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tv   C-SPAN Weekend  CSPAN  January 9, 2011 1:00pm-3:58pm EST

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together. >> thanks for the call. pam is joining us from baltimore. go ahead, please. >> caller: good morning. i want to send my condolences out to the congresswoman and everyone who has been affected, especially the nine-year-old girl who ended up losing her life. i would have identified myself probably more to less but at this point, we're all americans and the hatred and to say it has no bearing on the things that are current today is to me ridiculous. to say this man is mental ly.
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this woman is fighting for her life and they are are fighting over glen beck contribute. we all contribute. this country
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host: next is victor joining us from mississippi. caller: first of all, my prayers go out to this family. we have to bear some responsibility for what happened. we are used so often by politicians, democrats or republicans both. when they want to get elected, they put us against each other.
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republicans say democrats are giving welfare to the poor people. every time they want to get elected, they say these things and they incite hatred in people. democrats do the same thing. they say the republicans are against the poor. people take these things and they run with them. and they have violence in their intentions with one another. if we stop doing these things, the people would come together. we need to vote them all out, not just the democrats, but the republicans. host: thank you. tomorrow morning we will be talking about this on "washington journal." we will discuss a peace looking
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at the constitution and justice antonin scalia. that is tomorrow morning on "washington journal." more of your phone calls as we await the press briefing. carlos is joining us from houston. quick comment because this briefing will begin momentarily. caller: i want to give my condolences to rep difference' -- representative giffords' family. host: the briefing is starting. >> it is my pleasure to introduce to you director mueller from the fbi. as we told you yesterday, not
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only our two agencies, but all state and local agencies and balls have not -- agencies involved, have not only been working hand in hand, but are joined at the hip. the investigation is progressing smoothly. at this time, i would like to introduce director mueller from the fbi. >> thank you, sheriff. good morning, everyone. first, i would like to express my condolences to the friends and family of gabrielle giffords, judge john roll, and the other victims of this tragedy. there was a child who was there to learn more about how our government works. other members of the community where meeting with their elected
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officials for the first time our work running errands on what would have been an ordinary weekend. this was an attack on our institutions and our way of life. as you know, jared loughner, was subdued by brave quick thinking people on the scene. he is now in federal custody. formal charges are expected this afternoon. federal agents and deputy sheriffs are working to learn as much as possible to gather the facts to determine why someone would commit such a heinous act and if anyone else was involved. while we do not yet have all of the answers to these questions, i can assure you that teams of professionals are working toward a single ball. that is to -- single goal.
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that is to find the facts and ensure that justice is done. given this tragedy, all logical precautions are in place to best insure the safety of other public officials. but i will say and emphasize that there is no information at this time to suggest any specific threat remains. for those of us on the ground and for all of us, the work goes on. we will continue to dedicate all necessary resources to every level of this investigation and do everything we can to insure that our elected officials and the citizens we serve are safe. with that, i would be happy, and
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the sheriff would be happy to answer any questions you have. stand up. yes, sir. >> i wanted to know about the motive regarding the shooting. >> the investigation is barely 24 hours old. it is a little early to speculate on those motels. there will be a filing in federal court this afternoon -- on those motives. there will be a filing in federal court this afternoon. that me go to the next person. yes, ma'am. [unintelligible] >> i will not comment on those particular laws. in this particular case, we have
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information that he purchased weapons in november of last year. we have been falling up along with atf on that. yes, sir. [unintelligible] >> as to the first question, it is quite obviously something we are closely looking at. we are pursuing all leads. we have put out a photograph of an individual who appears to be entering the safeway with the suspect, with these subjects. we are hoping to identify that individual. -- entry the safeway with the subject -- entering the seventh
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wave with the subject. we have put out that photograph. the second part of the question -- i do believe he will be charged with the assault on the congresswoman, with the killing of judge roll and the assault of the other staffers. there may be additional charges filed. yes, ma'am. [unintelligible] >> i cannot get into the details of the time in custody. the next step will be the filing of a complaint, probably this afternoon. after that, an initial
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appearance. i am not certain when that will occur. [unintelligible] >> i am not sure that has been scheduled yet. [unintelligible] >> again, i cannot get into the details of the action with him after he was arrested by the sheriff's deputies. [unintelligible] >> i think i indicated it was purchased in november of last year, 2010. it was a glock 9 millimeter. [unintelligible] >> the direction was to come and assure that the investigators, whether it be share of -- sheriff investigators, that they
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are conducting an investigation as needed. we have been working closely together out of one command center since late yesterday afternoon. his concern was that everything be done to ensure that the individual or individuals are brought to justice and no stone remains on turned to that end -- unturned to that end. [unintelligible] >> will additional charges be expected in state court for the other victims? >> there was a discussion with the united states attorney as to how you would outline these charges. i would refer to them about charges that may be brought in federal or state court down the
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road. yes. in the back. [unintelligible] >> correct me if i am wrong sheriff. i do not know where you heard that. we did say there was a nine-year old girl who had been shot. where that information you are talking about came from, i have no knowledge. [unintelligible] >> that is not correct. >> yes, ma'am. [unintelligible] >> we do not believe so. >> what city was begun purchased in? >> it was a gun shop and we can get you the city information afterwards.
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yes? [unintelligible] >> the package to which you refer did not contain any explosives. it is premature to determine that it is not related to the circumstances relating to congresswoman giffords. we have that package. we will be running it through our laboratories to determine whether dna fingerprints -- whether dna or fingerprints were left. yes, sir. right here. >> can you discuss the images and the posting that he put on
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youtube. but i can tell you with regard to the record -- >> i can tell you with regard to the record a little bit. i have seen postings that were obtained by the media. we will be looking at every one of those postings and any activity he had, whether it be e-mail or other communications. we will be looking at his phocion -- looking at his associates to see if they continue to be a threat. >> was he involved in any type of hate group? >> i have seen some allusion to that in the media. that is something we will look
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at and focus on in the course of the investigation. >> could you find in history where he had contact with the congresswoman or attempted to contact her? >> we have indication he attended a similar event in 2007. the specifics of that will come out in the course of the legal proceedings. yes, sir? >> is the agency getting more threats because things on both sides of the political aisle are causing this?
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>> we do not know the motivation of the suspect. whether it is international terrorism or domestic terrorism, the ubiquitous nature of the internet means hate speech and other insightful speech is much more readily available to individuals that it was 10 or 15 years ago. that represents a chance -- a challenge for us, particularly when it results in a lone wolf or loan offender undertaking attacks. right here. >> what type of website day live at? was it an extreme political
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website? >> we are still looking at that. [unintelligible] >> it appears that the target was the congresswoman. >> does he have a lawyer yet? >> have you ruled out that the other person had any part in transporting the suspect or was involved in being a getaway person? >> we want to identify him to determine what he may have seen or if he has any secondary role as an accomplice. [unintelligible] >> that i am not certain about. yes. in the back. sorry. i could not hear.
