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tv   C-SPAN Weekend  CSPAN  November 8, 2009 1:00pm-6:00pm EST

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the house had its say and passed a health care reform bill, but the debate's not over yet. our i-reporters are weighing in on whether this is a good or bad thing for the country. army investigators ask troops and civilians for help in its investigation of the deadly shooting at ft. hood. why they think some people caught in the rampage may have valuable evidence. and if you missed services at your church today, well now you have an option to attend from home. all you need is a computer. hln "news and views." hello. i'm holly firfer. the first battle of health care reform is over and it's a vikt fi for president obama's top domestic priority.
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the house of representatives has approved a health care reform plan but it was a close call. the measure passed with only two votes to spare, and one of them came from a republican. the fight over health care reform now moved to the senate. so, what's in the health care bill that the house passed? well, perhaps the most controversial part of the bill that it does contain the so-called public option. the government would sell insurance to those who can't find it elsewhere. the congressional budget office predicts those premiums would be more expensive than insurance from private companies, but many people would be eligible for government subsidies to help pay for that coverage. other provisions of the bill would ban insurers from denying coverage to people just because of pre-existing conditions. the house bill also contains strict bans on using federal money to pay for abortions. congressman john dingle, a longtime proponent of national health insurance, projects that the bill will extend health care coverage to 96% of americans. this morning, supporters and
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opponents of the house health care bill hit the sunday morning talk shows. the narrow vote in the house is indicative of even tougher fights looming in the senate. now, appearing on cbs's "face the nation," senator jack reid of rhode island said it would take time, but he predicted an overhaul would pass the senate. >> i believe we're going to pass health care reform. i believe we must do this because it's sennial to not just the quality of life here but our economic success in the future. senator reed, harry reid, has introduced a public option, there's strong support there, but we are far from the end of the debate in the senate. it will take time. it will be careful, thorough, and deliberate. i hope that a public option is part of the final bill. >> republicans in the senate are hoping to defeat any bill like the one passed by the house, which contains a public option. now, right now, some d moderate death democrats have expressed some reservations as well. also appearing on "face the
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nation" this morning, as well, was gop senator lindsey graham of south carolina. graham said he thinks the government option would destroy private health care and that the house bill passed late last night is doa. >> the house bill is dead on arrival in the senate. just look at how it passed, 220-215. it passed by two votes. you had 39 democrats vote against the bill. they come from red states, moderate democrats from swing districts. they bailed out on this bill. it was a bill written by liberals for liberal, and people like joe lieberman is r not going to get anywhere near the house bill. it costs medicare about $500 billion. it's over a trillion dollars in new spending. it does have the public option so, the house bill is a nonstarter in the senate. >> several i-reporters are sending us video responses to last night's passage of health care bill in the house. some are worried it could have devastating consequences, while others say it's about time the u.s. caught up with other countries that offer universal
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health care. >> i am here in panama, and i the tell you, my father is going to be having surgery on monday. panama, a third-world country, has more resources for every single citizen, whether employed or not. they're guaranteed health care. >> if you gave man a fish, you will feed him for a day. if you teach a man to fish, you will feed him for a lifetime. i think the government's handing out a lot of fish here. this bill costs more than obama wanted it to. this will add to the deficit like obama said it wouldn't, you know? and i think the consequences that come from this bill will be devastating to the middle class of the united states and make everyone poorer for it because sooner or later you're going to
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run out of fish. >> thanks to egberto and garrett for those i-reports. head to ireport.com to weigh in. click the upload now link and you'll have easy instructions there. the army says it needs help from troops and civilians as they investigate the mass shootings at ft. hood. investigators say they're looking for help from anyone who may have left the scene with evidence, specifically if they have vehicles that may have gunshot damage or clothing with gunshot residue on it. 42 people were injured in that shooting at the army post in texas on thursday. an army official says 17 of them and the suspected gunman are still hospitalized. >> all evidence at this point indicates the suspect allegedly acted alone in the actual shootings at the readiness center on 5 november. we have seen no evidence whatsoever to date of any friendly fire occurrences during
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the gunfight between ft. hood law enforcement and the alleged suspect. >> major nidal malik hasan is not on a ventilator anymore, but he is still in intensive care. there are plans for two memorial services honoring the ft. hood victims. one is scheduled for this evening at 6:00. on tuesday, president and mrs. obama will travel to ft. hood and take part in a memorial service on the post. police in cleveland have identified three more of the ten bodies found in the home of a registered sex offender. anthony sowell served 15 years in prison after pleading guilty to attempted rape in 1989. he was arrested two days after police discovered the first b y bodies in his home last week. authorities now have identified seven victims found in or near sowell's home. the skull of an 11th victim was also found. her father and son were
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diagnosed with brain disorders. but holly robinson peete didn't back away. hln's robin meade has more on this breakthrough woman. >> reporter: you might recognize her from "21 jump street," but holly robinson peete's most important role came when her oldest son was diagnosed with autism ten years ago. >> i had no idea what information was. i had no information and very few examples of hope. >> reporter: she learned everything she could and is encouraging other people to learn more about it as well. >> please keep up the good work in advocating for families, for yourself. you're your child's best advocate. >> she has a heart for the underserved and the undertreated. you just don't encount they're much, and that's what's really inspired me about holly. >> reporter: another close to her heart is parkinson's disease. she founded the holly rod foundation with her husband.
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>> occupational speech therapies, get them connected with the newest procedures. service is the rent we pay for living, and i feel like it's not what you have and what you give back, it's how you give back.
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it'll be a tough day tomorrow for commuters in philadelphia. talks aimed at ending a transit strike broke down last night. bus and trolley operators walked off the job last tuesday. the union is demanding an independent audit to make sure pension funds are secure. governor ed rendell is negotiating these talks. he urged union members to vote on a contract proposal. no new talks are scheduled. passengers on one delta plane found their flight was over before it even began in atlanta yesterday. smoke started spewing from an engine while the plane was on
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the taxiway. no one was hurt as the passengers evacuated that plane. the engine fire is under investigation. a late-season hurricane has prompted a watch all along the gulf coast from grand isle, louisiana, to the mississippi/alabama border. right now ida is about 70 miles northeast of cozumel, mexico. it's forecast to skirt the yucatan peninsula and then move through the gulf coast over the next couple days before finally making landfall somewhere between mississippi and alabama. but forecasters expect its winds, which are peaking now at about 90 miles an hour, to weaken by that point. families of those killed on flight 93 were on hand for yesterday's groundbreaking for a permanent national memorial. it'll honor the crew and the passengers who died in the september 11th crash in pennsylvania. one mom who lost her daughter said it was a joyful day. >> i was thinking of my daughter, deora, who was the passenger on flight 93, and, you
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know, what she would think of about today. and she would be very happy and proud that people will have a permanent memorial to come to and remember her and her fellow passengers. >> organizers say they will push to make sure the memorial is completed by september 11th, 2011. now, that's the tenth anniversary of the terrorist attacks. tomorrow the supreme court will start hearing lawyers' arguments on whether underaged kids should get long prison sentences for certain crimes. the case stems from the sentences of two men, joe sullivan sentenced to life in prison for raping an elderly woman. he was 13 years old at the time of that attack. and terence graham was convicted for his part in armed robberies that took place when he was 16 and 17 years old. he was also sentenced to life in prison. lawyers will argue that giving juveniles life sentences amounts
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to cruel and unusual punishment. someone paid nearly $54,000 for the hat worn by the man who shot lee harvey oswald. jack ruby's fedora was just one of the items on the auction block yesterday in dallas. all of the items were linked to president john f. kennedy's assassination. the auction came just weeks before the 46th anniversary of that event. a newspaper signed by kennedy for a maid the morning of his assassination sold for about $39,000. and get this -- it was worth about a nickel before his death in 1963. is there anything that isn't being shared on the internet? well, we're going to tell you about some personal online events ranging from the beginning of life to the search for higher meaning. >> everybody online right now, i got a question for you. >> oh, yeah. we've got some questions, too, about churches in cyber space. hear what a pastor says about communing with a computer.
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muslims in and out of the military were quick to condemn the alleged actions of major nidal malik hasan, the suspect in the shooting at ft. hood. some pointed out the attack goes directly against the teachings of islam. and today the army chief of staff weighed in on the subject. he told john king on our sister network, cnn, that it's important for the country not to get caught up in speculation about hasan's muslim faith. >> you know, there's a lot of speculation going on, and probably the curiosity is a good thing. but we have to be careful because we can't jump to conclusions now based on little snippets of information that
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come out. and frankly, i am worried -- not worried but i'm concerned that this increased speculation could cause a backlash against some of our muslim soldiers. and i've asked our army leaders to be on the lookout for that. it would be a shame. as great a tragedy as this was, it would be a shame if our diversity became a casualty as well. >> and casey added that diversity in the military, quote, gives us strength. the first police officer who confronted the suspect after the shooting just had another surgery. a military spokesman says sergeant kimberly munley is in good condition after the surgery last night. she was wounded during the shoot-out, but that's not believed to be life-threatening. her supervisor initially said she brought the gunman down. but now we've learned another officer also fired at him and may have been the one who finally stopped that rampage. the army is still investigating the details of the shooting. millions of christians go to church every week, and some are
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doing it without ever leaving home. jennifer westhoven introduces us to churches in cyber space. >> thanks, holly. it seems you can do almost anything online these days. what about using your computer to meet with your higher power? a lot more people are doing it. we have a lot more people revisiting the whole concept of what church means and how do age-old rituals like baptism and communion, you who do they work in the virtual world? we wanted to ask these questions. we're going to talk to the pastor of lifechurch.tv to get some insight. craig rochelle, thanks for joining us. let's say it's sunday morning. when i imagine church, i see those high ceilings, people are singing, everyone together is kind of aspiring for something else. how do you create that in front of the computer?
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>> we tried to answer some of those questions a few years ago when we started, and we were blown away at how people could actually worship along and have genuine community and connect in a very spiritual and very real way with an online church. >> and what about the sacraments, which, you know, for some people i think they've got a definite, this is how it should go. do you do those online? how does that work? >> that was something we had to to try to explore what would be the best options. what 'actually do, we'll invite people, if we're going to celebrate communion, to find some juice and some cracker, and we'll actually pray and invite them to participate in receiving the lord's supper. interestingly, with people all over the world. >> what do you think as a pastor? what do you want people to get from one of your services online? what do they walk away from the computer with? >> for one thing, we've got people that may be exploring christianity and this is a good option for them that may not
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step foot in a physical church building. and so we would like to clearly communicate the truth of the bible in a way that people would understand. and that's the top priority for us. beyond that, we find that people can really -- they can worship. they'll often gather around with -- maybe a family has a sick child and so the whole family will gather around the computer and they'll sing and they'll worship together, or someone's traveling, they can stay connected to their church that way. they can invite a friend who might not come to church otherwise, say there's no way i'm going to go to a physical church building out of some kind of fear. and so it's a tool to help -- instead of trying to get people to come to a church, we feel like we can take a church to them. >> well, thank you so much for telling us all about what it's like to go to church online. thanks. >> there you have it. absolutely no excuses. and here's something you don't see on the internet every
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day. the intimate moment of childbirth live. >> here you go. hi. >> hi. >> happy birthday. >> a minnesota couple decided to share the birth of their baby online. they welcomed their six-pound, eight-ounce girl yesterday on a social networking site called momslikeme.com. this site tracked new mom lipd say's experience from day one, following around for her checkups and all the way through her eight-hour labor and delivery. the former teacher looked at the experience as an educational tool and a way to create a lasting memento for her baby girl. 20 years ago tomorrow, this scene kept people around the world riveted to their televisions as an entire way of life changed almost overnight and millions of people suddenly tasted real freedom for the first time. how germany is marking the fall of the berlin wall.
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@@@@@@@ they said it would never last.
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but it's been two months, and you're still going strong. glade lasting impressions. two fragrances alternate to keep things... fresh and exciting day after day.
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- and not just for 30 days. - ( inhales deeply, sighs ) but for 60. it's the longest-lasting plugins ever. get freshness that won't fade away for 60 days. ahhh! with plugins lasting impressions. and yes, it's glade. s.c. johnson, a family company. the house had its say and passed a health care reform bill, but the debate's not over yet. our i-reporters are weighing in on whether this is a good or bad thing for the country. army investigators asked troops and civilians for help in its investigation of the deadly shooting at ft. hood. why they think some people caught in the rampage may have valuable evidence. and if you missed services at your church today, well now you have an option to attend from home. all you need is a computer. hln "news and views." hello. i'm holly firfer.
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the first battle of health care reform is over and it's a victory for president obama's top domestic priority. the house of representatives has approved a health care reform plan but it was a close call. the measure passed with only two votes to spare, and one of them came from a republican. the fight over health care reform now moves to the senate. so, what's in the health care bill that the house passed? well, perhaps the most controversial part of the bill that it does contain the so-called public option. the government would sell insurance to those who can't find it elsewhere. the congressional budget office predicts those premiums would be more expensive than insurance from private companies, but many people would be eligible for government subsidies to help pay for that coverage. other provisions of the bill would ban insurers from denying coverage to people just because of pre-existing conditions. the house bill also contains strict bans on using federal money to pay for abortions. congressman john dingle, a longtime proponent of national health insurance, projects that the bill will extend health care coverage to 96% of americans.
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this morning, supporters and opponents of the house health care bill hit the sunday morning talk shows. the narrow vote in the house is indicative of even tougher fights looming in the senate. now, appearing on cbs's "face the nation," senator jack reed of rhode island said it would take time, but he predicted an overhaul would pass the senate. >> i believe we're going to pass health care reform. i believe we must do this because it's essential to not just the quality of life here but our economic success in the future. senator reid, harry reid, has introduced a public option, there's strong support there, but we are far from the end of the debate in the senate. it will take time. it will be careful, thorough, and deliberate. i hope that a public option is part of the final bill. >> republicans in the senate are hoping to defeat any bill like the one passed by the house, which contains a public option. now, right now, some moderate democrats have expressed some reservations as well. also appearing on "face the
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nation" this morning, as well, was gop senator lindsey graham of south carolina. now, graham said he thinks the government option would destroy private health care and that the house bill passed late last night is doa. >> the house bill is dead on arrival in the senate. just look at how it passed, it passed 220-215. it passed by two votes. you had 39 democrats vote against the bill. they come from red states, moderate democrats from swing districts. they bailed out on this bill. it was a bill written by liberals for liberals, and people like joe lieberman are not going to get anywhere near the house bill. it costs medicare about $500 billion. it's over a trillion dollars in new spending. it does have the public option so the house bill is a nonstarter in the senate. >> several i-reporters are sending us video responses to last night's passage of health care bill in the house. some are worried it could have devastating consequences, while others say it's about time the u.s. caught up with other countries that offer universal health care.
