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tv   American Morning  CNN  October 28, 2011 6:00am-9:00am EDT

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weekend. >> you, too. "american morning" continues right now. not buying it this time. bernie madoff victims telling the con artist and his wife to keep their sob gingrich calling the president's new college loan scam a ponzi scheme? and news from michele bachmann, presidential nominee, drop out, please. and snow protections for the entire year. is the northeast next? a true fall classic. the st. louis cardinals stage a comeback to defeat the texas rangers and force a seventh and deciding game in the world series on this "american morning." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com oh, good morning to you, and happy, happy, happy friday! my favorite day. >> i know. >> besides saturday and sunday. it's october 28th. welcome to "american morning." christine has the morning off.
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>> that game you know, i was so sad, because the yankees were out so early, but, boy, these guy, the rangers and cardinals have really kept this going. good. good baseball. up first, bernie madoff victims are saying don't buy this scam. saying they're having trouble finding sympathy after madoff's wife -- madoff said he's happier in prison and his wife told "60 minutes" the couple tried to kill themselves. the story from our susan candiotti. >> i think anything that comes out of their mouths is self-serving and are lying. >> reporter: richard and cynthia friedman lost their life saving to bernie madoff, so did eileen kent's parents. when they heard ruth madoff talk about a failed suicide attempt in a new "60 minutes" interview. >> i don't know whose idea it was, but we decided to kill ourselves, because it was -- it
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was so horrendous, what was happening. we had terrible phone calls, hate mail. >> reporter: do you believe it? >> i don't believe it. if it's a madoff, you cannot trust anything they say. >> reporter: assuming that she's telling the truth about taking pills, do you feel badly about that? >> i just can't assume it. i think anything that they say is extremely self-serving. ruth has been quoted in the past as saying that she's very concerned about the victims and feels awful and feels terribly. well, why reopen the wound three years later? >> reporter: victims scoff at barbara walters distribution of her abc bernie madoff interview. he says he's happy in prison, because he feels safe there. >> for 16 years he has lived in fear that he was going to be found out, and now he's not in control of his life, and so he is happier there than he was on the outside i. was very much against sending him to a -- a maximum security prison. because i felt that would be revenge, not justice.
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but he's really just snubbing his nose. snubbing his nose at the stip and us. >> reporter: then steph li mazeoff whose husband mark committed suicide last year depressed over his father's crime. >> if i saw bernie madoff right now, i would tell him that i hold him fully responsible for killing my husband, and i'd spit in his face. >> reporter: so every time you hear an interview, every time you read an article involving an interview, what goes through your mind? >> i had a visceral reaction. i really feel sick to my stomach. >> i wish we could get that kind of publicity to people understand who the victims are. they're everyday people. >> reporter: you're hearing people ask them a lot of questions. do you have any questions that remain in your mind that you'd like to ask them? >> if i knew that bernie madoff would actually tell the truth for a change, i would say, why? how? and who helped you?
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>> reporter: for victim, there are many questions they feel will never be fully answered. prosecutors have not charged madoff's children nor his wife. she's living in a borrowed home in south florida. susan candiotti, cnn, new york. to politics now and gop presidential candidate newt gingrich saying president obama's pulling a madoff. yes, that's what he said. he's pulling a madoff with his latest student loan plan. gingrich with an education forum in new york went after part of the president's plan that would forgive outstanding student loans after 25 years of payments. >> i'd like to see the department of education become a research and information center. i'd like to see us reprivatize the student loan program before the president bankrupts the entire country by promising every young person, you will not have to pay your student loan as a student, however, you will later on have to pay off the national debt as a taxpayer. i'm being good to you. before you fig ter out you're
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paying it off as a taxpayer but you'll re-elect me because of your gratitude because you won't be paying off yore loan. which is a ponzi scheme. >>suggest head may skip some's the future debates. santorum will be there. >> i would never skip a debate. i never skip the opportunity to let the american public know what i think about these issues. >> perry nosedived in the polls after a series of stumbles onstage. right now committed to a november 9th debate in michigan. none after that. at many as 18 more gop debates are in the works. >> crazy, that he's not debating or there are 18 more? what's crazier? cain is surging in the poll, now in the bank. cain's chief of staff, mark block, that's him, the smoking
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guy from the ad told our erin burnett, fund-raising picked up raising $3 million in october. >> we've actually doubled in a little over a month, and that's what we're seeing in our grass roots activism growth. >> cane contain finds himself at our near the top of all national and state polls right there with mitt romney. >> you know where he is? he's in alabama. going to a game tonight. unusual campaign. >> running an unusual now, mich tea party card carrying candidate. ned ryan says she's not a serious candidate and her campaign is more about michele bachmann. bachmann is the leader of the tea party caucus in the house of representatives. she's dropped to the bottom of the polls after an early jump. cnn reached out to the campaign but did not get a response.
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it's the biggest "what if" of the 2012 race that will likely never happen, but what if hillary clinton ran? a new "times" survey shows she would do better than her boss, president obama. in fact, totally blow out mitt romney 55% to 38%, clobber rick perry and herman cain, both by more than 20 points. >> wow. looks like john edwards goes on trial in january. a judge rejected a motion by edwards attorney to dismiss his criminal indictment. he faces felony and misdemeanor charges for allegedly violating campaign contribution laws and could get 30 years behind bars and a $1.2 million fine. ending in violence sparked by the disqualification of six people's petition candidates who had already been declared victorious. an independent commission overturning results for what it calls funding issues. angry demonstrators setting
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fires to the movement. the moderate islamist party that turned out to be the big election winner. a rebel from eastern turkey. a 13-year-old found alive after more than 13 days. more than 500 people killed in sunday's earthquake. the mayor apologizing after police tear gassed wall street protesters and put an iraq veteran in the hospital. city officials started an investigation into the use of force. >> i am deeply saddened about what happened last tuesday. it totally didn't turn out the way we wanted it to. people were hurt, and i am the mayor, so i take responsibility and i apologize to those who were hurt. >> veteran scott molson suffered a skull fracture in the violence after a tear gas canister hit him in the head. this shows him bleeding and being carried out. he will need surgery to relief
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pressure on his brain. the 125th anniversary dedication. a special naturalization ceremony to welcome 125 new citizens to america. also a macy's fireworks show and brand new web cam installed on the torch during the face-lift. giving new yorkers a stunning look at the harbor. >> should be fun. world series game six, one for the ages. the st. louis cardinals wait to downed their final strike scored two runs in the ninth inning two more in the tenth giving them a tie against the texas ranger and then won it on david freese's home run in the 11th. the score, 10-9. >> there is goes. >> unbelievable. >> it sets up a seventh and deciding game between the cards and rangers tonight in st. louis. it's the first time since 2002 that the world series has gone to a seventh game, and there is nothing in the world more fun than a seventh game in the world series
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series. >> i know. i like the way david freese ran into that crowd of cardinals. that was cool. >> something there. >> interesting. still to come, the cold front that took texas by surprise could mean snow -- yes, snow -- for the northeast this weekend. rob has the forecast, next. and the widow of the ohio man who released dozens of exotic animals won't be getting them back anytime soon. what the state is doing to keep the animals in a zoo. the smartphone tracker washington says has gone too far. the battle against stocking apps, ahead. it's ten minutes past the hour. [ woman on radio, indistinct ] ♪ bum-bum
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♪ i tell you what i can spend. i do my best to make it work. i'm back on the road safely. and i saved you money on brakes. that's personal pricing. it is 15 minutes past the hour. welcome back to "american morning." state of ohio steps into stop six exotic animals from going back to the pens where they were released last week. the widow of the man who freed 56 pets before killing himself wants to take custody of the remaining animals. animal conservationist jack hanna told cnn's anderson cooper, the animals are just now
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recovering and there's no way they're going back to those cages. >> there's no way over my dead body, it might be that pretty soon, those animals are going back there to the same conditions. >> he says if he has his way, a new law in ohio would prevent 90% of people who try to keep exotic pets on their property from doing so. the family of 11-month-old lisa irwin missing near lay moshgs the parents cancelled an interview with baby lisa's two brothers home on the night she disappeared. jared and deborah bradley still refizing to be interviewed separately by police. and michael jackson's consider, conrad murray on track to go to the jury next week. the propofol expert, their last and most important witness, will be back on the stand today. our report this morning from cnn's ted rowlands. >> reporter: ali and carol, when court resumes we expect nor testimony from dr. paul white. he is the star witness for the defense in this case. it is up to him to try to convince the jury that michael
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jackson may have accidentally killed himself. we got a little bit of that from white during his testimony on thursday. >> i was somewhat perplexed as to how the determination had been made by essentially all of the experts that dr. murray was infusing propofol, because in my examination of the documents and the evidence that was described, it wasn't obvious to me, and i thought that there were questions if, in fact, murray had administered the drugs that he described in his conversations with the police department and the doses that he described, i would not have expected michael jackson to have died. >> reporter: before dr. white took the stand the defense put on an addiction specialist. the reason for this witness to establish for the jury that dr. conrad murray wasn't the only one treating michael jackson in the months before his death. this addiction specialist was also a physician, went through
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the medical records of dr. arnold klein, and established for the jury that michael jackson was given a lot of demerol. >> have you considered -- i understand based on records alone -- have you formed an opinion about whether or not by may 4th at least, or even earlier, that michael jackson was dependent on demerol? >> yes. >> what is that opinion? >> i believe there's evidence that he was dependent upon demerol. >> what about addicted? >> possibly. >> reporter: janet jackson was back in court today leading the jackson contingent inside the courtroom. we expect that closing arguments in this case will now be pushed to next week, because of all the delays that we've seen this week. ali, carol? >> all right. ted, thank you. mexican resorts on the riviera boarded's thus morning. tropical storm rina could drop up to ten inches of rain over
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the eastern part of the yucatan peninsula today. tens of thousands evacuated in cancun and cozumel. the storm is expected to fizzle out before reaching the u.s. coastline. it was supposed to be one of the driest years on record in amarillo. now the texas panhandle is cleaning up after a huge snowstorm broke a 100-year-old record. just over three inches by the time all was said and done. meteorologists you know, like rob marciano say it's not -- it's unusual, but not unheard of. >> let's talk to him. big weather story this weekend, probably the chance of some snow like you just saw in october in the northeast. rob is in atlanta with a striking orange tie. >> yeah. i like the theme there, ali. >> we're getting into halloween a little early. >> that's right. exactly. happy halloween, everybody. a chilly one for folks especially across the northeast and in cases a white one. you saw the video ever the whiteness in amarillo. white conditions across parts of massachusetts and vermont and
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upstate new york yesterday. from four to seven inches from this little system that rommed through the area. obviously the area was cold enough for snow there. but a more impressive system gathering strength, and it has prompted the issuance of winter storm watches from maine all the way down to virginia. two to five inches above 1,000 feet along the appalachians and then three to six expected across parts of interior new england. associated with this system that will be rolling up the eastern seaboard bringing rainfall to parts of the tennessee valley. this would get into atlanta as well and some of the rain or some of the moisture from rina getting up into florida. hats about it as far as rina is concerned for us. new york metro, showers creating a little bit in the way of delays. how the storm gets to the delmarva, intensifying, a nor'easter, first one of the season and not only rain potential, three to six inches of snow across areas of interior new england, new york, the suburbs might.
