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tv   CNN Newsroom  CNN  October 9, 2011 6:00am-7:30am EDT

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and so i've learned to say so do i. >> well, listen, i really appreciate you both coming on again. it was another lively debate. i hope we can do it again in six months. >> thank you, appreciate it very much. great being with you. >> thanks, victoria. that's all for us tonight. >> great being with you. that's all for us tonight. good sunday morning. i am going to show in a moment how things played out at one of these occupy rallies. this one in atlanta. i'm going to show you what happened when congressman and civil rights icon john lewis showed up. and they refused to let him speak. also, ron paul wins another straw poll while the presumed front-runner on the republican side finishes near the bottom. also, the world's cheapest tablet computer revealed. how cheap? how does $35 sound to you?
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from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn sunday morning for october 9. 6:00 a.m. in atlanta. i'm t.j. holmes. as always, we want to say a special good morning to our service men and women watching us right now, the american forces network. thank you for being here, and thank you for what you do. let's talk about the president first and the jobs bill. this is going to be an important week. in just a couple of days, the president's jobs bill will get an important test. the senate is expected to vote on his $447 billion package. the congressional budget office says the plan's tax on millionaires would raise an estimated $453 billion. still, republican leaders, they don't like that tax. the president this weekend, we heard from him. he's pushing ahead anyway. >> some see this as class warfare. i see it as a simple choice. we can either keep taxes exactly as they are for millionaires and approximatelynair -- and billionaires, or we can ask them to pay at least the same rate as
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a plumber or bus driver. in the process we can put teachers and construction worker and veterans back on the job. we can either fight to protect their tax cuts, or we can cut taxes for virtually every work and small business in america. but we can't afford to do both. it's that simple. [ inaudible ] >> the majority leader in the house says the full bill is actually not going to get a vote in that chamber, sow it's setting up pretty much a showdown this week. senate expected to take action. the house says it will not. we'll see where the jobs bill goes. the unemployment rate still at 9.1%. we got the numbers last week. the national retail federation says retailers expected to hire up to 500,000 workers for the end of the year holidays. among those looking for worker -- and listen up here -- macy's expected to add 78,000 jobs.
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kohl's plans to aide 40,000. toys 'r' us adding 40,000 workers. best buy looking for about 15,000 workers. many of these are, yes, temporary holiday jobs. at the same time, they often turn into permanent jobs after the holidays. we're just past the top of the hour. ron paul is getting to notch another straw poll win in his effort to capture the republican presidential nomination. he was the top vote-getter at the values voter summit in washington. he got 37% of the vote. herman cain still making good showings in the straw polls and national polls, as well. 23%. rick santorum ended up third with 16%. the two presumed front-runners, the one you've been hearing so much about, rick perry and mitt romney, they came in fourth and sixth respectively. both in single digits. we're learning more about the white house decision to kill
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anwaral-awlaci. a secret memo made the case for killing him. he allegedly helped the underwear bombing attempt to set off a bomb on a detroit plane in 2009. the memo concluded thattal-awlacki could be legally targeted if it was not feasible to capture him. after his death, the white house took heat for killing an american citizen. republican presidential candidate ron paul says the killing sets a bad precedent. >> if the american people accept this blindly and casually, we now have an accepted practice of the president assassinating people he thinks are bad guys. i think it's sad. >> according to the report, the memo was prepared specifically for al-awlacki and not for americans suspected of terrorist activities. i want to turn to the occupy wall street rallies, protests
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going on for it four weeks now. they seem to be growing every day. look at the map here at least. demonstrations happening across the country. people expressing frustration with the lack of jobs, corporate greed, they say, and their anger over government leadership. the protests going on in more than a dozen states and several cities. and among the demonstrations this weekend, the nation's capital. [ chanting ] >> end the war, tax the rich! >> the demonstrators in sacramento yesterday were chanting a theme we keep hearing over the a number of these protests. listen. [ chanting ] >> this is what democracy looks like! >> show me what democracy looks like! >> this is, this is what democracy looks like! >> i want to turn to an occupy rally in atlanta. interesting back and forth with this of the demonstrators. few hundred people did turn out. one that showed up was civil rights icon and georgia
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congressman john lewis. now he showed up to show his support, wanted to address the crowd. many of the protesters wanted to hear from him. first, protesters wanted to put it to a vote of whether or not he should be allowed to speak to them. listen to how some of this played out. >> for the freedom -- >> and the dignity and respect -- >> and the dignity and respect. >> of countless lives -- >> of countless lives. >> however -- >> however. >> the point this general assembly -- >> the point this general assembly -- >> is to kick-start -- >> is to kick-start -- >> a democratic process -- >> a democratic process -- >> in which no single human being -- >> in which no single human being -- >> is no more inherently valuable -- >> is no more inherently value
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-- >> than any other human being -- >> than any other human being. >> congressman lewis was watching the crowd debate his fate and whether or not he'd be allowed to speak. many in the crowd were upset and expressed anger later on saying we want the attention of congress. we got their congress, and one showed up at our rally. instead of allowing him to speak and converse with us, we're just talking at him. many thought that congressman lewis was disrespected. lewis did get a chance to speak, not to the crowd. he had to talk to the local media. still, listen to what he had to say. >> and another time, another period when i was very young and head of the student nonviolent committee, we participated in a similar process. we would discuss, we would debate, until we reached consensus. this has been something strange, out of the ordinary for people. >> are you disappointed that you did not get a chance -- >> not at all. not at all. >> what do you think this says about the organizational
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process? >> well, it will work on. they're maturing, it will work out. it will come of age. >> you hear him there. went through similar thing trying to get organized when many rallies, he compared it to some of the things he went through during the civil rights movement trying to organize. still, expressing his support for the occupy rallies. this is not the first time we've seen a scene similar to this. this was a little different, but this is new york congressman charlie rangel. this is what he had to endure when he showed up to show support to protesters in new york. watch this and listen to it, as well. >> budget for your don't -- go home! get out of here! boo! boo! boo! [ booing ] >> boo! boo! >> afterwards, representative rangle said he wasn't sure if he was the target of the heckling but said if he was, then he understands. we'll be talking about the
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occupy wall street movement a little later. some of the protesters from atlanta. you'll hear from them yourself ahead in about 25 minutes. the manslaughter trial of michael jackson's personal physician, jurors get back to the courtroom tuesday. they'll hear the rest of a taped interview police did with dr. conrad murray. he talked about the final hours of jackson's life. our ted rowlands with the story. >> reporter: coming up next week in the conrad murray trial, we'll pick up where we left off last week. that is with the playing of that audiotape of dr. conrad murray talking to investigators. this was an interview he gave investigators just two days after michael jackson died. the jury has heard about an hour and 40 minutes of the tape already. it's a two-hour tape. there's not too much left to go. what they've heard so far has been riveting. murray talk about what happened in the moments been jackson died. what he gave jackson in terms of prescriptions or medications.