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>> i am here in panama, and i the tell you, my father is going to be having surgery on monday. panama, a third-world country, has more resources for every single citizen, whether employed or not. they're guaranteed health care. >> if you give man a fish, you will feed him for a day. if you teach a man to fish, you will feed him for a lifetime. i think the government's handing out a lot of fish here. this bill costs more than obama wanted it to. this will add to the deficit like obama said it wouldn't, you know? and i think the consequences that come from this bill will be devastating to the middle class of the united states and make everyone poorer for it because sooner or later you're going to
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run out of fish. >> thanks to egberto and garrett for those videos. you can head to ireport.com if you want to weigh in on the health care bill or whatever you have images of breaking news. click the "upload now" link and you'll have easy instructions there. the army says it needs help from troops and civilians as they investigate the mass shootings at ft. hood. investigators say they're looking for help from anyone who may have left the scene with evidence, specifically if they have vehicles that may have gunshot damage or clothing with gunshot residue on it. 42 people were injured in that shooting at the army post in texas on thursday. an army official says 17 of them and the suspected gunman are still hospitalized. >> all evidence at this point indicates the suspect allegedly acted alone in the actual shootings at the readiness center on 5 november. we have seen no evidence whatsoever to date of any friendly fire occurrences during
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the gunfight between ft. hood law enforcement and the alleged suspect. >> major nidal malik hasan is not on a ventilator anymore, but he is still in intensive care. there are plans for two formal memorial services honoring the ft. hood victims. one is scheduled for this evening at 6:00. texas governor rick perry is scheduled to attend the ceremony at a killeen church. on tuesday, president and mrs. obama will travel to ft. hood and take part in a memorial service on the post. police in cleveland have identified three more of the ten bodies found in the home of a registered sex offender. anthony sowell served 15 years in prison after pleading guilty to attempted rape in 1989. he was arrested two days after police discovered the first bodies in his home last week. authorities now have identified seven victims found in or near sowell's home. the skull of an 11th victim was also found.
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what do matt dillon and jay leno have in common? they've probably been on "the tonight show" together, but did you know this -- they were born in the same town. a slightly less famous resident takes us on a tour in "my city, my secret." >> hi. i'm debbie. new rochelle, new york, is is my city. it's known as the queen city of the sound, and i'm going to show you some of the secret spots around new rochelle, which, by the way, is about 30 minutes from new york city. glen island is a place i've been walking at for about 20 years. i haven't lost a pound. but i'll be back tomorrow anyway. why? because it's about 104 acres of sheer gor jousz nature. i'm a girl who likes to eat so, one of my favorite restaurants is post o 22. sometimes restaurateurs nail it. joe just knows how to do it right. the ambience just feels good in
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here. the food is unbelievable. you get more food for the money than any place i've ever been. we're on the grounds of the college of new rochelle, and this is leeland castle, and the castle gallery is where we're going next. an entrepreneur named cindy leeland built the building and used this gigantic castle for his summer residence. today it's filled with art for the public. i've shown you my city. show me yours.
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the first police officer who confronted the suspect just after the shooting just had another shooting. a military spokesman says
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sergeant kimberly munley is in good condition after the surgery last night. she was wounded during the shoot-out, but that's not believed to be life-threatening. her supervisor initially said she brought the gunman down. but now we've learned another officer also fired at him and may have been the one who finally stopped that rampage. the army is still investigating the details of the shooting. millions of christians go to church every week, and some are doing it without ever leaving home. jennifer westhoven introduces us to churches in cyber space. >> thanks, holly. it seems like you can do almost anything online these days. what about using your computer to meet with a higher power? you can go to church right on your computer. a lot more people are doing it. we have a lot more people revisiting the whole concept of what church means and how do age-old rituals like baptism and communion, which are often physical, how do they work in the virtual world? we wanted to ask these questions. we're going to talk to the pastor of lifechurch.tv to get some insight.
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craig groeschle, thanks for joining us. i know you're on the phone. let's say it's sunday morning. when i imagine church, i see those high ceilings, people are singing, everyone together is kind of aspiring for something else. how do you create that in front of the computer? >> yeah. we asked those same questions a few years ago when we tried to start it. and we were blown away at how people could actually worship along and have genuine community and connect in a very spiritual and very real way with an online church. >> and what about the sacraments, which, you know, for some people i think they've got a definite "this is how it should go"? do you do those online? how does that work? >> that was something we had to to try to explore what would be the best options. what we'll actually do, we'll invite people, if we're going to
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celebrate communion, to find some juice and some crackers, and we'll actually pray and invite them to participate in receiving the lord's supper, interestingly, with people all over the world. >> what do you think -- as a pastor, what do you want people to get from one of your services online? what do they walk away from the computer with? >> for one thing, we've got people that may be exploring christianity and this is a good option for them that may not step foot in a physical church building. and so we would like to clearly communicate the truth of the bible in a way that people would understand. and that's the top priority for us. beyond that, we find that people can really -- they can worship. they'll often gather around with -- maybe a family has a sick child, and so the whole family will gather around the computer and they'll sing and they'll worship together, or someone's traveling, they can stay connected to their church that way. they can invite a friend who might not come to church otherwise, say there's no way i'm going to go to a physical church building out of some kind of fear.
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and so it's a tool to help -- instead of trying to get people to come to a church, we feel like we can take a church to them. >> well, thank you so much for telling us all about what it's like to go to church online. thanks. senior pastor of lifechurch.tv. holly, back to you. >> there you have it. absolutely no excuses. and here's something you don't see on the internet every day -- the intimate moment of childbirth live. >> here you go. hi. >> hi. >> happy birthday. >> a minnesota couple decided to share the birth of their baby online. they welcomed their six-pound, eight-ounce girl yesterday on a social networking site called momslikeme.com. this site tracked new mom lindsay's experience from day one, following around for her checkups and all the way through her eight-hour labor and delivery.
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the former teacher looked at the experience as an educational tool and a way to create a lasting memento for her baby girl. efforts to end a strike in philadelphia have jumped the tracks. what derailed the negotiations.
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it'll be a tough day tomorrow for commuters in philadelphia. talks aimed at ending a transit strike broke down last night. bus drivers and subway and trolley operators walked off the job last tuesday. the union is demanding an independent audit to make sure pension funds are secure. governor ed rendell has been negotiating these talks. he had urged union members to vote on a contract proposal. no new talks are scheduled. passengers on one delta plane found their flight was over before it even began in atlanta yesterday. smoke started spewing from an engine while the plane was on the taxiway. no one was hurt as the passengers evacuated that plane. the engine fire is under investigation. families of those killed on flight 93 were on hand for yesterday's groundbreaking for a permanent national memorial. it'll honor the crew and the passengers who died in the
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september 11th crash in pennsylvania. one mom who lost her daughter said it was a joyful day. >> i was thinking of my daughter, deora, who was the passenger on flight 93, and, you know, what she would think of about today. and she would be very happy and proud that people will have a permanent memorial to come to and remember her and her fellow passengers. >> organizers say they will push to make sure the memorial is completed by september 11th, 2011. now, that's the tenth anniversary of the terrorist attacks. tomorrow the supreme court will start hearing lawyers' arguments on whether underaged kids should get long prison sentences for certain crimes. the case stems from the sentences of two men, joe sullivan sentenced to life in prison for raping an elderly woman. he was 13 years old at the time of that attack. and terence graham was convicted for his part in armed robberies
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that took place when he was 16 and 17 years old. he was also sentenced to life in prison. lawyers will argue that giving juveniles life sentences amounts to cruel and unusual punishment. ♪ o christmas tree your branches green ♪ can the capitol hill christmas tree has begun its long journey to washington. the tree is an 85-foot-tall blew spruce harvested yesterday in the mountains of northeastern arizona. the 7,000-pound tree is now on a statewide tour of arizona and will arrive in washington on november 30th. the tradition of having states provide a capitol christmas tree started nearly 40 years ago. this is the first year the tree has come from arizona. a lot of businesses hope going green will put them back on the road to success, but one
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company found that just being organic by itself really isn't enough. mary snow looks at how they made their turnaround. >> reporter: it's become a place where hollywood hairstylists turn to where hollywood hairstylist turn to for beauty products. the rise to fame was far less glam glamorous. the start was near disastrous. they founded the company in 2001. >> would you put that on your salad? why put it on your skin or hair? >> reporter: it strives to use plant based products whenever possible. there was a big challenge. >> i had to sell my house, my car. it got to that point where every dollar we could make went back in. >> 2004 i said we are not going to recover unless something dramatic happens. let's step back and take a look at where we are. that's when the boys stepped up.
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>> step up they did. their sons jeremiah, gino and cory decided to take over the business. >> they had taken a beaten down horse and turned it back up into a racehorse. >> it was nerve-racking at the very beginning not knowing where our source of money was going to come from. >> reporter: the boys partnered with a smaller local manufacturing company who gave them discounts on raw materials and focused on the internet to drive sales and they went beyond hairstyling products and introduced accessories like lip balm and candles. >> we went from salon to salon telling our story and building our business that way. >> reporter: the result is a growing fan base. >> i was so excited because it was a product line that i actually believed in but then also gave me results. >> reporter: it also pumped up the bottom line. when the boys took over, sales were less than $100,000. this year the company is on track to make close to $4
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million. the future looks just as promising. >> i see this as being something that i'll pass down to my kids some day and really truly building an amazing family business. >> mary snow, cnn, new york.  they said it would never last.
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but it's been two months, and you're still going strong. glade lasting impressions. two fragrances alternate to keep things... fresh and exciting day after day. - and not just for 30 days. - ( inhales deeply, sighs ) but for 60. it's the longest-lasting plugins ever. get freshness that won't fade away for 60 days.
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ahhh! with plugins lasting impressions. and yes, it's glade. s.c. johnson, a family company. the house had its say and passed a health care reform bill but the debate is not over yet. our i-reporters are weighing in on whether this is a good or bad thing for the country. army investigators ask troops and civilians for help in its investigation of the deadly shooting at ft. hood. why they think some people caught in the rampage may have valuable evidence. if you missed services at your church today, now you have an option to attend from home. all you need is a computer. hln "news and views." hello. the first battle for health care reform is over and it's a victory for president obama's top domestic priority.
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the house of representatives has approved a health care reform plan but it was a close call. the measure passed with only two votes to spare and one of them came from the republican. the fight over health care reform moves to the senate. so what's in the health care bill that the house passed? perhaps the most controversial part of the bill is that it does contain the so-called public option. the government would sell insurance to those who can't find it elsewhere. the congressional budget office predicts those premiums would be more expensive than insurance from private companies but many people would be eligible for government subsidies to help pay for that coverage. other provisions of the bill would ban insurers from denying coverage to people because of pre-existing conditions. the house bill also contains strict bans on using federal money to pay for abortions. a congressman projected the bill will extend health care coverage to 96% of americans. this morning supporters and
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opponents of the house health care bill hit the sunday morning talk shows. the narrow vote in the house is indicative of even tougher fights looming in the senate. now, appearing on cbs's "face the nation" senator jack reid of rhode island said it would take time but predicted an overhaul would pass the senate. >> i believe we'll pass health care reform. i believe we must do this because it's essential to not just the quality of life but our economic success in the future. senator harry reid spintroduced public option and there's strong support there but we're far from the end of the debate in the senate. it will take time. it will be careful, thorough and deliberate. i hope that a public option is part of the final bill. >> republicans in the senate are hoping to defeat any bill like the one passed by the house which contains a public option. now, right now some moderate democrats have expressed reservationss well. also appearing on "face the
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nation" this morning was gop senator lindsey graham of south carolina. graham said he thinks the government option will destroy private health care and that the house bill passed late last night is doa. >> the house bill is dead on arrival in the senate. look at how it passed. 220 to 215. it passed by two votes. you have 39 democrats vote against the bill. they come from red states, moderate democrats from swing districts. they bailed out on this bill. it was a bill by liberals for liberals and people like joe lieberman won't get near the house bill. over a trillion dollars in new spending has the public option so the house bill is a nonstarter in the senate. >> video responses to last night's passage of the health care bill in the house. some fear it could have devastating consequences others say it's about time they catch
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up with other countries that offer universal health care. >> i'm here in panama and i tell you that my father is going to be having surgery on monday. panama, a third world country, has more resources for every single citizen whether employed or not. they're guaranteed health care. >> give a man a fish, you will feed him for a day. if you teach a man to fish, you will feed him for a lifetime. i think the government is handing out a lot of fish here. this bill cost more than obama wanted it to. this will add to the deficit like obama said it wouldn't. you know, i think the consequences that come from this bill will be devastating to the meddle class of the united states and make everyone poorer for it because sooner or later
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you'll run out of fish. >> thanks to our i-reporters for those videos. you can head to ireport.com to weigh in on the health care bill or other news. click on upload now and you'll have instructions there. the army says it needs help from troops and civilians as they investigate the mass shootings at ft. hood. investigators say they're looking for help from anyone who may have left the scene with evidence specifically if they have vehicles that may have gunshot damage or clothing with gunshot residue on it. 42 people were injured in that shooting at the army post in texas on thursday. an army official says 17 of them and the suspected gunmen are still hospitalized. all evidence at this point indicates that the suspect allegedly acted alone in the actual shootings at the rea readiness shootings on five
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november. we have seen no incidents of friendly fire shootings during the gun fight. >> nidal malik hasan is not an a ventilator anymore but is still in intensive care. plans for two formal memorial services honoring the ft. hood victims. one scheduled for this evening at 6:00 eastern. texas governor rick perry is scheduled to attend the ceremony at a killeen church. on tuesday president and mrs. obama will travel to ft. hood and take part in a memorial service on the post. police in cleveland have identified three more of the ten bodies found in the home of a registered sex offender. anthony sowell served 5 e15 yen prison after pleading guilty to rape in 1989. he was arrested two days after police discovered the first body in his home last week. police identified seven victims found in or near sowell's home. the skull of an 11th victim was also found.
