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tv   Anderson Cooper 360  CNN  July 15, 2013 8:00pm-8:59pm EDT

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you'll not see this anywhere else. one of only six individuals who knows what it's like to decide george zimmerman's fate. one of the six members of the jury who acquitted him, juror b-37, at her request, we're concealing her identity. for the first time anywhere, she's speaking out. she's the first juror to do so, to speak out publicly, the first to talk about how she saw the powerful testimony that all of us saw, which testimony resonated with her and the other jurors, which evidence persuaded her and the other five women on the panel. what happened inside that jury room, what does she think really happened the night george zimmerman shot and killed trayvon martin? there's that, whether she thinks race played a role and a lot more. here's part one of our exclusive conversation. >> when you first gathered together, what was it like? >> did you know how big this -- >> it was unreal. it was like something that -- why would they want to pick me? why would i be picked over all these hundreds of people that
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they interviewed. >> and when the trial started, what was the first day like? there were the opening statements. don west told a joke, what did you think of that? >> the joke was horrible. i just -- nobody got it. i didn't get it until later, and then i thought about it. and i'm like, i guess that could have been funny, but not in the context he told it. >> going into the trial, did you have an idea in your mind about what happened? >> no, because i hadn't followed the trial at all. i heard bits and pieces of what had happened, and the names that were involved, but not any details. >> take me back if you can to the first day, the opening statements, what do you remember about them? what stood out to you? >> not a lot. because it seems like it's been years ago that it happened. it does. it seems like it's been a very long time that we were there. >> was there a particular
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witness that stands out to you? who did you find to be the most credible? >> the doctor -- and i don't know his name. >> the doctor that the defense called? >> yes. >> what about him? >> i thought he was awe inspiring, the experiences he had in the war, and i just never thought of anybody that could recognize somebody's voice yelling, in like a terrible terror voice when he was just previously a half hour ago playing cards with him. >> this was the witness that -- friend of george zimmerman's that had military experience? >> no, this was the defense -- >> the defense medical kamaner. >> what was it like day by day being on that jury? >> day by day was interesting. there were more interesting things than others, when they got into the evidence it was a lot more interesting than just
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testimony. some of the witnesses were good, some of them not so good. >> did you feel -- a lot of the analysts that were watching the trial, felt that the defense attorneys were able to turn prosecution witnesses to their advantage. chris serino, for instance, the lead investigator. did he make an impression on you? >> he did. but he -- to me, he was just doing his job. he was doing his job the way he was doing his job and he was going to tell the truth regardless of who asked the questions. >> you found him to be credible? >> i did. when he testified that he found george zimmerman to be more or less truthful, did that make an impression on you? >> it did. it made a big impression on me. >> why? >> because he deals with this all the time. he deals with, you know, murder, robberies, he's in it all the
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time. and i think he has a knack to pick out who's lying and who's not lying. >> the prosecution started off by saying, that george zimmerman was on top in the struggle. and then later on, they seemed to concede, well, perhaps trayvon martin was on top, maybe he was pulling away. do you feel the prosecution really had a firm idea of what actually happened? >> i think they wanted to happen what they wanted to happen. >> to go to their side for the prosecution and the state. there was a lot -- the witnesses that -- the defense had on, plus some of the prosecution witnesses, there was no doubt that they had seen what had happened. some of it was taped, so they couldn't rebut any of that. >> it was on the 911 tape. >> the 911 tapes and the john good caughting and all of that. >> how significant were the 911 tapes to you?
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>> the louder tape was the most significant. it went through before the struggle, during the struggle, the gunshot and then after. >> you had the parents of trayvon martin testifying, you had the family of george zimmerman, friends of george zimmerman testifying about whose voice it was on the 911 call. whose voice do you think it was in. >> i think it was george zimmerman's. >> did everyone on the jury agree with that? >> all but probably one. >> and what made you think it was george zimmerman's voice? >> because of the evidence that he was the one that had gotten beaten. >> so you think because he was the one who had had cuts and abrasions, he was the one getting hit, he was the one calling for help? >> well, because of the witnesses of john good, saw trayvon on top of george, not necessarily hitting him, because it was so dark, he couldn't see. but he saw blows down toward george.