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boston on the back side will see wet snow as well. the problem with the storm is going to be there are still leaves on the trees. so you get three to six inches of wet snow, that's going to bring down tree limbs and knocking out power. that's the big issue with this particular storm. briefly on what's going on with rina. right over cancun, the center of the circulation. you see the moisture strewn up towards florida. the actual track of this is to go farther to the south and diminish completely. so big road block in the gulf of mexico in part because of the storm systems rolling up the eastern half of the country. bringing very winterlike weather for this halloween weekend. >> oh. that so stinks. >> come on. you know what, ali? carol was poo-poo the market rally. now she's short and does not have enough winter gear. >> exactly the way we need to look at this. >> it's not the winter gear. >> talk about your 401(k) after the show. >> i like that.
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it's your chance to "talk back" on one of the big stories of the day. the question this morning -- should cities prevent occupy protesters not from protesting but from camping out? if you're a protester, the answer's a cinch, right? no. camping out is a form of unity, organization and protest. for city, it's expensive. for police -- tense. especially in light of what happened in oakland. as oakland police tried to clear out occupy oakland protesters, scott olsen, an iraq war veteran was injured. protesters insist overzealous police lobbed a tear gas canister into the crowd hitting him in the head. oakland police are investigating. and in new york, the sergeant the benevolent association say several officers were injured trying to keep order in zanotti park. >> we warned them, did not arrest them. my feeling was that this was
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escalating, and escalating oust control. >> many protesters are incredulous. they say chaos ensues only when police try to rob them of the right to protest. >> rerestrain ourselves just by getting into what looked like they could be or what the police were prepared to be hostile situations. we've successfully remained a peaceful protest. >> so the "talk back" question for you today -- should cities prevent occupy protesters not from protesting but from camping out? facebook.com/americanmorning. facebook.com/americanmorning. we'll read your comments later this hour. all right. coming up, are you worried that your bank might start charging you for using your debit card? some banks have already, and some banks are not, however. details for you after the break. and, no more of them's the old spaghetti for brains.
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haunts houses have become much more sophisticate and successful than ever. our rob marciano goes zombie to show us what's scary. it's 21 past the hour. [ man ] i got this citi thank you card
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25 after the hour. "minding your business" this morning, big rally 0en wall street. news on a debt deal and a relatively strong report on economic growth here in the united states pushed markets higher yesterday. the dow gained 2.8%. nasdaq up 3.3%, s&p 500 closed
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4 3.4% meyer. the s&p 500 up about 13% so far this month. two more days of trading left. optimism over the eurozone deal is losing steam. u.s. stock futures trading lower ahead of the opening bell. criticism that deal doesn't map out a clear path to recovery and may not be enough to help europe avoid a recession. home appliance maker whirlpool announced it's cutting 5,000 jobs. amounting to 10% of its workforce. whirlpool is the parent company of several house hod names like kitchenaid. hewlett-packard decided not to spin off its pc business. it was considering getting rid of one of its core businesses. ceo meg whitman who took over last month says they're changing
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their mind. keeping the pc business, the right thing to do for customers and shareholders. a month since bank of america announced its controversial debit card cities. looking like most of the other big banks are opting not to follow suit just yet. the "wall street journal" reports this morning that jpmorgan chase, citigroup and keycorp decided not to charge customers for debit services. and korean company samsung giving apple a run for its money. surpassing them in global shipments in the sheard quarter making it the largest cell phone maker. sales jumps 34% from the second to third quarter and profits doubled from nearly a year ago. "american morning" right back after the break. ♪ there's a place i dream about ♪ ♪ where the sun never goes out ♪ ♪ and the sky is deep and blue ♪
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you can't change the way banking works. just accept it, man. free ? doesn't close at five ? try nature. it's a bank. what do you want, a hug ? just accept it. hidden fees, fine print, or they'll stick it to you some other way. stay with the herd, son. accept it.
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just accept it. accept it. just accept it. accept it. if we miss this movie, you're dead. if you're stuck accepting banking nonsense, you need an ally. ally bank. no nonsense. just people sense. welcomes back to "american morning." as we cross the half hour, time for the top stories now.
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victims of the biggest rip-off if his tray saying they have to sympathy for bernie madoff or his wife after think media blitz this week. ruth madoff told "60 minutes" the couple agreed to kill themselves but failed. one victim says he doesn't believe the sob story. looking for a snow shovel in amry joe the texas panhandle blasts a 100-year-old record as a surprise snowstorm dumps just over three inches. look at that. look like 15 from pictures. it's unusual, not unheard of, even though it was predicted to be one of the driest years on record in the area. pretty, isn't it? >> does look beautiful, but, man, i hate snow. the boys of summer. after being down to their final strike twice, the cardinals stage a rally in game six of the world series scoring two runs in both the ninth and tenth innings to tie it before a walk-off home run by david freese. the deciding seventh game tonight in st. louis.
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and october could go down as one of the best months wall street has ever seen especially after yesterday. the dow surging 3% higher on news the eurozone had cut a deal to bailout greece. the broader s&p 500 might look a little like your 401(k), up 13% so far in october. there hasn't been a month like this since 1974. neena is live in london where markets are edging back a little bit. is that out of concern as we look at fine print in the euro deal or is it just because we've had such a strong month and a strong reaction yesterday? >> reporter: ali, you really hit the nail on the head there. it is concerns that the devil is perhaps in the details when it comes to the eurozone plan. we got more than we expected in terms of meat on the bone, putting those plans in action will be fiendishly complicated. the chief executive of this efst having informal 3450 aal meetin
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china. perhaps the imf, indeed buying euro bonds eventually. he's stressed at the moment these talks are informal and that we don't actually have any figures in place as to just how much the chinese could invest, and the markets, as you say, still rising on this final friday session, but we do have a little bit of cautious nervousness entering the markets there, because they're off their intraday gains largely on the back of wondering when exactly they'll be able to put these deals into place, ali. >> we'll watch that closely. of course, any speed bumps they hit are going to start to get these markets, again, very jittery. we'll watch it closely with you, nina. you've been covering it closely. mean da dnina dos santos back i london. hanging an effigy along i-95. holding a briefcase, because,
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spieling with cash. the mannequin hung by a street artist next to a mural that says, give a wall street banker enough rope, and he will hang himself. ah. new video of police rounding up protesters in nashville overnight. warned yesterday to obey a curfew or get a permit or leave the plaza. after a meeting, occupiers said they're not going anywhere. six deaths reported from torrential rains and severe flooding in northern italy. towns completely cut off because of mudslides. the storms caused matsch are transport problems across the region. thailand seeing some of the worst flooding in decades. more than 400 people killed. floodwaters rising in bangkok sending millions to higher ground. these picture captured of dogs being evacuated in cages while others can be seen wading through flooded roads. cia director leon panetta's friend make goods on a unique
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bet. the restaurateur will uncork a 141 bottle of wine as promised to mark the successful mission to get osama bin laden. the wine, by the way, is worth an estimated $10,000 to $15,000. must be nice to have friends like that. >> lost on me. $10,000, $15,000 bottle of wine? comes with people who will give you a massage for a week. >> no, no. it would be astounding. if you want to invite me -- >> a glass of wine -- i'll give it to you. >> deal. a bathroom break warranted a quick call to 911 after a toronto man found a 3.5 foot python wrapped up in his toilet. officers put the snake in a pillowcase. i'm trying to get through this. >> after the wine story, it's kind of weird. >> the second snake-related incident police responded to with a 24-hour period. that's my hometown. police are hoping to identify their owners. still to come this morning,
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some ads promise smartphone apps telling you if your husband or wife is cheating on you by tracking every move they make. troubling? yes. illegal? a group of lawmakers say yes and what they're doing about it now. scaring you right out of your pants. rob marciano showing us halloween horrors proving to be a huge profit. 36 minutes after the hour. congratulations. congratulations. today, the city of charlotte can use verizon technology to inspire businesses to conserve energy and monitor costs. making communities greener... congratulations. ... and buildings as valuable to the bottom line... whoa ! ... as the people inside them. congratulations. because when you add verizon to your company, you don't just add, you multiply. ♪ discover something new... verizon. we are now printing on the back sides of used paper and we switched to fedex cause a lot of their packaging contains recycled materials. tell them what else fedex does.
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it is 39 minutes past the hour. welcome back to "american morning." growing concern over so-called stocking apps. the ability to secretly track someone's movements from the gps on their kren phone. now a group of senators is putting pressure on the government to do something about those kinds of apps. john able, bureau chief at wired.com is with us this morning. first, explain to us what sta
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stalking apse are. >> a misleading term. smartphones have always been able to tell you where you are. a big part of their functionality. they can also tell someone else where you prp there's been the ability to share your location with friends and stuff like that. applications like that existed for years. >> you have that on your phone now? >> i do. the phones have always had something like that. the new thing on apple is find my friends. not only do they want to find their phone but incorporate that into a group activity. i just made friends with my friend and colleague charlie serrell, a wired writer extraordinary, happens to be in barcelona, which does me no good, but i know his exact address and can pinpoint him on the map and message him and i could say, what are you doing there? why aren't you writing something for me? >> but he has to agree to that, right? >> he has to agree. >> there are apps, they call
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them secret stalking maps. >> here's the thing. i hone this phone. i have a family plan. that means i own my phone. i own the phone that i give to my wife and my daughter. so it's kind of sketchy what the law is here. i own the phone, but they possess the phone. so i could turn on all kinds of functionality. frankly, with parental controls can turn off a lot of functionality so that my daughter can't do certain thinkings and go to certain sites. i've been able to do that with letter home computer. i now can extend that to her mobile phone. >> can you do that without her knowledge and track her movements? >> absolutely. because i possess the phone. there's almost nothing you can do to someone's phone without having physical possession of it at least for a little while. so i can't, for example, magically snap my fingers and suddenly do something to your phone which tells me where you are or whatever you're doing. >> i wouldn't put it past someone to maybe get ahold of my
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phone and do something to it without my knowledge? >> you do go to sleep sometimes and things like that. you can always lock your phone. all phones have the ability to lock and there are lots of good reasons for that. you don't want people looking at your e-mail and voicemail, stuff like that. the bake precautions you would take against people reading your stuff physically are the same precautions you ought to take so they can't install bad software. >> the bigger question, the senate wants to do something about this. >> yes. >> can it? >> sure. the senate can do whatever the senate sort of wants to try to do. personally, i'm not always very happy with sort of legislative oversight, in emerging technology areas, because we really don't know exactly has the implications are. however, in this kind of area, applications which may or may not exist yet and by the way i spent a lot of time in the itunes store looking for something like this. they're not really quite there. there's a lot of phony stuff. these companies exist, though. having said that, these things exist primarily to do bad thing. the not advertised things, which
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are, to put it in stealth for private detectives, for jealous spouses, for things like that. once that exists and you can do that, that's bad news. so, yeah. i think we do need to look at this a little closer. >> so what type of legislation might they pass that would be effective? >> good lord. >> what could you possibly pit in, like, we'll just -- chts this is the problem. you can require people to inform other people. you can -- you can make it illegal to make certain -- >> that will work. >> well, yeah. putting aside the gridlock in congress, it's very hard to imagine how you could sort of legislate something which would make the technology impossible to use, unless you made the technology illegal to use. and there are so many good uses for this. that that would be wrong. >> right. you know, especially with your daughter. i can understand why you might want to put something like that on her phone. especially if she gets into trouble. >> absolutely.
