sights a lot higher. >> crazy, jason carroll. >> remember when richard branson said he wanted to send people into the atmosphere.
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it can happen. you know, it's not unusual to get a few raised eyebrows when jonathan prince talks about his goal, but he says he has the means, the method and very soon he says he'll be getting the training to make his galactic goal a reality. skeptics said it couldn't be done. >> that's one small step for man, one giant leap for man kind. >> reporter: but not only did astronauts take that giant leap, they took a historymaking golf swing. that was more than 40 years ago, now, one earthbound athlete is to striving towards making another lunar milestone. >> feels like a dream, but it feels like living the dream. >> reporter: jonathan prince's dream, run a mile on the moon. >> you can't help but stargaze at night and i just wondered about the possibility of running the first mile on the moon. >> reporter: prince has finished ambitious runs in the past. in 2005, he ran from los angeles to new orleans raising more than
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$100,000 for victims of hurricane katrina. his new goal, raise awareness in space trial while inspiring students to excel in science. >> it's the demonstration for the current generations and the generations are not yet born. you know, to go beyond. >> reporter: the question is, how to get there. >> the final lift off of "atlantis". >> reporter: nasa retired the space shuttle program this year. so he will go the private route. >> private companies are now able to build rockets, fund it on their own and sell trips. >> reporter: but first for prince, there's training. >> typically i reach around 100 to 120 miles a week. >> you have me beat by probably 120 miles. >> reporter: that's just the beginning. >> the gravity pressures, the buoyancy. everything. i have to reprogram everything i thought i knew about running. >> reporter: over the next few years he'll learn about space travel at a private facility at
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nasntar in pennsylvania. >> we are currently training the generation of folks that are not the astronauts. jonathan is at the forefront of leading this new industry. >> reporter: prince has received funding he needs from donors and sponsors and hopes to blast off by 2016. until then, the 31-year-old continues training. >> i know you must have heard from the people who say, that's a nice thing to say. nice goal that you've got there, but there's no possible way you're going to be able to do it. >> absolutely. skepticism is just part of human nature, but at the same time, kennedy had a dream to go to apollo, go to the moon with apollo mission. so, it's important to put massive action behind your dream. >> well, in addition to his training, prince will be speaking to students around the country, encouraiencouraging th learn more about science and space exploration and so many people have started to hear about what he's trying to accomplish or even bono is
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getting in on this. he wants to compose a song for him and help inspire him to meet his goal. >> so, he's not going to do it for a little while, though. how do you train for something -- where do you train for something like that? you just can't run around a track. >> he's going to start some of his training at nastar, as we explained. not just training on land. he is going to be training in the sea, as well. >> but isn't there the anti-gravity. >> you have the g-force training. you learn about the forces that you're going to encounter when you leave the atmosphere and you're heading into space. a lot of training and it will take a few years to get it done and, again, he's hoping to accomplish this by 2016. >> i admire him. >> me, too. >> maybe in the future there will be more. >> maybe. we'll see. thanks, jason. now is your chance to talk back on one of the stories of the day. the question for you, was espn right to part ways with hank williams jr. he doesn't care. he was so mad he was out of there anyway.
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he blasts espn for stepping on the toes of the first amendment and me, my song and all my rowdy friends are out of here. espn said, in essence, don't let the door kick you because you're fired and here's why. >> you mean, when john boehner played golf with president obama? >> come on, come on. like hitler playing golf with netanyahu. they're the enemy. >> who's the enemy? >> obama and biden, are you kidding, the three stooges. >> hey, it's a free country and it's not like hank williams, jr., chairs the republican national committee, well, here's whoopi goldberg. >> he's a musician. musicians do provocative things and i think of all the football players and all the musicians that have either taken a misstep or done something and, you know, what kind of standards are we holding folks to when we say, oh, no, we can't say, listen, man, that's not a good thing to do. instead, we pull. >> right. kind of sound like what happened
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to the dixie chicks. remember? natalie main said the chicks were ashamed of president bush because of his stance on iraq why they weren't fired they were blackballed by not only country music fans but the country music establishment. so, the talk back question today, was espn right to part ways with hank williams, jr.? facebook.com/americanmorning. i'll read your comments later this hour. 23 minutes after the hour. we'll be right back. ♪ kingdoms and queens ♪ they all bow down to you ♪ ♪ branches and ranch hands ♪ are bowin', too ♪ and i've taken off... [ man ] we could have gone a more traditional route... but it wouldn't have been nearly as memorable. ♪ here comes the sun again [ cellphone rings ] cut!