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[unintelligible] as we have shown in the photos we put out, it shows the individual in safeway near the individual who has been detained. yes, ma'am? >> since judge roll was a member of the judiciary here, what that ility with theithere be [unintelligible] >> i am not sure about that. >> we have time for two other questions. we have people from the sheriff's department and the
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fbi. >> members of congress, we have these types of events. can you talk about the security that gabrielle giffords had? will security in the future change? >> i can assure you that that is an issue that is being discussed in the halls of congress. how can we increase security against such threats that we see here? at the fbi, when we are referred complaints from the members of congress, we pursue them until we are certain that the individual or individuals do not constitute a continuous threat. i know that capitol police, the sergeant at arms, are working with congrressmen and senators
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to inform them about the investigation and what steps will be taking in the -- will be taken in the future. [unintelligible] >> not that i am aware. let's see. someone who has not asked. [unintelligible] >> the charge is expected to be filed today are based on the shooting of the congresswoman and the killing the judge john roll. i will not preclude that additional charges will not be brought as the investigation continues. thank you. [unintelligible] >> excuse me. i am david gonzales, united states marshal for the district of columbia.
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[unintelligible] >> any questions pertaining to the actual shooting, i would lead to the sheriff and the fbi. my role is the protection of the judiciary and to determine if there was any organized plot on the judge or any other judges in arizona or judges nationally. >> have you determined if that is the case? can you determine -- can you talk about what position he was in in relation to the shooter? >> i will leave that to the sheriff. >> the director addressed the question of the weapon. i would like to amplify a little bit on the weapon and how it was secured.
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there were three people. i do not have the names of the people involved. wendy gentleman ran out of ammunition from his first magazine -- when the gentleman ran out of ammunition from his first magazine, a woman went up and grabs the magazine and tore it away from him. while he was trying to put another magazine in, he was successful in doing that. it also had 31 bullets in it. there would have been a greater catastrophe had he been successful in doing that. fortunately, the spring in the magazine failed. the two gentlemen were able to get it away from him and subdue him until the law enforcement people arrived. >> there is some confusion about the number of casualties.
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do you have a definitive number? >> the information we have now is that there are six deceased and a total of 20 people shot, including the six victims. >> howard dean pronounced his name? -- how do you pronounced his name? >> the polish pronunciation is loughner. >> he is changing out of his spent cartridge and he tries to assert another one. >> he is able to insert the other one, but it does not fire. two men were able to get the weapon away from him and throw it away. [unintelligible]
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>> she was also wounded when she did this. [unintelligible] >> she was trying to get the gun away from him. >> there were indications he was saying goodbye to friends. was he planning on getting arrested or getting away? >> when the investigation is completed, we will be in a better position to answer that question completely. >> can you talk about the timeline leading up to the shooting? >> i think the shooting began around 10:00 a.m. >> so he went from his house there? >> we do not know how he got there. [unintelligible]
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>> you can probably call most murders a hate crime. >> what is the current you on this person up interest? >> we are still searching for this person of interest. we are more satisfied that this person may not have been involved in this incident. we still need to talk to him to verify that. [unintelligible] >> when you say documented, exactly what is your question? >> has he ever been committed? >> i do not know the answer. >>[unintelligible] >> i cannot answer that question at the moment.
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[unintelligible] >> i think there is no question about that. as the director mentioned, there will be meetings taking place, not only about the people in washington and how they are protected in what today, but as most of you have come to the conclusion, unless there are some specific requests for specific intelligence that there may be a problem, they are not aware of the numerous appearances by elected officials that take place every day. >> can you give us a timeframe? have these threats ibeen in recent months? >> yes. >> he said jared loughner had been at a similar event in 2007.
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>> that is correct. [unintelligible] >> it did. >> regarding the woman. can you describe her in any way? >> i cannot. we can make that information available to you after the conference. >> are you now saying that jared loughner was the only person involved in this? >> i am not say that. officers had some collaboration about this. we decided to release this picture as a person of interest. based on information we have developed, it would appear to us that the person may not have been involved at all. we still need to verify that. we are still actively seeking
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this individual. >> the other event. was that here in tucson? do you know anything about that? >> what i can tell you is that there was some correspondence between different offices and him about a similar event. he was invited to attend. >> the office invited him to attend? >> yes. 2007. [unintelligible] >> i do not know. do not know. [unintelligible] >> was the federal judge who was killed supposed to be under u.s. marshals protection? >> no.
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he was not. he had some issues he wanted to discuss with the councilmen. she was nearby where he lived. he took the opportunity to discuss some business with her. >> do you now know who he is or who he might be? >> we do not. [unintelligible] >> i am not in a position to address that right now. [unintelligible] >> he was nearby gabrielle giffords. [unintelligible] i do not know the answer to that. >> can you talk about the surveillance tapes you are in the process of reviewing?
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>> i am not at liberty to talk about that. [unintelligible] >> tell us a little bit about your personal feelings. >> i vacillate between extreme sadness and sorrow and shock and extreme anger. [unintelligible] >> can you ask the question again please? [unintelligible] >> i think that when the rhetoric about hatred, about mistrust of government, about how government operates and you try to inflame the public on a daily basis 24 hours a day, seven days a week, that has an
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impact on people, especially those who are unbalanced personalities to begin with. [unintelligible] >> i do not know. [unintelligible] >> i do not know the answer to that question. [unintelligible] >> i think we are the tombstone of the united states of america. >> is that a reference to the john? >> i have never -- -- is that a reference to the town? >> i have never been a proponent of letting people carry weapons whenever they want. the legislature at this time is proposing that students and teachers be allowed to have weapons in schools and college.
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colleges ought to be run by the college presidents, not the arizona legislature. that is the 3 digit -- the ridiculous state we have come to. and we have one more question. [unintelligible] >> yes, she was shot before grabbing the weapon. >> what about the mental health laws and the treatment of the mentally ill? >> that is an everyday issue for the entire united states for the entire world. we have serious problems in this community. in 1960, when i was a young cop on the beat, we put mentally ill people who were a threat into the system and we incarcerate them. today, they are out on the streets and we are paying the price. thank you.
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[unintelligible] >> we will have to address that as information becomes available. briefings like this, not likely. press releases, yes. host: the comments of pima county sheriff clarence dupnik. our thanks to kvoa tv for allowing us to share this with you. the comments of fbi director robert mueller. according to speaker of the house don banner, the flags are at half staff in washington, d.c. a total of 20 shooting that comes, six deaths and 14 injured. if you what information on the timeline, the first shots were fired 10 minutes after 10:00 a.m.
