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tv   U.S. Senate  CSPAN  January 19, 2011 5:00pm-8:00pm EST

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that have been accumulating in the past years that we'll cost the government to collapse. >> thank you. thank you. >> thank you very much, mr. marino for yielding the time to mr. smith. and now batting cleanup, one of our committee super stars, mr. royce, chairman of the designate of the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation, and trade is recognized for five minutes. >> thank you, madame chair. i was going to ask larry a question here. i think this is an issue that maybe everybody who is representative of the business community who does business in china should be thinking about. there was an article on extortion in the harvard business review in december. and the subject is china versus the world. who's technology is it? an exhaustive study of the actual consequences for u.s. businesses in china. let me just read you, larry, one
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of the conclusions that the authors wrote here. chinese officials have learned to tackle multinational companies, including u.s. companies, often forcing them to form joint ventures with it's national champions, and transfer the latest technology in exchange for current and future business opportunities. companies that resist are simply excluded from projects. the chinese government uses the restrictions to drive wedges between foreign rivals vying to land big projects in the country, and induce each of them to transfer the technologies that state-owned enterprises need to catch up. it is extortion. and we also know numerous examples. we've heard witnesses, i think two years ago, we heard from nancy weinstein, nancy lifestyles open the business in
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beijing to have it stolen from under her. she was in shanghai. since that hearing, i probably heard from a half dozen businesses that said we don't want to go public, but this is their hot thus -- motus op operandi. now it appears. >> mr. royce, it is the motus operandi. i have to say the american companies that are induced to do that, do that of their own volition, because they hope that based on the ability to enter the marketplace, they are going to earn a lot of money. some do, some don't. >> i know that part. but the next chapter is once the technology is stolen, that
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company had better be prepared for a pretty quick exit out of china. because it's contracts are often about to change, it's work force doesn't show up the next morning, it's in violation of any number of new rules, it's leases are terminated, we've heard the stories over and over again. >> well, i would only suggest a legislative committee to reverse it. if they can say the products for stolen, then prohibit the sale of that stuff in the united states. >> well, that's a good remedy. that's a good remedy. but from the experience that we've had, going to bat with our constituents out in california, and nancy weinstein would be an example, we have not been able through the court system in china to have any success and to my knowledge, i don't know any
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success. i wondered if you would agree with one the points made in this report and the authors conclude it might be useful for the u.s. to dispense with a premise that it can have an economically compatible relationship with china. in other words, knowing going in these are two radically different systems and china has failed to bring their system into compliance with any of the international norms for commercial activity, or for rule of law. >> i don't know why you would choose to do business with a documented thief. >> well -- >> excuse me. documented thief? >> well, my hope would be that there are many other countries in asia that have an interest in closer relations with u.s.
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we see this in the polling all the time. i think a key aspect of managing china's rise will be our alliances with china's neighbors across east asia and south asia. i think that giving reassurance to our friends and placing a check on maybe china's regional ambitions is going to be necessary. but what more could we be doing to encourage trade investment, and let the u.s. economy know their return on investment is a negative one in terms of china. that gets occasionally in the journal, but not often enough. >> thank you, the gentleman's time has expired. now for truly our last question and answer five minute will be mr. fortenberry of nebraska. to close out our hearing. >> thank you, madame chair for the time, and thank you gentleman for appearing for us today. i have a fairly lofty sentence in front of me.
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basically, it says i want to stress of importance of managing our relationship with china in a manner that honors the principals that define our national purpose and identity. let me stop there. as i look out into the audience here, i see a number of young people. i think it's important to get your mind around this. many of you are perhaps newly married or hope to be married in the future. let's suppose you were in china and the authorities come by and say how many children do you have? we have one and one on the way. that's one too many. come us with. can you imagine that in the united states? we can't even get our mind around these concepts. and yet this is president hu jintao's china of today. now i sin veerly hope that as the president meets with, as president obama meets with president hu, human rights issues are going to figure most prominently in the discussion, and the white house has indicated some direction in that regard.
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but since i've been serving in congress, members of both sides of the aisle have boldly challenged on the ruthless treatment, and their families, internet freedom, religious minorities, and women and families victimized by a callus policy of coerced abortion. let's turn to economics. full estimate is that we owe about $2 trillion to china. we have a bilateral trade approaching $300 billion. of course, this pose weighty concerns. where appropriate, i believe we must challenge china to abandon the america thattism in the subsidies to contribute to this inbalance. i think we also must look ourselves in the eye in the united states. and take action to get our fiscal house in order. to revive our stagnant manufacturing industries,
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refurbish or industrial base, and take responsibility for our economic future. the reality is we buy their stuff, and they buy our debt. and this is a truly dysfunctional marriage. i think we have an obligation to forthrightly address the sources of tension in this relationship with china. and our commitment to mutual respect should never entice us to ignore these very serious concerns. and i hope that the administration will echo these concerns in their meetings today with chinese leadership. my question to the panel is this, the chinese give cover to the north koreans. the chinese do business with iran. the chinese do not respect human rights. what time of world does china envision? what is their end game? a nationalistic surge by a new
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capitalistic communist model never foreseen in the world? can you comment on that please? >> i'd be happy to comment on it. i think the chinese objective is focused on the here and now. mr. yang emphasized they have a legitimacy deficit, and it rests on economic performance. to do that, they need stability. and to do that, they have to interact with the world on a lot of different ways -- in a lot of different ways. to confront the united states is in a major way is something that's not fundamental to what they are about. their long-term plans are very vague. they have a very big agenda for the short term. and it's going to keep them busy for a long time. >> so does raising the concerns that i raised, as well as many others today help address or give rise to more legitimacy concerns as they further