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and he could tell that it was george zimmerman on the bottom. he didn't know who it was, but he knew what they were wearing. >> the juror who didn't think it was george zimmerman's voice, who thought it was trayvon martin's voice. do you know why they thought that way? >> she didn't think it was trayvons, she thought it could have been trayvons. >> she wasn't sure? >> no. she wanted to give evan absolute out of being guilty. >> you were sure of george zimmerman's voice? >> i was sure. >> and everyone else in the jury was? >> i think so. i think they were. i don't think there was a doubt. that everybody else thought it was george's voice. >> i want to ask you about some of the different witnesses. rachel, the woman on the phone with trayvon martin at the start of the incident. what did you make of her testimony? >> i didn't think it was credible, but i felt sorry for
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her. she didn't ask to be in this place? she wanted to go. she didn't want to be any part of this case. i think she felt inadequate toward everyone because of her education and her communication skills. i just felt sadness for her. >> you felt like what, she was in over her head? >> not over her head, she just didn't want to be there, and she was embarrassed by being there, because of her education and her communication skills, that she just wasn't a good witness. >> did you find it hard at dimes to understand what she was saying? >> a lot of the time. because a lot of the time she was using phrases i have never heard before. >> when she used the phrased, creepy ass cracker, what did you think of that? >> i thought it was probably the truth? i think trayvon probably said
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that. >> and did you see that as a negative statement or a racial statement as the defense suggested? >> i don't think it's really racial. i think it's just every day life. the type of life that they live, and how they're living, in the environment that they're living in. >> so you didn't find her credible as a witness. >> no. >> so did you find her testimony important in terms of what she actually said? >> well, i think the most important thing is the time had a she was on the phone with trayvon. so you basically hopefully if she heard anything, she would say she did, but the time cone sides with george's statements and testimony of time limits and what had happened during that time. >> explain that? >> well, because george was on the 911 call while she was on the call with trayvon, and the times cone side, and i think there were two minutes between
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when george hung up from his 911 call, to the time trayvon and rachel had hung up. really nothing could have happened because the 911 call would have heard the nonemergency call that george had called, heard something happening before that. >> she said at one point that she heard the sound of wet grass. did that seem believable to you? >> well, everything was wet at that point. it was pouring down rain. >> we're going to have much more from juror b-37, you'll only see it here. coming up next, mark o'mara and don west react to this juror, what she's saying. you'll also hear from the prosecution, let us know what you think. follow me on twitter right now. i'm tweeting about some of the things this jury is saying. we'll be right back. peace of mind is important when you're running a successful business.
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just now we're joined by mark o'mara and don west. to bring them in to what we just heard, a moment with angela cory and bernie delarianda sitting down with vinnie politan. >> one word to describe george zimmerm zimmerman? >> lucky. >> trayvon benjamin martin. >> i don't know if there's one word that can describe -- victim. a victim. >> trayvon benjamin martin.
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>> prey. >> the jury believed otherwise that george zimmerman was a murderer. we're joined by mark o'mara and don west. first of all, what did you think of them describing george zimmerman as a murderer. >> how dare they not accept a jury verdict. they can be upset if they want to be. but they put on their best case, and the jury still said innocent. still said self-defense, they should accept it like adults and with some sense of grace. >> what are the things you were vocal about during the trial was, what you felt were misstatements or lies and evidence that the prosecution had held back from you. how difficult was it to try this case? >> extraordinarily challenging, because of just that, it took us probably hundreds of hours to get what we should have gotten
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by a simple request. so we spent so much time, so much resources, limited resources trying to get what was obvious, that we've asked for repeatedly, continuing to be held until we caught them over and over and over again. >> some of the analysts said they're used to dealing with public defenders who do not experience guys like you who are going to call them on this. and public defenders who are overworked. and they're used to kind of dealing with them in that way. do you think that's true? >> they have a better opportunity to get away with that type of behavior. and maybe they have stronger cases. they had a very weak case that was based -- i think the prosecution is based on the facts of the case. >> you have no doubt that politics were at play. and did this case -- >> when the sanford police department doesn't decide to file charges and moves it over to the state insurance office who is competent to make that
