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tv   New Day  CNN  July 15, 2013 6:00am-9:00am EDT

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damaging information that edward snowden is threatening to release. that's coming up. >> let's start with outside the courthouse in florida, protesters there say they will continue to demand justice for trayvon martin. let's go live to cnn's alina mochato live outside sanford, florida. >> reporter: protests here in sanford, florida, were small and peaceful, a sharp contrast to what we saw in some parts of the country. overnight, thousands of protesters from new york to los angeles to the nation's capital, out in full force, reacting to this moment. >> we, the jury, find george zimmerman, not guilty. >> reporter: in new york's times squa square, a solid showing of protesters united, arm in arm. one young man braved the sweltering heat in an all-black
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hoodie. but demonstrations in harlem turned into scuffles with police and reports of two people taken into custody. and in los angeles, mostly peaceful marches interrupted by protesters, throwing batteries, rocks, chunks of concrete, and a separate gathering on the 10 freeway shut down traffic. the lapd responding by shooting bean bags at demonstrators. in oakland, california, protesters were seen smashing a police car. demonstrations elsewhere were mostly peaceful. in sanford, florida, the anger was palpable in the goldsboro neighborhood, a largely african-american part of town. >> right now, i'm just too emotional. i'm just sick and tired. i'm just done. >> reporter: but community leaders were anxious to turn disappointment into constructive action. >> perhaps we can take this anger and move it into a positive vein, because if nothing else, this snapped our necks back.
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>> reporter: starting today, several churches here in seminole county, florida, will be opening their doors for community prayers every monday. the first session will take place at the church behind me and several community leaders are expected to attend. kate? >> all right, alina, keeping an eye on it for us if sanford, florida, thanks so much. now, it was a stirring moment when the not guilty verdict was read. >> in the circuit court of the 18th judicial court in seminole county, florida, state of florida versus george zimmerman, verdict, we, the jury, find george zimmerman not guilty. >> from there, there was immediate and powerful reaction across the country, even president obama reacting to the verdict. in a statement, he said in part, this. we are a nation of laws, and the jury, a jury has spoken. i now ask every american to respect the call for calm reflection from two parents who have lost their young son. and while george zimmerman's criminal trial may be over, his legal troubles may not be. in addition to any future
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lawsuits by the martin family, the justice department is considering whether there's sufficient evidence to bring a civil rights action against george zimmerman. and that is where cnn's athena jones is picking up that side of the story. what are we hearing from the justice department this morning, athena? >> they put out a statement, talking about this ongoing parallel investigation into this case. the justice department has been working with the fbi and with officials in florida and that investigation is ongoing. but this, of course, is not an open and shut case. there is a very high bar when it comes to federal civil rights charges here. they have to prove that george zimmerman acted out of a state of racial animus or racial hatred when he shot trayvon martin. and that is something that, of course, florida prosecutors had a very hard time convincing a jury of. and so, it really depends who you talk to, what the doj is going to end up doing here. we know that attorney general eric holder could speak about this case as early as today,
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when he speaks sorority here in washington, d.c. kate? >> athena, we'll be watching that along with you and we'll talk to some of our legal experts a little later in the show. >> now, all of this, obviously, grows out of what happened in the courtroom. you know, trayvon martin's parents were not there when the verdict was read, but they racketed instantly on twitter. his mother, sybrina fulton, grieved. "lord, during my darkest hour, i lean on you, you are all that i have." and his father, tracy martin wrote, "even though i am brokenhearted, my faith is unshattered, i will always love my baby, tray." this obviously causing controversy. i sat down with mark o'mara to talk about the outrage surrounding the verdict. mr. o'mara, thank you very much for taking the opportunity to be on "new day." let's begin with what is all around us. the reaction, a lot of it outrage to the not guilty verdict. you surprised by that part of
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the reaction? >> i'm a bit surprised that there is outrage, because we had hoped that everybody would look at this case as being a very fair trial with both parties represented well, where i think most if not all of the evidence came out and the jury took their time, deliberated, and came up with a fair and just verdict, so i think that those people, even though they're frustrated, will accept the verdict. >> address the basic concern. your client, george zimmerman, wound up killing trayvon martin, and yet there is no legal responsibility and people can't understand it. what are they missing? >> well, what they're missing is that george had an absolute right to be where he was and he had a right to see where trayvon martin was. people want to say it was improper profiling, but george had a reason to be concerned. it was trayvon martin who was the aggressor, at least by the forensic evidence, because trayvon martin did not receive any injuries but the gunshot 45 seconds after george zimmerman was screaming for help. so i understand people's
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frustrations, but it would seem to be that trayvon martin overreacted to what he perceived to be something going on, and he overreacted in a violent way. >> do you think this case is an example of the law needing to change? that stand your ground paychema too easy for violence to perpetuate. the law should be, you get to use equal force, not lethal force, in situations like this? >> i had a problem with your stand your ground law that would allow people not to retreat and to use deadly force when you have the opportunity to retreat. but that has nothing to do with this case at hand. i don't believe that the law should be changed to say you can only resist force with force, because once you get to the point that great bodily injury may occur, you should be able to protect yourself, your life, and the life of another. if someone is beating on you, if they're smashing your head against concrete, and that gives you fear for great bodily injury, that is a well-founded
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500 or 600-year-old standard that says you can resist that with force, up to and including deadly force. >> does george zimmerman regret having to take trayvon martin's life, having to kill him that night? >> absolutely. absolutely. he's human. he did not want to take any person's life. the fact that he had a gun with him gave him the opportunity to protect himself. >> his brother, robert, says that while he doesn't regret it because he did what he had to do and it was right then, so it's right now, do you think that's his brother just being a little sensitive to the legalities of language here. because you say that he does regret it? >> i think it is semantics. george did what he did because he had to. not because he wanted to. and that's the difference that we have to be careful of with the semantics of doing something because you want or because you have to. >> just because the prosecutors didn't meet the burden according to the jury, that doesn't necessarily mean that george zimmerman did nothing wrong that night, right? profiling the kid, taking an interest in someone who was doing nothing, having a weapon
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with a bullet already chambered, in a situation that was unknown. does he feel any sense of moral wrong? >> i think he regrets having to take a life. he was put in a position where he had an untenable choice. continue to be maybe killed or kill. and he made that decision. to look at things like, why did he have a chamber -- a round chamber, chris, i think you would agree, every person who has a gun for self-defense, if you don't have a round in the chamber, it's a paperweight. >> does he regret, though, picking out trayvon martin? he was wrong, right? this kid was not doing anything wrong. he belonged there. he had a right to the place and space where he was also. does he regret even singling him out that night? >> well, let's look at the circumstances. he saw somebody who happened to be in the area where another person had just burglarized a home, and yes, it was a young black male. was that a focusing, a
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profiling? it was a suspicion. we don't know what trayvon martin was doing right or wrong. all we know is that when he was doing what law enforcement seem to be telling him to do, which is keep an eye on him, that it turned violent, only because of what trayvon martin decided to do, not george zimmerman. >> thank you for taking the time to do this interview. i'm sure you share the hopes of all that we find a way to move forward after this verdict, and that any wounds can be healed in time. >> there's still a lot of conversations. i have, and we have a lot of conversations to have. i've been an advocate for the fact that black youth, black youth in america are not treated well by the criminal justice system, and we need to have that conversation. my fear is that we polarize the situation, because we attach it to a self-defense verdict that they have nothing to do with. >> and we appreciate that mr. o'mara took the opportunity to face the questions about the case head-on and that's what we're obviously putting to him. also important, stand your ground. we all talk about it.
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it did not play a role in this jury's verdict. they didn't these to use that law, it wasn't even argued at trial. at the bottom of the hour, we're going to have more of the interview with mark o'mara. he really did deal with a wide-ranging thing. his answer as to whether or not there's anything his client wishes he could take back, it may surprise you. >> let's talk more about not only this interview, but also the verdict and where things going from here. wendy murphy, a former prosecutor, and author of the book, "injustice for some," joining us from boston, and danny cevallos is a criminal defense attorney joining us from philadelphia. thanks so much for joining us, guys. we've been leaning on you a lot for your expertise and we appreciate you continuing to do so. danny, let me start with you. you've seen the protests on the street. we've shown much video of that. people are angry. people say they don't understand why if someone died, someone was killed, someone who believe was innocent was killed, why someone is then free and walking the streets. people don't understand how the jury reached its conclusion.
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so answer that. how did the jury reach their conclusion? what are people missing? >> well, our law allows for people to be killed under those facts. what they're missing is the additional facts. people die -- that's what self-defense is all about. self-defense allows an excuse for a homicide. and if george zimmerman reasonably believed he was in fear of serious bodily injury, he was permitted, like all citizens are, to use deadly force. it simply doesn't logically follow that because someone is dead, a crime is committed. that is just -- that's never been a fundamental principle of our law. if someone is dead, then there may be a homicide. there may be an unlawful killing. however, there are instances in which there may not. so that confusion should be cleared up. >> wendy? >> the notion of what the prosecution needed the to do to
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rule out self-defense, didn't give the jury enough here. explain that to me. >> not only did they not give the jury enough, the prosecution proved self-defense, beyond a reasonable doubt. and ethically, that was their job to do if that's what the evidence proved. they weren't allowed to hide it. they put on two key witnesses who were really the only eyewitnesss to some of the circumstances. john manilow, john good, both corroborated george zimmerman's claim that he was on the ground, being punched, having his head slammed into cement, and that he really had an absolute right to shoot in self-defense, to stop that attack. the prosecutor would have put on more evidence to deflate self-defense if there were such evidence, but when it isn't there, it isn't there. you know, i've described this as kind of putting lipstick on a
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pig. you know, no matter how you dress it up with all the yelling and hooting and hollering that the prosecution did, especially during the closing arguments, you cannot change the basic facts of this case. that was an easy self-defense case. this never should have been brought, in my opinion, because it really did anger people. it got hopes up. people angry today, because they thought this was a winnable case. whose fault is that? who are they angry at? because that was not the case the prosecution put on. they put on a losing case, because it was clear, overwhelming, no doubt about it, self-defense. >> and danny, so then you have the jury going in for deliberations, deliberating for more than 16 hours. they come back with only one question, asking for clarification on the manslaughter charge. the court said, give us a specific question, we may be able to answer it, and they never came back with a specific, only coming back with a verdict. what does that tell you was going on in the jury room? >> i mean, one guess would be
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fatigue. i think when they realized they had to clarify, i can see them -- i can almost hear them saying, we believe you know what, we don't think it's there anyway. we're moving on. i have to tell you, as somebody who said not guilty the entire time, as with every single vrkt watch, i thought, when that came out, i did have concerns that they were going to go to manslaughter, but i just felt so strongly that self-defense had been proven and that the state had not made its case as to second-degree murder or manslaughter. i want to add one more thing. when you talk about the unrest now, the public has suffered from a misunderstanding of this case from day one. i heard a commentator on with wendy murphy yesterday, who was still laboring under the belief that george zimmerman used racial epithets in his 911 calls. i was astounding, i was n nonplussed, i was flabbergasted. at this point, we're still
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misunderstanding the facts. >> but danny, you're dealing with it on a different level. you understand the law, you understand the burden. you are inherently mindful that our courtroom makes it very hard to prove somebody guilty. you know, you know all that. both of you do. to regular people, though, danny -- >> you don't need to be a lawyer, though, chris. >> here's why it helps, danny. what they hear is, you didn't have any reason to go after the kid, they told you to stay in the car, you did it anyway, you had a loaded weapon, you get too close to somebody's personal space, and basically, you make this happen. if it goes against you and you wind up killing the kid. so the kid who did nothing wrong until he was put in an uncomfortable situation winds up being the victim, but there is no justice. now, i know, not as well as you, but well enough, it wasn't enough in the courtroom. i get it, and i get it a lot from what you inform me about through the process. but do you understand why people, when they hear all those things, feel like this is unfair, if not illegal?