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a special shelter in mexico is providing care for low income children who have cancer. it's giving them much more than just medical help. dr. sanjay gupta has today's vital signs. >> reporter: as the name translates a house of friendship to mexico's youngest cancer patients. this woman has volunteered here for over 15 years. it provides free housing and medical care to those with cancer. children and families are invited to stay free of charge for as long as they need treatment at nearby mexico city hospitals. shelter volunteers help the time go by at the hospital reading and playing with the children as they wait for their chemotherapy
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treatments but the home is involved in more than just facilitating the medical treatment for youngsters. bail life and a sense of normalcy is protected as much as possible. >> for more on this and other exciting advances in medicine, go to our website, cnn.com/vitalsigns.
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it will be a tough day tomorrow in philadelphia. talks aimed at ending a transit strike broke down last night. bus drivers and subway and trolley operators walked off the job last tuesday. the union is demanding an independent audit to make sure pension funds are secure. governor ed rendell has been negotiating these talks. he urged union members to vote on a contract proposal. no new talks are scheduled. passengers on one delta plan
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found their flight over before it began. smoke started spewing from an engine while the plane was on a taxiway. the engine fire is under investigation. no passengers were injured. take a look at what hit washington state. the season's first big snowstorm. this heavy snowfall shut down several highways and caused problems for drivers but not everyone was complaining. >> just moved here from texas. we don't get snow in texas at all and so we were planning on coming skiing and sledding and we just wanted to bring the kids out to play. >> rain is forecast in the area today and tomorrow. temperatures hovered just above freezing but more snow expected by veterans day. tomorrow the supreme court will hear lawyers arguments on whether underage kids should get long prison sentences for certain crimes. the case stems from the
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sentences of two men. joe sullivan was sentenced to life in prison for raping an d elderly woman. he was 13 years old at the time of the attack. lawyers will argue that giving juveniles life sentences amounts to cruel and unusual punishment. someone paid nearly $54,000 for the hat worn by the man who shot lee harvey oswald. it was one of the item on the auction block yesterday in dallas. all of the items were linked to john f. kennedy's assassination. it came just weeks before the 31st anniversary of that event. a newspaper signed the morning of that assassination, sold for $39,000. it was worth about a nickel before his death in 1963. is there anything that isn't
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being shared on the internet? we're going to tell you about some personal online events ranging from the beginning of life to the search for higher meaning. >> everybody, online right now, i got a question for you. >> we've got some questions, too. about churches in cyberspace. hear what a pastor says about comnuning with a computer.
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muslims in and out of the military were quick to be critical of the actions of nidal malik hasan. some worried about a backlash against muslims. others pointed out the attack goes directly against the teachings of islam and today the army chief of staff weighed in on the subject. he told john king on our sister network cnn that it is important for the country not to get caught up in speculation about hasan's muslim faith. >> there's been a lot of speculation going on and
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probably the curiousity is a good thing. we can't jump to conclusions based on snippets of information that come out. i'm concerned that this increased speculation could cause a backlash against some of our muslim soldiers and i asked our army leaders to be on the lookout for that. it would be a shame. as great a tragedy as this was, it would be a shame if our diversity became a casualty as well. >> diversity in the military gives us "strength." the first police officer who confronted the suspect after the shooting just had another surgery. a military spokesman says sergeant kimberly munley is in good condition after the surgery last night. she was wounded during the shootout but that's not believed to be life threatening. her supervisor initially said she brought the gunman down but now we learned another officer also fired at him and may have
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been the one who stopped that rampage. the army is investigating the details of the shooting. millions of christians go to church every week and some are doing it without ever leaving home. jennifer westhoven introduces us to churches in cyberspace. >> reporter: it seems like you can do almost anything online these days. what about using your computer to meet with a higher power? you can go to church right on your computer. a lot more people are doing it. it's got a lot of people revisiting the whole concept of what church means and how do rituals like baptism happen in the virtual world? we'll talk to a pastor to get insight. craig, thank you for joining us. i know you're on the phone. let's say it's sunday morning when i imagine church i see those high ceiling, people are
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singing, everyone together is kind of aspiring for something else. how do you create that in front of the computer? >> we asked the same questions a few years ago when we tried to start it and we were blown away at how people could actually worship alone and have genuine community and connect in a very spiritual and very real way with an online church. >> what about the sacraments for some people this is a definite how it should go. do you do those online? how does that work? >> that was something we had to try to explore what would be the best options and what we actually do is we invite people if we're going to celebrate commune, to go and find some juice and some crackers and we'll actually pray and then invite them to participate in receiving the lord's supper. with people all over the world. >> what do you think as a pastor, what do you want people
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to get from one of your services online? what do they walk away from the computer with? >> for one thing we have people that may be exploring christianity and this is a good option for them that may not step food in a physical church building and so we would like to clearly communicate the truth of the bible in a way that people understand. that's the top priority for us. beyond that we find that people can well worship and often gather around with maybe a family has a sick child and so the whole family will gather around the computer and they'll sing and worship together or someone is traveling and they will stay connected to the church that way. they'll invite a friend who may not come to church otherwise. there's no way i'm going to go to a physical church building after some hurt or some kind of fear and so it's a tool to help instead of trying to get people to come to a church, we feel like we can take a church to them.
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>> thank you so much for telling us what it's like to go to church online. holly, back to you. there you have it. absolutely no excuses. here's something you don't see on the internet every day. the intimate moment of child birth live. >> there you go. >> happy birthday. >> a minnesota couple decided to share the birth of their baby online. they welcomed their 6 pound 8 ounce girl yesterday on a social networking site called momslikeme.com that tracked lindsey's experience from day one following her around for her checkups and all of the way through her eight-hour labor and delivery. the former teacher looked at the experience as an educational tool and a way to create a lasting memento for her baby girl. ♪ oh, christmas tree
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♪ your branches green >> the capitol hill christmas tree has begun it's long journey to washington. the tree is an 85-foot tall blue spruce harvested yesterday from the mountains of northeastern arizona. the 7,000-pound tree is now on a statewide tour of arizona and will arrive in washington on november 30th. the tradition of having states provide a capitol christmas tree started 40 years ago. this is the first time the tree has come from arizona. 20 years ago tomorrow this scene kept people around the world watching television. millions of people tasted real freedom for the first time. how germany is marking the fall of the berlin wall. y8
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the house had its say and passed a health care reform bill but the debate is not over yet. our i-reporters are weighing in on whether this is good or bad for the country. investigators ask for help in the deadly shooting in ft. hood. why they think people caught in the rampage may have valuable evidence. if you miss services at your church today, now you have an option to attend from home. all you do is a computer. hln "news and views." hello. the first battle for health care reform is over and it's a victory for president obama's top domestic priority. the house of representatives has
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approved a health care reform plan but it was a close call. the measure passed with only two votes to spare and one of them came from the republican. the fight over health care reform moves to the senate. so what's in the health care bill that the house passed? perhaps the most controversial part of the bill is that it does contain the so-called public option. the government would sell insurance to those who can't find it elsewhere. the congressional budget office predicts those premiums would be more expensive than insurance from private companies but many people would be eligible for government subsidies to help pay for that coverage. other provisions of the bill would ban insurers from denying coverage to people because of pre-existing conditions. the house bill also contains strict bans on using federal money to pay for abortions. a congressman projected the bill will extend health care coverage to 96% of americans. this morning supporters and opponents of the house health
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care bill hit the sunday morning talk shows. the narrow vote in the house is indicative of even tougher fights looming in the senate. now, appearing on cbs's "face the nation" senator jack reid of rhode island said it would take time but predicted an overhaul would pass the senate. >> i believe we'll pass health care reform. i believe we must do this because it's essential to not just the quality of life but our economic success in the future. senator harry reid introduced a public option and there's strong support there but we're far from the end of the debate in the senate. it will take time. it will be careful, thorough and deliberate. i hope that a public option is part of the final bill. >> republicans in the senate are hoping to defeat any bill like the one passed by the house which contains a public option. now, right now some moderate democrats have expressed reservations as well. also appearing on "face the nation" this morning was gop senator lindsey graham of south carolina.
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graham said he thinks the government option will destroy private health care and that the house bill passed late last night is doa. >> the house bill is dead on arrival in the senate. look at how it passed. 220 to 215. it passed by two votes. you have 39 democrats vote against the bill. they come from red states, moderate democrats from swing districts. they bailed out on this bill. it was a bill by liberals for liberals and people like joe lieberman won't get near the house bill. over a trillion dollars in new spending has the public option so the house bill is a nonstarter in the senate. several i-reporters are sending us responses. some fear it could have devastating consequences others say it's about time they catch up with other countries that
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offer universal health care. >> i'm here in panama and i tell you that my father is going to be having surgery on monday. panama, a third world country, has more resources for every single citizen whether employed or not. they're guaranteed health care. >> give a man a fish, you will feed him for a day. if you teach a man to fish, you will feed him for a lifetime. i think the government is handing out a lot of fish here. this bill cost more than obama wanted it to. this will add to the deficit like obama said it wouldn't. you know, i think the consequences that come from this bill will be devastating to the middle class of the united states and make everyone poorer for it because sooner or later
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you'll run out of fish. >> thanks to our i-reporters for those videos. you can head to ireport.com to weigh in on the health care bill or when you have images of breaking news. click on upload now and you'll have instructions there. there are plans for two formal memorial services honoring the ft. hood victims. one is scheduled for this evening at 6:00 eastern. governor rick perry will attend a ceremony at a killeen church. on tuesday president and mrs. obama will travel to ft. hood and take part in a memorial service on the post. it's just around the corner. one of the busiest travel days. >> this year's thanksgiving day travel outlook is different than years past. you can expect that prices will be lower this year than last which is great news for consumers. >> in order to get a cheaper flight travel on an offday like thanksgiving day.
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>> you can sign up for things like faire alerts that will alet you when the price goes down. using price like alternate airport search can be effective in finding a lower fair. you can see airfares into several airports into the area you're visiting rather than just one. >> know how much to spend. >> about $300 around trip for domestic ticket. that's a price point to keep in mind when you're shopping. you see something in that price range particularly on the peak travel days, you're doing pretty well.
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a tough day tomorrow for computers in philadelphia. talks aimed at ending a transit strike broke down last night. bus drivers, subway operators and trolley drivers walked off
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the job on tuesday. governor ed rendell is negotiating the talks. no new talks are scheduled. passengers on one delta plane found their flight was over before it began in atlanta yesterday. smoke smatarted spewing from an engine yesterday. the engine fire is under investigation. take a look at what hit washington state. the season's first big snowstorm. this heavy snowfall shut down several highways and caused problems for drivers but not everyone was complaining. >> just moved here from texas. we don't get snow in texas at all and so we were planning on coming skiing and sledding and we just wanted to bring the kids out to play. >> rain is forecast in the area today and tomorrow. temperatures hovered just above freezing but more snow expected by veterans day.
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families of those killed on flight 93 were on hand for yesterday's ground breaking for a permanent national memorial. it will honor the crew and the passengers who died in the september 11th crash in pennsylvania. one mom who lost her daughter said it was a joyful day. >> i was thinking of my daughter who was the passenger on flight 93 and what she would think about today and she would be very happy and proud that people will have a permanent memorial to come to and remember her and her fellow passengers. >> organizers say they will push to make sure the memorial is completed by september 11th, 20 2011. that's the tenth anniversary of the terrorist attacks. tomorrow the supreme court will hear lawyers arguments on whether underage kids should get long prison sentences for certain crimes.
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the case stems from the sentences of two men. joe sullivan was sentenced to life in prison for raping an elderly woman. he was 13 years old at the time of the attack. terrence graham was convicted for his part in armed robberies that took place when he was 16 and 17 years old and also was sentenced to life in prison. lawyers will argue that giving juveniles life sentences amounts to cruel and unusual punishment. someone paid nearly $54,000 for the hat worn by the man who shot lee harvey oswald. it was one of the item on the auction block yesterday in dallas. all of the items were linked to john f. kennedy's assassination. the auction came just weeks before the 46th anniversary of that event. a newspaper signed the morning of that assassination, sold for $39,000. it was worth about a nickel before his death in 1963. is there anything that isn't
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being shared on the internet? we're going to tell you about some personal online events ranging from the beginning of life to the search for higher meaning. >> everybody, online right now, i got a question for you. >> we've got some questions, too. about churches in cyberspace. hear what a pastor says about communing with a computer. our beyond the surface report this sunday takes on a topics let's just say most of us probably want to avoid. we're talking bad breath. >> a big concern among patients obviously is bad breath. it's really the bacteria that causes in part of the bad breath. gum disease is the real culprit for really bad breath. you're smelling bacteria. perhaps a crown is loose. you do get that bad breath from just the bacteria under that crown. i have gotten many concerned parents ask me about my child's
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breath is awful. you see two big golf balls in the back of the throat, the tonsils harbor bacteria. a lot of these mouth washes are just alcohol minty and they try to mask it. hydrogen peroxide is a good mouth rinse. another good thing that people don't think about doing is brushing your tongue and getting any areas that may harbor bacteria.
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muslims in and out of the military were quick to condemn the actions of nidal malik hasan, the suspect in last week's shooting at ft. hood. some worried about a backlash against muslims. others pointed out the attack goes directly against the teachings of islam and today the army chief of staff weighed in on the subject. he told john king on our sister network cnn that it is important for the country not to get
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caught up in speculation about hasan's muslim faith. >> there's been a lot of speculation going on and probably the curiosity is a good thing. we have to be careful. we can't jump to conclusions based on snippets of information that come out. frankly i am worried -- not worried but concerned that this increased speculation could cause a backlash against some of our muslim soldiers and i asked our army leaders to be on the lookout for that. it would be a shame. as great a tragedy as this was, it would be a shame if our diversity became a casualty as well. >> diversity in the military gives us "strength." the first police officer who confronted the suspect after the shooting just had another surgery. a military spokesman says sergeant kimberly munley is in good condition after the surgery last night. she was wounded during the shootout but that's not believed to be life threatening.