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he also talks about the fact that he gave michael jackson propofol every single day during the two months he was treating him until the last few days. he said he was trying to help the pop star wean himself off of this powerful, powerful drug. >> i cared about him. i didn't want him to fail. i -- i was compassionate. but what i was doing to recognize that michael jackson may have had a dependency to substance, i was trying to wean him off. >> following the conclusion of that interview tape being played to the jury, we expect that the prosecution will start to wrap up their case. we expect they'll be done sometime early next week. there's no court on monday. that mean the defense will get their chance at some point next week. ted rowlands, cnn, los angeles. at ten minutes past the hour. good morning to our reynolds wolf. how are you, kind sir?
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>> i'm great. how are you today? >> i am really well. >> we've got a great weather day for people on the east coast and west coast. in the center of the country, a big storm system stretches for 1,000 miles clear down through texas. in texas, it manes rain. heavy -- it means rain. heavy, heavy rain. flash flood warning in effect for parts of the area that were desperate for rain, now getting too much. we'll talk about that and let you know what to expect going into the workweek. back to you. >> thanks. and pittsburgh steeler troy polamalu, he's usually scaring quarterbacks or maybe running backs. now he's scaring visitors at a wax museum in hollywood. you see where we're going with this? we'll show you the video here in just a moment. stay with us. t can help lower cl and who ordered the yummy cereal? yummy. [ woman ] lower cholesterol. [ man 2 ] yummy. i got that wrong didn't i? [ male announcer ] want great taste and whole grain oats that can help lower cholesterol? honey nut cheerios.
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pittsburgh steelers troy polamalu, even if you're not a football fan you might know this guy because of the hair. he was having fun, and he was scaring the heck out of some tourists at madame tussauds wax museum in hollywood. look at this. ♪ [ scream ] ♪ >> you see how it is going? we'll let this play out. yeah, of course, they're at the wax museum. they think all of these are when we come back figures. but then this big dude start moving. so he was having a good time. he was playing a prank on some of the visitors there. this is great video. it's got a half million hits on youtube. it was part of a commercial that he was actually shooting there. but he's -- he's a good sport. [ screams ] >> he scares the -- out of them on the football field.
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one of the best players in the league. >> absolutely, man. >> that's great stuff. >> absolutely. good stuff. maybe auburn's team last night was made of wax figures. i was going to say, both of our teams played each other last night. his team won in a big fashion. >> never rub it in. we have a respect because over the years -- >> we have great e-mail exchanges during the game itself. the thing is, arkansas beat my team, the auburn tigers, in convincing fashion. what's the name of the stadium where the razorbacks play? the official name? >> reynolds. razorback stadium. >> really? reynolds, right? >> yeah. thank you for that. >> my team lost, but my name is still on the stadium. let's play ball. what we're talking about, the biggest weather story is what's happening at the bottom of this frontal boundary that extends through the central plains into texas. this means rain, heavy stuff. in fact, you can see right now some very intense lines driving through the prefrontal trough through austin to san antonio
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along the i-10 corridor. back toward junction, a break for now. check this out. another line is beginning to develop. what we have is plenty of moisture that continue to feed up out of the gulf of mexico. and as that boundary's trying to move across, we'll see rain through the rest of the day, possibly a bit into tomorrow. what that's going to mean plain and simple, the potential for flooding. some places in the texas hill country need two to five inch of rainfall. so far, bastrom county, austin, a place dealing with wildfires. now we're talking about bare earth with four to seven inches of rainfall. you've got really hard soil there. refer to it as calichi. the texas hill country, everything's going to run off. we could see widespread flooding through central and south texas. lone star state, an something time, especially the next ten hours or so. around the rest of the nation on the back half of the system, we talk good rain in texas. snow into the rockies. some places, maybe a foot of
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snow at the peaks. same deal toward the west coast, east coast, kind of a hodgepodge. plenty of sun in new england. and condition fairly warm. when you get to the extreme southeast and carolinas, georgia, and into parts of florida, rain is going to be the issue. quickly, temperatures, what you can expect east and making your way to the west. 84 new york, boston, atlanta, 71. 69 in san francisco. 65 in portland. all right. you're up to speed. back to you. >> reynolds, thank you, kind sir. we'll see reynolds shortly. coming up in a moment, the dean of the civil rights movement. he's actually celebrating his 90 years now, big birthday bash for him this weekend. he stopped pie here in the studio to talk history, politics, and who he think is the best candidate on the republican side. my conversation with this civil rights icon next. installed a gt monitoring system.
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18 minutes past the hour. he is 90 years old now and is still marching. maybe not as quickly as he once did, but the reverend joseph lowery, civil rights icon, known as the dean of the civil rights movement, is being honored this weekend with a big 90th birthday bash. happening in atlanta. before he went to his big party, he stopped by to talk to me. we didn't really plan on talking about politics, but he just couldn't help himself. wanted to talk about the republican presidential race.