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distance themselves for what we consider the international committee, the idea that we should address all of the issues that you've mentioned in a forthright way is very clear. we should do that. no question. but i think your idea that the chinese have the plan for domination and control of the world, i think a better image that china is a bit scrambling. trying to keep legitimacy, trying to keep control over the very vibrant economic and social situation. that is under good control in many respects. >> does raising the issues that i just raise hinder their request for their legitimate si? >> i think it could. >> or do they not care because economics trump everything? >> no, it's not everything. prestige is important, and position is important as well. >> thank you. the gentleman's time has
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expired. it's a testament to the great interest that the topic has that members keep coming back. i'm pleased to recognize mr. deutch, my floridian colleague for five minutes. >> thank you. i appreciate your leadership to this committee. i'd like to spend a couple of minutes talk about the way in which the chinese government has been willfully weak in property rights. the creativity, the imagination, the innovation of american workers. their intellect is being stole opinion it's being stole on a regular basic in china. it's been stolen by illegal downloads, my pirated dvds, it's being stolen by seizing again the intellectual property of our nation. what can we do to increase the pressure on the chinese government to be more serious in
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enforcing and protecting the intellectual property rights of our citizens? >> i think the one thing we can do if we are serious about it, start adding terrorists for goods of countries that do engage in willful threat of intellectual property. this is a really important thing for us to do. i think it's probably about the only way to do it. there are a number of other strategies. one thing the obama administration has done, it has gone after the indigenous rules that president hu jintao really has sponsored, and really does put american companies at serious disadvantage if they want to do big in china. that's one thing. when it comes to the actual theft. that's another issue. sanctions of some sort, penalties, they are probably going to follow hr2378. >> mr. wortzel, are you nodding
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your head? >> i agree with mr. chang. we have the valuable world trade organization remedies. we are not always doing that. they are more limited than we might like. but we must avail ourselves of them, and we have to work particularly with our european allies and friends so that when a case is brought, it's not just brought by one country. i think that helps. duties is another remedy that i think would be useful. >> i'd like to broaden the discussion to the implications of threat of intellectual property to the links between stealing intellectual property and terrorist organizations like hezbollah and hamas. the goods originate in china and end up in south america, where they have been provided to
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hezbollah. one such designated terrorists entity provided lumpsome payment. is there a way moving beyond the important nature of intellectual property rights on it's own to helping, to reinforcing this severe implications of these violations in our own? >> i think you just pointed the way toward a response to that. and that would be to take a look at the iran sanctions act. and with the terrorisms to see if legislation would be modeled around the lines of the iran sanctions act that was specifically sanction the chinese violators that are engaged in that activity. >> and along those lines, dr. wortzel, under the iran sanction
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and the legislation that we passed last year, but all accounts there are chinese firms that ought to be sanctioned. they have not been. do you have thoughts on the actions taken by these chinese companies, state-owned in iran and helping them to overcome the sanctions that have been imposed on other companies? >> you know, here you really have to get to oversight administration enforcement. if they are not doing the job, they are not doing the job. >> they sanction the enterprises. essentially, they are all controlled by the state. so essentially what we should be doing is thinking about sanctions that go beyond just the individual enterprise, because essentially what we are doing is we're going after the pinky when we should be going after the head. >> and in remaining seconds, how on that specific issue, how do we go after the head? >> it would be basically putting sanctions on goods from countries that do involve in certain prohibitive behavior.
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this is going to be difficult for the united states to do. we don't -- up to know have had the will to do it. when it comes to things like iran, or selling arms for the taliban, something else within we have to think about our priorities. >> thank you. thank you to the panelist for excellent testimony. thank you to the members who participated. thank you to the audience and the briefing is now adjourned. thank you. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations]
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[inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> in about 10 minutes, beginning at 5:30 eastern time, we're going to have live coverage to the arrivals to the white house state dinner to honor chinese president hu jintao. before that, vice president joe biden and his wife jill hosted a lunch. we'll show you as much as we can. it runs about 20 minutes. >> here with other people in this room 32 years ago when vice
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president bing led a historic visit to the united states, event not unlike today. [speaking chinese] >> i can literally recall our "newsweek" magazine described the visit. they said a turning point in the affairs of the modern world. [speaking chinese] >> a few months later, i had the opportunity to be among the first members of congress and the delegation led by frank church and jacob javits to visit. [speaking chinese]
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>> even back then there was a debate about a rising china was in the interest of the united states and the world. [speaking chinese] >> i believe then and i am even more convinced now the rising china is a positive development for not only china but the united states and the rest of the world. [speaking chinese] >> i admit my view is born out of my overwhelming confidence and the capability of the american people and confidence that a prosperous china benefits not only chinese citizens, but other nations as well.
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[speaking chinese] >> the lone concern that i had then and remains my concern now is the instability in this relationship could arise only from mutual misunderstanding as to our respective countries in tensions and our domestic needs. [speaking chinese] >> that's why i'm convinced, mr. president, that face-to-face bilateral meetings like this and the ones you've had last night and earlier today and will have again tonight are so important.