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the first 911 call coming out at 11 minutes after 10:00 a.m. minutes later, gabrielle giffords was being taken to the emergency room. we are told she is in an emergency coma. she is responding to simple commands. she is not able to see. her eyes are closed at the moment. she is able to squeeze her hand and respond to simple commands allowing the doctors to say they are encouraged and optimistic about her prognosis 24 hours after the shooting. we want to hear from you. 202-585-3885, that is our ally for democrats. 202-585-3886 is the line for
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republicans. reynaldo on the line for republicans. go ahead. caller: the key for the opportunity. i thank you for c-span. -- thank you for the opportunity. i thank you for a c-span. i am sorry for the victims and their families. i agree with the start -- with the sheriff. the be baiting by both of the parties on radio and television -- the debating by both of the parties on radio and television has to stop. you learned to fly by using a simple --a simulator.
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we have to change our laws to make sure this rhetoric does not get into our public streets under the excuse of the first amendment and freedom of speech. host: we have a comment from joining. go ahead. caller: i sent my condolences to the victims and their families. i would like to say that sarah palin made comments about reloading and in the cross hairs. what we must realize about these type of situations -- because president obama won, the people who are infected him were elated. you have people who hate him. this is the rhetoric. these domestic threats have
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picked up against politicians. whether you will admit or not, people were taking assault weapons to president obama's political rallies. host: we have violence in this country in the 1960's. the assassination of robert kennedy. we saw the assassination attempt against ronald reagan. how can you attribute it to recent events. we have a history of violence in our country. caller: those were for other reasons. you did not have a black man as president during those times. you have a reason for violence. you can have racial hatred or violence and different types of things. martin luther king was killed, but he was for nonviolence.
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host: thank you for the call and your point of view. the sergeant of arms of the house of representatives issued a statement with regard to safety measures for members of congress. there is a lot of protection here in washington. the capitol police department asking for a 54% increase in their budget for 2011 because of their needs and costs for protecting congress. the sergeant of arms said he is asking all members of congress to report things that seems suspicious. if you are appearing at a rally and feel uncertain about your safety, he is asking those members of congress to contact the capitol police or the sergeant at arms.
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from chicago, go ahead. caller: first of all, i would like to give my condolences to the victims of the shooting. an earlier caller said blame should not be placed. we have republicans and democrats who are against each other. i did not hear a democrat screaming, we must take our country back. i did not see one democrat said we must reload. i did not see one democrat saying they were putting an opponent in their cross hairs. we have a 9-year-old girl who lost her life. sarah palin would jump on television and spit all of this rhetoric. when is she going to be on television and what is she going to say about the graphic she put up?
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she needs to talk about her rhetoric and what it may lead to. they said we should not jump to conclusions, but this is the conclusion of that type of rhetoric. we supposedly live in the united states. as a black man, i cannot go to any city and live in peace. there is nothing american about that. the people on both sides need to pull themselves back and do a little soul-searching. you have innocent lives taken. they say they do this to support their party. host: kevin from st. paul, go ahead. caller: actually, i am call in from pennsylvania. host: go ahead.
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caller: someone said the person that we needed to lead this country will not be part of this. this has gone on from -- on for a long time. i am hope i am not -- i hope i am not misquoting colin powell. she said -- he said there are as many lunatics in my party as there are in yours. i hope we get more money so we can get some of these people out of these parties. there are extremes in each party. maybe we need to get that out of it. host: thank you for the call. we heard from fbi director robert muller. rep giffords was the target of
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the shooting. for ast one staff er congresswoman giffords was killed. john boehner spoke outside his district in cincinnati. >> good morning. the thoughts and prayers of the house and the nation are with congresswoman giffords and her family. we are also pressing for the families of judge roll and all of those who were taken from us so senselessly. among them was gabe simmerman. zimmerman.
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i have ordered that the flags be flown at half staff. an attack on one who serves is an attack on all who serve. i want to commend the federal, state, and local officials, as well as the capitol police, for all of their efforts. i told the fbi that the house stands ready to assist in anyway possible. last night, the majority leader announced that the normal business of the house for the coming week has been postponed so that we can take necessary action regarding yesterday's events. the majority will announce a revised schedule. to the house and their staff, i ask that you keep gabby and her family in your prayers. public service is a high honor. but these tragic events remind us that all of us in our role as public servants take a risk.
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this in human act should not and will not deter us from our calling to represent our constituents and fulfil our oath of office. no act, no matter how heinous, actust be allowed =--- no must be allowed to stop us from our duties. host: the scheduled vote on the health care bill has been changed. the arizona governor said today that she still plans to deliver state address tomorrow. she added she will revise what she will say because of the shootings in tucson. she was working on the speech
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when word of the shootings broke. we heard from her yesterday. we will be covering her remarks as part of our coverage of the state of the state's speeches. her speech will be act 3:45 p.m. eastern. caller: i want to give my condolences and prayers to the families and especially to the little girl who lost her life. i believe the rhetoric and the bigotry is unexcelled -- is unacceptable, especially in the political arena. its suggestions of cross hairs were clear to us all. -- the suggestions of cross hairs were clear to us all. it is sad to think the shooter
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was unstable. what would be more sad would be if the shooter was in his right mind. that is all i have to say. people are using the fact that he was unstable as an excuse. it gives more reasons why people in leadership should choose their words wisely. sarah palin, if she suggested these things, i would like to know what she is going to say to the family of the 9-year-old girl and the family of representative difference and the rest of america now. host: thank you for your call. christine taylor was born on 9/11, the day of the attacks in new york city. judge john roll, a federal
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district judge and gabe zimmerman. mark kelly, the husband of gabrielle giffords, is in arizona now. they were married a few years ago. caller: one issue i have not heard addressed is how someone so deranged, who was considered unfit for the army, is allowed to walk into a gun store and legally by a sickly assault rifle. the people in arizona need to aultand by a sisemi-ass
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rifle. host: someone in the newspaper is saying, it is natural to jump to conclusions. editorial is available on the website. caller: good afternoon. thank you for accepting my call. i am concerned because there is no one who wants to hold sarah palin response before what has happened. sarah palin put a cross hair on representative giffords' head. she has blood on her hands. i cannot understand everyone now was to protect sarah palin and the tea party. they want to call for peace. where were the calls for peace
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before this happened. giffords' office was broken into? when there was an attack on represented difference -- representative giffords. they wanted to get the majority back for the american people to voted for them. now they are back in office and they are running scared. they know that they are irresponsible. the republicans have blood on their hands. there are so many of them who are not in their right mind. should they be put out of office because they are not in their right mind? they want to make excuses and say this young man was not in his right mind. host: we should point out that sarah palin issued a statement
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yesterday condemning what happened in arizona. senator john mccain, the presidential nominee in 2008, called the suspect in this case which it. he condemned what he did and said he is a disgrace to arizona and the human race. that is a strong statement from senator john mccain. we will go to joe next. where are you phoning from? caller: new jersey. the first day i want to say is that this is a terrible thing that has happened to our country. it is not because of any particular party. the politics being played at this time is absolutely wrong. we should be addressing the poor families, the victims, and how we can change the political environment that has allowed this to happen. it is not the republicans.