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her supervisor initially said she brought the gunman down but now we learned another officer also fired at him and may have been the one who stopped that rampage. the army is investigating the details of the shooting. millions of christians go to church every week and some are doing it without ever leaving home. jennifer westhoven introduces us to churches in cyberspace. >> reporter: it seems like you can do almost anything online these days. what about using your computer to meet with a higher power? you can go to church right on your computer. a lot more people are doing it. it's got a lot of people revisiting the whole concept of what church means and how do rituals like baptism happen in the virtual world? we'll talk to a pastor to get insight. craig, thank you for joining us. i know you're on the phone. let's say it's sunday morning
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when i imagine church i see those high ceiling, people are singing, everyone together is kind of aspiring for something else. how do you create that in front of the computer? >> we asked the same questions a few years ago when we tried to start it and we were blown away at how people could actually worship alone and have genuine community and connect in a very spiritual and very real way with an online church. >> what about the sacraments for some people this is a definite how it should go. do you do those online? how does that work? >> that was something we had to try to explore what would be the best options and what we actually do is we invite people if we're going to celebrate
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communion, to go and find some juice and some crackers and we'll actually pray and then invite them to participate in receiving the lord's supper. with people all over the world. >> what do you think as a pastor, what do you want people to get from one of your services online? what do they walk away from the computer with? >> for one thing we have people that may be exploring christianity and this is a good option for them that may not step food in a physical church building and so we would like to clearly communicate the truth of the bible in a way that people understand. that's the top priority for us. beyond that we find that people >> caller: worship and often gather around with maybe a family has a sick child and so the whole family will gather around the computer and they'll sing and worship together or someone is traveling and they will stay connected to the church that way. they'll invite a friend who may not come to church otherwise. there's no way i'm going to go to a physical church building after some hurt or some kind of fear and so it's a tool to help instead of trying to get people
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to come to a church, we feel like we can take a church to them. >> thank you so much for telling us what it's like to go to church online. holly, back to you.revolution. however, step by step the shah brought himself closer to the united states, and once he entered america, we felt threatened. we. insulted. our revolution, our people. and so there was a rebellion and a measure was needed to be taken that was effective that could impact the world public opinion. we needed to do something that could simply effect the world public opinion. >> so let me ask you, john him bett limb -- john limbert, you heard the person who held you captive, his perspective, what were you thinking that day? >> that day wherever they thought they were doing, whether it was the 1970s-style student sit-in, the results of it were
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very different. they brought misery to the iranian people. >> but to yourself, to you and the hostages that day? >> to us, what happened to us was difficult, it was frightening, it was uncomfortable. but it lasted 14 months and was over. but what -- >> did you think it would last that long? >> of course not. we thought -- >> what did they say to you? >> we thought this was a 1970s-style student sit-in. >> as they say. >> as they have in retrospect presented it. >> uh-huh. >> what happened i don't think -- we certainly didn't expect it to last that long, they have said they didn't expect it to last that long. what they did in effect was create a climate of lawlessness and mob rule that they and their compatriots are today the greatest vicks. >> and gary sick, there you were
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in the white house with president carter trying to figure out what to do about this. what happened that day when this happened? >> well, the -- as you know, the time differences, 7.5 hours with iran. this was absolutely the middle of the night. so i was awakened. went in and not to the white house actually, i went to the state department where upon the seventh floor they set up a special room to follow the events. and that room remained in effect dedicated to the hostage issue for most of the rest of the time that they were being held. >> and what was going on through your mind? did you think they would be so long? >> well, we honestly believed as john said and as mr. ssgharzdeh said that they were going to make reparations with the shah and that then the hostages would be let loose. the people in the embassy had been taken in february and released shortly thereafter. that's what we expected. when it changed was when the son
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of the ayatollah khomeini came to the embassy, climbed the walls himself with his turbin falling off and pronounced himself in favor of what the students were doing. at that point it became a government process, not a student process. >> it took on a life of its own. >> it that way actually became an act of the iranian government rather than a group of students who were acting potentially outside the law. even if people liked what they were doing, they were acting on their own. after that moment, it was then a government process, and the whole rest of the hostage crisis revolved around trying to get the iranian government to take responsibility for its own actions and end the process, and john is absolutely correct that this, the fact that the iranian government was unwilling and unable to take action meant that the process has cast a shadow on u.s.-iran relations for the 30 years since that time. >> indeed. let me ask you, you since became a reformist member of
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parliament. i interviewed you in iran several years ago. where do you think the relationship between the united states and iran can
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>> this would eventually become iran's first female vice president, pushing for more democracy. but back in 1979, she was the voice of the revolution. >> these people are spies working in the united states embassy. >> we were not terrorists. we were not militia. we had no training, no military training. this was a student movement.
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a genuine student movement. but they knew that they had to take some sort of unconventional step. >> unprecedented in the history of global diplomacy. >> unprecedented. exactly. >> that unprecedented act was the takeover of the american embassy in the heart of tehran. the relationship between iran and the united states has never recovered. and that was from my documentary "god's worries," two years ago. with me to continue this discussion, john limbert, the former u.s. diplomat who was one of the hostages in tehran. and columbia university professor gary sitt, author of the blog on iran and president of jimmy carter's security council, and joining me again, ibrahim asgharzdeh, one of the mastermind of the hostagetaking. you saw one of the spokesmen for the students there. what was your reaction when you
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heard her now just personal? >> i never had the pleasure of meeting her until the end. i understand that her name is milufah and not masumeh. after the revolution people did make some changes. now whatever it is, what i -- what i'm hearing, christiane, is an awful lot of rationalization for an act that people know was -- was an ugly act. and a very -- and an act with very negative consequences for iran, for iranians. and as much as they rationi izl it, as much as they say we were young, we were this, we were that -- >> you wrote "negotiating with iran and the ghosts of the past." >> right. >> these are the ghosts of the past. can you get over them? >> of course. you need to call in the ghostbusters. and bring the ghostbusters in. you know, they put -- they put the ghost in the can and put the
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can and can away. and somehow you've got to do -- you've got to do that. you don't forget them. you don't necessarily even ask for an apology. but you look them in the face, you know them for what they are, which is a very ugly and negative act, and then you put them in their proper compartment. >> we've got some picture of you during 1981 when finally you came out of that situation and made the first stop in germany before coming back to the united states. i believe that's threw with the glasses on. >> yes. >> do you recognize yourself? >> a lot younger. >> and do you remember what was going through your mind then? >> very happy to be out. >> let me also play -- and i'll go to gary sitt after this my interview with my interview in 1998 in which addressed was the issue of what the hostagetaking had done to the american psyche. >> with regard to the hostage issue which you raised, i do
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know that the feelings of the great american people have been heard. and of course i regret it. >> so trying to put the ghost back into the can there, you are really on top of the iran/u.s. situation. what do you think now? can you get over this and all the current obstacles in the way to fulfill what president obama has said and that is a new engagement he wants with iran? >> i think we can. but you know, it is not a one-way street. basically, just as the hostage crisis had multiple dimensions and i'm willing to accept that a group of students could go in and take over the -- take over the embassy, but i'm also aware that the government intervened and became -- and became committed to that, which in fact has affected our relations. and then i was very much part of the negotiations that we -- that went on with iran after that, and the -- the hostage crisis
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was extended probably eight month beyond what it should have been. no matter how you look at it in terms of iran's interests or whatever what have you, they simply couldn't make up their mind. and it has left the impression that, one, iran couldn't be trusted, two, that when they negotiate they negotiate in bathbad fact, and three, that they are paying only attention to their internal circumstances and ignoring everybody else. that is a legacy that we live with, and even people who don't remember the hostage crisis at all still have that image of iran that was created in those days that has not gone away. and it's -- it's not enough just to say, well, that's over, we had different ideas at the time. let's forget about it, and go on. >> but yet you are also -- come to grips with it somehow. >> right. are you also amongst the group of people who believe that you actually do have to get over history and move forward. >> i agree completely, and i believe that very deeply. but i also believe that it's not going to be just the americans
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saying, gee, we respect iran, iran is going to have to quit saying -- i'm -- >> for america. >> right. >> let me ask you, mr. asgharzdeh, we have heard mr. sick and mr. limbert talk about it must be a two-way street to move forward. what is your opinion? can one move forward, and do you think there's any hope for a grand bargain to put this history aside and to actually restore relations? is it iran ready for that? >> i understand mr. limbert's feelings, especially i know that he went through hardships. but if we're to recount ugly events, i think it's far uglier to hate a passenger airline or hate iran's oil rigs or support saddam hussein to attack iran.
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i don't need to create a long list and bring everyone before a court. i do agree that it's a two-way street. iran-u.s. talks are no ordinary talks. it is a talk between two powers, each claimant on their interests in the region. nato has come as far as iran's security arena in the region, the united states knows that iran has a stable, stronghold both in afghanistan and in iraq and can have a defining role. on a long-term basis, if you want to be a regional power, you have to understand it doesn't happen in a vacuum. and iran understand that. iran's security cannot happen in a vacuum. iran must understand that international situation has changed the bipolar world and the cold war system has collapsed. and in any case the regional calculations have evolved. so iran must take itself out of the realm of threat, and that is
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its best diplomacy. i believe for the united states from the start with the emergence of mr. obama and the obama factor, it's something that it has to take advantage of. i think that the nobel peace prize to mr. obama is not so much about the past but about the future. allow america to look to the future. >> all right, mr. asgharzdeh, i appreciate that. and thank you for joining us from tehran on this anniversary. i want to ask you the final word. can one get over the notion of regime change, all the grievances that you both havar tim late tick lated -- have articulated, mr. asgharzdeh has articulated, can it be gotten over quickly? >> we've seen mr. asgharzdeh gone from being a radical student and somebody contrary to the
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>> the first police officer who confronted the suspect after the shooting just had another surgery. a military spokesman says sergeant kimberly munley is in good condition after the surgery last night, she was wounded during the shootout, but that's not believed to be life threatening. the shooter said she brought the
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gunman down. we've learned another officer fired at him and may have been the one who finally stopped the rampage. the army is still investigating the details of the shooting. millions of christians go to church every week, some are doing it without leaving home. jennifer westhoven introduces us to churches in cyberspace. thanks, holly, it seems like you can do almost anything on line these days. what about going to church right on your computer? a lot more people are doing it. we've got a lot of people revisiting the concept of what church means. and how do age-old rituals like baptism and communion that are often in vitro -- often physical work in the virtual. thank you for joining us on the phone. let's say it's sunday morning, when i imagine church i see those high ceilings, people are
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singing, everyone together is kind of aspiring for something else. how do you create that in front of the computer? >> yeah, we asked the same questions a few years ago when we tried to start it. and we were blown away at how people could actually worship along and have genuine community and connect in a very spiritual and very real way with an online church. >> and what about the sacraments which for some people i think they've got a definite this is how it should go. how do you -- do you do those on line? how does that work? >> that was something we had to try to explore what would be the best, the best options, and what we actual dee is we'll invite people if we're going to celebrate communion to go and find some juice and some crackers, and we'll actually pray and invite them to participate in receiving the lord's supper. interestingly with people all over the world. >> what do you think as a
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pastor, what do you want people to get from one of your services on line? what do they walk away from the computer with? >> yeah, for one thing, we've got people that may be exploring christianity, and this is a good option for them that may not step foot in a physical church building. and so we would like to clearly communicate the truth of the bible in a way that people would understand. and that's the top priority for us. beyond that, we find that people can really -- they can worship. they'll often gather with -- maybe a family has a sick child so the whole family will gather around the computer, and they'll sing and worship together. or if someone's traveling, they stay connected to the church that way. they can invite a friend who might not come to church otherwise, who said, you know, there's no way i'm going to a physical church building after some hurt or some kind of fear. and so it's a cool to help -- instead of trying to get people to come to a church we feel we can take a church to them.
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>> thank you very much for telling us what it's like to go to church on line. thanks, that's greg groeshel, senior pastor of life church tv. there you have it. >> absolutely no excuses. here's something you don't see on the internet every day, the intimate moments of childbirth live. >> there you go. hi. hi, baby. >> oh. >> happy birthday. >> a minnesota couple decided to share the birth of their baby on line. they welcomed the six pound, eight-ounce girl yesterday on the social networking site called momslikeme.com. it tracked new mom lindsay's experience from day one, following her for checkups and through her eight-hour labor and delivery. the former teacher looked at the experience as an educational tool. and a way to create a lasting memento for her baby girl.
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♪ a christmas tree your branches ♪ >> the capitol hill christmas tree has begun a long journey to washington. the industrial 8y aiay aial -- an 85-foot tall blue spruce. the tree is on a statewidetor of arizona and will arrive in washington on november 30. trat addition of having states provide a capitol christmas tree started nearly 40 years ago. this is the first year the tree has come from arizona. >> a special shelter in mexico is providing care for low-income children who have cancer. it's giving them much more than just medical help. dr. sanjay gupta has today's
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"vital signs." >> reporter: casea de la amistad as it translates is a home to mexico's young cancer patient. ese i casa has been here for 15 years providing shelter and care for children with cancer. most come from rural areas without cancer specialist. the children and their families are invited to stay at friendship house free of charge for as long as they need treatment at nearby city hospitals. shelter volunteers help the time go by reading and playing with the children as they wait for chemotherapy treatment. but the home is involved in more than just facilitating the medical treatment for youngsters. daily life and the sense of normalcy is protected as much as possible. >> for more on this and other exciting advances in medicine, go to our web site, cnn.com/vitalsigns. they said it would never last.
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but it's been two months, and you're still going strong. glade lasting impressions. two fragrances alternate to keep things... fresh and exciting day after day. - and not just for 30 days. - ( inhales deeply, sighs ) but for 60. it's the longest-lasting plugins ever.