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>> the broader perspective. is this something we should be worried about? >> well, yes, if you don't have control of your phone and only if you have people in your phone that you're suspicious of that you don't trust, that don't trust you. but that's the same -- that's always been the case. the difference now is that this thing, the device is so small, and you always have it with you, it is a wonderful target for things like this. because instead of just knowing what you're doing at your home computer and your search history and stuff like that, you have that, plus where you've been, when you were there, what are the things around it, the contacts in your phonebook, which might link up with your o geo location, in the wrong hands would be a terrible thing. >> yes, sir. john able, thanks for being with us this morning. we appreciate it. ali?
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major shake-up in the uk this morning. the ancient rules of royal succession are changing in great britain. a little over an hoar ago the british commonwealth announcinged that princesses will finally be getting their fair shot at the throne. max foster live in london for us. what is this news? >> reporter: ali, not just britain. actually 16 countries where the queen is head of state and they've been gathering in australia for a commonwealth heads of government meeting and dana cameron pushing this change in the law, these ancient laws completely out of date, everyone's agreed but a very complex process. talking about the act of succession and what he's going to try to do is change it. under the current system, if catherine had a girl followed by the boy, the boy would be king. trying to change that so that the girl becomes the monarch. if william married catholic --
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historic and affects 16 different countries around the world. not a done deem. the prime ministers agreed they have to take it back to their parliaments and change the law in each one of those parliaments. not done yet but we can assume, it's a major breakthrough. >> does royalty have to agree? >> the royalty is completely out of it. the queen opening the meeting referred to women in her opening speech. certainly giving her seal of approval. not in any way involved. she's completely out of the picture. you can assume obviously the queen is a woman so she would probably be agree. >> probably endorse this. >> let me ask you this. on a separate note, there's a lot of talk about a scar on kate middleton's head that people could see her hair was pulled back. >> like harry potter? >> exactly. i can't really make it out, but a do we know about this?
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>> well, if you look just above the ear, you can see a mark. the talk of yesterday. people talking about hair extensions and stuff. completely out of my comfort zone. the palace said she had a childhood injury. lots of people are saying this is a scar from an operation. it might be the injury. not really sure. it's pretty viz about, but they're quite relaxed about it and not saying anything more about it beyond that. it's a personal matter. >> you think you're out of your comfort zone talking about hair extensions? could mean you're a hairpie. you're a handsome fellow, max. thank you. interesting story coming out of the royal family. what do you think? carol, you like to? or -- >> i'm just laughing about the whole controversy. oh, my gosh, she has a scar on her head. what could be it? >> we'll look into it deeper. coming right back. ♪ when your chain of supply ♪ goes from here to shanghai, that's logistics. ♪
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we asked you on "talk back," the question -- how long should occupied protesters be able to camp out? this from adam. protesters shouldn't be allowed to camp out at all on public
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property. it's called trespassing's they wouldn't allow fames that lost their homes to live on public property. why should protesters get special treatment? from john, get organized and vote. that's where the real power of the people can be felt. from joshua, i feel bad for the people who live in the neighborhoods where the protesters are camped out. they have a right to be heard, but not all night long. where did this new phenomenon come from? they should go home at night and come back in the morning. i agree with a lot of what they're complaining about so my comments aren't aimed at the messages, just the messengers. >> keep your comments coming. we'll read more throughout the show. the industry scoring big bucks from corn mazes, spooky houses, haunted houses generating estimated $300 million here in the united states. >> i especially love corn mazes.
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i get lost. not like those people who have to call 911. rob marciano went undercover in one of the most popular haunted haas the in the entire country to show us how much things have changed. >> reporter: i mean, who doesn't like a good scare? right? the haunted house industry as you -- goodness. that scared me right there -- is booming. yeah. i went undercover to bring you this hard-hitting invest gative report. >> reporter: i always enjoy meeting new friends at halloween and this is some of the creatures of another world haunted house. mind if i take a look inside? i'll take that as a yes. >> oh! ow. friend. you're a friend. i'm here with ben armstrong one of the owners. ben, this place is massive. it's got to be a year-round operation? >> yes. we work on this absolutely all year long.
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we conceptualize it, work on all the creatures and begin construction as early as february. what queer goiwe're going to dom you into a monster that even your mother would be proud of. ♪ i feel pretty i feel pretty ♪ >> all zombie's up. i'm going to go scare some kids. come on. so this is our spot. >> this is it? >> what's the call? what's the game plan? >> you use the dark to your advantage. dead man rising from the grave. >> yes, i love it. >> yes! >> ah! >> i just had my first scream. it felt good. ah! every night they line up around the block at haunted houses like these across america bringing an estimated $300 million a year! >> the haunted house industry changed dramatically in the last 15 to 20 years. so you really need to deck it
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all out, 360. everything's got to be good. and technology is increasing. we have a lot of animatronics, sophisticated characters that move. we use a lot of projection and illusion. we're constantly upping the ante to gish the customer more than just a guy jumping out and scaring them, although there is the scare of what we do. >> reporter: well, that is sensory overload. working at a haunted house is an adrenaline rush. now back to my day job. >> that was the late-night report, and quite frankly, i couldn't get all the makeup off yesterday. guys, i can't even explain to you. you know, i wasn't that jazzed about it until i got the makeup on and got in there. you get your first scare. i mean, the poor kid dropped to his knees screaming, and i was like -- >> i forgot. i'm here with the kid-haters! christine is off today. that's the excitement you got out of it. you made some kid wet his pants. >> i don't hate children. i just like other people's children for a short time.
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>> scary people. >> you know, i was going to ask you about that, because you can't scare them too much. right? you have to sort of temper -- >> hey, a kid chooses -- >> i asked, a height restriction, age restriction? they don't recommend kids younger than 6 to go in. basically you pay $20-some odd bucks to get in, you know what you're getting into. it's play to your own risk. >> doesn't matter if you're 5! >> it did look like fun. the makeup was incredible. >> they do a great job with makeup. over 100 actors. they do it for the love of the game. once in there you get a taste of it, you're hooked. >> very good, rob. we're going to check that out later in the show. that was really good. >> awesome. you haven't seen a meerkat eating a pumpkin, you simply haven't lived. the brookfield zoo gives animal as real halloween treat. hippo, gorillas, african wild
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dogs all feasted on these gourds. the lions and bears fed pumpkins in front of visitors over the weekend. be honest. nothing beats the meerkat inside the pumpkin. check this out. oh. we already saw that. >> i saw the meerkat inside the pumpkin. it was quite cute. >> okay. just ahead in the next hour, the threat of new crackdowns and legal moves against occupy wall street as oakland's mayor does some damage control. we'll speak to a new york city police sergeant who says cops need protection from the protesters. going head-to-head way protester in our studio. it's four minutes until the top of the hour. treat you like a policy, not a person. instead of getting to know you they simply assign you a number. aviva is here to change all that. we're bringing humanity back to insurance and putting people before policies.
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[♪...] >> announcer: now get a $250 airfare credit, plus save up to 65%. call 1-800-sandals. certain restrictions apply. occupy oakland protesters are back after police cleared them out with tear gas tuesday night. the mayor of oakland apologizing this morning after the violence landed a marine in the hospital. not buying it this time. bernie madoff's victiming telling the con artist and his wife they can keep their sob stories to themselves. and a winter wonderland minus the actual winter from
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record-breaking snowfall in texas it the white halloween that could be ahead in the northeast. and it's not heaven. it's st. louis. it was a field of dreams for the cardinals last night sending the world series to a winner take all game seven on this "american morning." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com good morning. it is friday october the 28th. welcome to "american morning." christine is off today. >> yes. happy friday to you. up first this morning, the damage control after the crowd control. oakland's mayor now apologizing after police tear gassed wall street protesters and put an iraq war veteran in the hospital. she also says city officials have started an investigation into the use of force. dan simon live in oakland this morning. it's kind of surprising that the mayor apologized. >> reporter: well, it's a total flip-flop.
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let me tell you where we are first of all, carol. we're here at the hospital where 24-year-old scott olsen, the iraq war veteran is recovering. what happened to him has really been a rallying point, provided a rallying point for protesters here in oakland and across the country. in the face of the negative p.r. that oakland received, the mayor completely reversed herself. she is now saying those protesters can know go back to that plaza in front of city hall. issued a statement, gave a little news conference. listen to some of what she had to say. >> i am very deeply saddened about what happened last tuesday. it clearly didn't turn out the way we wanted it to. people were hurt, and i am the mayor. so i take responsibility and i apologize to those who were hurt. >> reporter: so one thing the mayor is saying is that she doesn't want those protesters to camp out overnight, but those
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calls are apparently being ignored. once again, we're seeing a tent city being set up in in front of city hall. carol, this really raises the question, why did the city of oakland take this action in the first place only to reverse itself a few days later, now letting the protesters back in. back to you. >> the other question, is she saying that the police were in the wrong here? >> reporter: she's not saying that. what she is saying is that she's going to investigate the tactics. it's not really clear who authorized that use of force, what kind of arrangements or planning was done in advance. clearly, the perception is that the police was overhanded in its efforts to get rid of those protesters and take them out. i should also tell you that there's been a ripple effect across the san francisco bay area. san francisco was also said to remove its protesters, where they had been peddling over the past couple of weeks, and police
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officers were set to remove the protesters there, and then they called things off as well. so apparently this negative attention that oakland has received has caused san francisco to rethink its policy as well, carol. >> the same thing is happening in many parts of country. in baltimore, the mayor asked the protesters not to camp out at the inner harbor, but they're still there and police haven't moved in to act. so sort of a ripple effect because of what's happening in oakland. dan simon, live in oakland, thanks so much. coming up at 10:00 eastern, we'll talk to keith shannon, the injured marines roommate who's been at his bedside at the hospital. that comes your way in an hour on "american morning." bernie madoff's victims are saying don't buy the latest con. people who lost thousands say they're having trouble finding sympathy after madoff said he's happier in prison and his wife told "60 minutes" the couple tried to kill themselves. susan candiotti sat down with some of the victims.