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listen. >> probably one of the more sensitive fellows in atlanta is huntsman. they don't pay any attention to him. they're -- they're interested in herman cain, bless his heart. he's having the time of his life. he would give ten years of his life for what's happening to him now. and i'm -- i'm happy for him. i don't think he realizes that -- >> what do you mean -- >> they're using him. i think they're using herman to send their resistance against romney and perry and the other fellows who are up top in the money raising. if you'll notice, i don't think herman's money is anywhere -- it doesn't reach his vote in the popularity contest. that's how you can measure how much support he has, by how much money he raises. >> what would you think -- a few years back, people didn't think we would have a black president.
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what would you say about the day when people go into the voting booth and their options are to vote for the democrat, a black man, and the republican, a black man? what would you think of that? >> incredible. i don't -- i didn't think we lived -- in 1965 when we succeeded in getting the voting rights act passed, martin and others of us would talk about we would never live to see an african-american president. we thought there would be one, but none of us would live to see it. unfortunately martin didn't, but thank god he did let me live long enough to see it. and not only see it but participate. i didn't think we would. so but i -- i take the same position as a black democratic candidate and a black republican candidate. i don't think i'll live to see that. and i don't think you will either. >> -- you're here, you're 90 years old this week.
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you have a big birthday celebration this weekend. i don't know what 90 is supposed to feel like. what does 90 feel like? how are you feeling? >> it feels just like 89. 89 felt good wednesday. and 90 feels good friday. >> now here we are, turning to a serious note. it wasn't long ago -- just days ago -- fred shuttlesworth, someone who you knew very well, was right there with you to find the sclc march on the streets with you. he died. what is the significance of the elder statesmen, the civil rights-era guys like you, getting older? what's the significance of us losing those guys over time? those men and women over time? >> well, time moves on. and as much as we might regret it, we're all going to answer the bell when it tolls for us. but god has rams in the bush. and i think you'll see from time to time, leaders will come forward, and the leadership is
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proliferating. we no longer -- back in the early days, we depended on civil right people for almost all the leadership. now, leadership comes from many quarters. we have leaders in business. we have leaders in science. we have leaders in education. and we are experiencing and -- a widespread litration of leadership that i think is healthy for the country. we're at 22 minutes past the hour now. and they couldn't get it passed on the federal level, but california has now passed its own dream act. now student who are in the country illegally will be able to get state money to if to college. we'll explain more in a moment. how about chinese at home with wanchai ferry? you can make it in just 14 minutes. mmmh, orange chicken. great. i didn't feel like going out anyway. [ male announcer ] wanchai ferry. restaurant quality chinese in your grocer's freezer.
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25 minutes passed the hour. in boca raton, florida, a 9-year-old spelling beacon test ant, schuyler johnson. [ applause ] >> oh. she knew how to spell sergeant. after he got the answer right, her soldier dad -- look at that -- showed up, surprise visit. this was the first father/daughter hug they had had since last christmas when dad was deployed to iraq. we have seen a number of these, and they never get old. and each and every one of them will get you every time. love these stories. let's turn to california now. the governor, jerry brown, has signed the state's dream act into law. it will allow thousands of undocumented immigrant students a chance at college. they have to be top student and on a path to citizenship. here's some of the reaction out this. >> we struggle just to ensure that our daughter can go to school. so for me to have an opinion for
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somebody who's not legal, to have that financial aid or to have that opportunity, i'm a bit bitter with that. >> i think it's a good idea, like i've heard. as long as they're showing documentation. foul ball they're performing -- obviously, if they're performing well, we should give them a chance to pursue their dream in america. >> the dream act in california goes into effect in 2013. as we get close to the bottom of the hour, you are hearing them and seeing them. they are fed up and on the march. complaining about a lack of jobs, complaining about big corporate profits. banks not looking out for the little guy, they say. after the break, hear from some of these occupy demonstrators. let them explain for themselves what they want. [ dad ] i love this new soup. it's his two favorite things in one... burgers and soup. did you hear him honey? burgers and soup. love you. they're cute. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup.
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[♪...] >> announcer: now get a $250 airfare credit, plus save up to 65%. call 1-800-sandals. certain restrictions apply. the bottom of the hour on this cnn sunday morning. welcome back, everybody. i'm t.j. holmes. glad you could spend part of your weekend here with us. you have been seeing these protesters, and you have been hearing them, as well. >> we want democracy! >> this is what democracy looks
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like! >> they are talking about corporate greed, bank bailouts, the unemployment situation, and they want to be heard. we've seen these occupy wall street rallies pop up all over the country. many are young, but still we've seen older folks out there. we've seen some families out there even. many people are unemployed, not happy with the situation in the country, and they want some kind of change. still, this has been going on about a month now. many of these rallies. and a lot of people still have questions. they're wondering exactly who are these folks and really exactly what do you want. what change do you want to see. we invited three of these protesters from the occupy atlanta rallies to come in and explain it for themselves. take a listen to our conversation. >> social and economic inequality is at a tipping point, and people are hungry for getting involved and trying to do something to change it. when nine out of ten races in milk is won by the candidate -- in lipsticks won by the
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candidate with the most money. when one in four kids in georgia are in poverty, that's a 21% increase since the recession started. if people are struggling, it's almost like -- i want the american dream back movement. >> john, what do you do to change it, though? here -- you got our attention, we've got you here. we've been covering the protests. now what? >> i not the first step is acknowledgme acknowledgment. people coming together in unity, acknowledging these issue and saying we have to be more progressive, more inenusetive about solutions. >> you hear the voices. jim, we hear the voices, but how do you put that into action in such a way that you see what -- you want to sit down with lawmakers. do you want a meeting at the white house? do you want -- what is it that would look like that progress? >> people are going to as they get involved in this movement find their own place. they're going to network with