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decision. and miss cory comes into town, disbands the grand jury and files a charge, which as it turns out she cannot prove as the jury tells us, i think some accidental pressure like politics has something to do with it. >> we're hearing this accidental interview we did. when they first went into the jury room, there were three who wanted not guilty, two who wanted manslaughter and one juror who wanted second degree murder. obviously they all came to the not guilty decision. race did not play a role, and none of the jurors played a role in this trial. that's something you believed all along? >> absolutely. i kept saying it had nothing to do with race, and race was put on top of this case, by certain people who wanted it to be a racial event. and people who created the racial intones of this case, but it wasn't appropriate. i'm so happy that the jury's able to see through that. at least ignore it. >> one of the things this jury said was the testimony of chris
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serino. you guys really did a masterful job of talking to on the witness stand. some of the analysts, jeff toobin said he had never seen a police officer give such favorable testimony to a defense evidence. >> i think he was frustrated where he was put in a position where he didn't believe there was probable cause to move forward in this case. and the supervisors, again because of the political pressures on the sanford police department, demanded a photo to the state attorney's office. after nine edits of his report, then they were going to look at it and present it to the grand jury. i think that chris serino was looking at the case saying, it's not a crime, why are we moving this thing forward? >> at the end, in the last couple days, there have been demonstrations across the country. and people say that this is yet another example of the justice system not dealing with african-american males
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legitimately in the same way they deal with caucasian males. you actually work a lot on this issue, you just feel -- you believe there are inequalities in the system, but this is not a case where that applies? >> we have worked defending defendants in criminal cases. a large percentage of throws are young black males. we know ho the system treats blacks in the system, and we know how there are some inequities, we know it better than most people. in this particular case, it's not one of those, it's not a racial event. and it's not a case that suggests that trayvon martin was treated any differently than he should have been treated because of the color of his skin. what happened that night, is that there were two people who misinterpreted each other's actions, looks as though the evidence supports that trayvon martin reacted to that misunderstanding with violence, because george was violently attacked and he was the only one violently attacked but for the
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gunshot. that was a misunderstanding, it doesn't make it a racial event. >> thank you for being on the program tonight. coming up, my exclusive interview with one of the jurors in the zimmerman trial. i'll ask her what she thought of george zimmerman, whether she thinks he should have gotten out of his car that night. ♪ unh ♪ ♪ hey! ♪ ♪ let's go! ♪ [ male announcer ] you can choose to blend in. ♪ ♪ yeah! yeah! yeah! or you can choose to blend out. ♪ oh, yeah-eah! ♪ the all-new 2014 lexus is. it's your move. i honestly never thought that someone would try to enter into my home without my permission. when i arrived at the residence, to my surprise, the officers had already received a call from adt
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welcome back. more on our 306 exclusive interview with juror b-37 in the george zimmerman trial. she's the first juror to speak publicly about what went on in the jury room, and what made up her mind whether george zimmerman was guilty.
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we pick up the conversation, talking about her impression of the defendant. >> what did you think of george zimmerman? >> i think george zimmerman is a man whose heart was in the right place, but just got displaced by the vandalism in the neighborhoods. and wanting to catch these people so badly, that he went above and beyond what he really should have done. but i think his heart was in the right place. it just went terribly wrong. >> do you think he's guilty of something? >> i think he's guilty of not using good judge. when he was in the car and he called 911, he shouldn't have gotten out of that car. but the 911 operator also, when he was talking to him, kind of egged him on.
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i don't know if it's their policy to tell them not to stay in their car. i think he should have said, stay in your car, not can you see where he's gone. >> do you think george zimmerman should have been carrying a gun? >> i think he has every right so carry a gun. i think it's everyone's right to carry a gun. >> george zimmerman did not testify, but his testimony essentially was brought into the trial through those videotapes, a number of videotapes. he walked police through a re-enactment of what he said happened. how important were those videotapes? >> i don't really know. watching the tapes, there's always something in the back saying, is it right? is it consistent? but with all the evidence of the phone calls, and all the witnesses that he saw, i think george was pretty consistent and told the truth, basically.