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>> i think anything that comes out of their mouths is self-serving and are lying. >> reporter: richard and cynthia friedman lost their life saving to bernie madoff, so did eileen kent's parents. when they heard ruth madoff talk about a failed suicide attempt in a new "60 minutes" interview. >> i don't know whose idea it was, but we decided to kill ourselves, because it was -- it was so horrendous, what was happening. we had terrible phone calls, hate mail. >> reporter: do you believe it? >> i don't believe it. if it's a madoff, you cannot trust anything they say. >> reporter: assuming that she's telling the truth about taking pills, do you feel badly about that? >> i just can't assume it. i think anything that they say is extremely self-serving. ruth has been quoted in the past as saying that she's very concerned about the victims and she feels awful and she feels terribly. well, why reopen the wound three years later? >> reporter: victims scoff at
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barbara walters description of her abc bernie madoff interview. he says he's happy in prison, because he feels safe there. >> for 16 years he has lived in fear that he was going to be found out, and now he's not in control of his life, and so he is happier there than he was on on the outside. >> i was very much against sending him to a -- a maximum security prison. because i felt that would be revenge and not justice, but he's really just snubbing his nose. he's snubbing his nose at the system. he's snubbing his nose at us. >> reporter: then stephanie madoff, whose husband mark committed suicide last year depressed over his father's crime. >> if i saw bernie madoff right now, i would tell him that i hold him fully responsible for killing my husband, and i'd spit in his face. >> reporter: so every time you hear an interview, every time you read an article involving an interview, what goes through your mind? >> i had a visceral reaction. i really feel sick to my
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stomach. >> i wish we could get that kind of publicity so people understand who the victims are. they're everyday people. >> reporter: you're hearing people ask them a lot of questions. do you have any questions that remain in your mind that you'd like to ask them? >> if i knew that bernie madoff would actually tell the truth for a change, i would say, why? how? and, who helped you? >> reporter: for victim, there are many questions they feel will never be fully answered. prosecutors have not charged madoff's children nor his wife. she's living in a borrowed home in south florida. susan candiotti, cnn, new york. to politics now and gop presidential candidate newt gingrich saying president obama is pulling a madoff with his latest student loan plan. gingrich at an education forum in new york went after part of the plan that would forgive outstanding student loans after 25 years of payments. >> i'd like to see the
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department of education become a research and information center. i'd like to see us reprivatize the student loan program before the president bankrupts the entire country by promising to every young person, will you not have to pay your student loan as a student, however, you will later on have to pay off the national debt as a taxpayer, but i'm being good to you. so by the time you figure out you're paying it off as a taxpay taxpayer, i'll be gone, but you'll re-elect me because of your gratitude because you won't be paying off yore loan. which is a ponzi scheme. >> rick perry suggesting he may skip some of the future debates. rick santorum saying he will be there. >> i would never skip a debate. i never skip the opportunity to let the american public know what i think about these issues. perry took a nosedive in the polls after a series of stumbles
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onstage. right now committed to a november 9th debate in michigan. none after that. as many as 18 more gop debates are in the works. surging in the polls and now in the bank. herman cain. cain's fund-raising surge. he raised $3 million in october. >> we've actually doubled in a little over a month, and that's what we're seeing in our grass roots activism growth. >> cain now finds himself at our near the top of all the latest national and state polls, right up there with mitt romney. also new this morning, another miracle rescue from the rubble in eastern turkey. a 13-year-old boyne found alive after being trapped five days. more than -- isn't that amazing? more than 500 people were killed in sunday's 7.2 magnitude
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earthquake. six exotic animals in ohio will stay put. the widow of the man who freed the animals before killing himself wants custody. they will be kept in kwaurnt tooen. jack hanna says the animals are just now recover and by no means should go back into the conditions in which they were living. the statue the liberty welcoming the huddled masseses again on the 125th anniversary dedication. a ceremony to welcome 125 new citizens to america, also a macy's fireworks show and brand new web cams installed on the torch. could that happen during libby's face-lift? giving new yorkers a stunning look at new york's harbor. a night to remember in st. louis. the cardinals twice down, final strike scored two runs in the ninth inning. two more in the tenth inning to tie the texas rangers and then won it on david freese's home run in the 11th. incredible. >> there it goes. >> look at ta.
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look at it go. sets up a seventh and deciding game between the cards and rangers tonight in st. louis. first time since 2002 that the world series has gone to a seventh game, and there is nothing in life more fun than a seventh game in the world series. >> yeah, but wa could beat game six? game seven couldn't possibly. >> that's right. there's nothing more fun than a series that gets to seven games. that was the way to do it. game six was really fun. >> awesome. still to come this morning, the cold front that took texas by surprise and why people in the northeast may have to get out their shovels this weekend. it's going to -- in fact, it's snowing in some parts of connecticut already. it's crazy. rob has the forecast up next. and newer is not always better, at least when it comes to birth control. a new warning about one of the most popular forms of the pill in the world. you're watching "american morning." it's 10 minutes after the hour. we're america's natural gas
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it is 14 minutes past the hour. welcome back. after seeing what happened in oakland, a new york city police sergeants is looking to protect 5,000 officers in his union. he says you're not hearing the whole story about the violence in oakland or lower manhattan and is threatening to sue any protest who injures an officer. president of the sergeant's benevolence association in new york and speaking on bam of the protest, dan cantor of the working families party 4 new york. welcome to both of you. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> let's start with what happened in oakland, because one of the protesters was injured there yesterday. the mayor of oakland apologized for what happened, although she
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did not place any blame on police. from your perspective as a police officer, what went down in oakland? >> well, i don't know her reasoning behind giving the green light, so to speak to have the police take action. my understanding of what happened was that you know, specific laws, conditions, were created and being broken, and protesters were basically being asked to move and clear out. that didn't happen, and then police took action, and it escalated. >> at what point did police decide to use tear gas, let's say? >> well, that's an interesting decision to be made. tear gas would be used in violent crowds. we see it all the time on tv. particularly in a lot of foreign countries, where crowds are being disbursed. >> in this particular instance in oakland, there were reports protesters were throwing things like rocks and pain at police officers. do those actions in themselves warrant the use of tear gas?
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>> they could. absolutely could. >> and, dan from your perspective, what happened in oakland? >> it seemed that the police overreacted, that the amount of force was used on an overwhelmingly peaceful group of demonstrators. there were some outliars. police have a tough job. they've got to keep order and respect the first amendment rights of protesters. that's not a trivial balance to keep and we count on the police to uphold the rights of protesters to petition their government, so to speak and assemble freely. in oakland, it was terrible. this young iraq vet is in critical condition, serious now. >> he's better now. >> he's good. >> regardless, it's terrible that in such a situation somebody back from iraq gets hit in the head and is in the hospital. it's good the oakland mayor apologized. we see many police departments around the country dealing much better with protesters than in oakland. much more respectful. that's how it should be, because this is a very serious amendment
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to aware trying to uphold. >> even you have said that police are in a tough position. right? and tell us about that, because -- >> why they're trained. >> do police feel they're in the middle and being used in a way? >> authority can be used. our job, police across the country, their job is really to hold the constitution, when you think about it, and when violations occur, laws are broken, there becomes the issue of conflict. this is a decision that has to be made whether action is taken, and, are you know, everyone understands the right to free assembly and protest. we get that. there are also rights of other person who are on their way to work, live in the area, need to get in and out of traffic and walk around their particular city. >> and you say officers have been injured in lower manhattan. 20 officers. tell us about that? >> that's right's there's approximately 20 officers, maybe a little bit more than that right now who have received mine are injuries. no one has gone to the hospital. like in the case of this veteran
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in california. you know, they've received injuries in the course of making arrests or being assaulted, and what i'd like to see is that not happen. i'd like to see nobody get injured. we talk about the veteran in oakland who was injured and yes, he's an iraq veteran, but anyone could have gotten injured and that wouldn't be a good thing either. my method is put everybody on notice -- >> who is injures these police officers? >> what happens in a demonstration, when there is a need to take action, to correct a violation, a law, or correct an obstruction of, you know, pedestrian traffic, two things can happen. either the protesters comply, or they resist. and we've seen peaceful demonstrations in the past. we've seen sit-ins where people get arrested, that's the end of it. in cases where conflict and violence comes about as a result
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of it, we now have a situation that escalates to a whole different level, and that expands into other people or people that want to -- >> so you're saying that protesters in the occupied movement have injured police officers in the course of arrests? >> yes. that's how it generally happens. >> well, in general, these have been overwhelmingly peaceful protests all over the country. unfortunately, new york, the most prominent example of unfortunate action was the pepper spray by a police captain of one of the protesters. listen, that happens and there are areas we count on the police to exercise restraint and count on the protesters could be non-violent. an irony, this becomes the decision about this, as opposed to what protesters are really about, which is why the oakland thing was so upsetting. ironic, my favorite sign, one of my favorite, police join us. they're destroying your pensions, too. i know this is on the minds of sergeant mullens and his members. their pensions were undone by
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some of the gambling that happened on wall street. so it's important to keep in mind what this is really all about, and not turn it into a battleground. >> let me ask you this question. why is it important that these protesters camp out? why can't they go home at night and come back in the morning? >> you might have asked the same in tahrir square in egypt. you have to be there physically to make your point. >> all night long? >> sure. why do they say resurrection city on the mall amp the king died? a long, historic condition. it's not the only way but a long, historic one and saying this is so important we're going to upset our normal routine and be here overnight. this unemployment crisis and housing crisis are so important to people they're willing to do that and they have to be respected for doing it. >> these protesters camping out overnight, would you rather they not? >> i would, and i honestly believe they have an impact to other businesses in the area, to the community and the area, and
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they're arguing for pensions, but public safety has to come before money. and that seems to be the big issue in this country. it's always about money. we lost touch with public safety, values and things that affect the everyday working person. if we're all for the working person, then we would be doing orderly protests, we would be doing -- we've had many protests in this city on a daily basis. sit-ins, for the most part this has been a peaceful demonstration, but there has to come a point where the people, the residents and the business people in lower manhattan also have rights that are enforced. how do you survive paying $20,000, $30,000 a month in rent. a big number, but ultimately that's the american dream. >> thank you both for coming in. sergeant mullens, dan, thank you so much. ali? >> good discussion. 22 minutes after the hour. check of the weather. rob, a lot to report on in terms
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of the weather. snow in connecticut, and in the south, snow close to we we are? >> snow in many spots and nor come, ali. first off, what happened in the texas panhandle. amarillo reporting snow over the past 24 hours. coating grassy areas. two to three inches, as a matter of fact. we didn't think they'd get this much snow and they're take it. any precip is welcome. this early in the season, it's a shocker. seeing snow across parts of new england. upstate connecticut and upstate new york, western massachusetts just outside of boston seeing significant ♪ and vermont. four to seven inches from a system that rolls through yesterday, setting the stage for what's about to come over the next 24 to 36 hours. the storm system across the south is bringing rain across the tennessee valley and mid-south making its way towards the east coast.
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as it does so, winding itself up like a nor'easter would do. memphis back to nashville seeing rain. huntsville now, not terriblery strong but strengthening towards the coastline. rain across florida from what's left of rina. our system towards the carolinas, towards the delmarva, winding itself up during the day tomorrow and throughout the overnight tomorrow night. it looks like significant snow in inland areas. ocean temperatures still kind of warm. as long as you get that breeze off the water it's going to keep temperatures just warm enough so we don't see a significant accumulation, but could see a difrting, an inch maybe two in places like new york city or boston. you go further inland. winter storm watches posted as far south as virginia. of course, as far north as parts of maine. three to six inches potentially. you may say, it's that time of year? no. this is unusual if we get this much snow to fall this time of year. we still have leaves on the tree. weighted down by the snow.
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power outages especially away from the i-95 corridor. for some folks, ali and carol, we're going to see maybe a bit of a white trick-or-treat scenario. >> i love it. people tweeting their kids will wear snowsuits for the first time before their halloween costumes. i like you, rob. i love the snow. >> bring it on. >> carol, on the other hand, would like it to be a little warmer. >> i was born to live in a tropical climate. >> you're welcome anytime, carol. still to come, everybody's favorite airline fees still going up. details after the break.
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two more days of trading left to go in october. optimism over the eurozone deal is losing steam. now u.s. stock futures trading lower ahead of the opening dell. criticism that that europe oh deal doesn't map out a clear path to recovery and may not be enough to help europe avoid a recession. the nation's largest airlines collecting a bucketload on fees. it's 1ds.5 million in april, may and june says the government. up 1% from the same time last year and more than 8% from the previous quarter. for the very latest an your money check out the all-new cnnmoney.com. "american morning" back, right after this break. where do you go to find a super business?