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get freshness that won't fade away for 60 days. ahhh! with plugins lasting impressions. and yes, it's glade. s.c. johnson, a family company. hello, this is a special edition of "your bottom line: protecting your privacy." your credit card spending habits scrutinized. could your spending limit be cut because of where you shop? and who's watching you? we'll take a peek inside your background files and the big business of privacy data brokers. and what in the world is a fusion center? answers to all those questions and more. the show that saves you money starts right now. let's begin with your credit. indispensable when it comes to getting a home or loan or job. credit card issuers used to look just at your credit score to
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determine your risk. not anymore. times have prompted companies to scour your spending habits. if they don't like what they see the result could be a lower credit limit. >> how you doing? i'm kevin johnson -- >> kevin johnson is an entrepreneur, candidate for office. >> running for state representative. >> hi. >> and according to american express, a credit risk. coming home from his honeymoon last year, he was shocked to find amex had cut his credit limit from over $10,000 to just $3,800. >> i've done a very good job of being responsible and making sure that i pay my bills on time. >> even more surprising, one of the four reasons amex gave for the decision. >> i was shocked when i read it, didn't know that the companies could actually affect your creditworthiness based on other around you. >> with more than ten% of credit card customers defaulting on
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their debt, credit card issuers are trying to weed out the risky ones. how? by looking for changes in the way we shop. >> you're shopping from a middle or upper tier retail store and suddenly it shows a purchase at a dollar store. some form of downshifting, suddenly shopping at walmart. >> those red flags can lead to a deeper look at your behavior. >> and if you suddenly started exhibiting new consumer behavior and then you have made three or four purchase in a row at a local bar, that would raise some flags that maybe there's some impending financial crisis. >> for its part, amex says, "we don't look at and never have looked at where someone shops to make a line reduction. the primary factor is someone's overall debt level. and we also look at payment history with us, credit reports, and fico scores." banking industry sources say credit scores are still the most important tool in predicting consumer behavior. but those scores don't reflect
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sudden life changes, like joe biden loss or divorce. >> all they can do is look at the actual volumes and transactions that are coming in and see changes in that pattern. >> for kevin johnson, the experience has motivated him to get involved, and perhaps change the way banks work. >> no one should be penalized for the actions of others. >> okay. so kevin like many other this year, he's not alone when weather it comes to dealing with questionable credit card practices. what is your credit card company looking at and how can they best protect your bottom line? let's talk to our panel of expert. robert manning is nor of "credit card nation" and joins us in montreal. in washington, evan hendrix, editor and publisher of "privacy times." welcome to you both, evan, i'm going to start with you. how much info. are these companies looking at? >> well, the first problem is that we don't know. we know they're doing it. one of the ironies in trying to protect your privacy is the first thing is you need transparency so you do know exactly what they're looking at.
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we know about the american express case, and we know about another subprime credit card company that was lowering limit because people were going to marriage counselors and personal counselors and places to get their tires retread. i think we need a stronger policy so consumers know. >> right. robert, i want to turn to you now. i mean, millions of us have credit cards. we make hundreds of purchase every year. how come these companies, how can these companies possibly keep up? >> well, the ski that the companies -- the key is that the companies have been refining cognative analysis and data mining for a long time -- >> whoa. >> but the key issue is it was okay when they were satisfying our desires to take a summer cruise and they were going to tell us where we'd prefer to go and what kind of wine we wanted to have at dipper. the problem is that when charge-offs went from 5% to 10% the same executives that didn't anticipate the recession suddenly panicked for new tools to identify consumers in
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financial distress. and of course these tools are misapplied. they're very inaccurate. >> right. you were talking about merchant codes, where they put numbers on certain types of purchase. help me understand them. >> in other words, when you make a transaction, the consumer actually sees the statement at the end of the month of what you purchased. you don't understand that there's actually a code associated from the merchant you purchased it from. so if you want to a pawn shop and bought a necklace, you'd see a necklace as maybe the charge. you wouldn't identify that the merchant code was from a pawn shop which is crucial important in these data mining activities. >> so they're looking at a lot of information. they know exactly who we are, what we're doing. they know the information because you're using a credit card. evan, can you fight back? >> well, you should not be shy about communicating with your credit card company because most of us have a choice of credit cards, and there -- like robert said, they're in panic mode now anyway. and you can remind them that you're a good customer and you
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want ton what their policies are. by the way you need to lower my interest rate because it's too high. we're finding a company -- i know this denver, it's starting to do this on behalf of consumers, and they're having great success by asking for these sorts of pro-consumer actions. >> robert, evan, stick around.
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if you're like most of us you probably haven't given much thought to the data broker business, but employers rely on
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report from data brokers which track everything from past due loans to police records to determine whether their hiring decisions are sound. now it sounds simple, but as one georgia family found out, the information isn't always right. >> with all the good stuff -- >> a job offer with good benefits. a dream for this woman's husband that suddenly turned into a nightmare. >> he did the drug test and of course that was fine. and all we needed was the background check, and that was supposed to turn out fine. >> but his background check revealed two felony convictions. and like that the job offer was gone. she wants her identity hid tonigen to avoid further problems for her husband. >> we were in shock. >> in shock because the records belonged to another man with the same name and same birthday as her husband. >> how did they put these two together? you know, how could they miss this? >> the report came from choicepoint, one of the nation's largest commercial data brokers, part of a multimillion dollar
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industry that sells your personal information, obtained from public and private records to employers and law enforcement. privacy advocate lily coney says most people have no clue what in these data bases that can include incorrect or outdated information. >> say it was an arrest that was based on faulty information and it was resolved and there was no trial. no conviction. they still have that original arrest record that may be in the data base somewhere that is being passed along repeatedly to people outside of your knowledge. >> i think most of us don't know how exposed we are. >> senator patrick leahy has introduced legislation to make those data bases more accessible and more secure. >> i want to know what's in my record, and i want to know how to stop misinformation in my record. today people cannot do that with surety. >> for its part, choicepoint says that under the fair credit reporting act individuals may obtain copies of previously prepared report about them as well as public record information used for such
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reports and correct such information as appropriate. the company says those corrections typically take two weeks. time this woman says her husband didn't have. >> i called the department of justice and the fbi. >> and her congressman who was able to get choicepoint to quickly correct the mistake. her husband got the job, but she's still concerned. >> this will happen again. if my husband ever has to have a background check, if he ever changes jobs, that record is out there. >> so if you're trying to get that job, how can you be sure your record is accurate? joining us is lillie coney from the electric privacy information center. and with us again is evan hendrix. welcome back. good to see you. evan, i want to start with this. how often is this info. wrong? you see that story, you see the consternation going on with that family. how often do they just have stuff that's not right? >> right. we don't have the research to give us really strong numbers on that. but we know it has to be pretty
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bad because with credit reports which is much more standardized and much more advanced in the evolution, we have a 25% to 30% error rate. >> wow. >> with the background checks, the companies like choicepoint, they're not the only one, there's a bunch of them, they're like knuckle draggers. like in this case they'll produce a record based on a name and a date of birth match, and they won't go and see, well, gee, did they have the same social security number, did they live in the same state. i've been involved in five or six cases where the same thing has happened. people are pinned with felonies because background check companies are in such a hurty to sell the information that they can't do one more check to make sure they don't mess up somebody's life. >> that is amazing. lilley, it seems like it's in my best interest to goat the report and scan it for errors. is it easy? choicepoint says they make it available to consumers. >> it's important you understand you want to see the report that they may have shared with a business. evan is right, using only a
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bitterdate and a name -- birthdate and a name, you're going to pull up a lot of errors. there is an application process that choicepoint has established for its own records system where individuals can submit the additional information to the company, and it's more information than just your name and birthdate. actually social security number and current address. they even asked if you've had fallen into bankrupt or any contact with criminal just system which creates another opportunity for the company if it's not using proper policies regarding privacy. to take that information and add it into their records system. but it's important to see the information in order to begin the process of protecting yourself. >> evan, can you get this info. corrected? is it hard? >> well, you have a right to correct it. because of the work of the electronic privacy information center we know that choicepoint says some of the records are beyond the reach of the law. this is why a company that i'm working with called ivy watchdog
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and other like it are providing services to make it easy for people for a fee to get all these records together so they can review them before they go in for the employment application. >> eye-opening information. lillie coney and evan hendrix, thank you very much for joining us. coming up, you may not know what afusion center is but your information may be part of it.
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>> it's no secret that the government hold a lot of personal information on your personal life. in the wake of 9/11 fusion centers were set up to track terrorists bringing together information from local, state, and federal law enforcement. critics say the centers are really domestic surveillance agenci agencies, watching all of us even if we haven't violated the law. it was the morning of connecticut governor jodie rell's connecticut parade. >> i pulled out the camera and shot him -- >> moments later kim crieski was stopped by hartford police officers, arrested and jailed. >> i said, "what did i do?" they said, "you shouldn't have been making those threats." >> they were looking for him
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after state police were given a security bulletin with his face on it. officials wouldn't comment pending a civil lawsuit. court document reveal state police were alarmed by blog posts. "who's going to protest the inaugural ball with me?" and "no need to make nice." >> why do i have to be nice to a political figure simply because she won an election? >> police began digging for metro station, mining public and commercial data bases. they learned kryeski had been a green party director, had protested the gubernatorial debate, and had once been convicted for civil disobedience. he had no history of violence. law professor daniel sit ron said police are not supposed to gather information on citizens who aren't suspected of a crime. >> interested in someone because they are an advocate for a green party candidate and think they're suspicious because they want to get other people to protest someone's ideas but not because we think there's a true threat to their lives, i think that's just troubling. >> today law collects and shares
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more information than ever. and much of it goes on at state intelligence centers called fusion centers. fusion centers were started after 9/11 to help federal, state, and local law enforcement connect the dots and stop a terrorist attack. the department of homeland security says they are a critical tool in keeping the nation safe. >> in a typical fusion center, an fbi agent might be sitting next to a state highway patrol officer. they don't merely share space. they share data baze and techniques. >> but what's going into those data baze has critics worried. the aclu says there's evidence that some fusion centers have targeted muslim groups and peace activist for surveillance. >> collecting information about people that has no relevance to whether or not they're breaking the law. >> we're in the center of the analysis element -- >> the director of new jersey's fusion center says law enforcement works hard to balance national security with individual privacy. >> we in law enforcement and
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certainly in fusion centers are very attuned to the bill of rights. we are not in the business of investigating first amendment or constitutionally protected rights. >> but kryeski thinks police in his town crossed the line. >> the police did not determine the difference between who is dangerous and who was merelily expressing constitutionally protected viewpoints. >> you don't have to be a political activist to be watched these days, whether you're a blogger or just a member of a social network. everyone from law enforcement to your employer could be searching the web for information on you. danielle citron is a professor of law at the university of maryland. and liz lynch is the founder of center for networking excellence. welcome to you both. danielle, you spent some time with the fusion centers. i know people are wondering, my gosh, should i be worried about this? how concerning is it for the average american? >> i think it's concerning to all of us, quite frankly. and the problem is we're not going to know what fusion
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centers have on each and every one of us because their practices are not transparent. and there's really very little oversight. >> all right. okay. let's widen the conversation a little bit. i also want to talk about employers, friends, social networking friends, social networking sites. liz, you've got a really good list of dos and don'ts when it comes to social networking. tell me what i should be doing and what i should avoid. >> basically if you wouldn't say it in an auditorium with the general public, then don't post it online. don't bad mouth your customers, coal leagues or customers. don't share private company information. no off-color jokes or provocative photos. don't overshare. >> danielle, there's also employers looking out there. a lot of people are asking it's not their right to look, but guess what? they do it anyway. >> and you know what? they absolutely can. there's not to prevent them from doing it and it's smart to do it. they want their people, their
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clients to be able to look at, right, and see online. so in a sense it -- as a business perspective it makes sense to be looking at this information. nearly 50% of all employers readily admit that they're looking at your social network activity in assessing your employment application. >> all right, liz. i want to turn to you. it's not so simple. other people talk about you online, on the web, blog posters. there's other information people are sharing about you that you seem to have no control over. how do you take care of that to but your best face forward to your employer, to maybe the federal government. >> the first thing to do is google yourself. see what comes up when people search on your name and clean up anything on your name that you control on your social networking profiles. take off any provocative photos, inappropriate comments, and any pages that your friends have control over. ask them too. you can't go in the past but
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going forward be mindful. >> thank you for that. don't move. the daily assaults on your personal privacy continue. what you can do about it next.  they said it would never last.
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but it's been two months, and you're still going strong. glade lasting impressions. two fragrances alternate to keep things... fresh and exciting day after day. - and not just for 30 days. - ( inhales deeply, sighs ) but for 60. it's the longest-lasting plugins ever. get freshness that won't fade away for 60 days. ahhh! with plugins lasting impressions. and yes, it's glade. s.c. johnson, a family company.
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gold, it's all the rage. people are asking me, should i buy it? should i have it? well, i'm going to give you my advice about that and other ways that you can make more out of your dough. you give me this next half hour, and you're going to smile all the way to the bank. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com ever since i can remember, i've been fascinating by money, making it, saving it, studying it. by the time i was 31, i had earned enough to retire. so i embarked on a new mission -- helping you take care of your money. so you can save more, spend less, and avoid getting ripped off.
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the new stats on the housing market were absolutely atrocious. did you hear about this? for the third quarter of this year, foreclosures hit an all-time record. but wait. it gets worse. if you look in the pipeline of what's coming in terms of people who are already delinquent on their homes -- wow. we're going to have a really, really rough time with the housing market in 2010. and it's really democratizing, because instead of it being lower-priced homes, it's homes of all price levels. now there is a good side to this. you know what that is? there is great, great, great opportunity for you as a buyer, and it's only going to get better, especially through the winter. so i'm looking forward to seeing this first one. it looks really nice from the curb.
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wu. these people beat the daylights out of this place. light right here where this formica is damaged. it makes a bad impression. it looks awful. but this would be so inexpensive to repair. >> small dining room, small living room, but we build so much more than most of us really need. so what do you think was going on here? people were taking containers of grease and just pouring them on these carpets? >> the carpets will probably need to be replaced. >> ooh. i think we've got some water damage. sheetrock not well repaired. i think an inspection would be real important. >> lull -- absolutely. >> i give this one an "a." how would you grade it? >> i think it's a great price point, especially for a first-time home buyer. take advantage of the tax credit. and most of the work that needs to be done is user-friendly. >> right. right. this is not a real -- this is
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not a real handyman's special. this one is a good buy. this is a nice house. i can tell right from the curb. and in this case, the bank is doing a good job of taking care of the property. i bet the family that was here spent all their time right in this area right here. i'd be right here with my big screen tv sitting there watching the nfl. you know when i lived in the north, i had a bedroom that was the size of this closet here. this house is in great shape. now, if you look at other distressed sales in the neighborhood, it's priced about right. but compared to other nondistressed sales? this one's a deal.