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i'm sure there were some fabrications, enhancements, i think pretty much it happened the way george said it happened. >> when george zimmerman said trayvon marten reached for his gun, there was no dna evidence. the defense said it could have gotten washed off in the rain or the like, do you believe that trayvon martin reached for george zimmerman's gun? >> i think he might have. george probably thought he did, because george was the one who knew that george was carrying a gun. >> and he was aware of that. >> you can't say for sure whether or not trayvon martin knew george zimmerman was carrying a gun? >> no. >> so you can't say for sure whether or not trayvon martin reached for that gun? >> right. but that doesn't make it right. there's not a right or a wrong. even if he did reach for the gun, it doesn't make 234i difference. >> how so zm. >> well, because george had a right to protect himself at that point. >> so you believe that george
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zimmerman really felt his life was in danger? >> i do. i really do. >> do you think trayvon martin threw the first punch? >> i think he did. >> what makes you think that? >> because of the evidence on the t on the sidewalk, where george says he was punched, there was evidence of his flashlight and keys there, and little further down, there was a flashlight that he was carrying. and i think that's where trayvon hit him. >> you think based on the testimony you heard, you believe that trayvon martin was the aggress aggressor? >> i think the roles changed. i think george got in a little bit too deep. which he shouldn't have been there. but trayvon decided that he wasn't going to let him scare him and get the one up on him or something. and i think trayvon got mad and
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attacked him. >> do you feel like you know for sure what happened inned altercation? and did the other jurors feel for sure that they knew what happened? >> nobody knew exactly what happened. i mean, started at one point and ended on another point. witnesses said they heard left to right movement. other witnesses said they heard right to left movement? but the credible witnesses said they heard left to right movement. so whatever happened, i think the punch came, and then they ended up in front of the -- in back of the house. i don't think anybody knows. >> when the defense in their closing argument played that animation of what they believe happened, did you find that credible? >> i found it credible. i did. >> what did you think of the testimony of trayvon martin's mother and father. did you find them credible? >> i think they said anything a mother and father would say.
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just like george zimmerman's mother and father. i think they're your kids. you want to believe that they're innocent and that was their voice. hearing that voice would make it credible that they were the victim not the aggressor. >> so in a way both sets of parents kind of cancelled each other out in your mind? >> they did, definitely. because if i was a mother, i would want to believe so hard that it was not my son that did that, or was responsible for any of that. that i would con virvince mysel probably that it was his voice. >> how critical was it for you in your mind to have an idea of whose voice it was yelling for help? how important was that yell for help? >> i think it was pretty important. because it was a long cry and scream for help that whoever was calling for help was in fear of their life.
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>> the prosecution didn't use the word racial profiling in the case. they used the word profiling. that was something that was worked out between the judge and the lawyers when the jury wasn't in the room. >> right. >> do you feel that george zimmerman racially profiled trayvon martin? do you think race played a role in his decision, his view of trayvon martin as suspicious? >> i don't think he did. i think circumstances caused george to think that he might be a robber. or trying to do something bad in the neighborhood because of all that had gone on previously. there were unbelieve an number of robberies in the neighborhood. >> you don't believe race played a role in this case? >> i don't think it did. i think if there was another person, spanish, white, asian, if they came in the same situation where trayvon was, i think george would have reacted the exact same way.
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>> why do you think george zimmerman found trayvon martin suspicious then. >> because he was cutting through the back, it was raining. he said he was looking in houses as he was walking down the road. kind of just not having a purpose to where he was going. he was stopping and starting. but i mean, that's george's rendition of it, but i think the situation where trayvon got into him being late at night, dark at night, raining. and anybody would think anybody walking down the road stopping and turning and looking, if that's exactly what happened, is suspicious. and george said he didn't recognize who he was. >> well, was that a common belief on the jury that race was not -- did not play a role in this? >> i think all of us thought race did not play a role. >> nobody thought race played a role? >> i don't think so. >> i can't speak for them.
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>> that wasn't part of the discussion in the jury room? >> no, no, we never had that discussion. >> it didn't come up, the question of, did george zimmerman profile trayvon martin because he was friend american? >> no, i think he just profiled him because he was the neighborhood watch and he profiled anyone who came in acting strange. i think it was just circumstances happened that he saw trayvon at the exact time that he thought he was suspicious. >> the prosecution tried to paint george zimmerman as a wannabe cop, overeager. did you buy that? >> i think he's overeager to help people. like the woman who got broken in and robbed, he came over and offered her a lock for her backsliding glass door. he offered her his phone number, his wife's phone number, he told her that she could come over if she felt stressed or she needed anybody, come over to their house, sit down, have dinner.