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you know, the ones who do such a super job, they're backed by the superguarantee®? only superpages®. wherever you are, wherever you're going, you'll find the super business you need. so next time, let the good guys save the day. get the superguarantee®, only at superpages®. in the book ... on your phone or online. it is 30 minutes past the hour. good morning to you. here are your top stories -- grief giving way to a moment of joy in turkey more than 100 rour hours after a powerful 7.2 magnitude earthquake killed more
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than 500 people. a 13-year-old pulled from the rubble alive. in nashville a deadline to get occupy wall street protesters off the plaza. yesterday incurring a curfew saying they'll need a permit if they want to stay. an a meeting, occupiering say s they're going nowhere. and in oakland, an iraq war veteran put in the hospital. he is said to be improving in the hospital after suffering a fractured skull. and the animals, 56 exotic, staying in the ohio zoo for now. the woman of the husband who freed them wants custody. they're saying they are malnutritioned and could cause a threat. the st. louis cardinals
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refused to lose tying it up on davis freese's two-run triple and tied it up again in tenening and finally won it for good on freese's walk-off home run in the 11th. game seven tonight in st. louis. >> what a great series it's turning out to be, carol. game seven doesn't come along very often. all in all, thursday was a very good day for the u.s. economy. europe had a deal to ease its debt crisis, and america's economy is growing. the market is rocking, we're looking at possibly the best month since 1974. the s&p 500, which may look a bit like your 401(k) is up 13% in one month. you'd be lucky to get 13% in most years. is it too soon to start celebrating? the former undersecretary of the treasury under president george herbert walker bush, a visiting scholar at the policy center, good friend of the show. good to see you in person.
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>> good to be here. >> you run these numbers a lot. you look at 2.5% gdp growth. we grew 2.5% from the second to third quarter. biggest measure of our economy that we have. some criticize it, but it's what we have. where does 2.5% growth stand in the world of booming economy versus a recession? >> it's all compared to what? 2.5% is good. the good news, much better than numbers earlier in the year, less than 1% and 1.5 in the second quarter. 2.5% is pretty good. signals we're heading away from recession. a real concern a month ago. it's not large enough to make unemployment go down. we freed to be 3%, 3.5, 4% to make unemployment go down. >> is it truly strong enough to say maybe that double dip talk can go away for a little while? >> put it on the shelf for the time being. there are other straws in the wind, too. significant other data showing the economy returning to a path of modest growth consistent with
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a strength in the economy. >> polling, some of the things going on in the republican presidential nomination debates are giving people the impression that so much of what is wrong with the economy or not fixed in the economy has to do with washington. in truth what washington today or in the past has done is almost marginal compared to the effects of the whole world on our economy. >> yeah. i think that's right. i think europe is incredibly important. that's why this deal reached is very, very important, and it's not -- it's a long way from being a done deal. they did the three things they freed to do. reduce greek debt, strengthen their banks and put together a facility to keep italy and spain in the markets as a reasonable price. started down all three roads. very positive. a long way to go on that but that helps our economy, the mood in the economy and the markets a lot. >> sure. those two things combined led to the market gain we saw yesterday. >> right. >> you ran a simulation yesterday, your organization, to sort of see what would happen if a major bank were to fail right
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now. tell me why you did that and what you found. >> the reason question it the dodd frank law ended too big to fail and ended the possibility of taxpayer money used in bailouts of back. that's not well understood among the public or the financial industry. we put together a cast led by larry summers and other famous regulatory people, former secretarying, and failed a big bank under dodd-frank and showed how it would be dealt with. >> and it wouldn't be dealt with the same -- not that the government would intervene to protect that bank? >> the rules completely changed under dodd-frank. the rescues done in 2008 of big banks could not be done without congress stepping in. regulators don't have that authority. >> what would happen? >> the bank closed. the senior most management if responsible fired and perhaps have pay clawed back and the bank put to a resolution process, returned to the private market but not until cred ters actually lose money and that would be the process.
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which is completely different from what went on before. banks remained open, management stayed in place, equity holders did just fine and were bailed out. >> a lot of people say, if banks fail, let them fail. the fear we have, of course, after lehman what we didn't necessarily, and what a lot of smart people didn't expect to happen, it would put a freeze on lending between banks. a lot of regular folks say why do i care? it ended up causing a financial crisis the world had never seen before. >> the issue is the contagion issue. with banks, their liability are liquid. dep depositing and awe flee. when they fail, the economy fail. no example of a modern economy that works without a healthy banking system. banks present a special problem and the dodd-frank resolution system is meant to walk a fine line between bailouts, which nobody wants, including the big banks don't want and failures. so we've got to sort of a middle ground where we resolve the
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bank, return to the private sector, in a humbled form, and hopefully we've found that middle ground. that's what the simulation was intended to do. >> at risk of scaring off viewers, one of the things important in the euro deal was that banks in europe need to have something called core capital. a minimum of 9%. 9% of their assets have to be fairly liquid, solid things that they can depend on. i wonder if you asked ten people on the street how much they think a bank should have in something like core capital, i think most would think it would be substantially higher or need to be substantially higher than that? >> yeah. if you run the number, if you look at simulations, 9% of capital, which is common equity. it's the excess of the assets over the liabilities. >> right. >> for a bank, it's really a pretty good number, that will eliminate a very, very large percentage of failures and losses. that seems to work. if you don't put any leverage, the banks make no money, aren't
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profitable and can't serve customers. >> they work. people are surprised banks have less money in that equity than you think they do. that's the fact. thanks for joining us. >> my pleasure. >> the former undersecretary of the treasury under president george h.w. bush. carol? core capital. i've learned something this morning. thanks. still ahead, progress made. lengthy nba labor talks offering a glimmer of hope this morning. could handshakes be next? and no more of spaghetti for brains. haunted houses have become more sophisticated and more successful than other. our own rob marciano goes zombie on us to show us what's scary. it's 38 past the hour. ♪
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[ scary laughter ] >> did you that really well. >> thank you. thank you very much. voice-overs for haurnted mothers. >> hey, did you know there was a
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haunted attraction industry? that's what it's called. a haunted attraction industry. anyway, it's scoring big bucks from corn mazes to spooky houses general are aitding $300 million in ticket sales each year in the united states. >> our rob marciano went undercover in one of the most popular haunted houses in the country to show us just how much things have changed. [ xarpy laughter ] >> yeah. ali, we could use that voice. >> all have is the voice. you've got the whole operation going. >> thanks to a team of makeup artists and costume directors. here's a look at my hard-hit investigative report. >> reporter: i always enjoy visiting haunted houses. do you mind if i take a look inside? i'll take that as yes.
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>> oh! ow. new friend. new friend. i'm here with ben armstrong one of the owners. ben, this place is massive. it's got to be a year-round operation? >> yes. we work on this absolutely all year long. we conceptualize it, work on all the creatures and begin construction as early as february. what we're going to do now, though, we're going to transform you into a monster that even your mother would be proud of. ♪ i feel pretty i feel pretty ♪ >> reporter: all zombie's up. i'm going to go scare some kids. come on. so this is our spot. >> this is it? >> what's the call? what's the game plan? >> you use the dark to your advantage. come out through the door, you're a dead man rising from the grave. >> yes, i love it. >> yes! >> ah! >> reporter: i just had my first scream.
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it felt good. ah! every night they line up around the block at haunted houses like these across america bringing an estimated $300 million a year! [ truck horn sound ] >> the haunted house industry changed dramatically in the last 15 to 20 years. so you really need to deck it all out, 360. everything's got to be good. and technology is increasing. we have a lot of animatronics, sophisticated characters that move. we use a lot of projection and illusion. so we're constantly upping the ante to give the customer more than just a guy jumping out and scaring them. although that is the core of what we do. >> reporter: well, that is sensory overload. working at a haunted house is an adrenaline rush. now back to my day job. who doesn't like a good scare and a good haunted house for sure? over 100 actors that work that deal. they're not making a whole lot, but i know how they feel now. once you get your first scream, once you see the terror in their
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eyes -- there's nothing like it. >> what's wrong with you people? >> hey, by the way -- take a look what i sent my dentist earlier this morning. not -- not happy. i spent 24 hours scrubbing my face and brushing my teeth to get back on set here. >> gosh. really, you were so excited, earn your first scream. what did that feel like? >> it's hard to describe. it's much like any other sort of adrenaline rush i've gotten doing other things that are a little more physical. seeing the fear in some of these eyes and seeing the first kid drop to his knees in terror. he'll live. he'll be fine. >> hey, they know what they're getting into. >> they pay money. over $20 to go into these places in haunted houses across the country. he know what they want, and they're getting it. >> a business story. a halloween story. good to see you, my friend. >> happy halloween. morning headlines are next.
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including an ugly mold problem on campus. you'll never believe where they're going now. let's say they're about to get a crash court in aquatics. we asked this question -- should protesters be prevented from camping out overnight? we'll read some of your responses later. it is 26 past the hour.
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13 minutes until the top of the hour. welcome back to "american morning." your morning headlines -- a major shake-up in the uk. commonwealth leaders approved a change to a 300-year law succession giving princesses an equal shot at throne. and losing steam this morning, u.s. stock futures trading lower ahead of the opening bell. oakland's mayor apologizing after police tear gas wall street protesters and put an iraq war veteran in a hospital. she also said city officials have started an investigation into the use of force. six exotic animals in ohio will stay put. the widow of the man who freed 64 pets before killing limbs will not get custody of the surviving animals for now. ohio's government says they should stay in quarantine until they recover. and cruising through the rest of the semester. starting today, 240 students will be relocated to a cruise
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ship because the school is dealing with a mold problem. there's no deal, just cautious optimism as nba owners and the players union plan to meet again this morning to try to end the lockout. the first two weeks of the regular season have already been cancelled, and the rest of the november schedule is now at risk. oh. and the world series going to a game seven after a comeback for the ages. the st. louis cardinals beat the texas rangers on a david freese walk-off home run in the 11th inning. it came after the cards were down to their last strike, twice. once in the nine, again in the ten tenth, but rallied to tie. tame seven tonight in st. louis. that's the news you need to start your day. "american morning" back after a break. ford fusion hybrid emerges as the clear fuel economy leader over camry hybrid. kimberly? the fusion hybrid holds a 10 mile per gallon advantage in the city over the toyota camry hybrid.
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uh... that's not good. i would like 10 more miles. he's going to have a a lot to think about, kimberly. and there you have it....fusion hybrid. with best in class city fuel economy.
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there you go, happy birthday, statue of liberty. 125th birthday in new york city here. it's crisp this morning. getting up to 51, but a whole lot of people commuting into new york complaining about snow on the ground before halloween. it's happening. >> it's going to snow tomorrow. maybe three inches. >> like real snow. >> crazy. welcome back to "american morning." house call now. a new warning about an extremely popular form of birth control. a new study of almost a million women released by the food and drug administration shows women who are on the drug yaz made by bayer had a 70% greater chance of experiencing a blood clot than women taking older birth control drugs. fda finding troubles from johnson & johnson and merck.