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>> good things can happen to bad neighborhoods. this neighborhood behind me, very well maintained. this foreclosure, on the other hand -- well, it's not looking so hot. if you look right here, it looks like termite damage here. over here, this bay window, look at this. this is either termites, water damage, or a combination of the two. well, actually it's not as bad inside so far. as it was outside. oh, that play set's not looking so good back there. wow. i don't think you can have a better representation of the heartbreak that the mortgage meltdown has than seeing that. eeeew. that bathroom is -- not looking so good. let's go upstairs, see what
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we've got. uh-oh, uh-oh. uh-oh. danger, will robinson. we've got some serious water damage here. let me see. yeah. there's -- there's been real water damage here, and these tiles are just trying to cover it up. and then more water damage up above my head. this would be one you'd want to watch and wait for, and you'd have to be willing to use a lot of elbow grease to get this house in shape. oh, this was somebody's self-help job, doing this. if this was smell-a-vision, what you'd be experiencing right now is the absolute mold smell. in fact, my nose is itching from the mold, of the dampness down here. hide the children. no! no! no!
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what were they doing? what in the world is this? oh, look at the mold. see, i was telling the truth. this is something that would tell me -- this house is more trouble than i could handle. so as you've seen on my video tour, there's both tricks and treats. you really got to think through when is something a real deal versus fair market value in a neighborhood and the cost that it will take you to do the repairs that that house requires. and are you up to those repairs? i can tell you -- i'm not. next on "clark howard." >> i'd like to learn a lot of things from the money coach. but the bottom line is responsibility. i want to learn how to be smart with my money. how to make it work for me. >> caller: the best cd rate i can find is 2.2.
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i'm considering buying $300,000 worth of gold. >> wow, that's a huge amount of gold to own.
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bob is with us. bob, how are you doing? >> caller: i'm doing fine, clark. how about yourself? >> great. thank you. i understand you want to buy some gold. >> caller: i'm thinking about it. i'll give you a brief outline. i'm 78 years old. i own five pieces of real
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estate. three of them are rental houses. and i have eight cds at $100,000 each. i'm considering the best cd rate i can find is 2.2. i'm considering buying $300,000 worth of gold. >> wow! that's a huge amount of gold to own. generally when people want to own gold or precious metals, owning somewhere 5% to 10% of your assets in gold is fine. >> caller: okay. >> i mean like at a max, based on what you just told me, owning somewhere like $80,000 in gold would be appropriate. but owning $300,000 in gold would be too much of your assets tied up in something that's very volatile. and has significant risk over time. >> caller: all right. >> but if you're going to buy gold, i would like you to buy something that's kind of like a
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mutual fund of gold known as an etf. exchange traded fund is the kind of gold you should buy. research this term. gold etf fund. because gold etf allows you to own the underlying gold without you having to handle it, store it, or without you paying big fees to buy and sell it. but i would be careful taking too much of that low-earning cd money and throwing it into gold because that would ultimately prove to be very risky. michael's with us. hello, michael. >> caller: hi, clark. how are you? >> great. i understand that you were ill recently. are you okay now? >> caller: much better, thanks
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for asking. last month i had to go to an emergency room locally for flu symptoms. and saw the doctor for a few moments. paid the bill. left. everything was fine. then i get -- about a month later, i receive another bill for doctor services. and i -- is this normal because i asked when i left the hospital what my total was. they gave me a total amount. i paid it. and now i've received another bill. i didn't have any lab work or anything like that. it was basically just a doctor's visit. >> so you will have -- in your case they didn't do any culture or anything to try to confirm that you have this, that, or the other? >> no. they just asked me for my sympto symptoms, she wrote a prescription, and i left. >> okay. so if you got a bill from the hospital and then the bill from the doctor, your surprises should be over. do you have insurance? >> caller: i didn't at the time because i just started a new
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job. >> all right. so when the hospital bills you, initially they bill you at full retail. and then the attending physician bills you at full retail as well. did you know those charges are negotiable? >> caller: no, i didn't. >> all right. give me a -- give me a for instance. like what is this doctor's bill that you were charged? >> caller: $245. and initially i paid $200 at the hospital. >> all right. the $245 is a full retail list price. and nobody pays full retail list. what you should do is you should contact the doctor and see -- and -- you have insurance now. say, what would my doctor charge have been under your plan? and whatever that is, that would be a reasonable amount for you to pay. by now i hope everybody in america who has a toyota or a
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lexus made between 2004 and 2010 has checked to see if your vehicle is one of the ones affected by one of the oddest recalls of all time. 4 million vehicles approximately recalled because the driver floor matt could cause you to be in an accident and possibly cause even a fatal wreck? it's weird, isn't it? the remedy, so simple. you pull out the floor matt on the carpet side and you let your carpet get dirty in the car. but most recalls aren't so simple. the shocker is that most of the time, even when there's a recall involving serious safety stuff, people don't respond, don't take their cars or trucks to the dealer. i want to you take care of it, especially if it's steering, braking, something like that. there's a website you can learn what's going on with your car, autosafety.org. check it out. next on "clark howard" -- >> is it a credit card that you already had?
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or is it brand new one out of the blue that you heard from that somebody was pretending to be you? >> caller: it's about ten of them so far. >> no. really? >> caller: really.
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do you have a question for me? well, it's so easy to ask. just go to my website, cnn.com/clarkhoward. and click to do a video submission of your question.,. and click to do a video submission of your questio and click to do a video submission of your question. and who knows. you could be like ashley asking your question of me. >> hi. i'm ashley, and i need a money coach. my biggest concern relating to finances would be that i'm ill-prepared for the future. and the future meaning tomorrow and the next day. and i'm just afraid i'll keep making mistakes and continue on this cycle of destruction, as far as finances go. i like to start saving for retirement. and saving for other big
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expenses. i've got a retirement account now. it only exists because i worked for a big company in my last job, and i automatically contributed. so since then, which was about five years ago, i haven't contributed anything. my question is, as a single 30-year-old, how do i start preparing for the future for things like family and retirement? >> ashley, ashley, ashley. five years you haven't been saving any money? don't break my heart that way. you got to get cooking with this. now, because you're self-employed, you have available to you a wonderful retirement plan, very simple to set up, known as a sep. very simplified employee pension. it's very flexible how much money you contribute to it. very easy to do, you can do it with many companies that are no-commission companies. that will take care of one-half of what you need to do. the other thing was more ill-defined. saving for a family.
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well, for that, simple savings will do. every month i want you to automatically deposit money into a savings account to start building up a cushion for whatever near-term needs you might have for dough. now, as for you, it's always a juggling act. trying to figure out what to do with limited resources, where your money should go. your first dollar of savings should go into tax advantage plans. you work for an employer with a 401(k) or something equivalent? that's where you start saving. next thing, you do the roth account. and then after that, you save for other things like -- well, a kid's college education. danielle, how are you doing? >> caller: i'm good. how are you? >> good. now, danielle, when did you get this duplicate personality? >> caller: i found out about it
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this week. >> what we're talking about here is somebody has flattered you in a way nobody wants to become flattered. >> caller: that's correct. >> they have become your clone. >> caller: they have. >> is it a credit card you already had or is it a brand new one out of the blue that you heard from that somebody was pretending to be you? >> caller: it's about ten of them so far. >> no. really? >> caller: really. and they've gotten my social security number and my birth, all of that information, and are opening up credit cards under my -- my person. >> so this individual has been a human wrecking crew -- >> caller: right. >> -- in that they have already -- think about all the effects here. they've opened ten credit cards as if they're you. they have trashed your credit score because suddenly you have all these new lines of credit that have been opened everywhere that you had nothing to do with.
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what solves the problem -- and you're even allowed do this up front in all 50 states to prevents what happened to you -- is to freeze your credit files. the second you freeze your credit, which you can go online and you can freeze all three of your credit files, bam! from that second forward, nobody will be able to apply for credit as if they're you. you stop them cold, 100% in their tracks. you have an identity theft victim, you have access of copies of your credit reports for free where normally people would be allowed only a single free copy of each report a year. so you have extra rights because you've already been wronged. and in most states, when you actually need legitimate access to credit, you'll be able to temporarily thaw your credit for free as well. >> caller: okay. >> so it is -- it gives you the peace of mind that you are not going to have right now until you do freeze your credit. next on "clark howard" -- >> have you ever been to
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australia before? >> caller: i have not, no. >> it's a fun, fun trip. are you going to drive? >> caller: um -- >> i don't mean to there. i mean once you get there, are you going to drive?  they said it would never last.
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get freshness that won't fade away for 60 days. ahhh! with plugins lasting impressions. and yes, it's glade. s.c. johnson, a family company. today on the "clark howard" show, you're going to learn how to stay out of harm's way of identity theft. br bubut that'p but tgo your wallet. yr you give me this next half hour, and i'm going to show you how to be your own boss. ever since i can remember, i've been fascinated by money, making it, saving it, studying it. by the time i was 31, i made enough to retire. so i embarked on a new mission, helping you take care of your money so you can save more, spend less, and avoid getting ripped off. >> now from his radio studio, your money expert, clark howard. >> i'm not from the fbi, but i'm here to help you.
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there is a new warning from the fbi about a hot, hot scam working where you get an e-mail that pretends to be either from the fbi or the department of homeland security with a claim that there's information there that you might be interested in. what kind of information? well, there are several versions. one of them says that it's a confidential fbi report on new patterns in al qaeda financing. another one says weapons of mass destruction directory. just gives you an example of what kinds of things are floating out there. and what happens if you open one of these e-mails? well, you end up loading viruses on your computer. and what are the criminals going to do with that? they're going to try to take over your bank accounts. they'll have access to all your passwords and all the rest. these are known as trojan and key logger programs, and the key thing for you is to know the fbi isn't sending theechls you've
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got to be smart about any e-mail you receive and ever opening any attachment. now, how can i help you stay out of harm's way? what's your question for me? erin is with us. erin, hi. how are you? >> caller: hey. i'm hoping you can help me keep my santy, clark, and that i'll be okay. >> well, tell me how i can be of service. >> caller: my husband and i are one of those unfortunate people that are upside-down on the value of their home now. and through listening to your show and advice through friends, we learned earlier in the year through possibly refinancing through our mortgage company or doing a loan modifications through our mortgage company. so in april we started a process with our then mortgage company, we got approved, and two days later, they called -- a new mortgage company called and said, we bought your loan. we thought, okay, it's coincidence. so immediately we restarted the
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process over, faxed in all the 60 pages of paperwork, filed three weeks ago, got approved, and literally the very next day, again, the mortgage company called and said we can't continue with the loan modification even though it's been approved because we're selling your loan effective november 1. >> are you fannie or freddie? behind the scenes is your loan owned by fannie mae or freddie mac? >> caller: no, sir. >> so your loan as a modification is done or a refi is done. it's up to the individual bank, if you're not fannie or freddie, to say if they'll do it or not. and amazingly twice -- this is an amazing story you're telling me. twice you even been approved, and each time the rug gets pulled out from under you. >> caller: yes, sir. >> here's what you do. i want to you go to the website nfcc.org. let me repeat that. nfcc.org.
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then you're going to put in your zip code, and then it will take you to the closest national foundation for credit counseling office, where you will be able to make an appointment with a housing counselor. and with their help, hopefully you'll be able to get this thing moving for you and your family so that you can keep your home. steve, you are headed to retirement. congratulations to you! >> caller: well, i had things go right, clark. i appreciate that. i'm -- you know, i'm just laying it out right now. i guess my question is, you know, i've been on the -- well, let me back up. i don't know if it's once a year or twice a year, you know, the social security sends you a statement saying you have so many credits based on -- shows your income over the years and says if you retire at 62, it's approximately this. if it's 65, full retirement. first of all i was wondering if
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you know or have any idea how accurate those numbers are? >> very. >> caller: oh, okay. >> those are very accurate, because especially as you get close to retirement, they are almost right on the money. >> caller: that's good. i'm pleasantly surprised. >> so that's not something to worry about. by the way, your social security check's going to be fine if you're getting close to that stage. >> caller: well, in february i turn 62. >> yep. you've going to be fine. >> caller: the trick is trying to figure out, of that check, if i keep working versus if i take something part time. my wife works part-time. i could get by on part-time. >> do it. >> caller: but i'm just trying to figure out -- >> do it. sometimes i talk in absolutes and sometimes i hem and haw. i will tell you that you will smile so long through your retirement years if you defer taking that social security
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check at 62, keep working part-time, build up more credit, and then ultimately take your social security benefit. you're perfectly capable of working now. it will generate a much larger check from social security the longer you wait to take it, and you will have earned money when you're capable rather than what happens to so many people that get older and they won't be able to work but they need the money. >> next on "clark howard" -- >> caller: when i logged in, the website asked for my bank name first, my routing number, and then my user i.d. and password to my bank account. and that's where i immediately stopped. >> if she knows about the money and she turns out not to be responsible -- >> caller: i hope not. >> -- you can't keep her from taking the money and blowing it. >> caller: okay. >> so kind of keep it quiet this money is there.
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do you have a question for me? it's so easy to ask a question. just go to cnn.com/clarkhoward and post your online video question for me. if you do so, you could be right here with me on "money coach" where you get to ask me your question about your wallet. we're going to meet somebody right now who has a question for me about whether or not something that i've talked about is really safe to do. it's time to meet tasha. >> hi. i'm tasha, and i need a money
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coach. i want help doing a budget because i want to know where the money is going. there's not any extra, and if we do need extra, it's put on a credit card. and that's what i'm trying to get away from. i heard about mint.com either on "the clark howard show" or in the paper. mint.com is a site you can go to prepare a personal budget. of course, you log in, use your i.d. and when i logged in, the website asked for my bank name first, my routing number, and then my user i.d. and password to my bank account. and that's where i immediately stopped and -- i can't do this. my question is mint.com a safe and secure website to use when preparing a personal budget? >> tasha, you're on to something. i use mint.com, but, yes, there
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is a risk because you're coughing up your passwords. if you read their security briefing, they'll tell you all the things they do to try to make your information safe. but nowhere there does it say if they have a breach, that they're going to cough up your dough if there's a problem. but they do, in fact, give you alerts that let you know later, hey, there is a big transaction going on in your account. is this okay? so that you are able, over time, to monitor what's going on. and speaking of monitoring, for you, if you were trying to track your dough, i want you to know i love mint.com. i love their competitor wesabi.com because with these sites, you can track all your income, all your outgoing, all your assets so you're able to see where you can trim expenses, where you need to beef up your savings and your retirement dough. collette is with us.