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not anybody -- i mean, have you to have a heart to do that and care and help people. >> so you didn't find it creepy that -- you didn't fined it a negative? you didn't buy the prosecution when they said he was a wannabe cop? >> no, i didn't at all. >> is george zimmerman someone you would like to have on a neighborhood watch in your community? >> if he didn't go too far. i mean, you can always go too far. he just didn't stop at the limitations that he should have stopped at. >> so is that a yes or -- if he didn't go too far. is he someone prone to going too far? is he somebody you would feel comfortable -- >> i think he was frustrated with the whole situation in the neighborhood, with the break-ins and the robberies and they actually arrested somebody not that long ago. i -- i would feel comfortable
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having george, but i think he's learned a good lesson. >> so you would feel comfortable having him now, because you think he's learned a lesson from all of this? >> exactly. >> i think he just didn't know when to stop. he was frustrated, and things just got out of hand. >> people have now remarked subsequently that he gets his gun back. and there are some people that said he can have a gun, that worries them. does that worry you? >> it doesn't worry me. i think he would be more responsible than anyone else on the planet right now. >> coming up, more of my interview, our first look inside the jury room, what happened, juror b 37 saying when they first went in to deliberate, half the jurors thought zimmerman was not guilty. the other three voted for second degree murder or manslaughter. she tells me how their minds were changed. that's next. yes! one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day
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back with more on our exclusive interview with juror b-37. she takes us inside the jury room, and how jurors changed their minds. >> let's talk about how you reached the verdict. you go into the jury room, what happened? >> the first day we went in, we were trying to get ourselves
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organized, there's no instructions on what you do, how you do it and when you do it? so we all decided. we nominated a foreman so she could have the voice and kind of run the show. so everybody's not talking over everybody. and then she could say, stop, we have to -- one person at a time, we have to do this. the first day we got all the evidence on the tables and the walls, then we asked for an inventory, because it was just too time-consuming looking for evidence when it was in no order whatsoever. >> did you take an initial vote to see where everybody was? >> we did. >> where was everybody? >> we had three not guilties, one second degree murder and two manslaughters. >> half the jury felt he was not
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guilty, two manslaughters and one second grow? >> exactly. >> can you say where you were on that? >> i was not guilty. >> so going into it once all the evidence was presented you felt he was not guilty? >> i did. i think the medical examiner could have done a better job presenting trayvon's preserving trayvon's evidence -- they should have bagged his hands, dried his clothes, they should have done a lot of things theyen did the do. >> do you feel you know truly what happened? >> i have a rendition of what i believe happened. and i think it's probably as close as anybody could come to what happened. nobody's going to know what exactly happened except for george. >> you took that first vote, you saw basically the jury split, half the jurors, including
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yourself thought not guilty, two people thought manslaughter, one person thought second degree murder had been proven. how do you go about 12k50iding things? >> we started looking at the evidence. we listened to all the tapes, two, three, four, five times. >> the 911 recordings? >> the 911 recordings, there's the re-enactment tape, there were some tapes from previous 911 calls george had made. >> the re-enactment tape, the tape of george zimmerman walking through what happened with the police? >> yes. we looked through everything, that's why it took us so long. we're looking through the evidence and then at the end we just -- we got done and then we just started looking at the law. what exactly we could find. and how we should vote for this case. and the law became very confusing. >> tell me about that.