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this terrible train derailment is still going on in
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ti sx tiskilwa, illinois. because of the train derailment and ensuing fire, the train was carrying chemicals, ethanol, to be specific, the entire town of 800 had to be evacuated. joining us on the phone is casey kelly from the american red cross and you're in molina, right? >> molina, illinois, correct. >> bring us up to date on what's happening in this tiny town. >> sure. about 4:00 this morning we were notified that the train had been derailed and immediately the american red cross went into action because we were told that the entire town needed to be evacuated for precautionary measures. we have opened a shelter at a local high school in princeton, illinois, in order to provide people a place to go, a place to stay, is to spend the day, to provide food, water and other services. >> and i would suspect that police are going door to door knocking on doors trying to get
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people out and to go into the shelter. are people being pretty cooperative? >> it is a voluntary evacuation. no one is being forced out of their homes. the authorities are just suggesting that people leave for safety reasons. just until the fire and the blaze is contained and taken care of. >> what's the concern here with this vapor, this smoke coming from these train cars? >> at this point, they're just not sure what to expect. and, so, what we've been told is just a precautionary measure we're just evacuating, they're evacuating people just to be on the safe side. >> kasey kelly, thanks for joining us. thanks for your efforts out there and hopefully people will evacuate even though it's voluntarily and take the safe route. thank you so much for joining us. coming up next, the big september jobs report. are more job seekers getting
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hired? we're not expecting great numbers, but what does that mean for our faltering economy. christine romans is monitoring it. she'll have an answer when we come back. it's just about 30 minutes past the hour. rol and my risk of heart attack. why kid myself? diet and exercise weren't lowering my cholesterol enough. now i'm eating healthier, exercising more, taking lipitor. numbers don't lie. my cholesterol's stayed down. lipitor is fda approved to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke in patients who have heart disease or risk factors for heart disease. it's backed by over 19 years of research. [ female announcer ] lipitor is not for everyone, including people with liver problems and women who are nursing, pregnant or may become pregnant. you need simple blood tests to check for liver problems. tell your doctor if you are taking other medications, or if you have any muscle pain or weakness. this may be a sign of a rare but serious side effect. [ man ] still love that wind in my face! talk to your doctor. don't kid yourself about the risk of heart attack and stroke. if lipitor's been working for you, stay with it. lipitor may be available
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just in to cnn, the labor department report is out and it says 133,000 jobs were added to the economy in september and better than wall street expected and the unemployment rate remains at 9.1%. remember economists were expecting 65,000 jobs to be added. i want to break this down for you a little bit and show you how it fits into the overall picture. we had some revisions. remember last month when zero jobs were created in august and
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that caused quite a stir because no job's growth is where we want to be. that is revised by the government. it is now 57,000 for this month. little bit better there. more than 57,000 if you had a line there, it would be right about there. you also had a revision for july. it had been 85,000, that was revised to about 127,000. so, this line looks a little bit better and sorry about that, not very precise but that gives you an idea of late job's growth. the unemployment rate at 9.1%. now, where you've seen a lot of job loss, local jobs. we lost more local jobs, government jobs and 35,000 of them after all in that one month and local governments. in the past two years, the government says we have lost 535,000 local jobs. that tells you, local government jobs. that shows you how these budget cuts are really hurting states and municipal governments. another thing here, i always talk to you about private sector jobs.