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collette, i want to welcome you. how are you doing? >> caller: fine. thank you, clark. thanks so much for taking my call. >> yes, ma'am. how can i be of service? >> caller: yes, please. i was calling to get advice from you. my 9-year-old daughter had an accident in 2006. >> oh. is she okay? >> caller: yes, she is. thank you. we just had a court settlement and just wanted to ask the best way to save this money for her. >> the purpose -- did the court specify a purpose for the money for your daughter? >> caller: no. it's just that it has to be for her. >> all right. and how old is she now? >> caller: she's 9. >> 9. what would you like the purpose of this money to be? >> caller: to save it for her in an account to use it for school or maybe later in life for her first home or something like that. it's a flexible -- >> so pretty far down the road. >> caller: yes, yes, yes. >> and the total amount that you
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have after taxes? >> caller: it's $17,250. >> most often what happens when someone gets a settlement like this, the lawyer who negotiated it for you will try to hook you up with an insurance person who would then sell an annuity for your daughter. and what i prefer instead is that because your daughter is only 9 and the goal is longer term in nature is that you look at putting the money into a mutual fund for your daughter. in her case, there is one in particular that i would like you to look at that is what's known as a tax-managed portfolio. what that will do is put this money into a mix of stocks and bonds, and there will be no tax that she will owe in the years up till the point that she's an adult, and only at the time that she would sell would she owe
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tax. but the way it's set up, the tax that she would owe is tiny, tiny, tiny, if any, at the time that she would need access to the money. >> caller: okay. >> next on "clark howard --" >> caller: we're looking at these self-directed iras that supposedly you can put real estate in them. >> that is something that just freaks me out. that is such a smart way to handle car buying because it means that you will never owe more on the car than what it's worth. and it means you will own it free and clear without any monthly payment for years and years and years.
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ed is with us. ed, how are you? >> caller: good afternoon. very well. and you? >> wonderful, thank you. >> caller: i need your advice in an area that's a little bit confusing. >> okay. >> caller: and that is self-directed i.r.a.s. my wife and i have accumulated a little bit of money in regular i.r.a.s, not roths.
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we've had them in cds, and as you know, they're not paying much right now. >> the money in the i.r.a.s, is it money you'll need in the next few years or 20 or never? >> caller: we want to live off income from the i.r.a. >> starting how soon? >> caller: we're starting to eat into the principle right now because of the low interest rate. but, you know, we're looking at these self-directed i.r.a.s that supposedly you can put real estate in them. >> that is something that just freaks me out. >> caller: they are scary. >> what are you thinking of doing in terms of real estate? are you thinking of owning real estate inside that i.r.a.? >> caller: yeah. >> eww. >> caller: buying a condo in a resort area that you can rent out. >> owning an investment property inside an i.r.a. really costs you in so many ways because real estate is best owned in a taxable way because there are so many tax advantages to owning
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it. you know, in an i.r.a. -- and if there's -- if you have somebody handle the self-directed aspect of you actually owning actively managed real estate in one, you pay a lot of fees for that. i mean there is a way for you to diversify in real estate without having to actually own and manage, and that is in your self-directed i.r.a., you can own a real estate mutual fund. if you look at the tax advantages to owning that as a taxable asset, you won't consider any further at all owning that inside an i.r.a. and rodha is with us. how are you? >> caller: very good, clark. how are you? >> wonderful. >> caller: thank you for taking my call. i love your show. >> thank you very much. >> caller: i do have a question. my husband and i are looking at buying a new car, and the
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manufacturer has incentives going on right now. either you get cash back, or you get zero percent for 36 months. i'm trying to hear from you what is the better way to go. >> well, there is no one right answer on that because if you were to get the zero percent financing versus what you might be able to get at a credit union, are you a credit union member? >> caller: i'm not. but i got preapproved for a loan under 4%. >> you're already in the right territory. if you compare, and you have to run the numbers on this, you do an amortization schedule where you figure out which is actually going to be the cheaper for you. some of the easiest calculators, you'll find some available for cars on edmonds.com, and then you'll be able to see exactly
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which of the two alternatives would be cheaper. normally on a short loan cycle like that, with you getting such a cheap, cheap rate from rate ever lending source you found at under 4%, you'll usually do better taking the the $2,000 off and taking out the low cost loan. did you know that you're a genius? >> caller: i am? >> yes. for taking out a three-year loan. >> caller: thank you. >> if you went back 40 years ago the only loans people ever took out were three-year car loans. we've gotten away from that, but that is such a smart way to handle car buying because it means that you will never owe more on the car than what it's worth. and it means you will own it free and clear without any monthly payment for years and years and years. good for you.
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>> i've had so many calls from people who are just absolutely fit to be tied by the notices they're getting from their credit card companies. credit card companies are racing new legislation that takes full effect in february of next year that restricts when a credit card company can raise interest rates on you, and when they can change terms and conditions on you as well. now, they have to give you longer notices, that's already happening. what kind of things are credit card companies doing in advance? well, number one, they're switching how your interest rate is calculated on your credit card, moving from fixed rate offerings to variable rates. why is that significant to you? the rate that the variables work off of is known as the prime rate. the prime rate is extra low right now. when the prime rate rises your interest rate will rise on your credit card as well. how do you fight back against a changing interest rate? pay off your balances. then they can't charge you. >> next on clark howard.
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>> even if it means you have to delay finishing school for a while till you saved up money, pay with cash, do not, under any condition, take out private student loans because they are the most miserable experience.
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hurricane ida is moving through the gulf of mexico as a category 2 storm. but, louisiana's governor is not waiting for it to hit his state which is now in a state of emergency. the house has had its say and pass add health care reform bill t. debate's not over yet. our eye reporters are weighing in on whether this is a good or bad thing for the country. army investigator asks troops and civilians for help in its investigation of the deadly shooting at ft. hood. why they think some people caught in the rampage may have valuable evidence. you're watching hln news and views. hello. bobby jindal declared a state of
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emergency as hurricane ida draws closer to the mainland u.s., the late season hurricane prompted a watch along the gulf coast from grand isle, louisiana to mexico beach, florida. jindal's declaration is precautionary move allowing resources to be freed up if needed. there is a concern that ida could bring high winds and heavy rains to the southeastern part of louisiana. right now, though, new orleans is not in the hurricane watch area. ida is about 75 miles west of cuba, forecast to skirt the yucatan peninsula and then move through the gulf coast over the next couple of days before actually making landfall along the gulf coast sometime on tuesday. between now and then, it could hit a cold front over the gulf and may lose hurricane strength and come ashore perhaps as a tropical storm. you try to block it out? >> it's hard to deal with. >> that was private foster, one of the soldiers wounded in the
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ft. hood shootings on friday. we got those comments in a short time ago. and the latest development three days after the shooting rampage that left 13 dead and more than 40 injured. private foster says though the attack was horrible it's brought out the best in that tightly knit ft. hood community. >> i got back home friday afternoon. >> you say you were hit where, sir? >> in the left hip. >> and what does this mean to you, to have these other families come here? >> it's been great, actually. she does most of the cooking but i enjoy, too. and they have been coming by bringing us food, watch my children when i went to go pick up my brother. they have been more than helpful. it's just -- the community came together. you would have to get a taste of it. it's like a giant family.
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when anything like this happens, we just get stronger. the army says it needs help from troops and civilians as they investigate the mass shootings at ft. hood. investigators are looking for help from anyone who may have left the scene with evidence, specifically if they have vehicles that may have gun shot damage or clothing with gunshot residue on it. 42 people were injured in the shooting at the post in texas on thursday. army official says 17 of them and the suspected gunman are still hospitalized. all evidence at this point indicates the suspect, allegedly acted alone. in the actual shootings at the readiness center on 5 november. we have seen no evidence whatsoever to date of any friendly fire occurrences during the gun fight between ft. hood law enforcement and the alleged suspect. >> major nadil malik hasan is not on a ventilator but is still in intensive care.
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there are plans for two formal memorial services honoring the ft. hood victims. one is scheduled for this evening at 6:00 eastern. texas governor rick perry is scheduled to attend the ceremony at a killeen church. on tuesday president and mrs. obama will take part in a memorial service on the post. the first battle for health care reform is over and it is a victory for president obama's top domestic priority. the house of representatives has also approved a health care reform plan. but it was a close call. the measure passed with only two votes to spare and one came from a republican. the fight over health care reform now moves to the senate. so, what's in the health care bill that the house passed? perhaps the most controversial part of the bill is that it does contain the so-called public option. the government would sell insurance to those who can't find it elsewhere. the congressional budget office predicts those premiums would be more expensive than insurance from private companies, but many
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people would be eligible for government subsidies to help pay for coverage. other provisions of the bill would ban insurers from denying coverage to people because of pre-existing conditions. the house bill also contains strict bans on using federal money to pay for abortions. congress john dingell, a propronent predicts it will extend coverage to 96% of americans. president obama congratulated the house on passing its version of health care reform. the president says the bill will bring down the cost of health care and that it's fully paid for. he says congress is finally meeting the challenges that washington has put off for decades and that now the country is closer, closer than it has ever been to comprehensive health insurance reform. >> now it falls on the united states senate to take the baton and bring this effort to the finish line on behalf of the american people. and i'm absolutely confident that they will.
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i'm equally convinced on the day that we gather here at the white house and i sign comprehensive health insurance reform legislation into law they will be able to join their house colleagues and say this was their finest moment in public service, the moment we deliver change we promised to the american people and did something to lead this country stronger than we found it. >> this morning supporters and opponents of the house health care bill hit the sunday morning talk shows. the narrow vote in the house is indicative of even tougher fights looming in the senate. now, appearing on cbs's "face the nation" senator jack reed of rhode island said it would take time but predicted an overhaul would pass the senate. >> i believe we're going to pass health care reform, i believe we must do this because it's essential to not just the quality of life here but our economic success in the future, harry reid has introduced a public option, there is strong support there.
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but we are far from the end of the debate in the senate. it will take a time, it will be careful, and deliberate. i hope a public option is part of the final bill. >> republicans in the senate are hoping to defeat any bill like the one passed by the house which contain as public option. right now some moderate democrats have expressed reservations as well. also appearing on "face the nation" was gop senator lindsey graham of south carolina. graham said he thinks the government option will destroy private health care and the house bill passed last night is d.o.a. >> the house bill is dead on arrival in the senate. look at how it passed. it passed 220-215, by two votes. you had 39 democrats vote against the bill. they come from red states, moderate democrats from swing districts, they bailed out on this bill. it was a bill by and for liberals and people like joe lieberman are not going to get
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near the house bill. it cost medicare about $500 billion, over a trillion dollars in new spending. it has the public option. the house bill is a nonstarter in the senate. >> efforts to end a strike in philadelphia have jumped the tracks. what derailed the negotiations and what that means for tomorrow's morning commute.
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it will be a tough day tomorrow for commuters in philadelphia. talks aimed at ending a transit strike broke down last night. bus drivers and subway and trolley operators walked off the job last tuesday. the union is demanding an independent audit to make sure pension funds are secure. governor ed rendell has been negotiating these talks. he urged union members to vote on a contract proposal. no new talks are scheduled. passengers on one delta plane found their flight was over before it even began in
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atlanta yesterday. smoke started spewing from an engine while the plane was on the taxiway. no one was hurt as the passengers evacuated that plane. the engine fire is under investigation. take a look at what hit washington state. the season's first big snowstorm. this heavy snowfall shut down several highways and caused problems for drivers, but not everyone was complaining. >> just moved here from texas and we don't get snow in texas at all. so, we're planning on coming skiing and sledding and we just wanted to bring the kids out to play. >> rain is forecast in the area today and tomorrow while temperatures hover above freezing. more snow is expected by veterans day. tomorrow the supreme court will start hearing lawyers' arguments whether underaged kids should get long prison sentences for certain crimes. the case stems from the sentences of two men.
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joe sullivan was sentenced to life in prison for raping an elderly woman. he was 13 at the time. terrance graham was convicted for his part in rm aed robberies when he was 16 and 17 years old. he was sentenced to life in prison. lawyers will argue that giving juveniles life sentences amounts to cruel and unusual punishment. someone paid nearly $54,000 for the hat worn by the man who shot lee harvey oswald. jack ruby's fedora was one of the items on the auction block. the items were linked to president john f. kennedy's assassination. the auction came weeks before the 46th anniversary of that event. a newspaper signed by kennedy for a maid the morning of his assassination sold for about $39,000. get this, it was worth about a nickel before his death in 1963. is there anything that isn't being shared on the internet? well, we're going to tell you
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about am sp personal online events ranging from the beginning of life to the search for higher meaning. >> everybody online right now, i got a question for you. >> we've got questions, too. about churches in cyberspace. hear what a pastor says about communing with a computer.
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muslims in and out of the military were quick to condemn the alleged actions of major ka san, the suspect in last week's shooting in ft. hood. some worried about a backlash against muslims in the aftermath. others pointed toult attack goes directly against the teachings of islam and today the army chief of staff weighed in on the subtd. he told john king on our sister network cnn it's important for the country not to get caught up in speculation about hasan's muslim faith. >> you know, there's a lot of speculation going on and probably the curiosity is a good thing. but we have to be careful.