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>> can i say something about that? because i do understand -- >> by all means. >> well, i just want to say, i do understand the sentiment from a very broad sense. i mean, my book, "injustice for system," in part talks about the disproportionate failure of our criminal system to address violence against blacks, also young men. it also fails women and children, when you have systemic injustice, a case like this brings those feelings right to the fore. but that doesn't make this case an example of that systemic problem. and i think that's the disconnect here. rational people understand, the defense could have stayed home and they still would have won this case. now we have to find a way of talking about that larger problem, racism in our criminal justice system, using the right case, where it really is an example of that problem, because this is not it. >> wendy, danny, thank you very
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much. i appreciate the perspective, as i have from the beginning. i'm just giving voice to what's out there, because i know that your minds and your sophistication is helping inform it on the other side. i appreciate you doing it. it's a dialogue we need to have. thanks for contributing. we'll have more with you and more on the verdict later on, including reaction from george zimmerman's brother, dealing with some of these same questions. >> addressing that outrage that you hear out there. but there is a lot of other news developing at this hour. let's get straight to the headlines. >> a suspicious man spotted allegedly taking pictures of secretary of state john kerry's home now under arrest. police in boston questioned tun identified man and then arrested him for having an unopen container of alcohol and also said they found a pellet gun in his home. an autopsy is planned today to determine what caused "glee" actor cory monteith's death. his body was found in his hotel room saturday after he failed to check out as scheduled.
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police in vancouver, canada, say there is no sign of foul play. monteith completed a month-long stint in rehab earlier this year. he told a friend he was feeling just fantastic just a few hours before his body was found. we'll have more on this developing story at the bottom of the hour. to taiwan now, at least two people are dead and more than a half million are without power this morning in the aftermath of typhoon soulik. it has now been downgraded to a storm. schools and businesses across taipei are closed. in eastern china, over 330,000 people have been forced to evacuate. an ntsb intern mistakenly confirmed inaccurate and offensive names as those of flight 214's pilots to ktvu. asiana airlines says its reputation and that of the pilots were seriously damaged by the report. both the ntsb and ktuv have
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apologized. it might be the third time is a charm for actress halle berry. she tied the knot this weekend with french actor olivier martinez. the 46-year-old oscar winner has been married twice before. and she'ses s also pregnant wite couple's first child together. >> halle berry is the reason why people say, the 40s are the new 30s. she looks amazing. >> it is not fair. >> and she has another baby. she's just amazing. >> and congratulations, from all of us to you. coming up next on "new day," washington's worst nightmare. word that edward snowden is holding on to classified information that could be more devastating than what we've seen so far. mine was earned in djibouti, africa. 2004. vietnam in 1972. [ all ] fort benning, georgia in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection
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look at that beautiful sunrise. welcome back to "new day." a major heat wave is underway and engulfing pretty much all of the east coast at this point. here's a live look at new york city, which we obviously just showed you and just took away as i was saying it. this week promises to be hot, humid, and potentially dangerous for millions of people. let's bring in ingrid peterson who is back. welcome back. >> thank you. >> so what should people be expecting? >> unbelievable. it's bad enough when you have heat for one day, but when you're talking about heat that is expected to stay here all the way throughout the week, that's when we start to run into problems. let's talk about july. we were already talking about temperatures for the average, for the entire month, already 5 to 6 degrees above average. now we're talking about a heat wave that's expected to last all the way through this upcoming weekend. so with that, we know those numbers are going to go even higher, as we're looking at this average really jumping up. currently, this morning, this is what we're dealing, temperatures near 80 degrees and we're only
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going up from here. we're talking about 78, 80 degrees with 70% humidity in the morning. by the afternoon, we're talking about temperatures that are about 95 degrees. we're going to add in humidity right around 50%. it's going to feel like 100 out there. here's the advisories we're dealing with. a large swath of an area, anywhere from bottom, really all the way down through philadelphia today, we're going to be talking about this excessive heat. heat indices near 100 degrees. of course, you always want to remember, you want to wear that loose-fitting clothing and stay out of the sun during those peak hours. this huge area of high pressure is expected to say. by thursday and friday, it's going to bump up again and we'll talk about that strengthening heat, in through friday. we talked about that humidity. it's really that combination of not just the temperatures, but the humidity. you felt yesterday how hot and humid that is. we're going to make it hotter today and last -- >> even if we're passed the rain that we were talking about, the monsoonal floods that we're talking about. it's so humid, it almost feels like it's raining. >> bingo. >> indra, thanks so much.
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>> really, that picture behind indra really kind of says new day. that's what we need. >> it's beautiful, right? >> picture perfect. just a little less heat. >> you can't see heat in the picture, though. another big story we're following this morning, nsa leaker, edward snowden. he's already released lots of information, but the journalist who first broke the story said there's much more. glen greenwald issues an ominous threat that it could be a nightmare for the u.s. government if the information is released. phil black is in moscow with the very latest. good morning, phil. >> reporter: good morning, chris. the "guardian" newspaper says snowden still has enough information to do more harm to the united states in a single minute than anyone ever has. he doesn't go into detail. we've heard from snowden before, who says he steextensive knowle of america's operations around the world and has previously raised that to knock back claims that he is working to actively harm the united states, because he believes if that's what he wanted too, he could do it much
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more effectively in a much bigger way than we've ever seen. he remains atm moscow's airport where despite his announcement that he would be seeking asylum, russian officials say they have not yet received any documents from im. the process usually involves a number of government departments, with the final decision made by the russian president, and we are told that process usually takes about a month. even if he gets moving, puts his documents in and kick-starts that asylum seeking process, he is still looking at an extended stay in the transit zone of this moscow airport, chris. >> thank you very much. coming up next on "new day." george zimmerman, he might have his freedom back, but the life he knew before the shooting, will that ever be the same? plus, a singer with terrible pitch. and i'm not talking about her voice. >> that is quite a projectry. >> i've done worse. >> i've seen it. i'm a careful investor.
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welcome back to "new day," everyone. it is monday, july 15th. good morning, chris. i'm kate balduan. >> always working. always working. i'm chris como here with michaela pereira, who could have told me the camera was on. >> you're throwing me under the bus! >> i defended you! >> wow. >> appreciate it. >> george zimmerman is a free man this morning, and we're talking to the lawyer who helped get that not guilty verdict. more of chris' conversation with defense attorney mark o'mara,
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straight ahead. plus, fans are mourning the loss of cory monteith. he played the lovable singing jock, finn hudson, on the big hit tv show, "glee." we'll have reaction to his untimely death and the very latest on the investigation. but first, let's get to michaela for the stories making headlines. >> after george zimmerman was cleared of all charges in the shooting death of trayvon martin, protests and a show of solidarity with martin's family. prayer services and more rallies happening in florida today and tomorrow. protests sprang up across the nation on sunday in los angeles, san francisco, chicago, baltimore, detroit, miami, and new york among other cities. deposed egyptian president mohamed morsi and several leaders of the brotherhood are being investigated for allegedly killing protesters and spying is. they have also frozen the assets of more than a dozen people as they investigate violence in cairo. all of this as the interim prime minister begin filling out his cabinet and they take steps to
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form a civilian government. amazing video. a powerful explosion in corpus christi, texas, was felt two miles away at a local tv station. >> chris diaz is here. pretty nice out there -- >> well, the studio has a little bit of a ruckus. we'll have to see what that's about. we might be making our own news. >> and they carried it on their broadcast right as an explosion destroyed two homes. the cause of that blast remains under investigation. a surprising twist in a crime novel. not about the plot, but rather the author. turns out that robert galbraith who wrote a book called "the cuckoo's calling" was actually j.k. rowling. much more on this coming up a little bit later. and i've got to say, a really good thing that carly rae jepsen can sing, because her fastball needs a lot of work.
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she threw out the first pitch at the ray's game, she gives a great effort, but as you can see, a pitching coach needs to call her not maybe, but definitely. she's mortified. don't they usually get a couple of go-rounds first. like rehearsal. >> maybe she should have gone to the bull pen a little bit. >> there was a word that one of the coaches called very late for her to check off to first base. she's already in the motion, she knew it would be a balk if she stopped the motion. >> so you have her back, but you didn't have mine. >> when threatened, i blame, immediately. >> your first reaction. >> apparently. >> gladly, you both made it very clear it was all about me and my fault. thank you very much thank you very much. new information for you this morning. we are learning that approximately a dozen people were arrested in new york city overnight, protesting the not guilty verdict in the zimmerman trial. a reflection of protests going on across the country. we had a chance to speak with george zimmerman's attorney, mark o'mara, and he answered all
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questions, including ones about the frustration surrounding the self-defense claim in this case. take a listen. perhaps many people don't equate what happens to you when you get beat up with the proper justification for taking someone's life. >> and that's a frustration that people have and i share it with them, because this is my life and i deal with this every day. when you have to look inside somebody's head, and in this case, they had to look inside george zimmerman's head, while he was on the ground, with somebody unknown on top of him, doing basically whatever they were doing to him, and him not returning any blows, you don't know that the next shot on concrete isn't going to be the one that sends you unconscious. you are allowed to rackeact to r reasonable perception of potential injury, and i think anybody in that set of circumstances, screaming for help for 45 seconds would say they acted reasonably in stopping the attack. >> because at that point,
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legally, you are allowed to use lethal force to protect yourself? >> george zimmerman did not want to shoot anybody. i think it's a testament to the fact that he didn't want to shoot anybody that he went through 45 seconds of screaming for help before he did. i wish people would look at it through that filter. i think they'd understand the very unfortunate and tragic circumstances that unfolded that very night. >> taking a half a step back, we talked about the 911 operator, saying to mr. zimmerman, "you don't need to do that, we don't you need to go after him," and then he goes after him anyway. do you think that that is something that george zimmerman wishes he could take back, that decision? >> you know, he has gotten criticized, because he wouldn't have changed anything. does he wish that he'd never gotten out of the car? does he wish he'd never went to target? absolutely. but let's remember that he got out of the car at the precise moment after the 911 or nonemergency operator said, where's he going? what's he doing now? he had said that on three
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separate occasions, so it's a tragedy, but i don't think that it was george zimmerman's fault in the way this thing unfolded. . >> and you have to remember, mark o'mara doesn't have to answer any of these questions. the case is over, the verdict is in, he won, right? his client was acquitted. but he wanted to take them on. he knows there are a lot of interpretations of fact out there and we appreciated him taking the opportunity to do so. and we will play more of the interview with mark o'mara at the top of the hour. >> george zimmerman may be a free man, as chris was discussing with mark o'mara, but his future is anything but clear this morning. and he could likely face a difficult road ahead. cnn's david mattingly is live in sanford, florida, with much more on this side of the story. good morning, david. >> good morning, kate. george zimmerman is no longer required to live just in seminole county. he's not wearing an ankle bracelet, the authorities aren't tracking him anymore, but being acquitted doesn't necessarily mean that he is free.