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it is not the democrats. it is the politicians. they have created a venomous atmosphere where there is such hatred. even our president is, to some extent, at fault. when you have politicians who have been elected by less than 50% of the electorate, let alone 50% of the residents of their district, making decisions that are greatly on popular, they create an environment where this kind of thing happens. that is why we had a revolution. host: thank you. next we will go to santa rosa, california. caller: i want to say that i feel that all of this about rhetoric and fueling the fires or is in such as this is that, people need to look at speech.
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this is not about democrat or republican. this is about one man acting on an impulse. many people are suffering because of it. host: senator lamar alexander said -- warns against blaming any group for the attack. he called on everyone to tone down the toxic rhetoric who can lead unstable individuals to believe violence is an acceptable response. on the democrats' line, go ahead. caller: my condolences go out to all of the families. the responsibility goes to the media, i do not care if it is radio or television.
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i am a white person living in a racist area. i hear a lot of different people talk about things against the government. it is disconcerting to hear that type of talk coming out of people's mouth. there are people in the media who inside this. after my day at work, i listen to rush limbaugh. he and sides of violence. you have people who are unstable. i listen to rush limbaugh after work. he incites violence. i am not saying it is right to go out and have this type of talk. but make people understand what
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the government is doing. host: from connecticut. go ahead please. caller: i hear anybody talking about the problems of hatred and rhetoric. do you know where the rhetoric and the hate comes from? it comes from people on fox news. bill reilly, sean hennessey, and culture -- ann coulter. i would like them to abide me on their show and have them call me a communist to my face. they are the ones who put this hatred out there. how would they like it if we got guns and locked and load. when they like to hear us talk like that like sarah palin does? with the republicans like to hear that? today, we talked about the developing situation in tucson,
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arizona. here is a portion from this morning's "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: you are hurt in how many radio stations around the country? guest: thousands. host: here is what house minority -- house majority leader erich kantor said, tragedy for everybody. what do you think? guest: on a human level, it was an enormous tragedy. a judge, an aide who was killed,
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a congresswoman who was shot. it is a violent act. it does not appear to be a politically motivated act. these things happen every day. but we are in washington. when it happens, it brings it home in a more vivid way. it has a ripple effect. as a christian, you pray for the families and asked to bring mercy and a measure of grace. host: is this part of the political discourse? guest: i agree with everything pete said. i was on the -- she was elected to the student council. she goes to see a member of congress because she is interested in politics and learning more about government. she is shot and killed for that
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act. this is a senseless tragedy. i was struck by what the sheriff said. this is a time for some soul- searching on the part of all of us, particularly in arizona. the political rhetoric has been red hot. not just in the congressional race, but on the immigration thing and everything. pardon the plug, but i wrote a book about this. the radical right has poisoned america's airways. it can produce violent actions. the share of the -- the sheriff said that the rhetoric is free speech, but it does have consequences. that is one of the messages. host: one of the questions from politico asked who shares the
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blame? is that a fair question? guest: no. what we are having today is not as bad as the 1800's. that has been applied to american political discourse since our founding. george w. bush was called a moral coward, a loser, a liar who betrayed his country. the left says very little about it. alan grayson was probably the most vitriolic member of the congress. he gave a speech on the floor
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that said the gop health care plan was to let people die early. to try to avert a human tragedy like this to politics is sickening, especially if there is no evidence. for a public official to create a situation i am quite confident that if a republican had been shot i would not be blaming people who are harsh critics of president bush. it is quite depressing this is happening. >> i'm not blaming anybody but the not who shot her. but one other problem we should talk about is this net to shot her was able to get his hand on
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a glock 19, which should never be allowed in arizona or anywhere else. but i think you are dead wrong. i'm reading letters about john and abigail adams right now. it took weeks if not months for abigail to get a letter from massachusetts to philadelphia. with the instant communication, you have a guy like savage -- michael savage, who uses violent talk all of the time, instantaneously, he can say something ugly and it's out there. we had a situation this summer where glenn beck called george soros the most evil man. the oakland police arrested a man who is headed to san francisco who was going to wipe out the leader of the tides foundation. so a centrist democrat, she was one of the women, one of the
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candidates that sarah palin put up and put cross hairs of their names and districts -- to somebody that is unhinged, at cross hairs means pick out your gun and go after them. >> she did issue a statement saying she was shocked and dismayed. rep deferreds -- represented -- represent giffords she said was one of the person who needs to goal. -- and needs to go. >> i do not disagree that civil discourse is important. as it happens, i have written things critical of glenn beck, michael savage, and the party members.
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i wrote a book where we talked about the importance as christians in politics -- i think it is a perfectly voluble debate. you do not hear liberals -- i have yet to find a liberal who went after alan grayson, and his record is a deplorable. and the people criticized bush. when you take about this issue of political discourse and tethered to a killing like this when it may well not even be valid, but to have the "new york times" write a story on rhetoric and political pitch real -- when it appears and we have to wait and see, that it had nothing to do with it. the implication here is that sometimes rhetoric goes too far. somehow it is the trigger for political assassination, i think is slightly sickening and
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certainly unwarranted. host: that was some of the discussion this morning on " washington dirl." we will be talking more tomorrow on the events in tucson, arizona. already the congressional schedule has been altered this week. bill kristol will be joining us, the editor of the "weekly standard." jeffrey rosen also has an editorial today in the "new york times, looking at the constitution. and jack jennings, the chief executive officer on the center of education policy, a report that came out on some of the gaps in test scores on gender groups. meanwhile, we are keeping an eye on things in the nation's capital. there is a live view of the flags at half staff in honor of those killed yesterday in arizona.
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the democratic caucus chair is expected to meet with reporters later this afternoon. we will have coverage of those comments as democrats reflect on rep gabrielle gifford who remains in critical condition. we got a briefing from the medical team to hours ago. here is that event. >> good morning, everyone, and thank you for being here. i am the interim ceo of the university of arizona health care. university of arizona health care is the parent of the university, center where it this is located. in a few moments, i will turn the microphone over to our front line doctors.