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[speaking chinese] >> president hu noted earlier in the oval office today that this was his eighth meeting, eight face-to-face meeting with president obama. in two years. [speaking chinese] >> and i think those meetings are baring fruit. our discussions so far and since the beginning of the meetings with the president has been straightforward and collegial. [speaking chinese] >> and i'm absolutely convinced if we continue to work at it, there are exceptional opportunities for economic growth and promotion of peace in the world as a consequence of
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this relationship. [speaking chinese] >> on the last day of that landmark visit 32 years ago, vice premiere dong offered an inspiring wish for the future. he said and i quote may the chinese and american people live in friendship from generation to generation and may they always safeguard world peace together. [speaking chinese] >> i want to thank all of those working so hard to realize this
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week and i'd like now to raise our glass in a toast to many more generations of friendship and peace. [speaking chinese] >> ladies and gentlemen. [speaking chinese] >> president hu. [inaudible conversations] [applause] [speaking in chinese]
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[speaking in chinese] >> vice president biden, mrs. biden, secretary of state clinton, ladies and gentlemen, and dear friends, i wish to thank vice president and mrs. biden and secretary clinton for hosting this luncheon for me and my colleagues. to begin, i would like to express sincere for your abiding commitment to u.s.-china relations. [speaking in chinese]
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[speaking in chinese] >> translator: this year marks the 40th anniversary since china and the united states reopened the door to each other. we cherished fond memories of the diplomacy, and dr. kissinger's visit to china 40 years ago. the handshake across the pacific between president nixon and china's leaders 39 years ago, and the early spring visit of mr. ping to the united states 32 years ago. these momentous events bare
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witness to the historical process in which the people of our two countries ended enstrangement and reviewed friendship. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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>> translator: china-u.s. relations have traveled an extraordinary path in the past four decades. in the beginning, leaders of our two countries would meet only once every few years. in the past two years ago, president obama and i have met eight times. bilateral trade was just over $2 billion u.s. dollars when we established the diplomatic ties. but it's exceeded $380 billion u.s. dollars last year. between 1949 and 1972, the total number of people who visited each other's countries was less
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than 5,000. today 3 million tourist travel between the two countries every year. not to mention the 120,000 chinese students in the united states, and over 20,000 american students in china. there was no providence state and the relationship at a start of our diplomatic relations. now but there are 36 pairs of sister providences, states, and 161 pairs of sister cities. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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>> translator: reviewing the past gives us a lot of food for thought. without shared strategic interest, and without a common pursuit of world peace, and prosperity, china u.s. exchanges and corporations would not have come this far. looking ahead, we have every reason to be confident about the future of our relations. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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[speaking in chinese] >> translator: this morning i held talks with president obama. we had an in-depth exchange of views on china-u.s. relations and major international and regional issues of shared interest. we reached broad agreements. the most important agreement we reached, in the face of new situation and new challenges, china and the u.s. should come up with new ideas and measures to further promote the positive, cooperative, and comprehensive china-u.s. relationship, and work together to build a cooperative partnership based on mutual respect and mutual benefits. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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: we need to maintain and intensify communication through modern channels and at different levels at this will help us for mutual trust, remove misunderstandings in a timely fashion and extend consensus. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] >> translator: to sustain the momentum of high level interaction, the two sides have
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agreed they will pay a visit to china this year. we need to deepen cooperation in the economy and trade, energy, the environment, counter terrorism, nonproliferation, law enforcement, and cultural and people-to-people exchanges, resume military exchanges, and actively nurture new areas of procreation such as new energy and infrastructure development. that's the foundation of our common interests. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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[speaking in chinese] >> translator: we need to better demonstrate the spirit of mutual respect, respecting each other choice of social systems and developing paths, respect sovereignty, territorial integrity and development interests. we need to work together to play as responsible and constructive major country and make greater contribution to peace, stability, and the prosperity in the asia-pacific region and the world, and we need to encourage more chinese and americans to get involved in the growth of our relations so as to solidify the social basis and public support for a stronger china u.s. relations.
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[speaking in chinese] >> translator: the agreement here that president obama and i have reached, i hope and believe that our agreement and em policemennation lands a strong u.s. china relationship and pushes it forward along the right path. [speaking in chinese chinese] >> translator: now i want to propose a toast to the health to biden, to the health of secretary clinton, to the health
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of the friends and friendship of our two people. >> now we get to eat. >> i think so. [applause] [applause] ♪ ♪ ♪
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♪ ♪ [inaudible conversations] >> live now here in washington, d.c., that is the north lawn of the white house on a reasonably nice evening for january in washington. about 47 degrees here as we wait for the state dinner to get underway for the president of china, president hu in town. the theme tonight according to a request by the chinese delegation, the men knew is american, and the decor and entertainment features jazz tonight. we're awaiting the arrival of president hu. you can see the welcoming party there. they are a bit in shadow.
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the honor guard is ready to go. we'll show you the book sellers area of the white house where the guests arrive. first lady michelle obama challenged the white house chefs to get involved in their communities and find a local american menu. the menu is all american, purchased lobster and ribeye steak and old fashioned apple pie with ice cream. that sounds like a very american dinner. we're waiting to get underway and we'll have coverage here. should be getting underway here momentarily. [inaudible conversations]
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>> so, again, we're waiting for the state dinner to get underway here shortly. president hu of china and the official state dinner. you're looking at the north lawn of the white house all lit up there. some of the entertainment tonight keeping with the american theme and the theme of american jazz being the entertainment. we expect to hear from herby hancock and lang lang and american food is in store for president hu. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations]
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[inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> so, what we're looking at here is the booksellers area of the white house as we wait for
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the arrival. we'll take you outside to show you what it looks like from the outside. the north port co the steps there and waiting for president hu to walk in there, that's the lower level of the white house. you'll see the arrival of all the guests. we have coverage both outside and inside the white house tonight. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations]
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[inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> again, we're inside the white house here live on c-span2 waiting for the state visit of president hu. a couple other quick notes. the information the white house gave us about this american evening including food from the white house and honey served in the dessert from the white house garden. also, we understand lobster from maine and shrimp from massachusetts on the menu.
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[inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> ladies and gentlemen --
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[inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> all right, so now we're taking you back outside the white house. you can see the honor guard and color guard standing at attention. we're an anticipating an arrival here shortly. let's watch and listen here on c-span2.