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>> it became very confusing. we had stuff thrown at us. we had the second degree murder charge iks the manslaughter charge, we had self-defense, stand your ground. and i think there was one other one. but the manslaughter case we actually had gotten it down to manslaughter, because the second degree, it wasn't at second degree any more. >> the person who felt it was second degree going into it, you had convinced them, okay, it's manslaughter? >> through going through the law. and then we had sent a question to the judge, and it was not a question that they could answer yes or no. so they sent it back saying, if we could narrow it down to a question asking us if -- what exactly -- what about the law and how to handle it, but if
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they could just have -- i don't know. you. >> sent a question out to the judge about manslaughter? >> yes. >> and about -- >> what could be applied to the manslaughter, we were looking at the self-defense. one of the girls said that -- asked if you can put all the leading things into that one moment where he kneels it's a matter of life or death to shoot this boy. or if it was just at the heat of passionate that moment. >> so that juror wanted to know whether the things that had brought george zimmerman to that place, not just in the minute or two before the shot actually went off. >> exactly. >> but earlier that day, even a prior crime? >> not prior crimes, just the situation leading to it, all the steps -- as the ball got
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rolling. >> him spotting trayvon martin, whether all of that could play a role in -- >> determining the self-defense or not. >> did you feel like you understood the instructions from the judge? because they were very complex. i mean, reading them, they were tough to follow. >> that was our problem. it was just so confusing with what and what we could apply to what. because i mean, there was a couple of them in there that wanted to find him guilty of something. and after hours and hours and hours of deliberating over the law and reading did over and over and over again, we decided there's just no way -- no other place to go. >> because of the two options you had, second degree murder or
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manslaughter, you felt neither applied? >> right. because of the heat of the moment and the stand your ground. he had a right to defend himself. if he felt threatened that his life was going to be taken away from him or he was going to have bodily harm, he had a right. >> even though he got out of the car, followed trayvon martin that didn't matter in the dlib rations, what mattered was the final seconds, minutes when there was an altercation and whether or not in your mind the most important thing was whether or not george zimmerman felt his life was in danger? >> that's how we read the law. that's how we got to the point of everybody being not guilty. >> that was the belief of the jury, you had to zero in on those final minutes/seconds about the threat that george zimmerman believed he faced? >> that's exactly what happened. >> whether it was george zimmerman getting out of the vehicle, whether he was right to get out of the vehicle, whether he was a wanna be cop, whether
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he was overeager, none of that in the final analysis mattered. what mattered was those seconds before the shot went off, did george zimmerman fear for his life? >> exactly. that's exactly what happened. >> and you have no -- do you have any doubt that george zimmerman feared for his life? >> i had no doubt george feared for his life in the situation he was in at the time. >> she said she had no doubt at all. coming up, more of our exclusive interview. juror b-37 whether she feels sorry for trayvon martin and the overall confrontation that took his life. >> it's a tragedy this happened, but it happened. i think both were responsible for the situation they had gotten themselves in to, i think both of them could have walked away. end up meeting a lot more people but a friend under water is something completely different. i met a turtle friend today. avo: whatever you're looking for, expedia has more ways to help you find yours.
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there's a wide range to choose from. we love to travel -- and there's so much more to see. so we found a plan that can travel with us. anywhere in the country. [ male announcer ] join the millions of people who have already enrolled in the only medicare supplement insurance plans endorsed by aarp, an organization serving the needs of people 50 and over for generations. remember, all medicare supplement insurance plans help cover what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you thousands a year in out-of-pocket costs. call now to request your free decision guide. and learn more about the kinds of plans that will be here for you now -- and down the road. i have a lifetime of experience. so i know how important that is. more of my exclusive interview now with juror b-37 in the george zimmerman trial and
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how it's affected her. >> how has this been for you? how was making that decision, when you all realized, the last holdout juror has decided manslaughter, we can't hold george zimmerman to manslaughter, there's nothing we can hold him to, not guilty. in that jury room, emotionally, what was that like? >> it was emotional to a point, but after we put our vote in and the bailiff had taken our vote, that's when everyone started to cry. >> tell me about that. >> it was just hard thinking somebody lost their life and there's nothing else that could be done about it. i mean, it's what happened. it's sad. it's a tragedy this happened, but it happened. and i think both were responsible for the situation they had gotten themselves in to. i think both of them could have walked away, it just didn't
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happen. >> it's still emotional for you? >> it is, it's very emotional. >> can you explain the emotion? >> it's just sad that we all had to come together and figure out what is going to happen to this man's life afterwords. you find him not guilty but you're responsible for the not guilty. and all the people that want him guilty aren't going to have any closu closure. >> do you feel sorry for trayvon marten? >> i feel sorry for both of them. i feel sorry for trayvon, in the situation he was in. and i feel sorry for george because of the situation he got himself in. >> did you realize how big this
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trial had become? >> i had no clue. i had no clue whatsoever. >> did it make sense to you that there was this much attention on it? >> it didn't to me, because i didn't see it as a racial thing. i saw it as a murder case, as a second degree murder case. it was just unbelievable that it had gotten so big and so political -- not real letter political, i don't want to say that, but so emotional for everybody involved. and i never would have thought when we went over to the hotel to get all our stuff from the hotel, we got to the hotel and in the parking lot -- it was a regular parking lot, by the time we came out, it looked like disney world, there was media, police, and it really started to sink in, when we went to get our stuff, and then the state police showed up, because they were going to be our escorts home?