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>> we, the jury, find george zimmerman not guilty. >> reporter: george zimmerman is free to go whateverever he can. the question is, where, when angry is sure to follow. >> he's a free man in the eyes of the court, but he's going to be looking around his shoulder for the rest of his life. >> there have been tweets, e-mail, and letters wishing him bodily harm or death. he can forget about being a cop. >> my advice would be, you need to find a new passion. and it needs to be helping people in a very different way. >> reporter: he'll also have to be wary of new friends. >> he's got to be very careful about who he associates with afterwards, even if they're offering financial support. >> reporter: for a view of life after acquittal, zimmerman needs to look no further than casey anthony, the hated young mother found not guilty of murdering her 2-year-old daughter. she has since lived in hiding and financial ruin. cheney mason was her defense attorney. >> you never know who the nuts
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are and where they are. there are still people that threaten me. >> not one more! >> reporter: experts advise zimmerman, disappear, if that's possible. be contrite. and try not to give the appearance that he he beat the system. and george zimmerman is not entirely without resourcing. there are hundreds of people sending him cards and letters of support, even contributing to his defense fund. he also has the strong support of his immediate family. kate? >> david, we'll be watching that. thank you so much. coming up next hour, we are going to interview george zimmerman's brother, robert, you see him right there, and what he says about george's reaction to the verdict, and as david was just looking at, his newfound freedom. a very interesting interview with him. >> robert zimmerman, a very intelligent, articulate, obviously zealous defender of his brother. but he knows the issues of the case very well. we'll take a quick break on "new day." when we come back, the premature death of a rising star. what do we know about what might
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have killed cory monteith? the autopsy is set for today and we'll bring you the latest. and today's must-see moment. if dave matthews needed you to drive him to his own concert, what would you say? >> no, you've got to sing it. >> okay -- >>♪ what would you say >> nice. >> am i back? >> you're back!
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welcome back to "new day," everybody. an autopsy is scheduled for later today in the death of cory monteith. the star of the hit tv series, "glee," was found dead in a vancouver hotel room. he was only 31 years old. >> that sits with you. only 31 years old. this was shocking, to say the
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least, by all accounts. cory monteith was premiering for season five of "glee." now we are all asking, what happened? ♪ i want it that way >> reporter: cory monteith entertained millions as the singing football player on "glee." sadly, that voice was silenced on sunday. the 31-year-old actor was found dead in is a vancouver hotel room. >> cause of death was not apparent on initial examination. and further examination and tests will take place to determine cause of death. >> reporter: as canadian authorities investigate what killed him, the shocking news of his death hit friends and colleagues hard. ♪ don't include me >> reporter: his on-again, off-again girlfriend, and "glee" cohalf star, lea michele is grieving privately. in a statement, her rep asked that everyone kindly respect lea's privacy during this devastating time. unlike his clean-cut alter ego, finn hudson, monteith had a troubled youth.
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he described himself as an out of control dug and alcohol-abusing teen who was skipping school to drink and smoke pot by the age of 13. >> for me, it wasn't so much about the substances, per se, it was more about not fitting in. just a lack of not really having a self image at the time. which is, that's just like typical teenager stuff. >> reporter: despite his success in "glee," monteith continued to battle his substance abuse demons. earlier this year, he checked himself into rehab. his friend, "glee" director adam shankman, spoke to monteith hours before he was found dead. >> i had several interactions with him yesterday, where he said to me that he was feeling amazing and even said, i'm feeling fantastic again. >> very sad. investigators have not officially tied monteith's death to substance abuse, but vancouver police have already ruled out foul play. he does have an autopsy that is being conducted today. >> now, you know, who knows what they're going to discover, but
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there's an interesting window here into the substance abuse. people think that it's the end, but it's just the symptom of something else. here, his self-image as a kid. >> and that battle continues every day. even if you're feeling fine, it's still a battle every day. that's what addicts will tell you. >> so young when that started for him. >> but it happens like that very often. >> exactly. thank you so much, nischelle. coming up next on "new day," a very fun day on the lake nearly turns tragic when the sand suddenly swallows a young boy. the dramatic rescue, ahead. plus, oh, my goodness! you're right. i'm totally out of line this morning. >> don't worry about it. you're not out of line. we're both excited about this picture! come on, it's our must-see woman. a woman stops to help some guy on the side of the road who needs a lift. yeah, the guy, his name is a dave mathews. this story, coming up. you have the potential to do more in business.
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see these photographs? cue them now. that's emily crouse with her idol, dave matthews. how she got the pictures, though, is the cool part of this story. she's on her way to one of his concerts in pennsylvania. she notices a bike rider on the side of the road with a flat tire. so she did the neighborly
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stopped to help, and it was actually dave matthews. they gave dave a ride to his own shone. the rock star was so grateful, he invited them backstage and even took them out to dinner. i think her life has been made. because he would have been missed the concert. >> he didn't have his cell phone with him, apparently. >> well, when you're going to ride to your concert, do you have your -- >> when don't you have a cell phone? >> dave, that makes me love you anymore. >> you're a big fan? >> i am a big fan. i'm really jealous of emily right now. >> pay more attention when you're on the road to those stranded bikers. never know. >> if you're not, i'm just going to leave. >> no, she wouldn't. >> i'm kidding! >> thanks, michaela. coming up on "new day," we'll have more of our conversation with zimmerman's attorney, mark o'mara, why he maintains that zimmerman had every right to defend himself against trayvon martin.
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>> and we'll also hear from perhaps george zimmerman's staunchest supporter, his brother, robert. he tells us what lies ahead. i worked a patrol unit for 17 years in the city of baltimore. when i first started experiencing the pain, it's, it's hard to describe because you have a numbness... but yet you have the pain like thousands of needles sticking in your foot. it was progressively getting worse, and at that point i knew i had to do something. when i went back to my healthcare professional... that's when she suggested the lyrica. once i started taking the lyrica, the pain started subsiding. [ male announcer ] it's known that diabetes damages nerves. lyrica is fda approved to treat diabetic nerve pain. lyrica is not for everyone. it may cause serious allergic reactions or suicidal thoughts or actions. tell your doctor right away if you have these, new, or worsening depression, or unusual changes in mood or behavior. or swelling, trouble breathing, rash, hives, blisters, changes in eyesight including blurry vision, muscle pain with fever, tired feeling, or skin sores from diabetes. common side effects are dizziness, sleepiness,
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saving time by booking an appointment online, even smarter. online scheduling. available now at meineke.com. welcome back, everybody. the george zimmerman trial has really affected all aspects of american society. even athletes took to twitter to express their feelings on for verdict and had some very controversial things to say. andy scholes is joining us this morning as part of his bleacher report. andy, you there? >> what's up, guys? twitter, it exploded saturday night once george zimmerman was found not guilty. as you can imagine, emotions were running very high. and while many athletes voiced their disappointment with the verdict, atlanta falcons wide
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receiver rodney white took it to another level. his most controversial tweet read, all those jurors should go home tonight and kill themselves for letting a grown man get away with killing a kid. white later apologized for that tweet saying, i understand my tweet last night was extreme. i never meant for the people to do that. i was shocked and upset about the verdict. i am sorry. all right, one golfer to keep your eyes on this week at the british open is 19-year-old jordan spieth. the former all-american and texan holed this shot from the bunker to force a playoff and spieth would go on to win the tournament for his first career victory. and he's the first teenager to win a pga tour event since 1931. all right, tonight, the home run derby at citi field in new york. the favorite to win it this year is baltimore first baseman, chris davis. t
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davis is on pace to hit 60 plus home runs this season. and a big debate going on right now is if davis ends up hitting 62 home runs, which is one more than roger maris hit back in 1961, should we consider him the new home run king, considering barry bonds and mark mcgwire did it, but they were amongst the steroid scandal going on back in the '90s and early 2000s. >> i say yes. that's my answer. >> respect him for being clean. i finally got invited to the home run derby, because it's here in new york. i think it's too late. it's too late. it's too late at night for us, because we have to go to bed. >> his new bedtime is around 7:30. >> i have to go to bed in like 15 minutes. >> record it on your dvr. >> thanks, andy. thanks so much. hope you had a good weekend. what is that? it's time for the rock block, a quick roundup of the stories you'll be talking about today. >> from the "pittsburgh post-gazette," a new trial today for pennsylvania's controversial voter i.d. law. critics say the law discourages
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young adults, the elderly, and minorities from voting. from "the new york times," retailers tracking a signal from your smartphone to monitor every move you make in their store. nordstrom's, family dollar, benitan among the businesses experiencing with this technology. and from the "san francisco chronicle," a tighter leash on local dog walkers. under a new law, they cannot walk more than eight dogs at a time. i don't know about you, christine romans, but two is enough for me. >> two is enough for me, but that sounds like a good business model. record levels for the dow and the s&p. if citi's earnings and retail sales are in line later, we might be off to the race again. the dow and s&p closed up 2.2 and 3% last year for the year. stocks are up 18% so far. the stock market steam roller continues. it's going to cost you $4.50 more every time you fill up. a gallon of regular unleaded rose. a year ago, gas prices were more like $3.29.
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higher gas prices won't mean much if you can afford to drive one of these. over the weekend, a 1954 mercedes-benz race car sold for a record $30 million. that car, $30 million. let's get to our indra peterson in the weather center for all you need to know about the weather before you head out the door. >> good morning. we think we're hot, but 20 million will be extremely hot today. anywhere from boston, down to philadelphia, 20 million of us dealing with temperatures that could have heat indices as high as 100 degrees. as if above-normal temperatures weren't high enough, you're addedi adding the high humidity to that. 1 to 3 inches of heavy rain and flooding possible for them. where else is it hot? for so many, it feels like july. down to the southeast, even on the west coast, temperatures are hot. looks like texas today, the only place feeling a little bit cooler than they should be. >> and that often doesn't happen. >> definitely not. >> all right, indra, thanks so much. we're at the top of the hour,
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which you know, means it is time for the top news. for trayvon to rest in peace, we must all be peaceful. >> overnight, anger and calls for change. coast-to-coast protests against the george zimmerman verdict. most peaceful, but some clash with police. not over yet. the justice department now investigating. could they face charges against zimmerman and could trayvon martin's family sue? we hear from both sides this morning. a young tv star found dead. his tv star girlfriend in mourning. how did "glee's" cory monteith die? your "new day" starts right now. good morning, everybody. welcome back to "new day." it's monday, july 17th. >> we're joined by news anchor
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michaela pereira. coming up this hour, we're following all the developing news surrounding the george zimmerman not guilty verdict. overnight, huge protests engulfed major cities from new york to los angeles, even leading to some arrests. the marches and rallies showing growing anger over the acquittal in trayvon martin's death. you just saw some of our reporters, like no other network can. in sanford, florida, as well as washington, d.c., we're all over it. >> we're also talking to the people who know george zimmerman and trayvon martin best, including martin family attorney, benjamin crump, george zimmerman's brother, robert, and his defense attorney, mark o'mara. and we're keeping an eye on all the other news developing, include information that edward snowden may have an nsa blueprint. and a grueling heat wave bearing down on the east coast. and we want to tell you the story about a little boy recovering after he was swallowed by a sand dune. >> 6 years old, right?
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i can't wait to hear the parent's story. but we'll begin with news that protesters demanding justice for trayvon martin have been taking to the streets. what started out peacefully ended in some places after clashes with police. about a dozen people arrested in new york and protesters in sanford, florida, where the trial took place, continue to be out in force. that is where alina machado is this morning. good morning, alina. >> reporter: good morning, chris. protesters and protests here in sanford, florida, have remained peaceful and calm, a sharp contrast to what we've seen in some parts of the country. overnight, thousands of protesters from new york to los angeles to the nation's capital, out in full force, reacting to this moment. >> we, the jury, find george zimmerman not guilty. >> reporter: in new york's times square, a solid showing of protesters united, arm in arm. one young man braved the sweltering heat in an all-black hoodie. but demonstrations in harlem turned into scuffles with
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police, and reports of people taken into custody. and in los angeles, mostly peaceful marches interrupted by protesters, throwing batteries, rocks, chunks of concrete, and a separate gathering on the 10 freeway shut down traffic. the lapd responding, by shooting bean bags at demonstrators. in oakland, california, protesters were seen smashing a police car. demonstrations elsewhere were mostly peaceful. in sanford, florida, the anger was palpable in the goldsboro neighborhood, a largely african-american part of town. >> right now, i'm just too emotional. i'm just sick and tired. i'm just done. >> reporter: but community leaders were anxious to turn disappointment into constructive action. >> perhaps we can take this anger and move it into a positive vein, because if necks back.e, this snapped our -
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>> reporter: starting today, several churches here in seminole county, florida, will be opening their doors for community prayers every monday afternoon. the first session will be taking place at the church behind me and several community leaders, including the police chief and the mayor, are expected to attend. chris? >> all right. thank you very much, alina. also this morning, the justice department is looking into a civil rights case against george zimmerman, potentially. they're investigating whether or not hate crimes charges are warranted. this after powerful reaction to the verdict from trayvon martin's grieving family. his parents were not in the courtroom for the announcement of the verdict, but they are publicly expressing their shock. george howell standing by live in sanford, florida, this morning, with more. good morning, george. >> kate, good morning. yes, they were not in the courtroom, but they did make their responses well known over twitter. i want you to see some of these responses. first, from sybrina fulton, talking about the verdict here. where she says, "lord, during my darkest hour, i lean on you. you are all that i have."