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[inaudible] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> we're taking you back inside and as we see more and more of the guests arriving here walking past the reporters and cameras, live coverage of the state dinner on c-span2. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations]
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morning, but they never mentioned moving business. it's about how many americans are in china and china moving to america and those kinds of things. >> are you going to share any news in there? >> not today. thank you very much. thank you. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations]
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[inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> and will go back outside now, live coverage on c-span 2 to the north portico of the white house. you see the president of the united states, and first light a shallow, waiting president hu from china. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations]
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[inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> welcome. [inaudible conversations]
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♪ ♪ >> so there you see the arrival of the president of china, president hu watkin inside the white house with president and mrs. obama. we'll show you the area called the booksellers. the white house, so called because back in the 1800s books were sold there, which is what we're told by some of her c-span producers who know about these things. we're watching just to brag. we've seen several notable figures, including former secretaries of state kissinger and madeleine albright and will watch it while longer as their coverage of the state dinner for the president of china continues on c-span 2. again, the theme tonight at the request of the delegation or quintessentially american evening, including american food
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[inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> we continue to watch the guests arrive at the state dinner for president hu jintao in town. his life in the white house. a quick reminder at 8:00 eastern with a special program on the
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network talking about u.s.-china relations. will also have coverage of the toaster that dinner. i think we'll have those by tape for you with coverage of all the offense run into dinner break here on c-span 2. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations]
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[inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> and we've been showing you some of the arrivals, some of the ceremony surrounding the beginning of this state dinner for the president of china, hosted by the president and mrs. obama tonight at the white house. we will have more coverage. we'll have coverage via tape of some of the toasts made. i know there will be a toast made by the president and the first lady, the president will make the toast, and president hu will make a toast. we'll have a special program at 8:00 eastern here. we'll talk about relations between the u.s. and china. a lot more coverage coming up for you here on c-span2 of this state dinner.
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also earlier today, there was an official welcoming ceremony at the white house for the chinese president hu jintao who is here for the state visit. we'll show you that now. this took place this morning. [silence] president obama: good morning, everyone. president hu, members of the chinese delegation, on behalf of michelle and myself, welcome to the white house. and on behalf of the american people, welcome to the united states. [speaking in chinese]
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president obama: three decades ago on january day like this, another american president stood here and welcomed another chinese leader for the historic normalization of relations between the united states and the peoples republic of china. on that day, the president spoke of the great possibilities of cooperation between our two nations. [speaking in chinese]
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president obama: looking back on that winter day, in 1979, it is now clear the previous 30 years had been a time of estrangement for all two countries. the 30 years since have been a time of growing exchanges and understanding. with this visit, we can lay the foundation for the next 30 years. [speaking in chinese]
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president obama: at a time when some doubts the benefits of cooperation between the united states and china, this visit is also a chance to demonstrate a simple truth. we have an enormous stake in each other's success. in an interconnected world, in a global economy, nations, including our own, will be more prosperous and more secure when we work together. [speaking in chinese]
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president obama: the united states welcomes china's rise as a strong, prosperous, and successful member of the community of nations. indeed, china's success has brought with it economic benefits for our people as well as yours. and our cooperation on a range of issues has helped advance stability in the asian pacific and in the world. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] president obama: we also know this: history shows that societies are more harmonious, nations are more successful, and the world is more just when the
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rights and responsibilities of all nations and all people are upheld. including the universal rights of every human being. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] president obama: mr. president, we can learn from our people. chinese and american students and educators, business people, tourists, researchers, and scientists, including chinese-americans who are here today. they worked together and make progress together every single day. they know that even as our nations compete in some areas, we can cooperate in so many
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others, in a spirit of mutual respect for our mutual benefit. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] president obama: what the president said long ago remains true today. there are still great possibilities for cooperation between our countries. president hu, members of the chinese delegation, let us seize these
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possibilities together. welcome to the united states of america. [speaking in chinese] [applause] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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>> translator: mr. president, mrs. obama, ladies and gentlemen, dear friends, it gives me great pleasure to come to washington and pay state visit to the united states and to the beginning of the new year with the invitation of president obama. at this point in time, let me extent on behalf of the 1.3 billion chinese people, sincere greetings and best wishes to the people of the united states. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] >> translator: i have come to the united
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states to increase neutral trust, enhance friendship, deepen cooperation, and push forward the positive, cooperative, and comprehensive china-est relationship for the 21st century. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] >> translator: over the past 32 years since the establishment of ties, the china-u.s. relationship has grown into one with strategic
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significance and global influence. since president obama took office with concerted efforts of the two sides, our cooperation in various fields have produced fruitful results and our relations have achieved new progress. this has brought real benefits to our two peoples and contributed greatly to world peace and the development. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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[speaking in chinese] >> translator: as we entered the second decade of the 21st century, the people of both china and the united states want to see further progress in our relations. and people around the globe want to see greater prosperity in the world. under the new circumstances, and in the face of new challenges, china and the united states share broad, common interests and important, common responsibilities. we should adopt a long-term perspective, seek common ground while reserves differences, and work together to achieved sustain, sound, and steady development of our relations. i hope that through this visit our two countries will advance the positive, cooperative, and comprehensive relationship and open a
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new chapter in our cooperation as partners. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] >> translator: our cooperation as partners should be based on mutual respect, we live in a increasingly diverse and colorful world. china and the united states should respect each other's choice of development paths and each other's core interest. we should deepen mutual understanding through communication, increase mutual trust through dialogue, and expand common ground through
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exchanges. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] >> translator: our cooperation as partners should be based on mutual benefit. china's future and destiny are increasingly tied to those of the world. in china-u.s. relations have become closer. our two countries should seek to learn from each other through exchanges and achieve win/win progress through cooperation. this is the right approach for us to develop our relations. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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>> translator: our cooperation as partners should be based on joint efforts to meet challenges. china and the united states should step up communication and coordination in international affairs, work together to counter the global challenges and make a greater contribution to world peace and the development. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] >> translator: our cooperation as partners should be based on the extensive involvement of