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those are the people you want to hear from the most about the condition of the 10 patients we now have in the aftermath of yesterday's tragedy. before i do that, i want to make a few brief comments. i promise i will be brief. i want to thank the first-line responders on the scene yesterday. the law enforcement officers, paramedics, the flight crews, ambulance crews, you all made a difference and you all save lives. i want to thank dr. reid and our trauma team. i have always held our people here in the highest regard. they have always inspired me, but i have never been so proud in my life as i was at yesterday as they rose to the occasion in almost combat conditions. i want to thank our emergency physicians to rose to the occasion yesterday to help out
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in this crisis. all of our nurses and staff, including social workers, clergy, and all of our support crew. yesterday was a challenging day for tucson, the state of arizona, and the nation. we will get through this. i am convinced after i saw the way people pulled together yesterday. in a minute, i will turn the microphone over to dr. reid. we plan to do daily updates at 10:00 a.m. and we will hang around in the of questions afterwards. for now, -- i would like to think the mayor for being with us here today. also the dean of the college of medicine joining us here today and i would like to introduce the president of the ever see of arizona who would like to make a few brief remarks and he will turn it over to dr. peter reid.
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thank you. >> thank you very much. i will be brief because the individuals you want to hear from our legitimate on my right in the white coats. -- the individual you want to hear from most are the gentlemen on ireland right in the white coats. there's a critical time line getting people into the operating room and into the hands of these exceptional individuals. another individual i want to mention is the chair of surgery. he will have a word to say. he joined us about three and a half years ago and has built the extraordinary team in surgery and trauma. i think is safe to say this team is second to none and the timeline and rapid response has save lives.
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you will hear from the chief of neuroscience and neurosurgery. and the chief of trauma and surgical care. i offer on behalf of the entire university of arizona community, certainly tucson, arizona and beyond, our appreciation and thanks for the remarkable skills of these error -- skills of these individuals. it is my pleasure to introduce the doctor who is chair of surgery here at the university of arizona. >> thank you. i will be very brief. this is obviously a sad day for the families, the community, for the state of arizona and the nation. our hearts go out to the families of the victims this is
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something we are rarely prepared for, but we were fortunate enough to have a doctor here with than one hour, six patients in the operating room, for trauma surgeons in the operating rooms, to neurosurgeons who are here, we had a vascular surgeon and it took 38 minutes for the most critical injured person to be transferred to the operating room. it is my great pleasure to introduce the individuals who are crucial in the recovery of the victims to you now. dr. peter reed has served our nation with great distinction in foreign wars in afghanistan and iraq. it is always the willingness of people to support us, the people in the operating room,
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everybody did a marvelous job yesterday and i think our community and the state can be proud of what happened here yesterday. >> thank you. i am the trauma medical director here at the university of arizona university medical center. we suffered a tragedy here. i never thought i would experience something like this in my own backyard. i have a lot of sympathy and empathy for the people here and this is a very trying time for all of us. our condolences to the patients and families. my update will be fairly short period we had a combination of 11 patients we have seen here at the hospital. hearst was a 9-year-old child who came in dead. we tried to resuscitate her,
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including surgery, but we were unable to resuscitate her and bring her back. we had five patients brought to us in serious conditions. of those patients, we had an additional five patients who are not in such a dire situation. we ended up doing six surgeries, including a variety of things in the trauma at combat scenario. we were doing things in the chest, abdomen, vascular and orthopedic in nature as well. as of this morning, we are happy to stay -- happy to state only one patient remains in critical condition and we will be able to discuss that in more detail. the rest have been moved out of the i see you and we have three in serious condition and the rest are in fair or good condition with one patient being discharged. with the one patient in serious
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condition is the congresswoman. at this point, i will turn it over to the chief of neurosurgery you can give you more information. >> thank you. i am the chief of narrow surgery here. i want to reiterate that our thoughts and prayers go out to the families of all of those hurt here. let me reiterate that this is a team effort at a level one trauma center and that kind of research enables this effort. everything from the emergency room physicians, support staff and nursing, the doctors able to tree osh the patients and get them to the operating room in 38 minutes. the anesthesiologist and support staff -- this kind of effort and outcome as possible because of these resources. let me take you back to the
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sequence of events to clear up some of the information there. congresswoman giffords was shot in the head. when she arrived, the report was she was able to follow commands, she was responsive to verbal communication. we very quickly got her back to the operating room within 30 minutes. once in the operating word, we went through our routine procedure for this kind of injury. that consisted of controlling the bleeding which was not severe or excess of. our next objective was to take the pressure off the brain. that was by removing the bone fragments caused by the bullet fracture as well as additional bone to allow the brain to relax. we removed any parts of brain and we did not have to do much of that. i will tell you briefly that when we talk about gunshot wounds to the head, the things
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that are most concerning to us are if the bullet crosses from one hemisphere to the other, one side to the other. if a bullet crosses through the geometric center of the brain. i am happy to say those were not the case in that instance. because of that, gongresswoman giffords is able to communicate with us this morning, following simple commands. we are still in critical condition and a brain swelling at any time can take a turn for the worst. i am cautiously optimistic. i will turn it back over to the doctor will talk about the critical care management will be vital in the next few days. >> the fact that she became an and was following simple commands, she was not verbalizing at that time. after surgery, she was under anesthesia so is hard to say if she was in a coma. we light but the assets and did
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an examination and we were very happy and optimistic because eventually, over the course of the evening, she was able to follow simple commands. this is a very early in the course and we don't know what the deficits will be in the future. we will be able to give you updates as we go along, but we have been very hospital -- we have been very happy at the hospital. we have been able to use hypertonic saline and other things and things are the well and we're all happy at the state. at this time, i will open the floor for questions. >> has she verbalized at all? there was a reunion of sorts with her husband last night. could you talk about that? >> we cannot get into much detail but i can tell you with the type of surgery, she cannot open her eyes from a mechanical
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standpoint. she is on a ventilator and cannot speak at this time. it could be anything as squeeze a hand or show us to fingers. it is very simple, but we take those simple commands for granted but they apply -- they imply high-level of functioning in the brain. >> this was not a grazing wound through the brain. this was a devastating land which travel the length of the brain on a blank -- on the left side. they have played this down, but they have saved a life. the function tells us how much injury bullet did, but the fact she had a lot of reservation -- as time goes on, the cavitation a fax from the blood itself will have some degeneration of brain cells and matter. we will have to see what happens
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later on. >> [inaudible] >> the most important thing is how she was before the surgery. in brain injury, particularly gun shot wound. we of the primary injury, the damage done by the bullet as it traverses. we cannot fix that. then there is secondary industries -- secondary injury which is caused by the swelling which we can try to mollify. if she comes in and is able to follow commands, that implies the brain circuits are still working and that's very important. the more we see them working after the surgery in the first 24 hours, the more encouraged we are. >> [inaudible] >> it went through from the left side from the back to the front. in most people, the left side controlled their right side of
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strength and sensation, and in most people it controls their speech functions and their ability to understand it make a speech, including the ability to make and understand simple commands. the surgery took about two hours. there was a little bit of an extension and we had a surgeon performing decompression because one of the fractures was affecting the i saw it. >> [inaudible] how long might the congresswomen have to be in the hospital? >> we do not speculate on the degree of recovery. it's not productive. in neurosurgery, we talk about between months and years. we do not close the book until
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we are several weeks out. it is not uncommon to be in the icu in the week and be in hospital for two or three weeks and there will be a rehabilitative phase which could take weeks to months. beyond that, setting the actual date is not productive. >> [inaudible] >> the drugs we use our -- we can get a good assessment, resting between those times and when we wake her up at how she responds is what we are able to base our prognosis on. i know that the doctor just did
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the surgery and everybody is going to be cautious, but i am optimistic and i was optimistic yesterday when i saw the amount of injury. but overall, this is about as good as you're going to get. when you are shot in the head and a bullet goes through brain, the chances of living are very small and the chances of the waking up and falling demand is the been much smaller than that. so far, this has been a good situation. we do not know which way is going to go. >> has there been a cat scan and what does that show? >> we had a cat scan before the first surgery and that tells us where we have to focus our efforts. i cannot go into the details for obvious patient privacy issues, but it showed the track of the blood through the left hemisphere and showed it was not through the critical trajectories that would have made it recovery much more difficult.