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another tweet from tracy martin. he says, "even though i am brokenhearted, my faith is unshattered. i will always love my baby tray." and a statement from the white house. i want to read this as well. "we should ask ourselves as individuals and as a society how we can prevent future tragedies like this. as citizens, it's a job for all of us. that's the way to honor trayvon martin." and we also hear from zimmerman supporters who also call this a tragedy, but they say when you look at the case, when you look at the facts, there was so much reasonable doubt, that they were not surprised that the verdict was what it was. but we're hearing reaction from all over the country, including sunday, in many churches, they talked about this verdict and protests where people on either side voiced their opinions. >> all right, george, i'll take it. thanks so much. one thing, as george pointed out, and i think is also worthy of pointing out again, what you hear from the grieving family of trayvon martin, as well as you heard it from president obama,
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is calling for calm. it's an important conversation and there are conversations to be had going forward. but calm is needed thousa eed n. >> and that's getting to a place where we can find how to move forward. this is the emotion of the moment. and part of that is addressing what is going on in george zimmerman's head during this. a lot of people want to know how he felt about it. we actually had the opportunity to talk about to george zimmerman's attorney, mark o'mara, and he insists that george zimmerman does regret taking trayvon martin's life. but he claims his client had no other choice. when we sat down and spoke, he addressed a range of questions, and he was anxious to address the raw emotion and anger set off by this explosive verdict. take a look. mr. o'mara, thank you very much for taking the opportunity to be on "new day." let's begin with what is all around us. the reaction, a lot of it outrage to the not guilty verdict. you surprised by that part of the reaction? >> i'm a bit surprised that there is outrage. we would hope that everybody would look at this case as being
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a very fair trial, with both parties represented well. where most, if not all of the evidence came out, and the jury took their time, deliberated, and came up with a fair and just verdict. my hope that those people, even though they're frustrated, will accept the verdict. >> address the basic concern. your client, george zimmerman, wound up killing trayvon martin, and yet there is no legal responsibility and people can't understand it. what are they missing? >> what they're missing is george had an absolute right to be where he was and see where trayvon martin was. people say it was improper profiling, but the reality is, i think george had a reason to be concerned. it was trayvon martin who was the aggressor, at least by the forensic evidence, because trayvon martin did not receive any injuries but the gunshot wound, 45 seconds after george zimmerman was screaming for help. i understand people's frustration, but it would seem to be that trayvon martin overreacted to what he perceived
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to be something going on, and he overreacted in a violent way. >> do you think this case is an example of the law needing to change? that stand your ground makes it too easy for violence to perpetuate? that the law should be, you get to use equal force, not lethal force, in situations like this? >> i had a problem with your stand your ground law that would allow people not to retreat and to use deadly force when you have the opportunity to retreat. but that has nothing to do with this case at hand. i don't believe that the law should be changed to say, you can only resist force with force, because once you get to the point that great bodily injury may occur, then you should be able to protect yourself, your life, and, by the way, the life of another. if somebody is beating on you, if they're smashing your head against concrete, and that gives you fear for great bodily injury, that is a well-founded, 500 or 600-year-old standard that says, you can resist that with force, up to and including deadly force. >> does george zimmerman regret
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having to take trayvon martin's life, having to kill him that night? >> absolutely. absolutely. he's human. he did not want to take any person's life. the fact that he had a gun with him, gave him the opportunity to protect himself. >> his brother, robert, said that while he doesn't regret it, because he did what he had to do and he was right then, so he's right now, do you think his brother is being a little sensitive to the legalities of language here? >> i think it is semantics. george did what he did because he had to, not because he wanted to. that's the difference we have to be careful of with the semantics, doing something because you want to or because you have to. >> just because the prosecutors didn't meet the burden according to the jury, that necessarily mean that george zimmerman did nothing wrong that night, profiling the kid, taking an interest in someone who was doing nothing, having a weapon with a bullet already chambered in a situation that was unknown.
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does he feel any sense of moral wrong? >> i think he regrets having to take a life. he was put in a position where he had an untenable choice. continue to get -- be maybe killed or kill. and he made that decision. to look at things like, why did he have a chamber -- a round chambered, chris, i think you would agree, every person who has a gun for self-defense, if you don't have a round in the chamber, it's a paperweight. >> does he regret, though, picking out trayvon martin? he was wrong, right? this kid was not doing anything wrong. he belonged there, he had a right to the place and space where he was also. does he regret even singling him out that night? >> well, let's look at the circumstances as he was viewing them. he saw somebody who happened to be in the area where another person had just burglarized a home. yes, and it was a young black male. was that a focusing, a profiling? it was a suspicion. we don't know what trayvon martin was doing right or wrong.
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all we know is that when he was doing what law enforcement seemed to be telling him to do, which is keep an eye on him, that it turned violent, only because of what trayvon martin decided to do, not george zimmerman. >> thank you for taking the time to do this interview. i'm sure you share the hopes of all that we find a way to move forward after this verdict and that any wounds can be healed this time. >> there's still a lot of conversations. we have a lot of conversations to have. i've been an advocate for the fact that black youth, black youth in america are not treated well by the criminal justice system, and we need to have that conversation. my fear is that we polarize the conversation, because we attach it to a self-defense verdict that they have nothing to do with. >> and we appreciate mr. o'mara taking the time to deal with the questions coming from that perspective, of what was wrong with this verdict. kate? >> let's continue this conversation. i want to bring in the attorney for trayvon martin's family, benjamin crump.
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you have been with the family throughout this whole process, mr. crump, and i really appreciate you joining us this morning to talk about this. it's been clearly a long weekend for everyone. first, i want to ask you, of course, about trayvon's parents. we know that the family is heartbroken. we haven't seen them publicly since the verdict, but what we have seen are protests in major cities, even arrests, many people coming out, outraged, supporting trayvon's family. what did they make of all of this today? >> well, kate, the family as you said, just was devastated with the verdict, and they thank all the supporters for disagreeing with the verdict, because they do believe trayvon had every right to walk home from that 7-eleven and not be profiled and pursued and not be killed. with that being said, they went through the grieving process, they've cried, they've prayed, they went to church sunday morning, and mswre swreybrina fe
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home from church, she said whereby this verdict will not define trayvon, we will define trayvon. i was so inspired by her. they've been so dignified and graceful throughout this terrible situation that has been laid upon their doorstep. >> now, you have said that the family is considering further re legal action. can you tell me more about that. will they be filing a civil lawsuit against george zimmerman? >> well, we'll be talking about all of that in the days to come. right now, they are trying to make sense of this criminal verdict. as sybrina fulton said, we have to roll up our sleeves, because even though we've come a long way, we've got a long way to go to make sure that this doesn't happen to anybody else's child, especially after this verdict. and, you know, what sybrina and tracy are concentrating on is the trayvon martin foundation,
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because that's what they can control. they can't control the court system. they're putting their faith in a higher authority, and they're putting their faith in god to get them through this. >> and no one can put a limit on the grieving of parents who have lost a son, that's for sure. one thing that is happening right now that we know is that the justice department is investigating. do you think that the justice department should be pursuing federal, civil rights violations, charges against george zimmerman? >> well, i know based on what came out in the trial, and the defense's strategy was that george zimmerman profiled trayvon martin, because there had been a black teenager, on a previous occasion, to burglarize one of the townhomes. so it was almost to suggest, because you had the action of one person in an ethnic group, that you can now indict the whole race, and you can stop any black teenager who was walking
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through that neighborhood. that's proving. and there's a big question, if that is allowed. and so i think the justice department should look at that. i know the supreme court had decisions that profiling was illegal when the police do it. so the question is, how about when a quasi-police or a private citizen profiles somebody, just because of what they're wearing and how they look, to say that, i have a right to profile you and follow you, and we don't know what happened from there, but we know he got out of that car to follow trayvon martin. he said it himself. >> now, as you mentioned, the defense team -- george zimmerman's team, they have been particularly critical of what they call is a public smear campaign, created by people assisting the martin family. they're basically saying that people outside of the process, of the legal process, are the ones injecting race into this case, and race was not a part of this legal matter before the
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court. what do you say to that? >> well, i can't speak for anybody else, but as for myself and my legal team, we have been zealous advocates for our clients, the family of tracy -- trayvon martin, and they've been very zealous advocates for their client, as lawyers should be. and we're not going to personally attack them for their strategies. we will talk about the messages and the irresponsible messages. everybody has a right to do that. but we have to be very professional and we have to make sure that we are aboveboard, because people are going to follow our lead. our supporters will follow what we do, their supporters will follow what they do. so we have to be responsible. we have to make sure we tell everybody to accept the rule of law. and as mr. martin has said and what we continue to tell all our supporters, trayvon cannot rest in peace if we are not peaceful. >> and i think that is an
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important message to end on this morning. benjamin crump, great to see you. thank you so much for taking time to speak with us this morning. i really appreciate it. >> thank you, kate. >> of course. of course. still to come later this hour, our interview with george zimmerman's brother, robert, what he has to say about george's reaction to the verdict and his newfound freedom. a lot to discuss this morning. but also, a lot of other news developing this hour, let's get to michaela for the headlines. >> making news this hour, nsa leaker edward snowden said to have some more bombshells, including inside information that could be a nightmare for washington. phil black is following the very latest for us from moscow. phil? >> reporter: michaela, good morning. glen greenwald from britain's "guardian" newspaper says that snowden has much more information, enough to do more harm to the united states in a single minute than any other person before. snowden himself has hinted at this before, saying he has extensive knowledge of america's intelligence and surveillance operations, both electronic and otherwise, but he has said that in response to claims that he is
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working to actively damage the united states, because he said that if he really wants to do that, he could do that in a much bigger way than what we've seen. snowden remains at moscow's airport, where despite his announcement on friday afternoon that he would be seeking asylum in this country, russian officials say they have still not received any official request from him. the request process usually takes about a month or so, we are told, involving a number of russian government departments. even if he puts his paperwork in today and gets this process started, he's looking at a significant stay in this moscow airport. michaela? >> it will be interesting to see how washington reacts. phil black reporting. thanks so much for that. an autopsy later this morning could provide answers about the tragic death of actor cory monteith. the 31-year-old former "glee" star was found dead in a vancouver hotel room on saturday. police say there is no indication of foul play. in the last several years, monteith talked publicly about his struggles with addiction. back in april of this year, he checked himself into a treatment facility. a year earlier, he told "parade"
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magazine that he felt lucky to still be alive. we'll have much more coming up the our next half hour. an attempt at a world speed record ends in tragedy. bill werner was trying to go 300 miles per hour on a souped up motorcycle. he lost control traveling at 285 miles per hour and crashed on a runway at a former air base in maine. werner was conscious and talking after the crash, but he later died at a hospital. hundreds of spectators were there when it happened. a suspicious man spotted allegedly taking pictures of secretary of state john kerry's home is now under arrest, after boston police questioned the unidentified man, they arrested him for having an open container of alcohol. they also say they found a pellet gun in his car. kerry was visiting his wife at a hospital at the time. she suffered a seizure earlier this month. and i would like to present you with the grossest beauty treatment since little fish ate dead skin off of people's feet. these are live snails placed on
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your face, crawling around, leaving their icky slime on your face. and the slime is what you want. it's apparently very good for your skin. this costs $250. >> how does she look so calm when she had snails crawling on her face? >> i love the snail officifaciad no one ever to anyone. >> biggest hit, snail facial. we're going to take a break here on "new day." when we come back, swallowed alive by a sand dune. we'll bring you this incredible rescue story. a 6-year-old boy almost lost his life on an indiana beach. and also, how this adorable pooch made it to safety. much more ahead. ♪ with diabetes, it's tough to keep life balanced. i don't always have time to eat like i should. and the more i focus on everything else, the less time i have to take care of me.