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the people, the chinese and american people cherish deep friendship towards each other. and they fought side by side at defining moments in history when the future and the destiny of mankind here at the stake. the two peoples should expand exchanges and enhance friendship. this will offer an exhaustible driving force for the growth of our relations. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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>> translator: ladies and gentlemen, our world today is undergoing major development, major changes, and major adjustments to pursue peace, development, and cooperation is the irresistible trend of our time. let us seize the opportunity to forge ahead, hand in hand, and work together in enhance cooperation as partners. and let us work with all other countries to build a harmonious world of lasting peace and common prosperity. thank you once again, mr. president, for your warm welcome. [applause] [applause] president obama: thank you. thank you. [applause] [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible
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conversations] [inaudible conversations] ♪ ♪ ♪ >> and there you saw the welcoming ceremony earlier this morning at the white house for the president of china. here tonight in town for a state dinner, our live coverage here on c-span2. that's a look at the north lawn, the north
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portco of the white house. coming up we'll have a special program here on c-span2 talking about u.s.-china relations as we look at the first state dinner for a china leader in 13 years. president hu was here in 2006, but that just included a luncheon with toast. our coverage will continue. there was a joint news conference held today at the white house. let's show you that now. >> gentleman, the president of the united states, and the president of the people's republic of china. president obama: everybody please have a seat. good afternoon. it is my pleasure to welcome president hu to the white house and to return the hospitality that he showed when i visited china last year. this is our eighth
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meeting. together we have shown that the united states and china when we cooperate can receive substantial benefits. the positive, constructive, cooperative u.s.-china relationship is good for the united states. we just had a very good meeting with the business leaders from both of our countries. they pointed out that china is one of the top markets for american exports. we're not exporting more than $100 billion a year in goods and services to china. which supports more than half a million american jobs. in fact, our exports to china are growing nearly twice as fast as our exports to the rest of the world. making it a key part of my goal of doubling american exports and keeping america competition in the 21st century. the cooperation between our countries is also good for china. china's extraordinary economic growth has
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lifted hundreds of millions of people out of poverty. this is a tribute to the chinese people. but it's also thanks to decades of stability in asia made possible by america's forward presence in the region, but strong trade with america, and by an open international economic system championed by the united states of america. cooperation between our countries is also good for the world. along with our g20 partners, we've moved from the brink of catastrophe to the beginning of global economic recovery. with our security council partners, we passed and are enforcing the strongest sanctions to date against iran over it's nuclear program. we've worked together to reduce tensions on the korean peninsula, and most recently, we welcomed china's support in southern sudan on the
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referendum. as we look to the future, what's needed, i believe, is a spirit of cooperation that is also friendly competition. in areas like those that i've just mentioned, we will cooperate, forging partnerships and making progress that neither nation can achieve alone. in other areas, we'll compete. a healthy competition that spurs both countries to innovate and become even more competitive. that's the kind of relationship that i see for the united states and china in the 21st century. and that's the kind of relationship that we advanced today. i am very pleased that we've completed dozens of deals that will increase u.s. exports by more than $45 billion. and also increase china's invest many in the united states by several billion dollars. from machinery to software to aviation and agriculture, these deals will support some 235,000 american jobs.
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that includes many manufacturing jobs. so this is great news for america's workers. i did also stress to president hu that there has to be a level playing field for american companies competing in china. the trade has to be safe. so i welcomed his commitment that american companies will not be discriminated with when they compete with procurement contracts, and i appreciate his willingness to takes to combat theft of intellectual property. we are renewing science and technology, which sparks advances in agriculture and industry. we are moving ahead with our u.s.-china clean energy research and joint ventures in wind and smart grids and coal. i believe the two biggest energy consumers and emitters of greenhouse gases, the united states and china have a responsibility to build on the progress in
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copenhagen and cancun. and president hu indicated that he agrees with me on this issue. we discussed china's progress in moving towards a more market-oriented economy, and how we can ensure a strong and balanced global, economic recovery. we agreed that in china, this means boosting domestic demand. here in the united states, it means spending less and exports more. i told president hu that we welcomed china's increasing the flexibility of it's currency. i also had to say that the r&d remained under layed, and there needs to be further fluctuate in the exchain -- exchange rate, and lessening the futures in their economy. we will look for the value of currency will be increasingly driven by the markets, which will help ensure no nation has an economic advantage. to advance our shared security, we are
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expanding dialogue and cooperation between our militaries which increases trust and reduces misunderstanding. with a regard to regional stability and security in east asia, i stress that the united states has a fundamental interest in maintaining freedom of navigation, unimpeted commerce, and peaceful resolutions. i welcome the congress that's been made on both sides of the taiwan strait in reducing tensions and economic ties. we hope this progress continues. because it's in the interest of both sides, the region, and the united states. in deep i reaffirmed our commitment to a one china policy based on the three u.s.-china communiques and the taiwan relations act. i told president hu that we appreciated china's role in reducing tensions on the korean peninsula. we agree that north korea must avoid further provocations. i also said that north
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korea's nuclear and ballistic program is increasing a direct threat to the security of united states and our allies. we agree that the paramount goal must be complete denuclearization of the peninsula. in that regard, the international community must continue to state the uranium enrichment program is in violation of the commitment and obligations. with respect to global security, i'm pleased that we are moving ahead with president hu's commitment at last year's nuclear security summit for china to establish a center of excellence which will help secure the world's vulnerable nuclear materials. to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons, we agree that iran must uphold the international obligations and the u.n. security council sanks on iran must be fully enforced. along with the partners, we'll continue to offer the government of iran
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for dialogue and integration into the international community, but only if it meets it's obligations. i reaffirmed america's fundamental commitment to the the universal rights of all people, that includes basic human rights like the freedom of speech, press, assembly, of association and demonstration and of religion. rights that are recognized in the chinese constitution. as i've said before, the united states speaks up for these freedoms and the dignity of every human being. not only because it's part of who we are as americans, but we do so because we believe that by upholding these universal rights, all nations, including china, will ultimately be more prosperous and successful. so today we've agreed to move ahead with our formal dialogue on human rights. we've agreed to new exchanges, to advance the rule of law. and even as we, the united states, recognize that tibet is part of the peoples republic of
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china, the united states continued to support further dialogue between the government of china and representatives of the dalai lama, including the preservation of the religious and cultural identity of the tibetan people. finally, we continue to expand partnerships between our people, especially our young people. today my wife michelle is highlighting our efforts to increase the number of american students studying in china to 100,000. and i am very pleased that president hu will be visiting my hometown of chicago. mr. president, you are brave to visit chicago in the middle of winter. i have warned him that the weather may not be as pleasant as it is here today. [laughter] president obama: but i know in the students and business people that you meet, you will see the extraordinary possibilities of partnership between our citizens. so again, i believe that we have helped to lay the foundation for cooperation between the united states and china for decades to come.