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friends, neighbors. they're going to get involved in their union. they're going to get involved in different groups. and it's from these social relations that are building from this discontent that, you know, some of these people will end up running for office. some people will end up, you know, finding avenues that -- they're able to articulate their voice and feel like they are being heard. >> you expect them to continue to grow? >> definitely. >> we're just getting started, you think -- >> if new york is any example and the occupations that are sprouting up all over the united states, boston, philly, d.c., l.a., san francisco, portland -- >> minnesota. >> this is the beginning. >> and these have been popping up all over the place, as you see there. so far at least a dozen states where we have seen these occupy rallies. give you a look at some of the other stories making headlines. we're learning more it the death sentence imposed by the white house on an american-born radical muslim, "the new york times" reports a secret memo
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written last year made the case of -- the legal case for killing anwar al-awlaki. al-awlaki allegedly helped plan terrorist attacks intended for american soil. the memo concluded that al-awlaki could be legally targeted if it was not feasible to capture him. the memo did not create a new legal doctrine to allow the targeted killing of any american believed to pose a terrorist threat. also, the president's jobs bill will be put to the test in just a few days. the senate expected to take it up and vote on the $447 billion package. congressional budget office says the plan's tax on millionaires would raise an estimated $45 it billion -- $453 billion. the republican don't like the plan. the president is pushing ahead anyway, apart from a series of targeted tax cuts, it includes infrastructure spending and new job training assistance. texas congressman ron paul has taken another straw poll. he came in first at the values voter summit in washington this
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weekend. locked down 37% of the vote. herman cain second, 23%. rick santorum third with 16%. ron paul also won straw polls in california and south carolina. new hampshire can expect a lot of attention this week. most of the republican presidential candidates are taking part tuesday in a debate focusing on the nation's economy. our deputy political director, paul steinhauser, has a preview and a look at the president's schedule this week. >> reporter: good morning. you know, the road to the white house goes through new hampshire this week. the state that holds the first primary in the campaign season is the scene for a republican presidential debate tuesday. there's a lot at stake for candidates, especially rick perry. the texas governor has seen poll numbers drop since his uneven performance in the last debate last month in florida. while the gop candidates share the stage in new hampshire, president barak obama is heading to two battleground states on tuesday. he's promoting his job plan at an event in pennsylvania, and later in the day he heads to florida to raise money for his
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re-election bid. t.j.? >> all right. 35 minutes past the hour. and it'sa the sign we love -- it's the sign we love to see in san francisco. this never gets old. i've seen this show. kicking off fleet week, ah, in the bay area. the navy's blue angels performing as always to a packed waterfront. more details next. [ male announcer ] for fastidious librarian emily skinner, each day was fueled by thorough preparation for events to come. well somewhere along the way, emily went right on living. but you see, with the help of her raymond james financial advisor, she had planned for every eventuality. which meant she continued to have the means to live on... even at the ripe old age of 187. life well planned. see what a raymond james advisor can do for you. new fiber one 80 calories... ...with its sweet honey taste, 40% daily value of fiber... ...and 80 calories per serving...
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another -- >> maybe i should have explained what i meant -- >> i thought you were being literal. good tunes. >> we stay in the bay area, we're showing that middle of the night picture. a daytime picture, lovely daytime picture. this is just gorgeous. every single year, i love this. fleet week out there. blue angels performing in the skies over san francisco. and this show right over the water. this is the attraction of fleet week. it's always packed out there. you have to wait, you know, for that fog to break a little in the afternoon. make sure you can see the good show. it always works out just gorgeous. started with a parade of navy ships sailing under the golden gate bridge and then the blue angels took over, performed. and this just never gets old. >> you know, i don't know how many people came out for the event yesterday. i can tell you that a year or so ago they had nearly a million people from around the bay area that came out. i had a buddy yesterday who works for one of the local affiliates who was driving in. they've -- they bring in all the -- all kinds of aircraft. not only the blue angels but
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driving across the main bridge, he looks up and sees the stealth fighter just flying along. cool stuff. >> it is. >> and great weather for them yesterday, too. >> okay. >> yeah. i can tell you not only for the blue angels but anyone flying on the west coast, no delays expected. it will be different in the center of the u.s. still looking at strong storms, trying to fly intoberg -- interest bergstrom, heavy rainfall an issue. we talk good how texas has been mired down with the heavy droughts. of course, a ridiculous fire season there. today the problems could be compounded due to a frontal bodiry that extends well over -- boundary that extends well over 1,000 miles from the u.s. canadian border down. you see the low pressure, the blue thing is the frontal boundary. you have a contrast of air types. once -- for once there's cold air coming from the north, right behind it -- on the front of it,
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moist air feeds in from the gulf of mexico. these are contrasts. when they have the contrasting air masses, what happens -- this front causes that moist air to rise up and condenses. you have the thunderheads, with that the heavy rainfall. along i-35, expect heavy rainfall especially in austin southward into san antonio. for much of the southeast, going to be warm to almost springlike. a lot of the crispness that was in the fall air is now going to feel more summery to you. a lot of moisture feeding into florida, south gentleman, the carolinas. breezy, too, especially in south georgia. high pressure delightful for you. a light touch of snow. light for some, if you happen to be in colorado, eight to 12 inches of snowfall. in the southeast, eight inch of snow, you'll go nuts. everything is relative, of course. in parts of the pacific northwest, expect scattered showers, great basin, picture perfect. speaking of rain, we were talking about texas. look at the rainfall yesterday in florida. vero beach, 8.32. cocoa beach, 7.08.