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this is humira at work. that's a great song choice. new york city, last night, there were protests here, but this morning, it is, by definition, a new day. welcome back, everybody, to "new day." here in the northeast, we definitely don't want to soak up the sun, even though it was a good song for other reasons. we're hiding from it. it's an oppressive heat wave coming through with temperatures feeling like they're in the triple digits. let's figure out what's going on with indra petersons. >> i've got that face again, like, i'm all the bearer of bad news. in june, we were well above normal for rain. here we are in july, where we wanted the sunshine. now we're getting too much of it. the averages now for the month of july, you can tell in the northeast want 5 to 6 degrees above average already and the heat wave now on the way, expected to last all the way throughout the week. we know those temperatures are going to go up as well. as far as 20 million people
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talking about this excessive heat today. from boston all the way down through philadelphia today, we're talking about not only temperatures 10 degrees above normal, but on top of that, we add that humidity. we're talking about it feeling like 100 degrees today. and day after day, that's what makes it so hard. look at the temperatures in the morning. about 78 degrees. that's our starting point. now we add about a good 15, 20 degrees to that and this is what it's going to feel like. new york today looking at feel-like heat end see for 100. even albany looking for 95. that is definitely hot. now, what we are going to talk about, though, of course, is heat not just out in the northeast, but also the southeast. even in the ohio valley. so really a huge chunk of the country today, dealing with this heat. one of those things i want to remind everyone is, please, do not think you can run into the store very quickly and leave a child in the car. this is how quick it is. 80 degrees outside, 10 minutes, it will feel like 99 degrees in the car. once it's 95, 97 degrees, you
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can imagine how dangerous that really is. >> everyone knows it, but when you see how fast that temperature jumps, that's something to pay attention to. thanks so much. >> we have an incredible story of survival right now, following a dramatic rescue in indiana. a 6-year-old boy followed up by a massive sand dune. he is in critical condition this morning. he was saved, though, by emergency crews that dug him out. pamela brown is joining us with the latest on the story. everyone goes to these dunes. everyone kind of in the midwest right there goes -- i went to them as a kid. this is terrifying. >> this is terrifying. this was actually in a restricted area where this little boy was playing. it was supposed to be a fun, family vacation to the beach. it turned into a horrifying, nearly four-hour nightmare for a 6-year-old boy and his family. those terrifying moments captured on a chilling 911 call. it's every parent's worst nightmare. >> 911? >> i'm at the mt. baldy beach and my friend's son, he got stuck in a sand dune and he's like under the sand and they
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can't get him out. >> reporter: authorities say 6-year-old nathan woessner was suddenly swallowed by a sink hole on the indiana sand dunes laining lake michigan. >> can anybody see him or is he completely covered by sand? >> yes. my husband and his dad are trying to dig him out. >> reporter: dozens of first responders rushed to the 11-foot mound of sand burying the boy. with excavation equipment in hand, they raced against the clock. >> we tried to just stay focused, you know, and the first two hours was complete misery. >> more than 3 1/2 hours ticked by, and finally, signs of life. >> at that point, everybody was really franticly, by hand, trying to dig him out. once i had a hold of his head, just supported his head and i was talking to him, lake i would talk to my own son. >> i kind of felt for a pulse. your heart wants you to feel that and your heart wants you to hear that breath. >> woessner, unconscious but still breathing was pulled from his vertical position in the
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sand and wurushed to the hospit. in the end, it may have been a single air pocket that saved his l life. >> when we pulled him out, he really didn't look good. the only thing you can think of is, you know, that could be your kid. we weren't going to give up. >> any parent, i'm sure, feels that way. the hospital tweeting nathan woessner released this update. the child remains in critical condition, but when he arrived, he was able to respond to simple commands and he has responded well to mechanical ventilation. good news there. and we learned in this story that actually, on the way to the hospital, he started crying in the surveillance. so welcome relief, of course, for the rescuers and his family. >> so scary. such a popular area, when you hear that story, it just terrifies me. as a kid, you run on the dunes. parents hang out on the beach and you just run the dunes. >> can you imagine, three hours? you have to think the worst, right? >> it turned into a recovery mission. >> for them to have the deal and watch the people digging him out and the idea that that kid comes
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alive. >> obviously, nothing's more important in a parent's life than their child, but now after something like this, the gift is just so precious. >> a good sign of him crying in the end. >> exactly. >> we'll stay on him. we're going to want to see -- >> and of course you want to wait to hear what the parents have to say. >> thank you so much for bringing us that. coming up next on "new day," we're continuing to follow the latest developments in the george zimmerman case. george zimmerman's brother said race had nothing to do with it. and also, he said that trayvon martin caused his own death. a stunning interview with robert zimmerman, straight ahead. and no one seems sure how he got there, but we can tell you firefighters finally managed to save this pooch from a 6-inch window ledge. kind of looks like a lion, like a little stuffed lion. >> those chows. >> it's a dog stuff there had between the window ledge and one of those child-restriction grates. obviously, not dog proof. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪
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welcome back, everybody. it's just a little after 7:30 here on "new day," monday, july 15th. i'm kris cuomo. >> i'm kate balduan. we're joined by news anchor, michaela pereira. coming up, we'll hear what george zimmerman's brother, robert, has to say about the not guilty verdict that set his brother free. and the royal baby watch continues in england. a little prince or princess due any day now. we'll bring you the latest from london. but first, the news from this morning. >> we'll talk more about those protests that are happening. protesters frustrated with the outcome of the george zimmerman trial take to the streets of cities nationwide, calling for justice for trayvon martin. in new york, what started out as
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a peaceful march turned violent when police arrested several demonstrators for stopping traffic. in los angeles, police shot demonstrators with bean bag guns after they had rocks and batteries thrown at them. meanwhile, thousands rallied in san francisco, chicago, denver, baltimore, and detroit. to the runaway train disaster in canada now, where the death toll stands at 35. two more bodies were recovered. 15 people are still missing and presumed dead. the crash and inferno leveled dozens of buildings, but crews carefully had to demolish two, because they were deemed unstable. they say there's a chance remains maybe found at those locations. asiana airlines is filing a defamation suit against a california tv station. the airline says a tasteless prank that went viral has damaged its reputation. ktuv has since apologized for a report that used several phoney and racially offensive names for the four pilots aboard that flight that crashed in san francisco, killing three people.
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ntsb says a former intern erroneously renamed the names of the former flight crew. the irs scandal growing more partisan by the day. a seventh congressional hearing begins this week with a focus on the inspector general. democrats argue the audit was misleading and failed to emphasize that liberal groups are also targeted and they're demanding to know whether the tea party targeting was orchestrated by the obama administration. all right. you've heard the saying, cat on a hot tin roof, how about a dog on a six-inch window ledge. there's a chow, managed to climb out on a second-story apartment, couldn't quite figure out how to get back inside because of one of those child window guards. a brooklyn firefighter used treats and a bowl of water and a bucket to try and get it to trust him and then finally was able to lower the dog to safety. chows can sometimes be a little testy, but this one was probably thinking, brother, you're my only chance, get me out of here.
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i'm with you. i will follow you wherever you want me to go. >> look at the face of that puppy. that's a really adorable doggy. all right. we're going to turn back now to our coverage of the george zimmerman trial. we're trying to get as many different perspectives as possible. one of those will be george zimmerman's robert. he says it will be a very long time before his brother's life returns to normal, if it ever does. he also says while trayvon martin was the victim in the case, he caused his own death. kate and i spoke with him about the trial and the impact on his brother. when's the last time you had a chance to speak with your brother and get a sense of where his head is now? >> we heard from george last night. he is adjusting. that is the best way i can put it. i think he's been kind of caged in. he's had these constraints with gps, and having to show up to court every day and having this weighing on him. freedom is kind of a new concept to him, all over again. as bizarre as it sounds, he really is free to move about this country and do whatever he pleases, for the first time in a long time.
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>> any idea of plan for him now? >> no. i, as his brother, would like to see him heal, recenter himself, take some time to rest, to relax. the stress has been incredible on him, on our family. i think it's important that he take some time for himself. he's been through a lot. i can't foresee any plans or any meaningful engagement that he'd have with society for a while, because of the threats that are still going around and continue to. >> now there are threats of new charges, possibly. the president of the naacp was just on with our colleague, candy crowley, talking about how civil rights leaders like himself, ben jealous and others, are pushing for the justice department to file and bring civil rights charges against your brother. and even the florida state attorney kind of talked about that last night after the verdict. what do you say to that? >> i think that i would encourage mr. jealous, who i describe as a self-professed
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civil rights leader, i don't think he does anything for civil rights by perpetuating a narrative that has now been proven false. and calling for an arrest and then a conviction and it didn't happen. so now there's more agitation by the same players that were insisting that george was a murderer and a racist to begin with. >> but the justice department is gathering information. the justice department is not directly responding to the n ii request, but they are gatherering information. >> and i think they've investigated about three dozen of his closest friends and acquaintances and there is not any inkling of racism. in fact, there's evidence to show the opposite. i would encourage them to cool their jets, give everyone some time to kind of process what's going on. agitation doesn't help us. it doesn't do anybody any good right now. >> from your brother's perspective, you know where his head is on these things. do you believe he looks at things he did that night and say, i wish i hadn't.
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i regret having a round in the chamber, or following him when i was told it wasn't necessary. or starting something or continuing something. what does he regret? >> i'll tell you what. i'll tell you that when this happened, george wasn't the same. he was profoundly saddened. he was completely a somber person that was just not himself. regret is a very strong word. regret implies that your actions -- you have culpability in what you did for what happened. and i think that's what you're asking, is does he share or accept the blame? i think that george, outside of the word blame, feels and has felt and i've expressed this before, very bad. >> have you ever heard him say, i wish i didn't do it? >> no. in fact, i've heard him say the opposite. >> what do you mean? >> well, he had that interview with sean hannity and that was presented in court as well. and i don't think that people who are forth coming and forthright with what they do and believe they're doing the right thing should then go back. that's the way we were taught always as children, if you do the right thing all the time or what you believe to be right, you don't have to go back and
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make amends for that and say, it should have been that way. if it should have been that way now and you can think of that in hindsight, it should have been that way then. >> will george carry a gun now? >> i don't know. i heard from piers morgan last night that his gun was returned him or at least he's eligible to have it returned to him. i don't know if he'll carry a gun. i think he would have more reason to now more than he did before, because there's so many people who want him dead and know he's free, but at the same time he can move about a little bit more than he did before. >> when robert zimmerman is talking about regret or responsibility or anything about that night, mark o'mara, zimmerman's attorney said, of course he feels regret. no one wants to end up in this situation. i found it interesting, they were a little different on that issue. >> i think his brother was seizing upon that word. i think there's such sensitivity regarding all the legalities that are going on here, that he wanted to make sure he had his brother's last interest at heart, but took every question he was. he was eager and anxious to answer them. >> and very candid with us. much more on this ahead. but coming up next on "new day,"
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reaction pouring in across the country following the death of former "glee" star, cory monteith. we'll talk with the senior editor of "people" magazine about that. and could today be the day? we are live from london with the royal baby watch. prince, princess? laying any bets? wi drive a ford fusion. who is healthier, you or your car? i would say my car.