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and michelle and i look forward to hosting president hu for a state dinner tonight to celebrate the deep tieing between our people, as well as our shared hopes for the future. president hu. [speaking in chinese] >> translator: friends from the press, ladies and gentlemen, good afternoon. first of all, i want to express sincere appreciation to the president obama and the people of united states for the warm welcome of me and my colleagues. just now i've had talks with president obama in a candid, pragmatic, and constructive atmosphere. we had in depth exchange of views and reached important agreement on china-u.s. relations and major international and regional issues of shared interest. we reviewed the development of china-u.s. relations in
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the last two years. we positively assessed the progress that we made in dialogue, coordination, and cooperation in various areas. the chinese side appreciations president obama's commitment to a positive and constructive china policy, and to stable and growing china-u.s. relations since he took office. both president obama and i agree that as mankind enters the second decade of the 21st century, the international situation continues to undergo profound and complex changes, and there is a growing number of global challenges. china and the united states share expanding common interests and show the increasing common responsibilities. china-u.s. cooperation has great significance of the last two
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countries and the world. the two sides should firmly adhere to the right direction of our relationship, respect each other's sovereignty, territorial integrity, and development interest. promote the long-term growth of china-u.s. relations, and make even contributions to maintaining and promoting world peace and development. we both agree to further push forward the positive, cooperative, and comprehensive china-u.s. relationship. and commit to work together to build a china-u.s. cooperative partnership based on mutual respect and mutual benefit. first to benefit people in our own countries and the world over. we both agreed to strengthen exchanges and cooperation in economy and trade, energy and
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the environment, science and technology, infrastructure, construction, culture, education, conflictism, nonproliferation, law enforcement, and other areas so as to achieve mutual benefit. during my current visit to the united states, the relevant departments, institutions, and enterprises of the two countries have signed a number of cooperation agreements, and reached agreement on a series of new cooperation projects. these will inject fresh cooperation into our bilateral cooperation, and create many opportunities for both countries. we discussed some disagreements in economic and trade area, and we will continue to appropriately resolve these according to the principal of mutual respect and equal footing. the president and i agree that china and the united states need to
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establish a pattern of high level exchanges featuring in depth communication and dialogue. president obama and i will stay in close contact through meetings telephone calls, and letters. the two sides believe that the expansion of exchanges and cooperation between our militaries contribute to deepen mutual trust between our two countries and to the growth of our overall relationship. we also agreed to encourage all sectors of our society to carry out various reforms of exchange activities, in particular, we have high hopes on the young people, hoping that they will better understand each other's country and be more deeply involved in the people to people exchanges between our two countries. president obama and i exchanged views on the international economic situation. we believe the world
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economy is slowly recovering from the international financial crisis, but there are a fair amount of unstable factors and uncertainties. both sides agree to strengthen microeconomic policy coordination and actively pursue opportunities for greater cooperation in this process. the two sides support the g20 playing a bigger role in international economic and financial affairs. we agree to push forward reform of the international financial system and improve global economic governance. we champion free trade and uphold protectionism. and to hope to go a round of negotiations can make early and substantial progress. president obama and i exchanged views on major international and regional issues, including the situation on the korean peninsula, the iranian nuclear
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issue, climate change and others, we agree to strengthen coop -- coordination on peace in the asian-pacific and in the united states and the world. we will work with the relevant parties to maintain peace and stability on the peninsula, promote denuclearization of the peppiness that. we will work with the united states and other countries to effectively address global challenges such as meeting the climate challenge, terrorism, transnational crime, energy, and resource security, food security, public health security, and natural disasters, so as to forge a bright future for the world. i stated to the president that china is committed to the peaceful and win/win
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strategy of opening up. china is a friend and partner of all countries, and china's development is an opportunity for the world. that's all. thank you. >> ben feller with request at request -- with "the associated press." thank you very much. i'd like to address both leaders. president obama, you've covered the broad scope, i'd like to follow up about your comments on human rights. can you explain to the american people how the united states can be so allied and known for treating it's people so poorly for using censorship and force to oppress it's people. do you have any confidence as a result of that visit that will change? and if i may on an unrelated topic, i'd like to know what you make on the speculation that ambassador might run against you in 2012? president hu, i'd like to give you a chance to respond to this issue of human rights. how do you justify
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china's record? and do you think that's any of the business of the american people? president obama: well, first of all, i think ambassador huntsman has done an outstanding job as ambassador for the united states to china. he is a mandrin speaker, he's brought enormous skill, dedication, and talent to the job. you know, the fact that he comes from a different party, i think is a strength, not a weakness. it indicates the degree to which both he and i believe that partisanship ends at the water's edge, and that we work together to advocate on behalf of our country. so i couldn't be happier with the ambassador's service, and i'm sure he will be very successful in whatever endeavors he chooses in the future. and i'm sure that him having worked so well with me will be a great
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asset in any republican primary. [laughter] president obama: the -- let me -- let me address the other issue. in a very serious issue. china has a different political system than we do. china's at a different stage of development than we are. we come from very different cultures, and with very different histories. but as i've said before, and i repeat it to president hu, we have some core views as americans about certain rights, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of assembly that we think are very important.
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and that transcend cultures. i have been very candid with president hu about these issues. occasionally, there are a source of tension between our two governments. but what i've believed is the same thing that i think seven previous presidents have believed which is that we can engage and discuss these issues in a frank and candid way, focus on those areas where we agree, while acknowledges there are going to be areas where we disagree. and i want to suggest that there has been an evolution in china over the last 30 years since the first normalization of relations between the united states and china. and my expectation is that the 30 years from now, we will have seen
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further evolution. and further change. and so what my approach will continue to be is to celebrate the incredible accomplishments of the chinese people, their extraordinary civilization, the multiple areas in which we have to cooperate, not only for the sakes of our countries, but also for the sakes of the world. to acknowledge that we were going to have certain differences, and to be honest, as i think any partner needs to be honest when it comes to how we view many of these issues. and so that frank and candid assessment on our part will continue. but that doesn't prevent us from cooperating in these other critical areas.