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>> [inaudible] >> normally, like when you spread your knee, fluid accumulates and there is a tremendous amount of pain. a brain would go to that same situation except that when a gets tense, the blood flow to the neurons and brain cells gets compromise. in this kind of situation, the doctor took the skull off and kept it off. so right now, on half of her brain, she does not have a skull. is preserved and we can reimplant that right now. that is part of the progress we have made in the euro surgery. what we have learned in experience from the military, letting the brain swell and not be constrained within the cavity has helped a lot. i think that played a major important factor here as well. >> if we run into trouble in the
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next couple of days, we have further tools. we can use medical embolus to dry out the brain and we can put a tube in to measure pressure and relieve the necessary. but because she looks good right now, there is no need for that. brain swelling is the biggest threat at this point. >> you said the bullet went through the back side of her head. did it come out of her forehead? >> from a forensic perspective, doctors are leery to state for sure, but what the experience we had, it looks like it did go from the back to the front. she is in a medical, right now. we have induced that, to register. we wake her up frequently to see what her progress is to make sure something catastrophic has not occurred while she is asleep. >> we turn off the sedation and
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that allows her brain to function at the highest level. >> it puts you into a pharmaceutical,. you can turn off and within minutes, you can't understand how it is. she is not suffering from being on the ventilator. >> can you try to explain how a brain can function at a near normal level with a bullet going all the way through it? is there any part making up for compensating in some way? >> i do not want to give you my opinion. i will let the experts tell you. >> this question borders on speculation for recovery, but suffice it to say there are
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obvious areas of the brain that are less tolerant to intrusion. it does not mean we're using 10 percent of our brain or the other parts of the printer not important. it means the brain is able to recover from his injuries as opposed to areas we call eloquent. without -- you are going. i don't want to go down the speculation road. at the same time, we are cautiously optimistic. >> with a penetrating brain injury, there is always a surprise. >> they said in a lot of cases -- what do you attribute the person being alive to. the paramedics got us -- got her
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to us quickly. we have a system in place and it looks like a finely tuned machine. we got her here quickly and the trauma surgeon who treated her did everything right. we got her quickly lined up and assessed and knew what injuries she had. the anesthesia staff put her to sleep and got her ready for the neurosurgery personnel. all of these things -- everyone gets a part of the credit. was not a particular individual who put a finger in the hole. >> [inaudible] >> there were a lot of other victims who came in here. unfortunately -- for july, no one who should have died died. and they're doing well. we were able to transfer everyone from the icu to the
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ward status which is an indication of how well they are doing. so far, we're happy with the prognosis about -- prognosis of all of the other individuals. it was a neat mass casualty we had in tucson and the hospital, what their preparation and their preparation and experience, they were able to pull this thing through and the medical community all contributed to this. we were in a good condition yesterday. >> [inaudible] >> she could not speak. she did not say any words. >> [inaudible] >> this does not compare. this is -- i have all the gear i could possibly want. is a luxury for me.
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this trauma center in southern arizona, we are the only one and this is as good as it gets. i'm very happy to call this my work here. you can see --w i'm not a political person, does the public servant. >> [inaudible] >> sometimes when we have these kinds of injuries, we have to use the drills to take off these call and relax the brain. a lot of the fractures have done work for us and it was a matter of removing larger pieces and extending it. that is probably the simplest way to say it. we will put it back when the brain has relaxed sufficiently. it may take several months, but every case is the individual. thank you for coming and your attention today.
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>> thank you for coming. the doctors will be available for interviews and most of the interviews will go through katie riling from the marketing and pr. we will have another medical bulletin tomorrow at 10:00. we will keep you apprised of any changes and the condition of the victims. we will keep this open and transparent to all of you and share the information. at this point, we are happy to say we have one critically injured person and the rest of the patients are doing better. we will see you tomorrow and if there are any questions, the doctors will be available. thank you for coming. host: that was the briefing from about two and a half hours ago from tucson, ariz., the doctors
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dealing with the six victims died and the other 14 who were injured in the shooting that began shortly after 10:00 local time in tucson, arizona. flags are at half staff in the capital to pay tribute to the staff who was killed and a judge and staffer who was involved. three senior citizens and a 9- year-old girl who was in attendance to learn more about government were among those killed yesterday. we will take your phone calls in a few minutes. we are awaiting live coverage from the democratic leadership teleconference call with members of the sergeant at arms. he will speak to reporters at the cannon house office building. dan is joining us from brooklyn, new york. caller: out to offer my condolences to anyone involved. but i want to take issue with
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your conservative guess on the last part he said he did not think this was that all political. i think the youtube videos he posted deftly point out this was political. he had the picture with the gun on top of the constitution and he has these rambling youtube videos which talk a lot about the government and being afraid of the government and the things you might hear from conservative talk-show hosts. i just want to point out i do think it was politically motivated. thank you. from the republican line, stillwater, minn.. caller: i do want to offer my condolences. i think is an absolute miracle she is still alive and i believe god intervened in her life to show that violence is not the answer for any political
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solutions in america. it has no place. the other thing i want to say is to come to the defense of g mr.lenn beck. i watch his show every single day, it is the only show i watch and over and over again, he is calling for non-violent solutions to the political and economic challenges we face in the 21st century. i want to make it clear that in no way does he support of violence or condoned violence, especially against americans and our elected officials. i hope we can't all learn from this lesson that violence is not the answer for our problems and the challenges we face. host: a colleague who represents a south florida district appeared on "meet the press" earlier today and talked about
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her relationship with gongresswoman giffords. >> she is showing full strength and from what i was told by her staff last night, she woke up and responded to her husband's boys. they sedated her again -- her husband's of voice. for anybody who knows her or has met her, she is the most open, warm, sweet woman. she -- the best way to describe her is she is the kind of person who tries to see the good in everyone. even when she is in the midst of the kind of strife that is going on in southern arizona with the immigration laws and the battleground arizona has been, she always looks on the bright side.