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the fda is holding a meeting in december to discuss the findings. if you have a family history of colon cancer, taking two aspirin a day may reduce the risk of colon cancer by more than 60%, if you're at risk of inheriting the disease. all the patients in the study suffered from lynch syndrome that predisposes people to other types of cancer. losing weight is not easy and keeping the weight off is tougher for many people and now a scientific explanation for that. >> excellent. that's what i've been waiting for. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen who would like to tell me to exercise and eat my vegetables may have contradictory evidence this morning. elizabeth? >> i'm not going to say anything contradictory to that. what am i going to say, ali, this study in the new england journal of medicine this week is yet more evidence that your body sort of turns against you when you try to lose weight. what the study shows is that when you try to lose weight, it kind of, whacks out the hormones
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in your body because your hormones are what tells you, hey, ali, you're full, stop eating. right. the problem here is what they're finding is when people diet, those hormones don't do that job very well. you start to lose weight and you're taking in fewer calories and your hormones say, eat, eat, eat, you're hungry even if you're not hungry. sort of as if your car was saying, i'm running on empty even when you're full. >> that happens to me all the time. i start exercising and i eat more and i get fatter. that's why i stop exercising all the time. >> oh, geez. >> you're not letting him get away with this, are you, carol? >> no, i complained to him all morning about his diet. i tell him he should exercise and he probably doesn't like me for that but that's too bad. >> this doesn't get anybody off the hook. if you're experiencing this, if you feel like you're getting hungrier and hungrier when you diet, there may be biological
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basis for that. >> what do you do for that? >> no magic bullet. i wish i had something incredibly new and exciting to tell you. what you're going to see, nothing new and exciting. all you can do is remember in your head, look, i may be feeling like i'm hungry, but am i really hungry because i just ate. so, all the stuff that you knew before, which is watch what you eat and exercise and, of course, it really helps not to gain the weight in the first place. >> here's what i discovered because i don't usually eat junk food and since i don't usually eat it, i don't have a craving for that kind of food. so, does the biology, i mean, does something in your body change that makes you les likely to crave. i know what you just said, but i do find that's true with me. >> i don't think there's necessarily science behind it, but people who have become vegetarians that they say they just don't crave me, after a couple months, meat is distasteful to them and i heard people say what carol said. when they stop eating junk food,
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they just stop wanting it. you have to get over that hump, but it's certainly something to try. >> definitely requires some more study. i'll be looking into this a lot more. >> thank you, elizabeth cohen. outrage over scott olsen, the iraq war veteran seriously injured during a battle with police during the "occupy" oakland protests. we're going live to the hospital where family and friends are holding vigil. leon panetta is ready to track with a friend for tracking down osama bin laden. what is the award? we'll tell you about it on the other side. the postal service is critical to our economy--
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delivering mail, medicine and packages. yet they're closing thousands of offices, slashing service, and want to lay off over 100,000 workers. the postal service is recording financial losses, but not for reasons you might think. the problem ? a burden no other agency or company bears. a 2006 law that drains 5 billion a year from post-office revenue while the postal service is forced to overpay billions more into federal accounts. congress created this problem, and congress can fix it. hey, jessica, jerry neumann with a policy question. jerry, how are you doing? fine, i just got a little fender bender. oh, jerry, i'm so sorry. i would love to help but remember, you dropped us last month.
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yeah, you know it's funny. it only took 15 minutes to sign up for that new auto insurance company but it's taken a lot longer to hear back. is your car up a pole again? [ crying ] i miss you, jessica! jerry, are you crying? no, i just, i bit my tongue. [ male announcer ] get to a better state. state farm. ♪ [ multiple snds ng melodic tune ] ♪ [ malennounc ] at northrop grumman, makthworld a feplace. th's value performance.
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northr gruan. going green. i'm carol costello. the markets heading to the best in decades. getting a double boost from your wallets. a vigil being held for a war vet who is badly wounded in oakland's wall street protest. a tear gas canister literally cracked his skull. we'll speak to his roommate and fellow marine on this "american morning."
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good morning and welcome to the best day of the week, friday, october 28th. christine romans has the day off. >> the best week day of the week. >> that's right. the best week day. >> coming up first, the hunt for green october. the markets are set to open in about 90 minutes coming off a monster rally yesterday. they're on pace for a record setting month. the reasons? well, europe looks to have averted disaster and you' your spending. consumers help grow to the largest rate in a year. losing some steam this morning. right now u.s. stock futures for the dow and nasdaq and s&p 500 are all trading lower ahead of the opening bell. but it sure felt nice for a while. president obama's numbers also getting a boost. a new gallup poll shows his approval rating is up slightly, about 3%. gallup reports that still leaves him in the danger zone. danger of becoming a one termer, we shall say.
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joining us now candy crowley. good morning, candy. >> good morning. >> tell us about this poll. >> listen, any time you're under 50% and the president in the gallup poll at least for this moment is at 40%, it's not great for an incumbent. why? because people know who the incumbent is and being under 50% when you're facing re-election is always seen as the red zone. having said that, the presidency is slightly different in this way. polls and this is another truism of politics really are just snapshots for today. here's what the white house is banking on. if the economy will show the right movement. that the trajectory will be right. people will become convinced and consumer confidence. people will become convinced that the economy is getting better. they also are counting on, you know, someone to oppose the president. right now, the only person have to be angry with is the president of the united states.
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they believe the white house and re-election campaign when there is an actual candidate who is running against the president, there will be a comparative and the president will come out on top. >> sort of what the president has implied when he was talking to jay leno the other night that he will wait until this all settles down. right now looks to be a lot of options against the president. you covered a lot of presidential campaigns. as the republican field narrows, does that sort of automatically give the president a boost because the comparison is so direct? >> listen, there's a couple things that go on at this point in the presidential stage. the presidential election cycle and that is, first of all, you know, it is not september of next year. we still have a full year to go before the actual elections. and the truth is, these elections are won by swing voters. the people may go for the democrat who don't feel an efinity for either party. those people don't start paying a lot of attention until september of election year. and add in that lots of things can happen that can change a
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presidency. >> right. >> be it a bad economy, be it something overseas. so, there's so many unknowns at this point that even if it's down to two or three, i think not until september do we begin to see the real shape of an election. >> that's what the real world does. we follow elections all the time. >> i love it. it's important because the weeding out process is going on. it's just that when you want to look at it in terms of president obama against, you know, x, y and z, it doesn't really tell us much about what is going to happen next september. >> what do you have on tap for next sunday, candy? >> david axelrod, also ron paul. a very loyal following. he has been slipping in the polls, but still has a lot of money, certainly, to make a name for himself. in either iowa or new hampshire if he is to go on and then we might just take a look at what halloween purchases tell us about the future of the economy. >> very good.
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>> something you haven't looked at, have you, ali? >> you'll be on my show this weekend, too. good to see you. don't miss "state of the union" starting live at 9:00 a.m. eastern. we have new video this morning of police rounding up protesters in nashville overnight. they were warned yesterday to obey a curfew and to get a permit or leave the legislative plaza but after a meeting last night, the occupiers said they were not going anywhere. and they didn't. in oakland, the damage control after wall street protests got out of control, the mayor is now apologizing after police tear gassed occupy protesters and put an iraq war veteran in the hospital with a severe head injury. also said city officials have started an investigation into the use of force. dan simon has the latest and he's live outside the hospital in oakland. dan, good morning. >> good morning, ali. you know, what happened to that iraq war veteran, scott olsen, has been a rallying point for
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the rally here in oakland, as well as other parts of the country. but it also raised a lot of questions about the police, the police's use of force. what we know is that, as you said, the mayor has reversed herself. she is now allowing those protesters to go back into that plaza at city hall. a complete reversal, a total flip-flop. she hasn't really said why, but, obviously, the negative, you know, the negpositive pr that we've seen over the last 48 hours or so has really caused her to rethink things and she gave a press conference last night. i want you to listen to some of what she had to say. >> i am very deeply saddened about what happened last tuesday. it clearly didn't turn out the way we wanted it to. i take responsibility and i apologize to those who were hurt. >> the big question here, ali, is why did this happen in the first place?
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if you're going to allow the protest to continue and allow people to go back into that plaza and set up tents, why did she and city leaders make that decision in the first place? they have not answered that question, but, certainly, the negative backlash that they received caused them to rethink things. ali? >> we'll continue to follow this with you, thanks. iraq war veteran scott olsen suffered a skull fracture. witnesses say a tear gas canister hit olsen in the head. this was video posted on youtube that shows olsen bleeding and being carried out by fellow protesters. olsen suffered a fractured skull. joining us is keith shannon, scott olsen's roommate. thanks for getting up so early. >> thanks for having me. >> you're sleeping at the hospital to be there with scott. how is he doing?
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>> he's awake now. he's not able to talk, though. although he knows wh s what he to say, but he's not able to articulate. they say they're expecting a full recovery. >> are his parents there yet in oakland? >> yes. his parents arrived here yesterday. but they're at a hotel right now. the doctors are still trying to keep a lot of people out of his room at the moment. >> i know you weren't right there next to him during the protest, but so much confusion over what exactly happened. can you fill us in on some of the details? >> possibly. from what i was told, they were on a peaceful march and police officers started randomly pulling protesters out of the march and arresting them when the protesters started throwing water and paint at the police officers. as the protesters started marching back towards their encampments, the police officers opened up with rubber bullets, tear gas and smoke canisters.
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>> and then what do you suppose hit olsen in the head? >> we believe it was a tear gas canister. >> you heard that the mayor came out and apologized for what happened. we also understand she went to the hospital personally to apologize to scott. do you know if he accepted her apology? >> i don't know yet. >> were you surprised that the mayor came out and apologized? >> a little bit. although i believe she's just trying to save face now that everyone is calling for her to resign, as well as for a recall. >> what mistakes do you think were made by the mayor. >> just the fact that they spent millions of dollars trying to clean up the encampment when they could have provided less money to keep it sanitary. >> and i know that protesters are going to continue to camp out there, can you tell us why it's important for protesters to
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stay out overnight in protest? >> yes. well, it's important to show the solidarity and that we're not going to give up no matter what the police officers try to do to stop us from protesting. >> what would you like, finally, what would you like the mayor or the city of oakland to do? >> to allow the peaceful protest to go on without any police force there, as well as possibly help provide the supplies needed to have a clean and safe camp area. >> and will you go back out there and protest and will scott, after he recovers? i don't know if that's possible. >> yes. i will and i'm sure scott will as soon as he's able to. >> keith shannon, thank you for joining us this morning. we appreciate it. still ahead on "american morning," the reward for tracking down osama bin laden. we're not talking about that $25
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million bounty. we're talking about this. pentagon chief leon panetta is ready to connect collect a bet friend and, boy, will it taste good. the tide is turning on sharks. once the most feared predator, shark populations are crashing and can we really save the sharks? we're going swimming with these beautiful beasts of the deep. everyone is talking about this today. one of the wildest and most memorable world series games ever played. cardinals/rangers. we have the amazing highlights for you. and snow on halloween? the first snowfall of the season in the northeast. what about, well, will it be a dark and stormy night for your trick or treaters? rob marciano has a spooky halloween weekend coming up for you. [ male announcer ] it's true...
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and on another hand, you have your life with another. but when you bundle them all together with nationwide insurance, they all work together perfectly and you could save 25%. wow... it's all in the wrists. ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ there are a lot of happy people in st. louis this morning. what an unbelievable game. partly cloudy, 38 degrees right now. mostly sunny later today.