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because we can't jump to conclusions now based on little snippets of information that come out. and frankly, i am worried, not worried but concerned that this increased speculation could cause a backlash against some of our muslim soldiers. i asked our leaders to be on the lookout for that. it would be a shame as great a tragedies that was, it would be a shame if if our diversity became a casualty as well. >> and casey added diversity in the military, quote, gives us strength. the first police officer who confronted the suspect after the shooting just had another surgery. a military spokesman says sergeant kimberly munley is in good condition after the surgery last night. she was wounded during the shoot-out but that's not believed to be life threatening. her supervisor initially said she brought the gunman down but now we've learned another officer also fired at him and may have been the one who finally stopped that rampage. the army is still investigating
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the details of the shooting. millions of chrissions go to church every week. jennifer westhoven introduces us to churches in cyberspace. >> thanks, holly. seems like you can do almost anything on line these days. what about using your computer to meet with a higher power? you can go to church right on your computer, a lot more people are doing it. got a lot of people revisiting the whole concept of what church means. and, how do rituals like baptism and communion, how do they work? we wanted to ask these questions. we're going to talk to the pastor of life church.tv. craig, thank you for joining us. i know you're on the phone. so, let's say it's sunday morning, when i'm at your church i see high ceilings, people are singing, everyone together is kind of aspiring for something else. how do you create that in front
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of the computer? >> yeah, we asked the same questions a few years ago when we tried to start it. we were blown away at how people could actually worship along and have genuine community and connect in a very spiritual and very real way with an online church. >> what about the sacraments which, you know, for some people i think they have a definite this is how it should go. how do you -- do you do those online? how does that work? >> that was something we had to try to explore what would be the best options, and what we do is we'll invite people f we're going to celebrate communion, to find some juice and crackers and we'll actually pray and then invite them to participate in receiving the lord's supper. interestingly with people all over the world. >> what do you think as a pastor, what do you want people to get from one of your services online? what do they walk away from the
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computer with? >> for one thing, we have people that may be exploring christianity. this is a good option for them that may not step foot in a physical church building. so, we would like to clearly communicate the truth of the bible in the way that people understand. that's the top priority for us. beyond that we find that people can really worship, they will often gather around with maybe a family has a sick child so the family will gather around the computer and sing and worship together, or if someone's traveling, staying connected to their church that way. they can invite a friend who might not come to church, there's no way i'm going to go to a physical church building after some hurt or some kind of fear. so, it's a tool to help, instead of trying to get people to come to church we bring the church to them. >> thank you for telling us what it's like to go to church
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online. that's craig from life church.tv. >> well, there you have it. absolutely no excuses. and here's something you don't see on the internet every day. the intimate moment of child birth live. >> there you go. hi. happy birthday. >> a minnesota couple decided to share the birth of their baby online. they welcome their girl yesterday on the social networking site called moms like me.com. this site tracked new mom lindsay's experience from day one, following her for checkups and all the way through her eight-hour labor and delivery. the former teacher looked at the experience as an educational tool and a way to create a lasting memento for her baby girl. ♪ oh, christmas tree your
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branches green ♪ >> the capitol hill christmas tree has begun its long journey to washington. the tree is an 85-foot tall blue spruce from northeastern arizona. the 7,000-pound tree is on a tour of arizona and will arrive in washington on november 30th. the tradition of having states provide a capitol christmas tree started nearly 40 years ago. this is the first year the tree has come from arizona. 20 years ago tomorrow this scene kept people around the world riveted to their televisions as a way of life changed almost overnight. and millions of people suddenly tasted real freedom for the first time. how germany is marking the fall of the berlin wall.
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hurricane ida is moving through the gulf of mexico as a category 2 storm. but, louisiana's governor is not waiting for it to hit his state which is now in the state of emergency. the house has had its say and passed a health care reform bill. but the debate's not over yet. our i-reporters are weighing in whether this is a good thing or bad thing. army investigators ask troops and civilians for help in its investigation of the deadly shooting at ft. hood. why they think some people caught in the rampage may have valuable evidence. you're watching hln news and views. i'm holly firfer. louisiana governor bobby jindal has declared a state of
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emergency as hurricane ida draws closer to themainland u.s. the hurricane prompted a watch along the gulf coast from grand isle, louisiana to mexico beach, florida. jindal's declaration is precautionary allowing resources to be freed up if needed. there is a concern ida could bring high waves and heavy rains to louisiana. right now new orleans is not in the hurricane watch area. ida is about 75 miles west of cuba. it's forecast to skirt the yucatan peninsula and move over the coast before making landfall along the gulf coast sometime on tuesday. between now and then, it could hit a cold front over the gulf and may lose hurricane strength and come ashore perhaps as a tropical storm. you try to block it out? >> it's kind of hard to deal with sometimes. >> that was private joseph foster, one of the soldiers wounded in the ft. hood
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shootings on friday. we just got the comments in a short time ago. and the latest development three days after the shooting rampage that left 13 dead and more than 40 injured. private foster says although the attack was horrible, it's brought out the best in that tightly knit ft. hood community. >> i got back home it was friday afternoon. >> you say you were hit where? >> in the left hip. >> what does this mean to you to have these other families come here? it's been great, actually. she does most of the cooking but i enjoy it, too. and they have been coming by bringing us food, offering care, watched my two children when i went to pick up my brother. they've been more than helpful. it's just -- the community came together. you would have to get a taste of it. it's like a giant family.
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when we -- when anything like this happens, we just get stronger. the army says it needs help from troops and civilians as they investigate the mass shootings at ft. hood. investigators say they are looking for help from anyone who may have left the scene with evidence, specifically if they have vehicles that may have gun shot damage or clothing with gunshot residue on it. 42 people were injured in the shooting at the army post in texas on thursday. an army official says 17 of them and the suspected gunman are still hospitalized. >> all evidence at this point indicates the suspect allegedly acted alone, in the actual shootings at the readiness center on 5 november. we have seen no evidence whatsoever to date of any friendly fire occurrences during the gun fight between ft. hood law enforcement and the alleged suspect. >> major nadil malik hasan is not on a ventilator but is still in intensive care.
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we're learning more today just about how tense the situation at ft. hood was during and after the shootings. the post is huge, essentially its own city including schools for the children. there is another district in killeen, texas where some of the kids go. today a ft. hood official told us things were especially tense for students when that post was locked down for hours. >> working with both of them the evening of the incident you could imagine with the gates locked here, children off the post in those schools, being held at those schools waiting for their parents to come to pick them up, the installation was locked so they couldn't get out. trying to work through that detail and then the part that was probably most troubling was in the event that one of the parents may have been wounded or killed and having a youngster waiting there for -- to be picked up and never getting picked up. and not being able to tell the school leadership which ones had
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been killed, which ones were wounded as we were sorting through that. >> there are plans for two memorial services honoring the ft. hood victims, one scheduled for this evening at 6:00 eastern. texas governor rick perry is scheduled to attend the ceremony at a killeen church. on tuesday president and mrs. obama will travel to ft. hood and take part in a memorial service on the post. take a look at what hit washington state. the season's first big snowstorm. this heavy snowfall shut down several highways and caused problems for drivers, but not everyone was complaining. >> just moved here from texas, and we don't get snow in texas at all. so we're planning on coming skiing and sledding. we just wanted to bring the kids out to play. >> rain is forecast in the area today and tomorrow while temperatures hover above freezing but more snow is expected by veterans day.
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a special shelter in mexico is providing care for low income children who have cancer. it's giving them much more than just medical help. dr. sanjay gupta has today's "vital signs." >> the name translates a house of friendship to mexico's youngest cancer patients. she has volunteered here for 15 years. most are from rural areas without access to cancer specialists. the children and their families are invited to stay free of charge for as long as they need treatment at nearby mexico city hospitals. slelter volunteers help the time go by at the hospital. reading and playing with the
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children as they wait for chemotherapy treatments. the home is involved in more than facilitating the treatment. daily life is protected as much as possible. for more on this agd and other exciting advances to medicine go to cnn.com/vitalsigns.
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it will be a tough day tomorrow for commuters in philadelphia. talks aimed at ending a transit strike broke down. bus drivers and subway and trolley operators walked off the job last tuesday t. union is demanding an independent audit to make sure pension funds are secure. governor ed rendell has been negotiating these talks. he urged union members to vote on a contract proposal. no new talks are scheduled. the first battle for health care reform is over and it is a
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victory for president obama's top domestic priority. the house of representatives has also approved a health care reform plan but it was a close call. the measure passed with only two votes too spare and one of them came from a republican. the fight over health care reform now moves to the senate. so, what's in the health care bill that the house passed? perhaps the most controversial part of the bill is that it does contain the so-called public option. the government would sell insurance to those who can't find it elsewhere. the budget office predicts the premiums would be more expensive than insurance from private companies but many people would be eligible for government subsidies to help pay for that coverage. other provisions of the bill would ban insurers from denying coverage too people just because of pre-existing conditions. the house bill also contains strict bans on using federal money to pay for abortions. congressman john dinkle predicts it will extend coverage to 96%
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of americans. president obama this afternoon congratulated the house on passing its version of health care reform. the president says the bill will bring down the cost of health care and that it's fully paid for. he says congress is finally meeting the challenges that washington has put off for decades and that now the country is closer, closer than it has ever been to comprehensive health insurance reform. >> now it falls on the united states senate to take the baton and bring this effort to finish line on behalf of the american people. and i'm absolutely confident that they will. i'm equally convinced on the day that we gather here at the white house and i sign comprehensive health insurance reform into law they will be able to join house colleagues and say this was their finest moment in public service. the moment we delivered change we promised to the american people and did something to lead this country stronger than we found it.
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>> this morning supporters and opponents of the house health care bill hit the talk shows. the narrow vote in the house is indicative of tougher fights looming in the senate. appearing on cbs's "face the nation" senator jack reed of rhode island said it would take time but predicted overhaul would pass the senate. >> i believe we're going to pass health care reform. i believe we must do this because it's essential to not just the quality of life here but our economic success in the future, senator reed, harry reid has introduced a public option, there is strong support there but we are far from the end of the debate in the senate. it will take a time, it will be careful, thorough and deliberate. i hope that a public option is part of the final bill. >> republicans in the senate are hoping to defeat any bill like the one passed by the house which contain as public option. right now some moderate democrats have expressed reservations as well. also appearing on "face the
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nation" was lindsey graham of south carolina. graham says he thinks the government option will destroy private health care and that the house bill passed late last night is d.o.a. >> the house bill is dead on arrival in the senate, just look at how it passed. it passed 220-215. it passed by two votes. you had 39 democrats vote against the bill. they come from red states, moderate democrats from swing districts. they bailed out on this bill. it was a bill by and for liberals and people like joe lieberman are not going to get near the house bill that cost medicare $500 billion, over a trillion dollars in new spending. it has the public option. the house bill is a nonstarter in the senate. >> is there anything that is not shared on the internet? we're going to tell you about personal online events ranging from the beginning of life to the search for higher meaning.
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>> everybody, online right now, i got a question for you. >> we've got questions, too. about churches in cyberspace. hear what a pastor says about communing with the computer.
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muslims in and out of the military were quick to condemn the alleged actions of major nadil malik hasan. some worried about a back lash in the aftermath of the tragedy. others pointed out the attack goes directly against the teachings of islam. and today, the army chief of staff weighed in on the subject. he told john king on our sister network cnn that it's important for the country not to get caught up in speculation about hasan's muslim faith. >> you know, there's been a lot of speculation going on and probably curiosity is a good thing, but we have to be careful because we can't jump to conclusions now based on little snippets of information that come out. and frankly, i am worried, not worried but i'm concerned, that this increased speculation could cause a backlash against some of
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our muslim soldiers. i asked our army leaders to be on the lookout for that. it would be a shame, as great a tragedy as this was, it would be a shame if our diversity became a casualty as well. >> and casey added diversity in the military, quote, gives us strength. millions of christians go to church every week. some do it without ever leaving home. jennifer westhoven introduces us to churches in cyberspace. >> thanks, holly. it seems you can do almost anything online these days. what about using your computer to meet with a higher power? you can go to church right on your computer. a lot more people are doing it. it's got a lot of people revisiting the concept of what church means. and, how do age old rituals like baptism and communion, how do they work? we're going to talk to the pastor of life choyv.tv to get
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insight. craig, i know you're on the phone so, let's say it's sunday morning, when i'm at church i see high ceilings, people are singing, everyone together aspiring for something else. how do you create that in front of the computer? >> yeah, we ask the same question as few years ago when we tried to start it and we were blown away at how people could actually worship along and have genuine community and connect in a very spiritual and very real way with an online church. >> what about the sacraments which, you know, for some people i think they have a definite this is how it should go. how do you -- do you do those online? >> that was something we had to try to explore what would be the best options, what we do is we'll invite people if we're going to celebrate communion to go and find some juice and
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crackers and we'll actually pray and then invite them to participate in receiving the lord's supper. interestingly with people all over the world. >> what do you think as a pastor, what do you want people to get from one of your services online? what do they walk away from the computer with? >> for one thing we've got people that may be exploring christianity and this is a good option for them that may not step foot in a physical church building. so we would like to clearly communicate the truth of the bible and the way that people would understand. that's the top priority for us. beyond that, we find that people can really worship, will often gather around with maybe a family has a sick child so the family would gather around and sing and worship together, or someone's traveling, they stay connected to their church that way. they can invite a friend who might not come to church, who says there is no way i'm going to go to a physical church
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building after some hurt or some kind of fear. and so, it's a tool to help, instead of trying to get people to come to a church we feel we can take a church to them. >> thank you so much for telling us all about what us what it's like to go to church online. that's craig rochelle, the senior pastor. holly, back to you. there you have it. absolutely no excuses. here's something you don't see on the internet every day. the intimate moment of child birth live. >> there you go. >> happy birthday. >> a minnesota couple decided to share the birth of their baby online. they welcomed their 6 pound 8 ounce girl yesterday on a social networking site called momslikeme.com that tracked lindsey's experience from day one following her around for her checkups and all of the way
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through her eight-hour labor and delivery. the former teacher looked at the experience as an educational tool and a way to create a lasting memento for her baby girl. ♪ oh, christmas tree ♪ your branches green >> the capitol hill christmas tree has begun it's long journey to washington. the tree is an 85-foot tall blue spruce harvested yesterday from the mountains of northeastern arizona. the 7,000-pound tree is now on a statewide tour of arizona and will arrive in washington on november 30th. the tradition of having states provide a capitol christmas tree started 40 years ago. this is the first year the tree has come from arizona. 20 years ago tomorrow this scene kept people around the world riveted to their televisi televisions as an entire way of life changed almost overnight
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millions of people tasted real freedom for the first time. how germany is marking the fall of the berlin wall.
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