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overall private sector job creation in the month was 137,000 private sector jobs. so, you take the private sector and you subtract the government factor and that's where you get the overall number. 137,000 jobs in the private sect sector, it's not terrible and it's not as bad as we've seen lately. a little bit of activity on that front and it's better than people have been expecting. i want to show you quickly overall because this is a political story overall. this is president obama's tenure. this red is the recession. this red is the financial crisis and jobs being shed. hundreds of thousands of them. then you saw some stabilization and you actually saw some increases because of census hiring and because of stimulus and then things have faltered a little bit and, as i told you, this picture now looks a little bit better here, here, and here. so, there you go, that's what it looks like. i want to bring in jay powell and also served as the treasury under secretary and under
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president george h.w. bush. it's not terrible, certainly not what we need. our frame of reference has changed over the past few years about what we'll accept as a decent jobs report. what's you reaction overall? >> i think this is good news, it's not great news. 137,000 jobs in the private sector is pretty good and substantially higher than what was expected. 45,000 of that is just from the end of the verizon strike, but, still, that's a good number. state and local governments as you point out continue to be an anchor to our progress and hold us back, but, you know this beats the alternative. i think there is a real fear that the economy could go into reverse gear after the debt ceiling thing in august and early september. this points in the other direction. it's welcome news. >> it shows maybe at least a step back from the concern from a double dip recession right now. >> it does. now, it does also leave in place a pretty awful employment market where you have 14 million unemployed americans and 25 million who are either
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unemployed or underemployed. so, it's a mildly positively change. >> we have a super committee that will have to come up with the recommendations for $1.2 trillion in revenue cuts or spending increases or some mix of both. at the same time we're seeing local government jobs lost over the past couple years. budget cuts are going to mean more jobs lost in that arena, right? it's very, very important here that the government gets it right about not starving the economy, but at the same time, showing that they're serious about deficit reduction. that's tricky. >> that's extremely tricky. that's the most difficult economic project of the age and that's why many economists are recommending that we adopt a deficit reduction plan that puts in place strong measures in the median and longer term without doing anything in the short term. >> let me ask you about europe. we're struggling with jobs here and we're watching people in the
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streets, thousands of people in the streets talking about jobs and opportunity and they feel wall street is benefitting and they're not and europe is something that's bubbling that really could have a pretty significant impact on how well the u.s. gets a recovery under way, doesn't it? >> yes, it does. europe is a major trading partner and a recession in europe will definite ll lly be here because fewer will buy our goods and services. the sort of headline risk is just one more reason for businesses and consumers in america to go into the basement and hide. which we don't need at all. i would say, though, our banks don't own a lot of european sovereign paper or money market funds own a lot less european bank paper than they used to. this kriss for europe lacks the financial market contagion aspects of what happened in 20 8 and 2009. we will feel the european recession here. >> this job stability and what's hap pg in the european situation, both of these pieces
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of information to end the week, they still leave us on pins and needles, don't they? but we don't think right now we're in a new crisis. >> it beats the alternative. we were looking at the front end of another double dip and this clearly points in the other direction and there are other faint signs in the other economic news that also point away from the precipice and a return to very modest growth. >> 9.1 unemployment rate just to bring you up to speed and 137,000 private sector jobs. jay powell says it means that we're not at the precipice of a double-dip recession. we'll take it as good news, indeed, this morning. thank you, sir, have a good weekend. >> you, too, christine. getting americans back to work is a oz cause very near and dear to john ratzenberger the know it all from "cheers." just like cliff, john ratzenberger knows what he's talking about. it's 38 minutes after the hour.
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okay, there's a reason we're playing that song. good morning, washington, d.c. it's sunny and 56 degrees right now. later on today a beautiful 73 degrees. okay, now, to the song pop star shakira is working with president obama. she has been named to the president's advisory commission on educational excellence for hispanics. she will be at the white house today for meetings and then a swearing in ceremony on capitol hill. early childhood development is key to improving education for hispanics here in the united states. the government reporting just minutes ago that 103,000 jobs were added in september. christine's been getting into that.