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over five inches of rainfall in melbourne. wichita falls, texas, back to the central plains, 2.63, 2.41 in sweetwater. still, the rain's going to continue. the rain-cooled air will cool things off in dallas. the high of 77. 83 in houston. 83 in kansas city. 81 in minneapolis. mid 80s boston to new york. about 80 in washington, d.c. some places may be warmer, toward chevy chase. meanwhile in parts of, say, the northern plains into the central rockies, back into billing and salt lake city, 50s and 60s. 79 in los angeles. 59 in seattle. all right. that is your forecast. t.j., back to you. >> reynolds, thank you. we're at 42 minutes past the hour now. two women get into a fight inside a walmart. they don't just throw punch, they start throwing something else off the shelves. and a hazmat team has to be brought in. i'll explain in a moment. also, india has a reputation for coming up with new
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innovations to make life easier and can do it at cheap prices. well, really cheap now. a fully loaded tablet computer for $35. that is in your morning passport, next. [ male announcer ] its design inspires. its power impresses. it's thin, light and built without compromise. but mostly, it acts like my personal assistant on set. unlike my real assistant who isn't quite as thin, light or powerful. ♪ he's right there, isn't he? designed with the 2nd gen intel® core™ i5/i7 processors, performance you need, style you want. visit dell.com this week and check out our october signature event for great offers on our best systems. and check out our october signature event can i help you? yeah, can i get a full-sized car? forfor convertibles, please stepress star one.ing menu. i didn't catch that. to speak to a representative, please say representative now. representative. goodbye! you don't like automated customer service, and neither do we. that's why, unlike other cards,
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we're about a quarter off the top of the hour. nadia joining me for our morning passport. ipad's pretty expensive. >> they are pretty expensive, but not in india if you're a student. >> if you're a student. >> there's a big butt. what has happen -- big about. what has happened is a british company, data wind, is working with the indian government to come up with a $35 tablet which was launched on wednesday. >> $35. >> $35 -- >> no catch here. only available for the students. >> it really is the -- basically the indian government ordered 100,000. they will eventually have ten million. >> wow. >> you're probably wondering how can it be so cheap. >> i'm listening. >> because of the volume. ten million eventually. also through the apps, the subscriptions and the advertising. also they're going to cut out the middleman by manufacturing parts versus outsourcing the
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parts. there are about 100,000 institutions in india where there is wi-fi -- forgive me, not 100,000, about 1,000 that have wi-fi. student can be using these. the idea was let's find a cheap tablet that can be used for the masses. so break the digital divide so to speak. >> okay. but this thing is fully equipped here. it can handle its own. it's not like they to short it or cut thing out, doesn't have the features, it's fully functioning. >> it's a fully functioning computer with a three-hour data life. but i'm promised that it has a solar panel. think about the reality of electricity. if this is going to rural areas in india, there's a problem with electricity and the internet. then also the cost of the internet. so right now, it is available, they gave 500 students on wednesday during the launch one of these new tablets. ironically wednesday of the day
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that steve jobs died. an extraordinary thing. they are going to have a commercial version of this. >> okay. >> called the u.b. slate. that's going to be about $60. >> that's a great deal. >> once again, you're only buying the hardware. it's the apps, subscriptions, and advertising that are going to cost. >> still, that should help you out. $60 for the tablet -- i don't know how much apps will cost, but still, compared to $500, $600, $700, $800- plus -- >> it will be interesting to see if it gets much chael -- cheaper. you have "i" everything. with your iphone, it's not where it makes its money, it's from the applications, your phone service. >> the monthly bill. >> and the monthly bill. yes, the hardware certainly at a reduced price. it's the things that come with it where the company makes its
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money. i had the pleasure of speaking to the ceo. he was clearly a genius and quite brilliant tech lodgely and would like to bring technology to india and the world. >> before you go, how long before the $60 one is available? >> in november. the commercial one. that will have a phone modem all for $60. breaking the digital divide. >> breaking the digital divide for us, thank you. see you again here shortly. another tablet to tell you about on this topic. this one certainly not $35. this one pretty much priceless. and top secret. it's a top-secret ipad that is carrying so much classified information that only a few people are allowed to see it.
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ten minutes off the top of the hour. a top-secret ipad to tell you about. only a few people in the military can use it. our barbara starr goes in depth as the military goes mobile. >> reporter: t.j., not only does the commander in chief use an ipad, but his top military adviser, the chairman of the joint chiefs, says his ipad is indespensible. i'm noticing the red sticker. secret. >> sure. >> this ipad contains some of this nation's most critical day-to-day military secrets. >> well, i don't want to overdramatize it. but it does have information on
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it that certainly you wouldn't want anyonele to have access to. -- anyone else to have access to. we're not wireless yet. we're not to the point where we can have secret information sitting in a cloud for the chairman. but they will load it, send it to the house, and it will have the daily brief. the intel brief, a walk around the world. it will answer my, what we call commander's critical information requirements. >> reporter: general martin dempsey says his ipad is not only crucial for him, but it's the kind of technology the entire military depends on. >> what i'm interested in, by the way, is we have -- one of the lessons we've learned over the last ten years with war is the extent to come we've pushed capability -- extent to which we've pushed capability to the edge. the junior leader at the edge of all of this with the information he needs to understand what's going on. >> reporter: the military does have to be careful. due to worries about viruses and worms, most devices must be used in a stand-alone mode.
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they cannot be directly connected to military computer network. >> this is probably the tactical outpost of the future. because the power, the generating power and the data management power of these devices in the future, and i'm looking out to about 2020 or such, wherever the commander is, if he and his people have it, it's a critical operation center. every piece of information will be available here. >> reporter: even pilots flying over afghanistan and libya used commercial maps loaded to their ipads when flying combat missions. apple, of course, isn't the only company with this kind of technology. but in one sign of the high regard the military has for the company, last year a number of senior army officers went to apple headquarters in california to see how steve jobs and apple made it all happen. t.j.? >> thanks to our barbara starr
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there. coming up, hazmat teams had to be called in to a walmart store in maryland. why? two shoppers were trying to beat the bleach out of each other. [y and abigail higgins had a tree that bore the most rare and magical fruit, which provided for their every financial need. [ thunder rumbling ] [ thunder crashing ] and then, in one blinding blink of an eye, their tree had given its last. but with their raymond james financial advisor, they had prepared for even the unthinkable. ♪ and they danced. see what a raymond james advisor can do for you. should we order panda blossom, panda moon... how about chinese at home with wanchai ferry? you can make it in just 14 minutes. mmmh, orange chicken. great. i didn't feel like going out anyway. [ male announcer ] wanchai ferry. restaurant quality chinese in your grocer's freezer.