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welcome back, everybody, and thanks for joining us here on "new day." while an actor is expected for later today, actor cory monteith is still somewhat of a mystery in terms of what took his life. all we know at this time is that the young star of the tv series hit "glee" was found dead in a vancouver hotel room this weekend. and fans and co-stars are
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reeling from the news. nischelle turner joins us now with what we know at this time. >> season five of "glee" was scheduled to start shooting later this month. monteith was not in the finale of season four, because he was in rehab at that time, but he did participate in the promotional shoots for the upcoming season with the rest of the cast in late june. now less than a month later, we're asking, what happened? >> reporter: cory monteith entered millions as the singing football player, finn hudson, in "glee." sadly, that voice was silenced sunday. the 31-year-old actor was found dead in a vancouver hotel room. >> cause of death was not apparent on initial examination. and further examination and tests will take place to determine cause of death. >> reporter: as canadian authorities investigate what killed him, the shocking news of his death hit friends and colleagues hard. ♪ don't include me >> reporter: his on-again, off-again girlfriend, and
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co-star, lea michelle is grieving kindly. in a statement, her rep asked that everyone kindly respect lea's privacy during this devastating time. unlike his clean-cut alter ego, finn hudson, monteith had a troubled youth. he described himself as an out of control drug and alcohol abusing teen who was skipping school to drink and smoke pot by the age of 13. >> for me, it wasn't so much about the substances, per se, it was more about, about not fitting in. just a lack of not really having a self-image at the time, which is, that's like typical teenager stuff. >> reporter: despite his success in "glee," monteith continued to battle his substance abuse demons. earlier this year, he checked himself into rehab. his friend, "glee" director adam shankman, spoke to monteith hours before he was found dead. >> i had several interactions with him yesterday, where he said to me that he was feeling amazing, and even said, "i'm feeling fantastic again."
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>> according to vancouver police, cory was out with friends the night before he died, but surveillance video at the hotel showed him returning alone in the early morning hours. and they believe he was alone when he died. investigators have not officially tied his death to substance abuse, but they have already ruled out foul play. his autopsy is being conducted today. chris? kate, back to you. >> a lot of those answers that we have can be answered after that autopsy, but let's talk a little bit more about the shocking news with the senior editor of "people" magazine, michelle tan. thanks so much for joining us. it is such a shock to any fan of "glee" and especially when you know how old he is. 31 years old, for this to happen. and he seemed to have everything going for him. >> right. >> public life and private life can be very different. what are you hearing? >> what's so interesting, when he came on to the scene as finn hudson as "glee," he was a clean-cut guy and we projected that image on to him. we had no idea that he had this troubled past. when the revelations happened in 2011, not only were people shocked by it, they really
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rallied him and really supported him, because they wanted him to be an example for those troubled youths who had the same dark past, that there is light at the end of the tunnel, that you can change your life. >> and he has been very public about his battles with substance abuse. where was he on the road to recovery. some will say, you never fully recover. where has he been on the road to recovery? >> he was just in rehab, in march. he got out in april. and he was really seeming to try to take control of his life again. and again, like you said, he's really been public about this battle, but what we're remembering now is, you know, addiction is a disease. it's something that people struggle with. you don't know what the triggers are, we don't know exactly how he died. but this is something that he has been struggling with in the past year. >> and we don't want to make those connections between the two. that's left for much smarter people than you and i to look into, but there will be answers soon. and many people asking now, what does this mean for the show? you heard from one of the producers in nischelle's piece
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who said that he was the glue, he was the cheerleader that kept everyone together. is there any idea, i know it's early on, but what this means for the show? >> right now the show and cast members are really struggling to find peace with this news. they're all very devastated. and finn and cory, they were the moral compass, not only of the show, but of the cast. he was somebody that everybody turned to and right now they're really struggling to find the right way to not only honor him on the show, but honor him off the show. >> and one of the big story lines is that he was dating one of his co-stars, lea michelle. have we heard anything more or are we expecting to hear anything more from her? >> right now her reps said she needs privacy and time to heal. so we're going to give them that space right now, until they can work through their mourning. >> that's absolutely true. you can imagine the shock, if it was a shock to us, you can imagine the shock everyone to who was so close to him. i'm sorry we have to talk about this story, but we must. thank you appreciate you coming in.
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we'll take a break here on "new day." when we come back, people are getting royally anxious. baby's coming. we'll be on baby watch across the pond, let union what's happening. i don't know what that pool is about. the princess was there. that's why it was there. [ male announcer ] a doctor running late for a medical convention loses his computer, exposing thousands of patient records to identity theft. data breaches can happen that easily. we don't believe you should be a victim of someone else's mistake. we're lifelock. we constantly monitor the web so if any of your personal information is misused, we're on it. ♪ ow. [ male announcer ] call 1-800-lifelock or go to lifelock.com today.
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congestion, for it's smog. but there are a lot of people that do ride the bus. and now that the busses are running on natural gas, they don't throw out as much pollution to the earth. so i feel good. i feel like i'm doing my part to help out the environment. what do you got? boy or girl?
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love this song. welcome back to "new day," everyone. this is a story that chris cuomo can't stop talking about. the royal baby watch. speculations running rampant whether this will be the week, this will be the day that the duchess of cambridge will give birth to the future king or queen of england. max foster has the difficult job of fielding all of our questions which is impossible to have many answers for at this moment. what is it looking like, max? >> well, kate, welcome to the great kate wait developed by the journalists over the weekend. we have as good an idea about the due date as anyone else. as you can see, it's sunny here in london. people are making the most of the situation. we saw william playing polo yesterday two hours from london, he looked pretty relaxed. that got rid of speculation that the due date was on the weekend
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and today i got the tipoff that he is taking the next few days off work. that got us all going, again. weirdly, we've become the story. if i turn the camera around a bit and show, this is the hospital where they will be based. if you look down the pavement, you can see people taking pictures of us. this has become a tourist attraction, kate. all these tourists coming to london are coming. we've become the story in the absence of kate. >> we do love to talk about ourselves, but it is not good when we become the story. don't be the animals, don't talk to them, talk about them. chris said exactly what you said. he said exactly what you said, the headline should be this is one of the few sunny days in london. >> exactly. no rain, that's the headline. >> we'll be watching it and we will be on the great kate wait with you.
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thanks, max, great to see you. >> i just checked out the hashing it, ithash ing tag, it's all over twitter. >> you are also an attractive man. >> who also looks nothing like james bond. that's why they're taking pictures of max. let's be real. >> let's be real. let's also talk a about the big news coming up next. ma mark o'mara will take on the big questions about the killing of trayvon martin. some heroic teenagers who are on bikes and save a 6-year-old. when we come back. ♪ tracks! they connect the factories built along the lines. and that means jobs, lots of people, making lots and lots of things. let's get your business rolling now, everybody sing. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪
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he's a free man in the eyes of the court, but looking around his shoulder for the rest of his life. overnight, coast to coast protests against the george zimmerman verdict. late-night clashes with police. we're live with the latest. next steps. could george zimmerman be back in court? the justice department is investigating and could charge him. we have the latest. trapped. a 6-year-old boy swallowed into a sand dune. the frantic nearly three-hour race to dig him up and save his life. your "new day" continues right now. what you need to know -- >> and she ran to me. what you just have to see. this is "new day" with chris
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cuomo, kate bolduan and michaela pereira. good morning, welcome back to "new day." monday, july 15th. 8:00 in the east. >> i'm chris cuomo with michaela pereira. following all the developing news. overnight protesters took to the streets of major cities demanding justice for trayvon martin. some of those protests ended up in clashes with police. all this as the justice department says it will look into civil rights violations by zimmerman. >> we're covering this story like no other network can with reporters on the ground. sanford, florida, washington, and new york and also hear more from george zimmerman's attorney mark o'mara and neighbor and close friend george rodriguez and jeffrey toobin here to give analysis. we're following so many other stories this morning.
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including the sudden and tragic death of gate glee" actor cory monteith. an incredible rescue by two young teens that may have saved a young girl's life. that story and many more ahead. the not guilty verdict sparking protests across the country. overnight police clashed with demonstrators in new york and los angeles and today rallies planned in the city where the verdict was handed down. cnn's elaiena is there with muc more. good morning. >> good morning, kate. demonstrations here in sanford, florida, have been small and peaceful. a sharp contrast to what we've seen in some other parts of the country. overnight, thousands of protesters from new york to los angeles to the nation's capital out in full force reacting to this moment. >> we, the jury, find george zimmerman not guilty. >> reporter: in new york's times
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square a solid showing of protesters united, arm a in arm. one young man braved the sweltering heat in an all-black hoodie. but demonstrations in harlem turned into scuffles with police and reports of people taken into custody. and in los angeles, mostly peaceful marches interrupted by protesters, throwing batteries, rocks, chunks of concrete and a separate gathering on the 10 freeway shut down traffic. the lapd responding by shooting bean bags at demonstrators. in oakland, california, protesters were seen smashing a police car. demonstrations else where were mostly peaceful. in sanford, florida, the ang aer was palpable in the neighborhood, a largely african-american part of town. >> right now, i'm just too emotional and just sick and tired. i'm just done. community leaders were anxious to turn disappointment into constructive action.
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>> perhaps we can take this anger and move it into a possible vain because if nothing else, this snapped our necks back. >> reporter: several churches here in seminole county, florida, will be opening their doors every monday afternoon for community prayers. the first session is expected to start here at this church behind me this afternoon and we're told the mayor and the police chief are planning to attend. chris? >> all right, alina, thank you very much. george zimmerman's criminal trial is over, but his legal troubles may not be. trayvon martin's parents are considering a wrongful death suit and the justice department is looking into whether he violated trayvon martin's civil rights. athena jones joins us from washington. what do you hear about the situation? >> the department of justice has been conducting its own parallel investigation into this case with the help of the fbi and florida officials and that investigation is ongoing. what isn't clear yet is whether they'll have the evidence to
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bring federal charges in this case. there's a very, very high bar they have to meet. they have to prove that george zimmerman acted out of a sense of racial hatred when he shot trayvon martin. that's evidence we haven't seen presented. it's a very high bar and depends on what you ask if the justice department ends up bringing charges. we could hear from attorney general eric holder today. he speaks before a group of sorority sisters here. >> trayvon martin's parents were not in the courtroom when the not guilty verdict was handed down but their lawyer says they're devastated and publicly expressing their shock and outrage. george howell is live in sanford, florida, with more on this side of the story. good morning, george. >> a lot of reactions. the statement from the white house to tweets from martin's family and also at the home church there in miami gardens,
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florida. with just two words -- >> not guilty. >> reporter: george zimmerman became a free man and for the family of the teenager he killed, devastation. martin's mother said in a tweet "lord during my darkest hour, i lean on you. you are all that i have." martin's father wrote, "even though i'm broken hearted, my faith is unshattered. i will always love my baby tray." the president released a statement asking the country to respect the jury's decision. we should ask ourselves as individuals and as a society how we can prevent future tragedies like this. s at as citizens, that's a job for all of us. a way to honor martin's family. >> comes down to what's right and what's wrong. you know, it was a terrible thing, but i guess mr. zimmerman did what he thought he had to. >> reporter: the verdict was the focus of sermons at many
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churches across the country on sunday. including this atlanta church. >> the wurmd has profiled them. the world has stigmatized them. the world has said to them that they are a problem. >> reporter: those sentiments echoed at the home church of trayvon martin's family. >> we're very concerned and very hurt and very disappointed at this point. but we know in the end god will prevail and justice will be served and we're just, keep everybody in their prayers. >> reporter: in the end, the jury of six women, five of them white, believe that when george zimmerman shot trayvon martin, he did so in self-defense. so, george zimmerman now a free man. what happens next? no one really knows. his attorney, though, did indicate that he will have to remain in hiding. obvisly, for fear. safety issues still unclear exactly where he will live given more than 16 months of media attention.