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that is better than expected. that is a good thing. >> it is better than expected. remember last month in august when everyone was concerned that no jobs were created, that number was revised. 57,000 jobs were created and july had more jobs created, as well. not really enough to make a dent in the overall unemployment rate, of course, but a little more momentum than many had feared. so, where are the jobs and are those actually jobs out there but there aren't people qualified enough to fulfill them? that's something to hear from employees. joining me now is john ratzenberger and you, sir, are passionate about skills, training for skills, manufacturing jobs and getting people the training they need to keep these jobs here. >> well, it's also for me it's to dance with -- created by manufacturing. people skilled in carpentry and brick laying and electricity. to be able to create a civilization, the sewers and all the infrastructure. we're still living off the
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infrastructure that our grandparents created. >> that's right. >> what we're doing now or not doing is training people to fill those shoes. >> how do we do that? how do we, is it vocational training? >> yep. vocational training and because we bought into the philosophy that everyone has to go to college. well, the bureau of statistics just came out with the numbers that by 2020 is going to be 10 million of those jobs unfilled. >> skilled labor jobs. >> skilled labor. the average age is about 56 years old. try to get a brick layer to come to your house. not going to happen for two, three weeks and they may or may not take the job because there are so few of them now. >> one of the things interesting to me. most of these are ladder jobs. you can start and your pay increases as you go. you need it be good at it and need on-the-job training and disciplined and it's not just for anybody but there are a lot of careers out there, if you can match the skills of the kid, our
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government doesn't do that very well. >> we bought into the fallacy that everyone has to go to college. our answer to it, 10 by 20 program. you can download a handbook on how you can help anywhere in the country no matter who you are or what you do. you can go to the schools and talk about vocational training and if you have a factory. go to the schools and have the kids tour the factory. we need to bring honor and respect back to those trades. germany does it, oh, mercedes-benz. that's the other thing, too. driving a car from india and you're wondering where the jobs went because we taxed them out of the country. >> we know where the jobs went and the jobs, quite frankly, some people say that the prowls of a manufacturing job, the fact that you could have a high school education and take a lunch box and build a middle class for your family without a lot of education, we don't have that stepping stone. it's been pulled out from under us. >> yes, kids graduate from high school now. this is the president of a big
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aircraft company told me this. kids graduate from high school without the ability to read a ruler. very smart kids, but where in their whole lives will they read a ruler? not playing a video game no more shop courses or home ec courses. if you build something, you have to know how to measure. you can't start people when they're 22, you have to tastart them when they're young. >> everyone has different skills. look at your own family. everyone has different strengths and weaknesses, but do we have enough opportunities in the country in the job market and in the education system to absorb everybody, no matter what their skills are? >> right now tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of jobs unfilled. i know somebody specifically in chicago who could put 20 welders to work tomorrow, he can't find one. >> they're not trained. >> no, they're trained welders out there but making such big money that they're not going to work for someone else. >> right, right, right. >> people actually raid other
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factories entice a welder to work for them. that's how desperate it is out there to find skilled workers. i call it necessary workers. your job, my job -- >> we're unnecessary. >> we provide a service, but if we disappear eed overnight, peoe would be sad and our families and stuff, but the country would go on just fine. but if the truck drivers, welders and carpenters disappeared, we'd grind to a halt. i think for so long, since the '60s we have been honoring failure instead of success. >> what do you mean? >> in the media. you have a carpenter come in on the screen, let's say it's a movie or tv show, they're depicted as being a buffoon or drunk or thief and the hero is some 16-year-old pot smoking knuckle head that just kind of flops through life, but we've made them heroes. >> i'm not sure i noticed that cultural shift. but i think the idea of, you know, honoring skilled work with your hands is something that the
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country just has to do. you can't outsource some of these job physical you are a good skilled laborer in this country and plumbers and welders and the like. these are the things that we should teach people how to do. >> you can give them dignity and respect, as well. if you go to aol this week, i'm hosting a program on there and where you can find jobs and those skilled trades. >> john ratzenberger american manufacturing activist. very nice to meet you, sir. have a great weekend. >> centerforamerica.org. >> thanks, christine. morning headlines coming your way, next. ali velshi sits down with william shatner and gets some shatner rules. shatner rules. it's 48 minutes past the hour. two of the most important are energy security and economic growth. north america actually has one of the largest oil reserves in the world. a large part of that is oil sands.