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60 degrees. hopefully perfect baseball weather tonight. >> wouldn't matter what the weather would be. mostly sunny in st. louis today. this is a game they're going to be talking about for a long time. world series game six was an instant classic. the cardinals were down to their final strike in the ninth and then in the tenth innings and they found a way to tie the game. in the 11th, the cards' david freese hit a walk-off homer to send the series to a seventh and deciding game tonight. >> david freese is a local boy, rob. the cool thing about it, he plays third base and he dropped a ball that he said any 4-year-old child could have caught but then he redeemed himself by having that walk-off home run in the 11th. >> i can hear my little league couch saying, two hands, marciano, two hands. i turned it off at the fifth or sixth inning and it looked like one of those games. i felt so bad for freese because i saw that ridiculous error and he comes back as the hero of the
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game. tonight game seven just as great, cold, but if will be dry. speaking of cold, across the northeast, cold enough for snow yesterday. we showed you snow earlier in amarillo, this stuff just outside and in and around the boston area and enough to coat the grassy areas and more slush on the streets. this is just a primer for what's to come over the weekend. here are some of the snow totals. anywhere up to seven inches in some spots of massachusetts. vermont seeing seven inches and windsor seeing 6 inches. all right, a little bit of rain across parts of the south, this is the system that brought the snow to amarillo. this is the system that will bring rain to the midsouth including nashville, tennessee, including parts of huntsville, alabama. the rain across florida is sort of associated with rita, which will stay. this storm will continue to strengthen up the spine on the appalachians through the delmarva and ending up a classic
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nor'easter. our computer models are doing this. a lot of wind and, yes, snow on the back side of this. especially away from the coastline. you know, the water is still kind of warm in the atlantic. any time you get that onshore breeze along the i-95 corridor, a serious accumulation of snow and you may see a couple inches in new york or boston, but just north and west of those cities, three to six inches and inland areas of massachusetts and upstate connecticut and new england and then winter storm watches are posted all the way down to the virginia area with this. all right, here's a look at one of oour computer models. away from i-95 more significant accumulations and in some spots we could see some pink showing up here and that could mean a foot or more of snow. and, you know, we're kind of peak foliage time, it's pretty, but the leaves will catch some of that snow and the branches will break and we'll get a little bit in the way of power outages. >> it's a little late for some
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foliage drives, but it's very unusual to have snow in the northeast this early, is it not? >> absolutely. if we just get an inch of measurable snow in new york city, that's going to break a record and similar in boston. so, getting five or six inches just outside of those cities this will be a record setting event likely. >> i haven't gotten out my winter coat yet. >> get it out, carol. >> thank you, rob. a texas billboard campaign is going for shock and value and, boy, is it getting it. one billboard in east austin says gop is the new black. another that ames in to pull in the african-american vote to the right says "martin luther king jr. was a republican." the signs linked to ragingelephants.org. cia director leon panetta's friend makes good on a very unique bet. the restauranter will uncork a 141-year-old bottle of wine as promised to mark the successful mission to get osama bin laden.
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this will mean something to carol. the wine is -- >> i can't believe you don't -- >> you know my eating habits. i don't know this fancy wine. it is worth an estimated $10,000 to $15,000. good thing it's not mine because it would be lost on me. >> well, one online review we found describes the wine as having a huge nose of freshly sliced celery, mint cedar and casese. >> it also has a jami, powerful finish. i'm often described like that with a huge nose. >> with the smell of casese. >> what is that? now, is your chance to talk back on one of the big stories of the day. the question for you this morning, should cities prevent occupy protesters, not from protesting, but from camping out overnight? if you're a protester, the answer is a cinch. camping out is a form of unity and organization and protest and
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for cities it's expensive and for police it's complicated and tense, especially in light of what happened in oakland, california. as oakland police tried to clear out occupy protesters scott olsen was injured. protesters insist overzealous police lobbed a tear gas canister into the crowd hitting olsen in the head. oakland police are now investigating. in new york, the city sergeant benevolent association claims 20 officers have been injured trying to keep order in the park. in georgia the mayor decided to clear out occupy atlanta because things were getting out of hand. >> we warned them, did not arrest them. my feeling was that this was escalating and escalating out of control. it was a hard decision, but i have to prevent catastrophic events from happening. >> many protesters are incredulous. they say chaos ensues only when police try to rob them of the right to protest.
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>> we've restrained ourselves despite getting into what looked like they could be or what the police were prepared to be hostile situations. we've successfully remained a peaceful protest. >> so, the talk back question today, should cities prevent "occupy" protesters not from protesting but from camping out all night long. facebook.com/americanmorning. i'll read your comments later this hour. >> we're just getting some reporting here that a local tv station in new york is showing the fire department here in zaccutti park pulling the generators out of the park as a fire hazard, but it's getting cold now. that's going to be an issue. we'll keep an eye on it. >> you wonder if the protesters will stay there if they don't have the generators generating heat. still ahead, we're watching your money. with so many people saying take this card and shove it, some big banks are now rethinking debit card fees.
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welcome back. 24 minutes after the hour. watching your money this morning. big rally on wall street. a relatively strong report on economic growth here in the united states pushed markets higher yesterday. the dow was up 2.8%, the nasdaq was up 3.3% and the s&p 500 closed 3.4% higher. at this rate, we are looking at the best month for u.s. markets in nearly 40 years since october of 1974. two more days of trading left to go through and that optimism over the euro zone deal is losing some steam. right now u.s. stock futures are trading lower ahead of the opening bell. new economic numbers about how much people are earning and spending right now and those come out in less than five minutes. home appliancemaker
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whirlpool is cutting 5,000 jobs in north america and europe as part of a cost cutting plan. that amounts to 10% of a workforce in those regions. several familiar household names like maytag and kitchen aid. it's been a month since bank of america announced controversial debit card fees and looks like most of the other big banks are opting not to follow suit. citigroup, pnc bank and key corp has decided not to charge customers for debit card purchases. remember the big hacking scandal from rsa secur. 760 companies were affected new analysis shows this week. the nation's largest airline is collecting a bucket load on all those fees. $1.5 million in april, may and june says the government. that's up 1% from the same time last year and more than 8% from the previous quarter. the heavy travel season is coming up and we have a list of the best and worst airport delays for you. travel & leisure ranks chicago
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midway airport as the worst. second is bwi and what is the number one? sea-tac airport in seattle. portland international and reagan national in d.c. do sharks have more to fear from us than we do from them? why some are trying to save the sharks. we'll go in the water with them. [ woman ] welcome to learning spanish in the car. you've got to be kidding me. yeah, this is good. vamanos. vamanos. vamanos. gracias. gracias. gracias. ♪ trece horas en el carro sin parar y no traes musica. mira entra y comprame unas papitas. [ male announcer ] get up to 795 miles per tank in the all-new volkswagen passat tdi clean diesel. [ siren ]
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[ technician ] are you busy? management just sent over these new technical manuals. they need you to translate them into portuguese. by tomorrow. [ male announcer ] ducati knows it's better for xerox to manage their global publications. so they can focus on building amazing bikes. with xerox, you're ready for real business.
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that's a great laugh. you know what, i think i forgot to turn on my microphone. take it away, ali. grief giving way to a moment of joy in turkey. more than 100 hours after a powerful 7.2 magnitude earthquake killed more than 500
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people, look at this, a 13-year-old boy has been pulled from the rubble alive in turkey. new video of police rounding up protesters in nashville overnight, they were warned yesterday to obey a curfew and to get a permit or leave the legislative plaza. after leaving last night, the occupiers said they're not going anywhere. >> oakland's mayor put an iraq war veteran in the hospital. she also said city officials have started an investigation into the use of police force. the injured marine is said to be improving in the apt after suffering a fractured skull. six exotic animals in ohio will stay put. the widow of the man who freed the 56 wild animals before killing himself wants custody of them. the state of ohio will keep them quarantined, though. after the governor said releasing them now could cause a public health threat. jack hanna says, no way are those surviving animals going anywhere. hannah is now pushing harder than ever to get new laws and
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regulations on exotic animal ownership in ohio. on "ac 360" hanna challenged the idea that terry thompson's widow should or could care for the animals at all. >> her husband went to prissen for a year and she left him, remember that? my question is, i understand she didn't go back to take care of them. now all of a sudden she wants the animal back and she has a love for them. she may have a love for them, anderson. you don't love something and put them in the horrid conditions that were up there. those animals are going to go back there to the same conditions and i'd wake up tomorrow morning and saying, let's say they get out and what they would think of the zoo and the state of ohio. these new rules, anderson, the most stringent rules in any state of the united states of america. i haven't announced this yet. perimeter fencing, inspection once a year and people made up of the resources and a zoo
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person and about five people inspect that place once a year and any of the other proper habitat and where the animal comes from and where they're going to. there will be some more i will mention. 90% or of the people or more won't have a grizzly bear. >> they were kept in tiny, dirty shelters on the thompson property. sharks are in steep decline. many have vanished from the oceans. commercial fishing and a grow demand for their fins is making them more and more scarce. a feared predator has more to fear from us. kajz has the story this morning. kaj? >> let's get the blood pumping this morning and get in the ocean with some sharks. as a life-long surfer and avid scuba diver i think a lot about sharks in the ocean and what
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they do to me and i don't spend a lot of time thinking about what we as man kind are doing to them. in this next piece i take a look at what's happening with shark populations. let's take a look. shark populations are crashing around the world. millions die by finning to feed the grow diagnose mand for shark fin soup in asia. roughly a third of all shark species face some sort of extinction. without them, the marine food web could start to unravel. marine biologist luke tipple is on a mission to protect sharks. we met up in the bahamas. >> actually, the marina we're in now is one of the first shark-free marinas in the bahamas. >> reporter: sharks is an apex which means they're at the top of the food chain. grow slowly, maturely and
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produce few young. making them vulnerable to overfishing. >> we are supposed to have a certain number of sharks to control all these animals which are below them. we take out that apex and allow a lot of other fish to breed underneath them. that leads to traffic collapse which means we don't have healthy ocean systems and won't be able to pull food or product from there any more. >> reporter: the bahamas ban commercial shark fishing and that helped to lure more divers and tourist dollars to the islands. >> back with both of these, all ten of these. >> reporter: luke and i jumped in to see some sharks up close. ♪
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>> wow, they were right there. >> reporter: outside of sanctuaries like this one, sharks remain at risk. >> wow. kaj, just a question. you were down there and the sharks were swimming all around you, but in australia, just a few days ago, a scuba diver was killed by a shark. so, why do some sharks kill and others don't? >> well, there are actually over 350 different species of sharks and of those 350, there's really only about ten that are potentially dangerous to man kind. you know, we have seen a spike in shark attacks this year and it's not exactly clear what the causal factors are for that. 13 fatal shark attacks so far this year, which is a high number. but if you contrast that to what we're doing to sharks, which is taking over 70 million out of the ocean this year alone, those
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numbers really pale in comparison. as you mentioned at the top, they have more to fear from us than we do from them. >> when a death like that occurs, doesn't it make your mission more difficult? >> i mean, it makes it, i think what it does is it heightens this awareness that the oceans are sick. and that the marine eco system is out of balance and you can't remove that many top apex predators from the system without throwing it off somewhat. >> kaj, isn't it the case, though, the increased demand for shark fin soup. isn't that a problem? if you can stop them from being caught in the bahamas but, ultimately, can you deal with it from the demand side? >> no, you've gotten to the essence of the problem. you can try to create sanctuaries and you can try to create legislation and that stops it, but as long as there's a demand, you're going to continue to have sharks being killed for their fins. they just recently found a ship
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just off of san diego, a place that's protected from shark finning and it had over 30,000 shark fins on it. so, you can sort of see the magnitude of the problem. >> all right, kaj, thanks very much for that. we're looking forward to seeing the special. watch more on the cnn presents all new show saturday, i'm sorry, sunday night at 8:00 p.m. hosted by soledad o'brien and dr. sanjay gupta. just ahead, how about those cards? game six comeback will go down in world series history and ended with a sweet and subtle tribute in the broadcast booth. we'll talk about that. it's 37 minutes past the hour. ♪
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when you're responsible for this much of the team, you need a car you can count on. [ chuckles ] you think that is some information i would have liked to know? i like tacos. you invited eric? i thought eric gave you the creeps. [ phone buzzes ] oh. [ chuckles ] yeah. hey. [ male announcer ] don't be left behind. get it faster with 4g.