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as we get close to the top of the hour, a government panel recommending that healthy men stop getting routine blood tests that check for prostate cancer. the panel says skreep think lead to treatment that -- screenings sometimes can lead to treatments that are more harmful than good. a doctor says the tests are still important. >> first of all, the message is it is a preventable disease. physical activity, exercise, it's -- easily preventable. you can cut down the prostate cancer risk by 30% just by doing 30 minutes of exercise a day. and a diet with fruit and vegetables, especially tomato products, can prevent prostate cancer. if you can't prevent it, we have to catch it early. it is able to be cured if we catch it early. we can only cure it if it's caught early and you need surgery and radiation, of course, to cure it. you have to catch it at an early stage. the only tests we have now to
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catch it early is psa tests. >> okay. >> without the psa -- until we come up with a better test, i think it is important to continue with testing and to catch it at an early stage while it's still curable. >> the recommendation from the task force has been met with a lot of criticism now. the public will be allowed to weigh in before a final recommendation is issued. we'll look at some of the stories making headlines across the country. we start in baltimore county in maryland. a walmart store had to be evacuated after two women got into a fight. authorities say they were going at it, but not just with their fists, they started pulling bleach and ammonia off the shelves and tossing it at each other. one of the women had to be taken to jail. the other had to be taken to the eye doctor. two others had to be hospitalized, as well. yes, a hazmat team was brought in to clean up the mess. no word on exactly what they got
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into it about in the first place. ♪ and in nashville, tennessee, hundreds of tea party activists turned out on behalf of gibson guitars. not just there for a concert but for a protest. the federal government raided two of the company's factories a couple of months ago over alleged illegal wood imports from india. the protester say the government shouldn't be trying to shut down badly needed jobs in a tough economy. also in one sacramento, california, neighborhood, they are talking turkey. wild turkey. check this out. apparently these turkeys have been chasing folks around. if you're out for a jog, pushing a baby in a stroller. literally, it's the attack of the wild turkeys. i believe this is video from one of our affiliate, went to check the story. they became victims of the wild -- >> help! okay! he won't stop!
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as we cross the top of the hour on this sunday, good morning to you all. we'll show you how things played out at one of these occupy rallies. this one in atlanta. congressman and civil rights icon john lewis showed up. but they refused to let him speak. that story just ahead. also, you may be heading to the store today. there's something you need to know when you walk inside the store. don't turn to your right. i'll explain how the retailers are tricking you into spending more money. from atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn sunday morning on this october 9. 7:00 a.m. here in atlanta. 4:00 a.m. out in san francisco. wherever you are, we are glad you are right here. this is going to be a big week. a big week for the president's jobs bill. it's going to get a test here in just a couple of days. the senate expected to vote on the $447 billion package. and while the congressional budget office says the plan's
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tax on millionaires is going to raise an estimated $453 billion, republicans still don't like the plan and don't like that tax. the president is moving ahead. we heard from him this weekend. take a listen. >> some see this as class warfa warfare. i see it as a simple choice. we can either keep taxes exactly as they are for millionaires and billionaires, or we can ask them to pay at least the same rate as a plumber or a bus driver. and in the process, we can put teachers and construction workers and veterans back on the job. we can either fight to protect their tax cuts, or we can cut taxes for virtually every worker and small business in america. but we can't afford to do both. it's that simple. >> as you know, the -- there have been numerous calls by the president and some of his assistant that we move forward on what he calls his job package and what we call stimulus two.
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the president today either will say or has already said at least put the jobs bill up for a vote so that the entire country knows exactly where every member of congress stands. i hope the majority will respond to the request of the president that we give everybody a chance to go on record on the second stimulus bill. >> the majority leader in the house meanwhile saying that the full bill will not get a vote in that chamber. on the subject of jobs now, we've got the report on the nation's economy, 9.1% we stayed ought for september as far as the unemployment rate goes. about 100,000 jobs were added. the national retail federation says stores expected to hire 500,000 workers for the holidays. among those looking for workers, macy's, expect to add 78,000 jobs. kohl's plans to add 40,000 jobs. toys 'r' us plans to add 4,000 workers, and best buy looking for 15,000 worker, as well, even
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though these are those temporary holiday jobs. oftentimes, they can lead to permanent positions after the holidays. turning to politics now. ron paul is getting another straw poll win. you know, he's one of a number trying to capture the republican presidential nomination. but he got the most votes at the values voter summit in washington. 37%, ran away with this thing. herman cain finished second, 23%, followed by rick santorum with 16%. rick perry came in fourth, and mitt romney, the perceived front-runner, came in sixth. and both governor perry and governor romney were in single digits. three minutes past the hour. more this morning, we're learning about the white house decision to kill anwar al-awlaki. an american citizen and al qaeda leader in yemen. a secret memo made the legal case for killing him. al-awlaki allegedly helped the so-called underwear bomber attempt to set off a bomb on a detroit-bound plane in 2009. the memo concluded that
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al-awlaki could be legally targeted if it was not feasible to capture him. after his death, the white house took heat for killing an american citizen. republican presidential candidate ron paul says the killing sets a bad precedent. >> if the american people accept this blindly and casually, we now have an accepted practice of the president assassinating people who he thinks are bad guys. i think it's sad. >> according to "the new york times" report, the memo was prepared specifically for al-awlaki and does not set a precedent for killing americans suspected of terrorist activity. let's turn to the occupy wall street protests that have been going on for about four weeks now. they look like they continue to grow. we have seen demonstrations across the country. those are the states, people expressing frustration with the lack of jobs, perceived corporate greed, anger over government leadership. protests going on in a dozen states and a number of cities at
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least so far. among the demonstrations we saw this weekend, in the nation's capital, as well. >> end the war, tax the rich! >> these are demonstrators or other demonstrations in sacramento yesterday. hearing a familiar theme at these protests. here it is. >> this is what democracy looks like! >> show me what democracy looks like. >> this is, this is what democracy looks like! we'll turn specifically to an occupy atlanta demonstration. kind of an interesting back and forth playing out there. we had a few hundred people show up at the atlanta rally. one of them, civil rights icon and georgia congressman john lewis. he showed up to show his support. wanted to address the crowd. but the protesters, many of them, didn't appreciate that. didn't want it hear him. and so they wanted to put it to a vote. want you to listen to what
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happened. you'll hear the people near the speaker repeating what the speaker here is saying. so those who are farther away can actually hear what's going on. that explains the dynamic. now listen to how this played out. >> we have fought for the freedom -- >> he has fought for the freedom. >> and the dignity and the respect. >> and the dignity and respect. >> of countless lives. >> of countless lives. >> however. >> however. >> the point of this general assembly -- >> the point this general assembly -- >> is to kick-start -- >> is to kick-start -- >> a democratic process -- >> a democratic process -- >> in which no singular human being -- >> in which no singular human being -- >> is inherently more valuable -- >> is inherently more valuable -- >> than any other human being. >> than any other human being. >> thank you. [ cheers ] >> this went on for several minutes. a lot of back and forth. speakers saying that they wanted to hear from the congressman. but many other ended up voting saying they did not.