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host: that was from this morning's "meet the press." she was reacting to the shooting of her friend and colleague, gabrielle giffords. we will take some of your phone calls. a caller from georgia is next. caller: >> i would like to offer my condolences to the families involved and i would like to say this kit was sick. the part of the -- blaming it on palin is asinine as blaming it on video games are violent movies. caller: i would like to offer my condolences. the point on how to take this as a citizen of the guided states, i think the rhetoric seems to
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continue, even with -- i am a first-time caller and a lot to say thank you for having c-span, but it just seems there is a hatred or a polarization permeating potentially generally coming out in the citizenship and the comments on both sides. this is a national thing. that is part of the way our country runs. everybody needs to do an introspective look on their comments and feelings right now. really, who are you going to blame? you cannot pick any one person or a party, so everybody take care in how you think and approach this. these sad situations have happened throughout history and will continue to happen. but we should not take it out and pointed at one person and take this incident to polarize everybody.
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we should galvanize our citizens and the introspective and think about what our next steps are as dozens. >> the head of the fbi left to oversee the investigation and we heard from him about two hours ago in tucson, arizona. he was joined by the county sheriffs and we'll have that later this afternoon. we are waiting live coverage of job larsen whose comments will come in about 10 minutes. we where all -- we are learning more about what happened -- to bystanders apparently wrestled the gun away before it was -- before a second round was able to go off. he was attributed with helping to save her life. two staffers were injured and out of critical condition at the ever since medical center.
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14 were injured in total and there were six deaths as a result of the shooting yesterday. we're joined by nancy in dallas tx on the democrats' line. caller: i would like to give my condolences to the families affected by this tragedy. i am wondering why sarah palin -- now everybody is on her bandwagon. i feel sorry for her that she has a child that could benefit from her presence and influence and she chooses to spit out poison to our nation and i hope our people start thinking for themselves and not letting people intervene in their thoughts and put things there that shouldn't be there. caller: a caller from colorado on the republican line --
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host: a caller from colorado on the republican line. caller: i am appalled because the preamble to the civil war -- -- the preamble to the bill of rights says we the people. [unintelligible] as a lifetime member of the mormon church, because of the fear of these people -- this has nothing to do with democrats and republicans. it has to do with anti-society people and we have given them a platform, just like sarah palin. host: the constitution was read in the house. this is from the house floor
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this week. >> i now yield to the gentleman from arizona. >> the first amendment -- congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof or abridging the freedom of speech or of the press or the right of the people peaceably to assemble and petition the government for redress of grievances. host: an update on representatives gabrielle giffords -- she is in a medical, to control the swelling of her brain as part of the healing process. the medical press conference is
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available on our website. diane joins us from harrisburg, pennsylvania. caller: thank you for taking my call and condolences to the families. people are so quick to blame talk radio and fox and the chances are the alleged shooter does not even watch those shows or listen to the radio programs. on his website, on youtube, he posted some of his favorite books -- the communist manifesto, he does not write anything about the bible or rush limbaugh, but he cites "mein kampf" and the "communist manifesto." reading my congresswoman voted against nancy pelosi and is now against
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me. if they want to blame fox, they need to look at this other website that my congresswoman voted against nancy pelosi and is now dead to me. host: a writer posts the same point you made in the "new york times" this morning and talks about political rhetoric. the arizona governor was at the capitol yesterday preparing for the state of the state address. there had been speculation that remarks -- her remarks would be delayed. we are hearing today that the speech will go on as planned. she will of course make reference to what happened in tucson on saturday. we'll have live coverage at 3:45 eastern.
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the house schedule is very much in flux as we've heard from speaker john boehner this morning. there was a vote scheduled for wednesday on the health-care bill which has been postponed. we will probably hear more today or tomorrow about what the schedule will be like. a number of hearings, including the house energy and commerce committee on the health care bill has been postponed. things that very much in flux over the next couple days. a caller from concord, calif., on the democrats' line. caller: it is a very sad day for our country. for people to say they don't think it is palin or the right wing on the radio or the web, this takes is back in history and we shall be scared and think about what is going on. is a very sad day for our
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country. host: we have been providing live coverage from the estate in arizona. the fbi director, we are awaiting john larsen from that democratic leadership to brief reporters in just a couple of minutes. word from the white house is the president has called for a moment of silence at 11:00 eastern standard time. he will have a moment of silence on the east lawn of the white house and is asking all americans to pay -- to pay tribute to the victims. the president is scheduled to go to schenectady, n.y. and that trip has been postponed. the president is calling for all flags at federal buildings to be flown at half staff. caller: i keep hearing of the blame game going on here. sarah palin is free to speak in
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america just like anyone else. if fido remember, the president said if we bring a knife, we will bring a gun. should we blame him? i doubt. i think everyone should take responsibility for themselves and this guy should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. that is why we have laws of america. i think this is the greatest country on earth and everybody should stop playing the blame game. host: from gramercy, louisiana, on the republican line. caller: thank you for taking the call. i think everyone is trying to blame each other. they took prayer out of school and our kids have no morals anymore. if there would put prayer back in school. if they took a vote, about 85% of people want prayer in school. it would teach our kids the right way to live and not to go
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out and shoot somebody just because they say something you don't like. even the bible tell you that if my people humble themselves and pray and come back from their evil ways, i will heal their nation. i think that is what we need above everything. thank you for taking my call. host: the sergeant at arms has asked members of congress to immediately report circumstances that appear suspicious and your scheduled to appear at a public forum or town hall meeting and feel uncertain about your safety, contact u.s. capitol police, the threat assessment, or the sergeant at arms. from tampa florida on the republican line. caller: my heart is crushed and the rhetoric and vitriol has to and on both sides.
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since the day our president was inaugurated, i felt like there is a target on my back for two years. i have been called many names and heard many comments, starting with the day after the inauguration when a famous rapper says it's about time we got the white out of the white house. his wife saying that the inaugural ball, i am a white, 55-year-old republican and i have been living in fear because it assumed i am a racist and a hater and a bigot. i could not wait to take the day off from work to watch the inauguration of our first bat -- first black president. even though i did not vote for him, i have been living in fear, but i'm too afraid to express my political views at my work place which i have been that for 50 years because i'm the only conservative. my sons are italian, irish, african-american, and cherokee indian. my sister-in-law and that you are mexican. please stop falsely accusing
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republicans and conservatives please. we all want what is best for our country, but we have different views. by congress woman was shot in the head yesterday. a lot of people are forgetting that that is the main point here. sarah palin, if you want her to go way, stop talking about here. if you want to focus on what happened yesterday, focus on that. you cannot go around talking about guns like jesse kelly did who is running against gabrielle giffords. he put statements on his website that were inflammatory. you cannot do that and expect things to be ok. that is going to happen when you put that out there.