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>> are you scared now? >> i'm not scared. i don't know how to say it. >> you clearly don't want people to see your face? >> no. but i don't want anybody else around me to be affected by anyone else. i mean, i'm not really scared, but i want to be cautious, if that makes any sense. >> it's understandable. >> yeah. >> but you want people to know. why did you want to speak? >> i want people to know that we put everything into everything to get this verdict. we didn't just go in there and say, we're going to come in here and do guilty or not guilty. we thought about it for hours and cried over it afterwards.
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i don't think any of us could ever do anything like that ever again. >> in fact she says she never wants to serve on a jury again. our legal panel has listening to everything b-37 has to say. jeff, let me start with you. >> it was breathtaking, it's so interesting. we've been speaking for weeks what did the jury think? now we know what the jury thought. how about when they went in for deliberations, it was three for acquittal, two for manslaughter, one for second degree murder. i don't know if that's surprising or not, it's very interesting. she was a very pro prosecution jury. i think the thing that surprised me most about that interview was how sympathetic she was to george zimmerman. you asked at the end, do you feel sorry for trayvon martin. she said, i feel sorry for both
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of them. >> you meant pro defense? >> pro defense, yes. she said i feel sorry for both of them. i mean, only one of them's dead. that was a pretty breathtaking comment, but she took her job seriously, she obviously knew the evidence well, and i can't say she was wrong on the verdict. >> paul, what do you think? what stood out to you? >> you always want to talk to jurors after a trial and this really reveals a lot of insight. we've been talking about this and watching this for weeks, what i think, and what stood out to me was that basically zimmerman was telling the truth and they believes his version of the story. i think that's really answers a lot of those questions, they believe it was his voice on the tape. they believe that trayvon martin threw the first punch. one of the things that stood out to me, when he pulled the trigger of that gun, he believed he was in fear of his life, and that was the linchpin to analyzing all of the legal issues and the standards that
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they had been given that they brot back to the room to deliberate. really just fascinating to hear that, and interesting to hear her perspective and approach. and one of the things i noted as well. how sympathetic she was to zimmerman's presentation. and obviously that's who she believed and the rest of the jury believed as they heard the story. the evidence. >> clearly -- by the way, i should point out, at the end of the interview, she said she doesn't want to do any more interviews, she doesn't want to speak again. she's hoping this will burst the bubble of pressure on the jurors to speak. and she kind of just wants to be left alone. >> she didn't ask to be a public figure, she didn't want to be a public figure. she's not selling a book deal. >> there is another thing, there is a book that she and her husband have talked about writing. >> she's the one? >> yeah, she's the one, that
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emerged today. she said part of the reason they would like to, they don't want to profit off it, they would like the story told, she thinks they have an interesting story, her husband being an attorney, what it was like to be on the jury. she made a big deal of stressing, she didn't want to profit from this. we didn't pay for this interview. she wanted to get her story across. we're going to be right back. my mantra?
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trust your instincts to make the call. to treat my low testosterone, my doctor and i went with axiron, the only underarm low t treatment. axiron can restore t levels to normal in about 2 weeks in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18 or men with prostate or breast cancer. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these symptoms to your doctor. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer; worsening prostate symptoms; decreased sperm count; ankle, feet or body swelling; enlarged or painful breasts; problems breathing while sleeping; and blood clots in the legs. common side effects include skin redness or irritation where applied, increased red blood cell count, headache, diarrhea, vomiting, and increase in psa. ask your doctor about the only underarm low t treatment, axiron.
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