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this resource has the ability to create hundreds of thousands of jobs. at our kearl project in canada, we'll be able to produce these oil sands with the same emissions as many other oils and that's a huge breakthrough. that's good for our country's energy security and our economy.
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ten minutes until the top of the hour. here are your morni ing headlin. happening right now an entire town in illinois being told to get out after a train derailment several tanker cars filled with ethanol alcohol exploded. this is in the town of tiskilwa. 800 people live here. a red cross shelter has been set up. the government reporting 103,000 jobs have been created last month. more than economists have expected. the unemployment rate remains unchanged at 9.1%. u.s. stock futures are spiking off the jobs report.
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look like they're poised to open higher and three women rights activists have won the noble peace prize. the three will share $1.5 million in prize money and, of course, a place in history. the detroit tigers knocking out the yankees right out of the playoffs. back-to-back home runs by don kelly in the very first inning. that propelled the tigers to a 3-2 victory last night in game five of the alds. the phillies host the cardinals and the brewers, i can't get enough of this game, oh, yeah, the brewers take on the diamondbacks. go, tigers. da bears finally getting their white house visit today. president obama will welcome the 1985 super bowl championsed t t afternoon. he is their hometown team and they never met with the president 25 years ago because of the shuttle disaster. that's the news you need to start your day. "american morning" back after a break.
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mr. spock had and a little more captain kirk.
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>> mr. obama is has got the ownerous burden of obeying the constitution. captain kirk was captain of everybody's fate. he was a dictator. there was no constitution anybody's rights so he could dictate what would be the solution to the problem. we are going in, we're leaving. we're going sideways. mr. obama is forced to deal with members of his own party and members of the opposition. so, unless he were to become a dictator relating kirk and obama is unfair. >> anybody in the field that you're intrigued by? i'm not asking for endorsements or who you're going to vote for. but anybody you're intrigued by? >> this country and canada is being torn apart by people of great passion who believe in their point of view andd
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disparage that point of view is to lose the argument. there is something to be said for the fundamentalists on all sides of the political spectrum. the puzzlement, but the necessity is to try and make that work to get it to work. it's always worked before. there have always been people who have spend less, spend more. but we've always worked it out. and this last few years has not been impossible. there have been things that are worked out and we're approaching a crisis where people see the, not just the necessity, but the armageddon of not cooperating. >> yeah. >> and hopefully the people re-elect will see it, as well. >> you could see more online. we'll be back in a bit. yeah. how many tires does ford buy every year? over 3 million.
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world series championship number 28 will have to wait. the detroit tigers knocking the new york yankees out of the playoffs last night. that's why we bring in rob marciano who has the day off but could not escape the i told you sews. >> you were supposed to be here in your boston red sox uniform, rob marciano. >> i told you two weeks ago i was taking the day off and it's a dark day in the marciano household, that's for sure. >> rob, do you have anything to
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say to carol? >> well, i haven't been watching, i'm sure she's gloating. i would say this to the tigers, congratulations. i'm ashamed of the yankee fans that were there last night. i have never seen the crowd so quiet. and, of course, you have to look at a-rod and i'm not a violent man, at least not any more and i just wanted to punch him in the nose last night. >> are you willing to say that the tigers are a better team than your yankees? are you willing to admit that? >> in a best of five series, i'm not willing to say that. if anything that major league baseball has done wrong in the last ten years is implement not only the wildcard race but to do a five-game series. >> you are so diluted. you are diluted, marciano. the

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