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>> all right, george, thank you very much. now, george zimmerman's attorney said zimmerman didn't want to kill trayvon martin, but felt he had to to save his own life. i asked mark o'mara if his client has any regrets and if he wishes he would have just stayed in his car that night. people don't equate what happens to you when you get beat up with the proper justification for taking someone's life. >> that's a frustration that people have and i share it with them because this is my life and i deal with this every day. when you have to look inside somebody's head. in this case, they had to look inside george zimmerman's head as he was on the ground with somebody unknown on top of him doing basically whatever they were doing to him and him not returning any blows. you don't know that the next shot on concrete isn't going to be the one that sends you unconscious. you are allowed to react to reasonable injury and anybody in
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that set of circumstances, screaming for help for 45 seconds would say they acted reasonably in stopping the attack. >> because at that point legally you are allowed to use lethal force to protect yourself? >> george zimmerman did not want to shoot anybody. i think it's a testament to the fact that he didn't want to shoot anybody that he went through 45 seconds of screaming for help before he did. i wish people would look at it through that filter. i think they would understand a very unfortunate and tragic circumstance that unfolded that very night. >> taking half a step back. we talked about the 911 operator saying to mr. zimmerman. you don't need to do that. we don't need you to go after him. and then he goes after him anyway. do you think that is something that george zimmerman wishes he would take back, that decision? >> he is kind of criticized because he said he wouldn't have changed anything. does he wish he would have never gotten out of the car and went to target? absolutely. but let's remember that he got out of the car at the precise
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moment after the 911 or nonemergency operator said, where is he going? what is he doing now? he had said that on three separate occasions. so, it's a tragedy, but i don't think it was george zimmerman's fault in the way this thing unfolded. >> thankful that mark o'mara gave us some of his time to address some of those questions. let's talk about more of those questions and what it means with senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin. first, when i ask you, we have a lot to talk about it on how the verdict went down. going forward, the big question about the justice department considering federal civil rights charges against george zimmerman. but as athena jones laid out, a high threshold for the justice department to do that. do you think it's there? >> it's hard to say. it's a high bar, but very similar to the bar the prosecution faced in the state trial. remember, the prosecution argue aed that george zimmerman was
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motivated by hate. they used that word in court. they didn't say racial hate, but the implication was certainly there. if the justice department proceeds, they would have to prove, in effect, that he was motivated by racial hate. self-defense will also be a defense in a federal case, if there is one there. so, the big difference might be a different jury. but the facts of the case and the legal standards are really not going to be that different. >> any limitation on timing when this would need to be brought? >> not really. the statute of limitations goes on for quite some time. that's not an issue. >> concerns of false expectations. talking with some of the people in the protest last night. maybe the prosecutors brought this case for the wrong reasons and now looking backwards about it. this talk about it being worthy of a civil rights action or that that may actually happen. do you think we need to see people being more careful in terms of the determinations made so we don't set up false
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expectations? >> this is a very similar pattern to what went on after the shooting itself. initially the sanford police department said they were not going to proceed and then protests and then decided to prosecute him for second degree murder, which even more harsh a charge than people expected. we could go through a similar cycle here. another charge. it's not a great way to conduct criminal justice in response to public expectations. the lawyers have specific standards that they need to follow, rules, procedures. and, you know, i can't speak to what the motivations are either of the protesters or of the prosecutors, but it's better to make these decisions as much as possible on the law. >> what are the big, what is your big take away from this case? people are going to be looking at this and studying how this all played out in court and the facts that were not allowed into the courtroom. what is your big lesson from this? >> well, my lesson is that
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individual criminal trials are not a very good way to draw general conclusions about the state of america. these trials are so specific. they're about what one witness said and how lawyers make choices about which witnesses to call and which not to call. they don't, i think, tell us a lot about the broader political world. but, that's often how we see these cases. >> they do touch on the pressure points that maybe do spark a conversation that needs to be had. >> that is true. but, obviously, race is a subject we're all talk about. race was everywhere and no where in that courtroom. you know, it was never specifically said that george zimmerman did this as a racist act. they talk about profiling. they didn't say racial profiling. >> they kind of had it both ways. he was profiling, but why was he profiling him? because he was a black kid and had some suspicion about what
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happened. also, they had opportunity to charge him with a bias crime on the books in florida. a crime saying it was an aggravated crime because you picked this person because of race or other specific categories. they decided not to charge. is one of the lessons, jeffrey, it's not about truth in the courtroom. you only know what you hoe. there was a burden. we want to make sure if someone is guilty, they had every benefit they had. >> they are not guilty and innocent and that's something always to keep in mind about any criminal trial, but seems appropriate in this one. >> jeffrey, thank you so much. and talk to you. we'll talk to you soon. thanks so much. in a few moments we'll get a chance to speak with a friend and long-time neighbor of george zimmerman and get his perspective on where george is throughout this. but, first, a lot of news at this hour. let's get to michaela. >> good morning, good morning to
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you. the leaker's revelations may not be over. he is said to have more insider information that could be a nightmare for the u.s. government. phil black is following the very latest for us from moscow. phil? >> michaela a, good morning. yes, according to the journalist that initially brought the snowden story, snowden has more information to do more harm to the united states in one minute than anyone ever had the potential to do before. he talks about thousands of documents, effectively an instruction manual for how the nsa is built and how it is done. information that could be used to replicate or evade that survei surveillance. snowden remains at the airport and on friday afternoon he announced he was going to seek asylum in this country, but he has not yet applied formally. not made any formal request. the process once he makes that request will take about a month with the final decision made be russia's president, vladimir
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putin. a man arrested outside the boston home of secretary of state john kerry. the man was snapping photos of the house and had a pellet gun in the car. his wife is recovering from aur progress on the carpenter 1 fire. homes are no longer in danger and residents of kyle canyon can return to their homes wednesday. fire crews say they hope to have most areas of the mountain open to the public by friday. family members are hoping that nelson mandela can come home to celebrate his 95th birthday thursday. he has been hospitalized for more than five weeks. a former key deputy predicts south africa's former president is recovering well enough to possibly be discharged in the next few days.
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test
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. welcome back to "new day," everybody. since his acquittal george zimmerman only communicated with family and friends. his long-time friend and next door neighbor george wherrodrig. thanks for taking the opportunity. >> thank you. >> how does he feel about the
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situation? >> from the last time i text him, it seems like he's hummable and i'm sure it hasn't absorbed into him yet. but he seems calm. >> is he aware of the intensity of the reaction and what has been said about him? >> i'm sure of all the media coverage and all the outbursts that have happened since the verdict, you know. i'm sure he's keeping viewing, watching. >> along the way, has he felt this was unfair? did he understand that this is just a process? what has been his take on it? >> he figured it was unfair. but he knew there was a process. you know, he knew that he had to go through that process. >> did he have doubts about how it would come out? >> we never really talked about that. it was mostly every time we talked was more, you know, are you reading the bible? yeah. are you eating? just keep your clear mind. >> was that who he was before all of this?
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was he religious, spiritual or was this a situation that made him seek out some higher comfort? >> you know you have your jehovah witness that knock on your door, he would let them in and listen to them. >> one thing that happened during this case is, obviously, the defense team had to figure out who might we want to come on and testify. you were deposed in this case as a witness. why did they want you to testify? >> because i've seen the bruises on his face the day after the incident and i recognized his voice on the 911 tape. >> now, you're a man, you grew up you knew when there could be fights. do you know what you're talking about when you look at somebody in this kind of situation. what do those marks look like to you, those wounds? >> well, when i saw him in the back of his head, he had two big lumps and two big bandages covering those lumps. when i went to the front of his face, i saw the big, his nose
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and a bandage on top of his nose. >> you know that was a lot of talk surrounding the case. how bad were the injuries? would it make you fear something bad was being done to you. what is your take? >> from knowing george and seeing the injuries, something happened that night where he had to protect his life and which he did so. >> from your knowledge of your neighbor. tough guy, been in fights before? knew how to handle himself? >> no, not at all. he does not have a fighting bone in his body. he seemed real calm. always peaceful when he talked. hummable. not that rough neck, you know, ready to fight type of attitude. not at all. >> george, though his name is zimmerman is peruvian decent. sensitive to race and ethnicity. you suspect him talk about race? >> not at all.
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this is so far from being racial it's not even funny. just because he has a white last name and an african-american was dead, automatically, everybody assumes racial. this is far from being race. you know what i'm saying. this is just a bad situation that happened. >> what can you tell us about him that explains how he feels about people of different background? >> pretty sure, just like everybody else, he accepts everybody. you know, he doesn't have no black, white, yellow, green in s body. he accepts everybody for who they are. >> you say you've seen him entertained and have people of color at his house? >> i live next door to him. i've seen >> in the very beginning your reaction was very different. >> you think about it. how many people in your neighborhood would stand up for
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something like this? not a lot. a lot of people in america wouldn't stand up. this is one person that actually stood up for his community. >> how so? >> because he, he kept everybody safe. you know, he checked everybody out. what i mean by that is, you know, there was a lady that got her house robbed. she was in there with her 3-month-old baby, i presume. and he went to her and actually bought her a lock to keep her safe. how many people does that in the united states? not that many people. >> for george people, it was just about keeping his neighborhood safe. that's what it was about? >> of course. keeping his community and fellow neighbors safe. >> any idea what he's going to do next isn't. >> not sure what he is going to do next. i am pretty sure right now he's just absorbing everything that happened and waiting for what else is going to happen. >> were you surprised by the verdict? >> no. >> from day one i knew he was not guilty.
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>> georgjorge, thank you for ta the opportunity. appreciate it. coming up next on "new day" the host of cnn's new "crossfire" joining us to discuss this very important issue. how race may have played a role in this case of george zimmerman and the conversation after it. also coming up, harry potter author j.k. rowling is revealing the secret behind her best selling novel. vietnam in 1972. [ all ] fort benning, georgia in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve military members, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve.
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see i don't sing it because i can't hit that note. kate is being nice welcome back, everybody to "new day." monday july 15th, i'm chris cuomo. >> i'm kate bolduan and we're joined by michaela pereira. an incredible rescue after a trip to the beach to have some fun that trip took a terrifying turn. a boy gets stuck in a sandy sinkhole. you won't believe the story a. he's recovering this morning. >> dag digging through the sand. can you imagine what you're doing there as a parent thinking he's never going to make it for hours. one of the most popular authors ever, right, j.k. rowling. why did harry potter's creator decide to write a book under another name? we'll tell you the story. but the five things you need to know for your new day. very important. only michaela pereira can tell you these things. >> let's look at number one. the justice department
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confirming it is a civil rights case. an autopsy expected to be performed on "glee" star cory monteith. his body was found saturday in a hotel room. highs expected in the 90s factoring in humidity, it's going to feel like triple-digit heat. president obama honoring one of his predecessors. the first president bush. mr. bush and his wife being recognized for light of life program. number five, 40,000 boy scouts meet up in west virginia for the annual jamberee and for the first time girls are taking part. you know, we're always updating our five things to know, be sure to go to cnnnewday.com. >> were you guys in scouting? >> i was a boy scout.