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there were people there who expressed some anger and disappointment that they were able to get the attention of an influential congressman like congressman lewis. then when he showed up, he wasn't allowed to have a conversation with them. meanwhile, congresswoman lewis was standing by -- congressman lewis was standing by as all this played out. he eventually was able to speak but not to the crowd. he ended up talking to the local media right after. >> another time, another period when i was very young and head of the student nonviolent committee meetings, we participated in a similar process. we would discuss, we would debate, until we reached consensus. this is not something strange, out of the ordinary for people. >> are you disappointed that you did not get a chance -- >> no. not at all. not at all. >> what do you feel it says about the organizational process? >> well, it will work out. they're growing, mature, it will work out. it will come of age. >> congressman lewis will join
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us next hour. want to stay with us for that. hear his take on how things are going with the occupy movements and also what happened at the atlanta rally. also, this isn't the first time we have seen something like this happen. charlie rangel, congressman from new york, he showed up at one of the occupy rallies in new york, and a lot of those protesters clearly didn't appreciate having him there. >> budget for your own -- go home. get out of here! boo! boo! boo! [ booing ] >> boo! >> afterwards, representative rangle said he wasn't sure if he was the target of that heckling but says if he was, he understands. we turn now to the manslaughter trial of michael jackson's personal physician. when jurors get back to the courtroom on tuesday this week, they'll hear the rest of a taped interview police did with dr. conrad murray who talked about the final hours of jackson's
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life. our ted rowlands is covering the case for us in los angeles. >> reporter: coming up next week in the conrad murray trial, we'll pick up right where we left off last week. that is with the playing of that audiotape of dr. conrad murray talking to investigators. this was an interview he gave investigators just two days after michael jackson died. the jury has heard about an hour and 40 minutes of the tape already. it's a two-hour tape. there's not too much left to go. what they've heard so far has been riveting. murray talks it what happened in the moments before jackson died, what he give jackson in term of prescriptions or medications. he also talks about the fact that he gave michael jackson propofol every single day during the two months he was treating him until the last few days. he said he was trying to help the pop star wean himself off of this powerful, powerful drug. >> i cared about him. i didn't want him to fail. i had no intentions of hurting
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him. and i was compassionate. but what it was doing to recognizing michael jackson may have had a dependency to substance, i was trying to wean him off. >> reporter: following the conclusion of that interview tape being played to the jury, we expect that the prosecution will start to wrap up their case. we expect they'll be done sometime early next week. there's no court on monday. so that means the defense will get their chance at some point next week. ted rowlands, cnn, los angeles. ten minutes past the hour now. and take a look, what has come to denver. some areas actually getting a snowstorm. reynolds is here with me now. reynolds, are these the same areas that a week ago had temperature in the 80s? >> yeah, right you are. and what we're seeing is a big transformation, what happens when you jump from one season to another. we're moving into fall. that's what fall looks like in parts of the central rockies.
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fall in parts of texas looking very different now. there was a time in central texas where they couldn't buy a raindrop. now they're getting tons of rain. more than they need. we've got flash flood warnings in central texas. more coming up. sit tight. we'll see you then. ♪ [ male announcer ] what is the future of fuel? the debate is over. ♪ lexus hybrid drive technology is designed to optimize any fuel source on the planet.
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quarter past the hour now. i was going to ask you a question about this video -- >> bring it on. >> no. you've been in a sarcastic mud,
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i didn't want to set myself up here. this is in denver, qualifies as a snowstorm? >> you know, to say this is a snowstorm, i would definitely say so, yes. the first blast of snow they've had, first winterlake precipitation in a long time. keep in mind, you know, if you ever spend time in the rocky mountains, you'll have snow on the peaks year-round. this is just the first time we're see something at what they call the front range of the peak. even out to the pacific range. cascades. this for the rockies is the first snowfall that we're seeing where people are dealing with it -- >> we were amazed to think that a week ago it was 8 or something like that -- 85 or something like that. >> all this because of a front moving through the u.s. on the other side, in austin, texas, where they were dealing with fires, bastrop, they're getting rainfall. here's the weathermaker. we showed you video moment ago,
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the thing causing this area of low pressure. a giant mixing bowl. you have moisture coming in from the gulf. on the back side, you've got frigid air that comes in from the north. everything spins counterclockwise around an area of low pressure. when we're talking snow, of course the highest points are going to see maybe a foot of snowfall in places. where you get into texas, this is where you could see the heavy rainfall and we're talking about heavy rain. it's going to come in a couple of doses. we've seen a prefrontal trough here and a little secondary installment here. the main front is still back over parts of, say, junction, texas. clear up to abilene. if you're wondering how much rainfall you can expect, some of these places may see from six, maybe seven inches of rainfall just for today and to tonight. for the next 48 hours, take a look at this. still get the frontal boundary. you still have the area of low pressure. then again, the next 48 hours, four to ten inches of rainfall possible for dallas. again, you have to think of what a turn of event we've had in this part of the world.