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[speaking in chinese] >> the translator is now translating the question back to chinese. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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[speaking in chinese] president obama: i apologize. i thought we had simultaneous translation. i would have broken up the answer in smaller bites. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] president obama: i'm sorry. i'm getting it in chinese. >> i'm from china central television. you know there's that
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old saying in china that a good relationship between the two peoples holds a key to a sound relationship between states. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] >> translator: we know that to further strengthen the public support for the development of this relationship is also very important to the
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sustained sound and steady growth of our relations. so president hu jintao, i would like to ask you the question, what do you think the two countries need to do to further increase the friendship and mutual understanding between the chinese and american peoples. at the same time. we have also noted that the u.s. side has been saying that the united states is willing to see a stronger and more prosperous china. i would like to ask president obama that deep in your heart, do you really think that you can leave comfortably with a growing china? and also this question that what do you think that china's development really means to the united states?
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[speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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[speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] >> translator: i would like to take this question from the lady. i think that the exchanges between our two peoples represent the basis and the drives force behind the growth of our relationship. ever since the
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establishment of diplomatic relationship between our two countries we have seen more robust exchanges between our two peoples. in such exchanges also help promote the steady growth of our relationship. the statistics i have show that each year we have about 3 million people traveling between our two countries. in other words, every single day, about 7 to 8,000 people will be traveling between china and the united states. this is something that's hardly conceivable 32 years ago when we first established diplomatic ties. in addition, we have also seen very broad ranging development of the exchanges at such national level. so far, our two countries have already established sister relationships between 36 providences and states, and we have also developed 161 pairs of
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sister cities between our two countries. the chinese government is supportive of the friendly exchanges between our two peoples. and we have been creating all kinds of conditions to expand the friendly exchanges between the americans and chinese peoples. during the visit, president obama and i reached an agreement that both sides will take positive steps to further increase the people to people exchanges. on the one hand, we will encourage the young people in our two countries to go to each other's countries to pursue further education and learn more about each other. and at the same time, we have also decided to putting place a dialogue and exchange mechanisms between chinese and american providences and states. besides, we are going to
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further expand cultural exchanges and developed tourism. we're going to use a variety of means to further increase people-to-people exchanges. i would like to particularly express here that the young people hold the future of this relationship. it is extremely important to increase the exchanges between the young people in our two countries. through such exchange, i hope that our friendship can be furthered. and i also hope that they in the future can serve as ambassadors of goodwill for our two countries and they will make even more positive contribution to the a development of positive partnership based on mutual respect and mutual benefit. president obama: let me respond briefly to your question. i absolutely believe that china's peaceful rise is good for the world, and it's good for
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america. [speaking in chinese] president obama: first of all, it's good for humanitarian reasons. [speaking in chinese] president obama: the united states has an interest in seeing hundreds of millions of people lifted out of poverty. [speaking in chinese] president obama: we believe part of justice and part of human rights is people being able to make a living and having enough to eat and having shelter and having electricity and the development of china has brought unprecedented economic growth to more people more quickly than just about any time in history.
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and that's a positive good for the world and it's something that the united states very much appreciates and respects. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] president obama: we also think that china's rise offers enormous economic opportunity. [speaking in chinese] president obama: we want to sell you all kinds of stuff. [laughter] [speaking in chinese]
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president obama: we want to sell you planes, we want to sell you cars, we want to sell you software, and as president hu and his government refocuses the economy on expanding domestic demand, that offers opportunities for u.s. businesses which ultimately translates into u.s. jobs. [speaking in chinese] president obama: it also means that as china's standards of living rise, they have more purchasing power. [speaking in chinese] president obama: something that i think we have to remind ourselves, the united states economy is still three times
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larger than china's despite after one quarter of the population. per capita income is still very different between the two countries. as china's per capita income rises, an offers an opportunity for increased trade and commercial ties that benefit both countries. [speaking in chinese] :
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president obama: to the extent that we have a partner in dealing with regional hot spots and have a partner in addressing issues like climate change or pandemic and a partner who is helping poorer countries in asia or in africa, further develop so that they too can be a part of the world economy. that is something that can help create stability and order and pros tearty -- prosperity around the world, and that's what we would like to see and they are more likely to be an effective partner with us on the world stage. [speaking in chinese]
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[speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] ] speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] >> hans
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nickels from bloomberg. thank you mr. president, because of the translation questions, can i address one first to president hu? >> yes. >> first i asked you a question about human rights which you did not answer. i was wondering if we can have an answer to that question, and also on capitol hill, senator majority leader harry reed and john boehner are not joining the state dinner. they see china as an economic threat, what can you do to relay their fears? [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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[speaking in chinese] >> i'd like to clarify because of the technical translation and interpretation problem, i did not hear the question about the human rights. what i know is that he was asking a question directed at president obama. >> translator: if you raise this question, and i heard the question properly, certainly i'm in a position to answer that question. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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[speaking in chinese] >> translator: president obama and i already met eight times. each time we met, we had an in-depth exchange of views in a candid manner on issues of shared interests and our issues to each other's concerns, and on the issues we have covered we also discussed human rights. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] >> translator: china is always committed to the protection and promotion of human rights, and in the course of human rights, china has also made enormous progress recognized widely in the world. [speaking in chinese]
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[speaking in chinese] >> translator: china recognizes and also respects the human rights, and at the same time, we do believe that we also need to take into account the different national circumstances when it comes to the universal value of human rights. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] >> translator: china is a developing country with a huge population and also developing country in a crucial stage ofhi, china still faces many challenges in economic and social development, and a lot still needs to be done in china
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in terms of human rights. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] >> translator: we'll continue our efforts to improve the lives of the chinese people and we will continue our efforts to promote democracy and the rule of law in our country. at the same time, we are also willing to continue to have exchanges and dialogue with other countries in terms of human rights, and we are also willing to learn from each other in terms of the good practices. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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>> translator: as president obama rightly put it, though there are disagreements between china and the united states on hiewch rights, china is willing to engage in dialogue and exchanges with the united states with the faces of mutual respect and the principle of none interference in each other's internal affairs. in this way, we can further increase our mutual understanding, reduce our disagreements, and expand our commonground. [speaking in chinese] >> translator: therefore, the latter question about the attendance of the state dinner by some congress people on who will atepid and who will not attend and for what reason, i
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think president obama is in a better position to answer that question. [laughter] president obama: is that the question you want to pose to me? [laughter] you get a one. >> you spoken on some video that you feel here goal of adding exports to your strategy. at the same time, you said there's further adjustment in the exchange rate and the rmb is undervalued. to what extent is china depressing their currency affect your job to create jobs in this country and low every the unemployment -- lower the unemployment rate? president obama: well, i th the entire economic relationship, and the currency issue is one part of it. the first time i met president hu was in april of 2009, and this was the first g-20 summit
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that i attended when we were mountain midst of the worst financial crisis we experienced since the 1930s. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in [speaking in c [speaking int oba: even as we stabilized the financial system, what was clear is we couldn't go back to a system in which the united states was massively, consuming massively, creatingroducing and selling to these huge imbalances that helped contribute to the crisis.