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getting back to our lead story of the day. the not guilty verdict in the george zimmerman trial sparking protests across the country and on social media, most of the protestess, though, were peaceful. you're seeing some clashes right there and the police scuffled with demonstrators overnight in new york, as well as los angeles. cnn's alina machado is in florida with the latest on all of this. good morning, alina. >> good morning, kate. people who were disappointed with the verdict to express their displeasure and also people who support george zimmerman who also weighed in. here in sanford, florida, small, but peaceful protests a sharp contrast to what we've seen in other parts of the country. overnight in new york thousands of people marched arm in arm. we heard of a demonstration and
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that scuffle resulted in some arrests. in los angeles, we heard of a march that turned violent when protesters started throwing rocks and batteries and chunks of concrete in one area and in another area they stopped freeway traffic. the lapd responded by throwing bean bags at demonstrators and this is exactly what community leaders say they did not want to see. today here in sanford, florida, people will be praying for continued peace and unity. alina? >> thank you, we appreciate that. what are the racial implications of the not guilty verdict in the george zimmerman trial? we're joined now by former obama white house official van jones and former speaker of the house, newt gingrich. two of the new hosts of cnn's "crossfire" that returns to cnn this fall. thank you for arriving early here this morning and talk about this. the day after all the protests yesterday, over the weekend we saw in all parts of the country now. i want to start with you, van. was this trial about race?
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>> well, it certainly was a big part of it and i think, i think that now the trial is over, really an opportunity to try to understand why did people have such different reactions depending on your understanding of how race works in america. you know, the stand your ground law, which i think was put forward maybe with good intentions to make sure people can defend themselves has turned out in florida to have a hugely different racial impact. if a jury sees a black defendant, they're much less likely to believe that person was in fear of their life. a white defendant, people know that. that's one reason why stand your ground is so controversial. now, its a's no longer about on person. we should look at a why our criminal justice system continues to give racially negative outcomes for affa african-americans and latinos and fix that. but, unfortunately, a lot of the discussion evolved into a lot of
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name calling which is not making things better. >> it certainly does not. cases are tried in the courtroom not in the case of public opinion. we know that for sure. what we do know is that this trial is reinvigorating a conversation in our nation about race. what should the focus be in your estimation, newt? >> first of all, large part of the reason is the news media. you know, george zimmerman is hispanic. he's a latino. so, if that had been correctly stated from the very beginning. "new york times" invents this new topic, white hispanic to maximize the racial implications. the fact is that six women sat orn on a jury for five solid weeks. i watch these protesters who none read the transcript and all basically prepared to be a -- they wanted one verdict, the verdict was guilty. you started with, if he had been found guilty, does that mean
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everybody on the other side should have gone on to the streets and thrown things at police. i want to start there. second, if we want to talk about saving lives and saving african-american lives. 350 african-americans were killed in chicago last year. over 100 latinos were killed in chicago last year. why isn't the justice department concerned about developing a task force that involves all of those people of color who were killed in the president's home town? but somehow that -- that doesn't set the national debate. >> dan, i hear you want to inject in here. is it too much? jeffrey toobin just made this point. is it too much to put this case on display of where we stand as a nation in terms of race? >> this is an incredible opportunity to kind of teach each other and help each other here. for instance, because mr. zimmerman is latino that racial bias can't be involved. it's just ludicrous. the tension between
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african-americans and latinos is legendary. if you have any idea of how urban communities work just because you're latino doesn't mean it's not a racial case. also, i was shocked to hear people talking about chicago all the time. let me just be very clear. i was one of the people who pulled together that big concert with prince and jennifer hudson in september trying to stop the violence in chicago. i'm somebody who has been a part of stopping the violence, the silence of violence movement . t doesn't mean you shouldn't care about the kid killed by a vigil ante. too much gun violence overall, but the fact that there is gang violence does not mean that we shouldn't be concerned about vigil ante violence. >> what do we do, gentlemen? emotion is running -- >> wait a second. i don't know there was vigil
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ante violence. the jury said it wasn't vigil ante violence. they said he wasn't guilty and part of the test for the prosecutors and one of the reasons it will be absurd for the justice department to manufacture a case is the prosecutors could not convince the jury that this was a vigil andy kite killing. they believe it was an act of self-defense. now, you may not like that solution, but six people who sat through five weeks of trial decided it was an act of self-defense. >> i respect those jurors. letes let's be clear, i respect those jurors and if you look at, there has been no riots and no violence against the society or even against these jurors but a concern now, is this a green light for vigil ante violence against young blacks? there is a danger now that you have to dress your kid in a tuxedo to send them out the door
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to buy some skittles because somebody might confront them. as a black parent there is a concern, if my child is confronted by a stranger with a gun, should they do what they're told? really serious implications here for black parents or anybody that cares about black kids. i think it's very important that we try to listen and learn from each other. this has become an ink blot test for how you see how society works and functions and i think we have to listen to each other and learn from each other. >> newt, your thoughts? >> my whole point about the media overfocus is simple. the odds are overwhelming if your child gets killed in chicago and is african-american, they were killed by an african-american. they didn't need to wear a tuxedo, it wasn't about skittles. i think this is one case -- absolutely we should. and we did, we just had a five-week trial and we just had a very substantial effort to find out whether or not this guy
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was guilty. and we should send a signal to everybody if you get involved in this situation, you're going to be investigated and you're going to be tried. i don't think the country is sending a signal that it's an open field day, but i would just say in terms of the media focus and in terms of the justice department focus, we would save a lot more lives by focusing in on the primary sources of why people are being killed and those sources aren't going out to buy skilltttles. >> i think if you're concerned and i know you are, sir, about violence overall and gun violence overall we should work together on that. but i just think it's very strange to hear about concern of kids dying in chicago being used against other people concerned about kids dying. coming up more and more with the right wing media. i'm concerned it is making the harder rather than easier. >> i know the three of us, the
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two of you can agree as jorge rodriguez just sat on our set a few minutes ago, this was a bad situation at the end of the day. a 17-year-old is dead. we want to say a big thank you to van jones and newt gingrich. cnn "crossfire" is returning this fall. thanks for joining us this morning. chris, kate, back to you. >> michaela a, yo, you're askin right questions. this trial means different things for different people. coming up on "new day" a 6-year-old boy lucky to be alive after getting swallowed by 11 feet of sand. he's just playing on the beach. we're going to show you an amazing rescue this morning. also amazing, a blockbuster on this one. author j.k. rowling is pulling back the cloak on her latest act of wizardry. we'll have the details ahead.
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la's known definitely for its traffic, congestion, for it's smog. but there are a lot of people that do ride the bus. and now that the busses are running on natural gas, they don't throw out as much pollution to the earth. so i feel good. i feel like i'm doing my part to help out the environment.
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welcome back to "new day "everyone. a 6-year-old indiana boy. amazing story we're talking about all morning. he is in critical condition after he was rescued from a massive sand dune really swallowing him up. he was with his family at a national park when a sinkhole opened up burying the boy alive. miraculously, he survived. pamela brown is here with the latest on the terrifying story. >> really just a miracle. this fun, family vacation took a terrifying turn. a race against the clock to save this 6-year-old little boy who disappeared underneath the sand. but as the hours passed, hope dwindled. this terrifying 911 call. every parent's worst nightmare. >> 911.
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>> i'm at the mount baldy beach and my friend's son, he got stuck in the sand dune and he's like under the sand and they can't get him out. >> reporter: 6-year-old nathan was suddenly swallowed by a sinkhole by the indiana sand dunes lining lake michigan. >> can anybody see him or is he completely covered by sand? >> yes, my husband and his dad are trying to dig him out. >> reporter: dozens of first responders rushed to the 11-foot mound of sand burying the boy with equipment in hand. more than three and a half hours ticked by and then, finally, signs of life. >> at that point everybody was frantically by hand trying to dig him out. once i had a hold of his head and talking to him, like i would talk to my own son. >> your heart wants you to feel that and your heart wants you to
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hear that breath. >> reporter: unconscious but still breathing was rushed to the hospital and in the end, it may have been a single air pocket that saved his life. >> when we pulled him out, really didn't look good. only thing you can think of, that could be your kid. we weren't going to give up. >> i just spoke with the spokesperson for the hospital treating nathan and i'm told he remains in critical condition this morning. when he did arrive at the hospital he was able to respond to simple command and good news there. there will be a press conference today. >> get a good update and good news on his condition. amazing we were talking about how long he was in that sand dune. pamela, thanks so much for bringing that to us. do you hear the music? time for the good stuff. we have an extra special edition to prove that hero comes in all
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different shapes and sizes. >> we need more good stuff, specifically today. authorities in pennsylvania see a 5-year-old kidnapping victim is home safe and sound thanks to the bravery of two teenage boys when they spotted the little girl inside a car. they chased after her on their bikes. what happened next will amaze you. over two hours of terror as a neighborhood frantically searches for 5-year-old jocelyn. >> anybody know her or play with her. >> reporter: late thursday afternoon she was playing in her front yard when she suddenly disappeared abducted by a man investigators think lured the girl into his car offering ice cream. >> the little purse she had was laying there. >> reporter: that's when this 15-year-old and his friend roamed the neighborhood on their bikes spotting the little girl in a sedan. >> we'd follow him. >> reporter: the two teens chased the alleged kidnapper for a heart pounding 15 minutes.
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>> sat at the end of the hill and she ran to me and said she needed her mom. >> reporter: unharmed, boggs immediately took had er to poli. the family overjoyed by the swift action of these teen heroes on wheels. >> seen the amber alerts and you think, oh, i feel for that family, but when you're in the situation, it's horrible. he's our hero. >> he is a hero. he is. relatives of her family says she's doing well. the suspect remains at large. a woman, we should tell you from western new york was so moved by this story she set up fa scholarship fund for those young heroes. >> have to put the information on the website. >> the description of the guy, too. >> what courage of those boys. dangerous for them to be chasing after him. >> incredible acts by the boys. we have to get the information for the scholarship fund and put it on the website for you. amazing.
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that's the good stuff. >> we want to hear more good stuff. >> we need it. what else you got? so tell us. tell us, tweet us. go to facebook and use the #newday. we want to tell you the new ones. this was a great one today. >> great one today. also a still ahead on "new day" harry potter authaer j.k. role rowling. you know that name and that face. she is revealing the latest secret behind her new book. [ male announcer ] this store knows how to handle a saturday crowd.
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starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. welcome back to "new day" everyone. an interesting surprise from harry potter author j.k. rowling. she just revealed she is the author of this book, a mystery novel. this mystery novel. hard to come by these days because it is her name. wrote it under a pseudonm and although the harry potter series sold 50 million copies her secret mystery book sold 1,500 copies. erin is live in london with much, much more. that is not the noise you want to hear in the morning. but what is the latest, air aen? >> j.k. rowling's first novel
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for adults published in the fall to intense media scrutiny and mixed reviews. longing for a normal book launch. i guess it's no surprise that she managed to hoodwink the entire literary community into thinking that her latest novel, it was written by someone else. >> my body's gone. >> i know what that is. >> reporter: the beloved mastermind behind harry potter's inviz aeblt cloak has come up with her own. j.k. rowling has written another best-selling book, this time using a secret identity. it was hailed as a brilliant debut model. a rare feat and a crime career. that's great news for the supposed author, the elusive robert galbraith.
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>> she has taken extra steps that other authaeors haven't taken. she created a whole back story for this guy. >> reporter: on the publisher's website galbraith is described as a retired military man married with two sons. rowling acknowledged the work as her own. here is a statement from j.k. rowling. "i help to keep this secret a little longer because being robert galbraith has been such a liberating experience." sales of the "kucko krr"cockoos" a representative from a major retailer here in the uk told me not a book to be found on any of his store shelves. they're rushing to order more. kate, chris and michaela. >> which poses the question, how
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much will you give me for it? >> back right after this break. ! the tide's coming in! this is my favorite one. it's upside down. oh, sorry. (woman vo) it takes him places he's always wanted to go. that's why we bought a subaru. (announcer) love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru.
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