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oh, happy halloween. welcome back to "american morning." it's 40 minutes past the hour. some are already calling it the greatest world series game ever. it ranks right up there, for sure, the st. louis cardinals rallied in the ninth and tenth innings after being down to their final strike. both the ninth and the tenth and
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then in the 11th home town hero david freese hit a walk-off home run sending the rangers and cards into a seventh and deciding game of the world series tonight. joining us andy martino. thank you for coming in. >> naung fthank you for having . little late with that game, but glad to be here. >> some fans said i was watching the game and found myself screaming with enthusiasm. >> i don't care about either team. most people in america don't care about either team. they have regional fan bases, but that game just rose above. it was so exciting that it roped everybody in to a world series that they might not have been roped in otherwise. >> let's talk about david freese. he could have been the goat, but he was the hero of the game. made a terrible error at third base and he said it was a catch that a 4-year-old could have
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made. >> little league coachers were disgusted by the dropped pop up. the simplest play in the world, there are errors and then what are you doing kind of errors. that could have been what he was remembered for for the rest of his career, had that game gone a different way. that's what's so fascinating about this. possibly the worst night of his life, which turned into surely the best night of his life because that game had so many twists and turns. the drop pop up was empty and then hits a home run. >> one of the texas rangers pitchers said, i felt like i was going to have a heart attack. that is how nerve wracking the entire game was. >> at one point i was looking at ron washington, the manager of the rangers in the dugout y was having a heart attack like everybody else and i was thinking, how could you possibly be him right now? how could you have a personal stake in this game and be standing up, be alive? i mean, it was so tense. his texas rangers are within one strike of winning their first world series ever. on two separate occasions and then to lose it twice and then hit it back in the tenth inning.
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it was just incredible and i don't know how you could have stayed calm if you were part of it. >> joe buck the announcer, like 20 years ago, what was it, the braves and the twins. >> braves and the twins. >> puckett hit a home run to win the game for the minnesota twins and striking similarities and joe buck sort of paid homage to his father. >> it was really nice. jack buck, the legendary broadcaster who was joe's father said, we'll see you tomorrow night in 1991 when he hit that home run. that was a classic call and joe buck in almost an identical situation said the same thing 20 years later. that's what is so cool about baseball. i remember being 11 years old, excuse me, in 1991 watching that on the couch and hearing that great jack buck call now being 31 years old, 20 years later and hearing his son make the same call that really just shows you how the game has those transcendent moments that connects the generations and connects you at different point
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in your life. as it did for me, as i'm sure it did for people all over the country. >> i love baseball, too. i love it so much. let's talk about the ratings of the world series because these are not the glamour teams, right? everybody said, oh, nobody is going to watch. the ratings have been okay, but will the excitement of this series elevate baseball maybe next year in the years and in the years to come? >> well, baseball had a great month. they had exciting playoff games and the regular season was thrilling the way it ended and it can only help because if you have casual viewers, i'm sure they're saying this is more interesting than i thought. a lot of people find it boring and it can be boring and also have these moments like it had over the past month. i do think that the game, in some ways, is a regional sport. very intense fan bases in individual cities, which might be different from the nfl where nationally everyone is interested in pretty much every team maybe it's because there are more games and maybe because of a different type of fan base. >> i think, if you watch espn
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concentrate on the boston red sox and the yankees, but they don't really concentrate on teams like st. louis or detroit or the cleveland indians, let's say. and maybe that, there is no connection with the fans because they can't see it on television. >> yeah, i think that's a really good point. regionally, people feel very connected and nationally you can blame the television networks and, like i said, only a few big market teams. there are a few factors. what this whole postseason has done is show all of america that people like david freese, the st. louis hometown boy can have a moment as exciting as anyone can have in sports and i don't know if that is going to explode the ratings for the next year, but certainly turn on a few more people because how can you not watch next year's world series. >> or game seven. i cannot wait to watch game seven. >> just the countdown until tonight. very exciting to see how the series concludes. it's not over, that's the thing.
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we forget, it's not even over. >> thank you for being with us this morning. we appreciate it. morning headlines coming your way next. it's 45 minutes past the hour.
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so if i didn't know better i'd say you're having some sort of big tire sale. yes we are. yeah. how many tires does ford buy every year? over 3 million. you say you can beat any advertised price on tires? correct. anywhere? yes. like this price? yes. riously? yes what about this one? i'll beat it. this one? s we will. right, i only have one more question for you...this one? (laughing) yeah. get $100 rebate when you buy four tires. 100 bucks! only at your ford dealer. 3 million tires. 11 major brands, fiona's kind-of-nice. i don't know why you're not here. when you're a sports photographer, things can get out of control pretty quickly. so i like control in the rest of my life... especially my finances. that's why i have slate, with blueprint. i can create my own plan to pay down large purchases faster... or avoid interest on everyday items. that saves me money. with slate from chase, i'm always in control.
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financially, anyway. get slate with blueprint and save money. call 855-get-slate today. 47 minutes after the hour. here are your morning headlines. major shakeup in the uk this morning. common wealth leaders approve a change to the 300-year-old law of succession that will give princesses an equal shot at the throne. big rally on wall street losing some steam this morning. oakland's mayor apologizing after police tear gas wall street protesters and put an iraq war veteran in the hospital. she also said city officials have started an investigation into the use of force. the six surviving animals from the 56 exotic pets freed in ohio are staying put in a zoo for now. the widow of the man who freed him before killing himself wants custody. the state of ohio isn't allowing it saying if they are dezeiseas
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or malnourished they could use a health threat. also up for bid, 17 of kevorki kevorkian's paintings, including one he drew with a pint of his own blood. student at st. mary's college will cruise through the rest of the semester. the school is dealing with a mold infestation and move to a cruise ship. the sea voyager, 286-foot-long vessel will dock later this morning. nba owners and the players union returning to the bargaining table this morning trying to end the 120-day-old lockout both sides reported progress after yesterday's session. the lockout already forced the league to cancel the first two weeks of the regular season. the never say die cardinals sending the world series to a decisive game seven for the first time in nine years. david freese won it for the
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cards. game seven between the rangers and the cardinals is tonight in st. louis. back right after this break.
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♪ i thought you were going to do your laugh, again. happy halloween. let's talk about halloween, shall we? the haunted attraction industry is scoring big bucks. >> which you like. >> corn mazes and i do get lost, but i don't have to call 911. anyway, spooky houses are also really popular. corn mazes and spooky haunted houses generated an estimated
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$300 million a year last year, actually, in ticket sales. >> so, rob marciano went undercover in one of the most popular haunted houses in the country to show us sort of how much things have changed. rob? >> my camera, camera 4 is spooked. that's for sure. yeah, hey, guys, show this again because that is one handsome fellow. my dentist would be proud. went undercover. who doesn't like a good scare, a good haunted house. they're making a lot of money and they came a long way in the past 10 or 20 years. here's my hard-hitting report. >> i always enjoy meeting new friends at halloween and this is some of the creatures. do you mind if i take a look inside? i'll take that as a yes. i'm here with ben armstrong, one
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of the owners. ben, this place is massive. it's got to be a year-round operation. >> oh, yes, we work on this thing absolutely all year long. we conceptionalize it and work on the all the creatures and begin construction as early as february. what we're going to do now, we're going to make you into one of the creatures. we're going to transform you into a monster that even your mother would be proud of. >> i feel pretty. i feel pretty. i'm all zombied up and i'm teaming up with the nightmare kid and we're going to go scare some kids. this is our spot? >> this is it, my friend. >> dead man rising from the grave. >> yes, i love it. >> i just had my first scream. >> every night they line-up around the block at haunted houses like these across america bringing an estimated $300
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million a year! >> the haunted house industry has changed dramatically in the last 15 to 20 years. you really need to deck it all out. everything needs to be good and the technology is increasing. we have, like i said, a lot of anima tronnics and sophisticated characters that move and we use a lot of illusions. we're constantly upping the ante to give it more than a guy just jumping out. although, that is the core of what we do. >> that is sensory overload. working at a haunted house is an adrenaline rush, but now back to my day job. thank goodness i still have one. not a very good zombie. boy, i was tired. still scrubbing off the makeup and still scrubbing my teeth. >> you still have some makeup somewhere? >> i left the eyeliner on, i can't get rid of that. >> i thought you were looking mighty attractive this morning. >> you know, how about that. the. >> interesting, though, we like
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to be scared. >> it is. i tell you what, it is even more fun to scare people. the rush you get when i first scared my first little kid and the kid dropped to his knees, it was fabulous. it was just fantastic. >> never forget your first time. halloween houses across country will be trucking along the next few days. >> thank you, rob. up next, we ask you to talk back this morning. the question for you, should cities prevent occupy protesters not from protesting but camping out all night long. we'll read some of your responses after a break. five minutes until the top of the hour. for their every financial need. [ thunder rumbling ] [ thunder crashing ] and then, in one blinding blink of an eye, their tree had given its last. but with their raymond james financial advisor, they had prepared for even the unthinkable.
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♪ and they danced. see what a raymond james advisor can do for you. so if i didn't know better i'd say you're having some sort of big tire sale. yes we are. yeah. how many tires does ford buy every year? over 3 million. you say you can beat any advertised price on tires? correct. anywhere? yes. like this price? yes. riously? yes what about this one? i'll beat it. this one? s we will. right, i only have one more question for you...this one? (laughing) yeah. get $100 rebate when you buy four tires. 100 bucks! only at your ford dealer. 3 million tires. 11 major brands, fiona's kind-of-nice. i don't know why you're not here. whoa. whoa. how do you top great vacations? whoa. getting twice the points on great vacations. whoa! use chase sapphire preferred and now get two times the points on travel, and two times the points on dining and no foreign transaction fees.
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you're looking at pictures from earlier on. this is the new york, the "occupy wall street" protest in zuccatti park. they have been removing generators from the park and fairly cold here in new york. might even get some snow this weekend. it has been rainy. we're waiting to see what the implications are of that. but the mayor's office has been
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tweeting that it is not legal in new york city for folks to have generators and thaer they're saying it is a fire hazard and they have been removing the generators from the park. >> it will get really cold tonight. we'll see if the protesters stick it out. that brings us to our talk back question this morning. should cities prevent occupy protesters not from protesting, but from camping out all night long? wall street and big business stretch the law, even break it at all of our peril. why worry about camping out? we have bigger problems than that. let them have their voice. this from doc, as someone who has to travel literally through occupy philly every single day, i can tell you the situation under dillworth plaza is far more unsanitary and unsafe. marking that part of the commute almost intolerable. where is my right to commute through philadelphia without being sickened or harassed. this from michael, the

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