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[speaking ininese] [speaking in chinese] in chines] president obama: that gives us to cut back on the huge levels of debt both in the private sector, but also in the private sector. [speaking inhat we have the best education system in the world, that we're producing more engineers than lawyers, making sure that we have a handle on our fiscal sure that we got a world class infrastructure.
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those are all important parts of chinese]competitive and being [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] president obama: it does also mean though that we have a level playing field when it comes par. [speaking in chinese] respect to china, what president hu and myself and our
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delegations have discussed is how do we make sure that, in fact, our trading relationship is fair and a win-win situation as opposed to a win-lose situation. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] president obama: some of that has to do with su[speaking in is to do with intellectual property protection, so we were just in a and steveaer of my cro soft pointed out one in ten wre amera
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actually excelled is in making high quality products and services. [speaking in chinese] [speaking chinese [speaking in] president obama: they have taken steps to better enforce intellectual property. we got getter agreements as a result of this state visit, and i think they would acknowledge that more needs to be done. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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president obama: what the currency issue is a part of the problem, the rmb is undervalued. the chinese government has intervened veryor $200 million t recently, and that's an indication of the degree to hu indicated he'sndervalued. motivated to move towards a system, but the movement is not as fast as we wanted. what i said to president hu, and i firmly believe this is not only with u.s. businesses be able to export more to china if we have a market-based currency, but it will also be good for china and president hu's agenda of expanding domestic demand because if the rmb is worth more, that means they can buy
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more products and services, and that will contribute to china having greater purchasing power and a hu's concern understandably about how rapid this transition can occur in the export sector, but i'm confident it's the right thing to do and my hope and expectation is his resolve will lead to a fully market-based currency program to allow more effective countries. chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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[speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese [speaking in chinese]
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[speaking in chinese] the simultaneous booth that i want to ask the chinese interpreter to interpret my two questions correctly and accurately. [laughter] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] >> >> translator: my first question for president obama is that many people believe the problem of this relationship is the lack of confidence between the two. do you agree? how do you think the two sidespe their differences and expand
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their common interests? [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] >> translator: my second question is for president hu jintao. we noticed that both the chinese and american leaders have on various occasions stressed the fact that significance of the u.s.-china relationship have gone far beyond the bilateral dimension. china and united states share broad common interests and show their important common
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responsibilities in addressing a variety of regional and global issues. my question is that how do you think that china and united states can step up their cooperation in the joint way to tackle the increasing number of global issues? [laughter] president obama: certainly the more that we can build a baseline of trust as you called it strategic mutual trust, the more likely we are able to solve the friction or irritants that exist in a relationship between any two countries in a more constructive way. [speaking in chinese]
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[speaking in chinese] president obama: which is why i think it's so important that not only governments, but people in both countries understand the challenges that each country faces. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] view every issue through the lens of rivalry. [speaking in chinese] president obama: for example, i know that in china, many believe that somehow the united states is interested in containing china's rights. [speaking in chinese]
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president obama: as i indicated in the answer that i gave a previous questioner, we welcome china's rights. we just want to make sure that that rise is done -- that that rise occurs in a way that reenforces international norms and international rules and, you know, enhances security and peace as opposed to it being a source of conflict either in the region or around the world. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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president obama: and these security and economic dialogues that we've established are precisely designed tolessen sus -- lessen suspicions, encourage understandings. the more we can understand each other's challenges, thetage of opportunities. [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] pe chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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[speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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[speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese] [speaking in chinese]
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>> translator: as the journalist who raised that question said, in today's world, mankind faces more and more global challenges, and i'd like to express here that no country can remain unschaved in the face of global challenges, and no countrysing-handedly tackle global challenges. for example, in the fights terrorism, uploading the security of humanity, or in tackling the international financial crisis promoting the growth of the world economy in addressing regional hot spots fighting transnational crimes, fighting piracy, and treating and preventing curable diseases, in all these areas countries need to work together to meet the challenge. china is the biggest developing
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country and the united states, biggest developed country. in this context, it is necessary for china and the united states to strengthen their cooperation to meet such challenges, then hue can chie -- how can china and the u.s. do a better job in working together to meet global challenges? i think there's three points i'd like to make, and these three points deserve our serious attention and continuation. number one, that our two sides have acted in the spirit of cooperation as if we were in the same boat that we should row in the same direction. when w previous international challenges, and i think we need to keep up the spirit in future as we tackle challenges. number two, we need to increase our communication and coordination, and number three, we need to respect and
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accommodate each other's interests and concerns. i'm convinced that as long as our two sides continue to act in this spirit and as long as we continue to work together with other countries concerned, we will be able to engage
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