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we've been so dry, and now we're making a damp recovery. and unfortunately for many of the farmers, it's too late to recoup on the -- the growing season, they lost out on that. issues with the livestock, too late for that, too. again, at least you have some changes. 80 degrees the change in chicago. it was very chilly a few days ago. warming up there. warming up in places like boston, new york, 84. 84 also for much of the northeast. 80 in washington. 71 in atlanta. this area of low pressure and the front is all going to drift its way to the east. the warmup you're enjoying across the ohio valley and upper midwest, it's not going to last long. and you can expect the change to move west to east and the rebound in spots like salt lake city and toward billings. we're not saying going to the 90s or anything, but you will rebound in the 70s, 80s, spots wrapping up. albuquerque, high of 62. 79 in los angeles. 65 in portland. 77 in dallas. and 86 down in miami. that is your forecast, t.j. your turn. >> all right, reynolds, thank you.
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at 17 minutes past the hour, the next time you if shopping, could be today, it's a weekend, you like to get out. when you go to the store today, don't turn to the right when you enter the store. retailers have figured you out. they know exactly what you are going to do, and they're going to use that to get you to spend more money. clyde anderson is next. [ female announcer ] once you taste new fiber one 80 calories... ...with its sweet honey taste,
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22 minutes past the hour. good morning to clyde anderson, financial analyst. >> good morning. >> we're talking about stores that are studying us, figuring us out and tricking us into
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buying something. how much time, energy, effort, and money do they put to the research? >> millions. we've got to realize the game and play it like it's game. we don't know the rules a lot of times so we lose. >> they're spending millions. clearly it get us to spend millions in the store. >> exactly. >> here's one of the tricks. the display, even how they fold the clothes is meant to entice us? >> the magic fold. the way they fold the clothes. it's a proper fold and it look so neat. also you've got the display with the model with the shirt on that's wearing the shirt. and you believe you're going to look like that model in the shirt. you're going to purchase it. it looks so neat you can't refuse that. >> i thought they stack them because you want a clean, neat store. >> it phrase with your mind. -- it plays with your mind. it looks wonderful stacked, you want to purchase that shirt. >> and you're telling me buy one, get one free is not a good one? >> sometimes, not always can be. tell me this, do you always know what the original price was? >> yeah. >> if what the original price of, how can you know if you're
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getting a deal? that's what you've got to look for. they could be increasing the price to go ahead and give you that. they're trying to up their numbers. the more units they sell, the pert the numbers look. >> i don't know about that. buy one get one free sounds good. here's the one i teased a second ago. when you walk into the store, don't turn to your right. this is something we would never think about. >> they're anticipating that you'll turn to the right. the majority of the people in this country are right-handed. what do we do? we turn to the right. they're going to put the higher cost items to the right. they'll play the music louder on the right-hand side. >> really? >> to attract you ever to that side. the new items, feature items, the things that are higher priced or higher ticket items, they'll have to the right. >> chances are you will -- aren't you going to eventually get around to that part of the store anyway? >> sometimes maybe, sometimes not. it depends what you're doing. you may spend all your money before you get to the left. >> and federal reserve probably knows this -- and everyone probably knows this thing. as you wait to pay, you see little stuff around. >> it seem like we should know.
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we've talk good this, but we still fall for it. the impulse items. we're standing there, waiting at the register, that looks good. only a couple of bucks, i'll buy it. they know you're going to do that. that's why they strategically place them for you to buy stuff you don't need. it was not your intention to buy it. >> the little add-ons. and let's put up the graphic now. >> yes. >> this is what we need to keep in mind when we go shopping. i have to do this today. shop with cash. >> the best way to do it. now you know exactly, when the cash is gone, shopping should be done. know your favorite retailers and the prices of the brands. when you go in, you know is this a sale or not a sale. of this item less last week and they increased it to put it on sale. you need to know that. >> it clearance thing? >> the clearance items are always in the back of the store. go directly to the back of the store. if you're looking for the clearance items -- they're messy, they do that intentionally. they want you to get frustrated and not buy the clearance items. >> they're not really trying to get rid of it?
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>> no, no. >> resist the urge? >> we've got to, especially in this economy. we've got to resist the urge, realize what we're doing. >> people these days don't have the choice but to resist the urge. >> you're right. >> good stuff. don't turn to the right, folks. we'll be right back. how about chinese at home with wanchai ferry? you can make it in just 14 minutes. mmmh, orange chicken. great. i didn't feel like going out anyway. [ male announcer ] wanchai ferry. restaurant quality chinese in your grocer's freezer. each day was fueled by thorough preparation for events to come. well somewhere along the way, emily went right on living. but you see, with the help of her raymond james financial advisor, she had planned for every eventuality. which meant she continued to have the means to live on... even at the ripe old age of 187. life well planned. see what a raymond james advisor can do for you.
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some of the stories making headlines -- georgia's democratic congressman, george lewis says he is not offended that the occupy atlanta protesters wouldn't let him speak at one of the rallies over the weekend. lewis says he can relate to what they're trying to accomplish, noting the movement is similar to the civil rights marches of the early '60s. we'll talk live with congressman lewis. my guest next hour. also, "the new york times" reporting on a secret memo that spelled out the government's justification for the killing of radical muslim cleric anwar al-awlaki. the u.s.-born muslim was killed
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in a cia drone strike over yemen about two weeks ago. the memo concluded that al-awlaki could be legally targeted if it was not feasible to capture him. president obama, he used his weekly address to push lawmakers to approve his jobs bill. the senate is expected to vote on the $447 billion measure this week. the national unemployment rate is still at 9.1%. also, long-time texas congressman ron paul, he came out on top in the values voter straw poll that held -- held was a gathering of conservatives in washington. he got 37% of the vote. herman cain finished second with 23%. rick santorum third with 16%. meanwhile, rick perry and mitt romney both came in fourth and sixth respectively. both in single digits. and actress zsa zsa gabor is in ucla's ronald reagan medical center. she was rushed to the hospital last night for an un

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