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if republicans and democrats are going to keep fighting against each other, nobody is going to win. we have to find a way to come together and you night and not say inflammatory things and not have more racism and hate that is out there. i have four children and i'm raising them in tucson arizona. i just moved to the maricopa area and i don't want to live in fear. my congresswoman is gone and i used to go to rallies at her office. that could have been my 9-year- old. stop the hate, stop the anchor, peace is the answer. peace is the only way we will get past this. we just want to point out she is not gone. she is in critical condition. doctors are optimistic about her
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recovery. it is a brain injury and there is a lot of uncertainty. she did it win reelection last november, winning by 4000 votes. she just began her third term and was sworn into office this past weekend was holding her first event of the new year at the safeway in tucson, arizona. caller: i am calling today because i have heard an awful lot of reasons given for why this happened. all the usual suspects from the media to rhetoric to guns to mental insanity and everything else. but something else as being fundamentally avoided. politics by its nature is violent. government itself is violent. he is responsible for what he did and the unfortunate events that happened yesterday.
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i'm not trying to justify, but if we only look at destructive violence and look at the larger scale of violence in our society -- host: we go live now to john larsen, democrat of connecticut. >> we just ended the joint democratic and republican conference and had more than 800 participants. they included members of congress, their spouses, chiefs of staff, all who have been caught up in the events of the last day and certainly our thoughts and prayers go out to the victims.
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earlier this afternoon, i had an opportunity to go over and speak with gabrielle giffords's staff, who obviously, like all , and certainly again with the death of gay but zimmermann and other colleagues who -- death of gabe zimmerman, the tragic loss of life of a judge, a little girl, gongresswoman giffords. as has been said by so many and expressed on this conference call, such an incredible, gifted, talented, sincere, gracious, incredibly gifted
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individual. this is the kind of senseless thing that leaves everyone aghast and wondering why and i especially want to commend the leadership of the speaker boehner in taking all appropriate action and working with leader pelosi who spoke with mark kelly today and his words and her conveying that to the members of congress was extraordinarily helpful. also to hear from gabrielle chief of staff who is there in arizona -- we felt it was appropriate to make sure we had staff members who are such
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an integral part of our daily life and someone who gave his life in the line of duty out there, it gives us all pause and we did hear from the sergeant of arms and chief. we also heard from the attending physician's office, the doctor who talked in technical terms, medically. we will be having majority leader canto going over the schedule and we appreciate the sensitivity involved in dealing with this issue.
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the expression and concern that there will not be votes this week. there will certainly be tribute's put forward for those who have lost their lives and the continued hope and fervent prayers that -- and well wishes for all of the victims as well with regard to their recovery. caucus conference on wednesday that the speaker has called for and again, we thank him in this great time of need for the house, the people of arizona, and the country and i think all members on the phone conversation and subsequently i'm matt miller, hopefully out of this tragic circumstance --
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subsequently, hopefully at this tragic circumstance, we are all in this together to improve the lot of those who were sworn to serve. with that, i will take a few questions and we will go. >> [inaudible] >> the sergeant at arms went through and we will have bulletin's -- there were some problems getting some of the e- mail's that were discussed. he very specifically went over some concerns and those concerns will be -- we have more than 800 people on the phone call and we had some technical difficulty initially, so we will be printing as out and they will be reviewed at the combined
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conference and at one of the things we are concerned about is spouses, to make sure we have quite a few numbers of new members of congress who were not here during the anthrax scare's added 9/11 circumstance. we want to make sure that they can connect. the sergeant at arms did a good job with the local entities and we want to -- we heard from chief morris as well with very specific recommendations for members and what to do. and passed out on wednesday. >> what are some of the specific recommendations you brought out? >> the primary thing is to make sure all members are
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coordinating their efforts with police officials, which allow members to routinely. but also designating the procedures as they regard to evacuation's and every office has a specific coordinator for that. there were specific suggestions as to what we can do and the speaker has called for -- and joined by leadership on both sides for a more thorough review of all these measures and obviously we will take those up on wednesday. we are sure many of them will be forced -- many of them will be forthcoming. >> [inaudible] >> the condition discussed by her staff was pretty much, if you heard the latest medical bulletin, the discussion from her staff was helpful.
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clearly, i am not a medical doctor and again, the attending physician's office did an extraordinary job of explaining those details. this is day-by-day, and what he did say was that there will be daily updates with respect to all the people involved, but there is obviously a keen interest -- >> [inaudible] >> i think members will take all of the precautions but, i do think members will continue to hold congress on the corner, public forums and hearings. that is our responsibility, that is what we are sworn to do. i thought the speaker was eloquent in the way he express
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that today. i think he epitomized what members of congress feel about their service to the public. >> [inaudible] >> extraordinary. i think what you have all witnessed talking to other members, gabrielle giffords is a pretty extraordinary member. when someone engenders that kind of feeling amongst members, i think there is such a feeling of cooperation. one member recalled the story of flying home became she stopped through dallas to arizona and the outpouring of concern -- what they can do to help her staff, what can we do during this time? it is the kind of thing that
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shows congress at its best, to be quite frank. people coming together when something like this happens, not unlike what happened in the spontaneous breaking out of people singing "god bless america" after september 11th. it is spontaneous and sincere and i think people get. .
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[captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] >> there is a lot of misinformation out there, so we want to try not to feed into that. thank you very much. >> the democratic representative from connecticut updating reporters on a conference call that took place this afternoon here in washington. let's bring you up to date in terms of the impact this is having on the official schedule here in washington. it was a week in which we expected the debate and vote on
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wednesday on the health care bill. the legislation the president vote and debate has been scrubbed for the week. as we heard from congressman larson, there will not be any votes in the house this week. they will be back january 24. the president scheduled to deliver his state of the union address. tomorrow the president has called for a moment of silence. he will appear on the south lawn of the white house. he is also asking for all flags to be flown at half staff. already they are being flown at half staff at the request of the speaker of the house. yesterday governor brewer asking for the same thing of all flags in the state of arizona. 12:45 for those of you on the west coast. the president was scheduled to
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be in new york. that trip has been postponed and rescheduled. a lot of changes with the result of what happened yesterday with the official calendar here in washington this week. the day began in westchester, ohio, where the speaker of the house, john boehner, had these remarks. >> good morning. the thoughts and prayers of the house and the nation are with congressman giffords and her family. we are also praying for the families of judge roll and all of those who were taken from us yesterday so senselessly. among the fallen is gabe zimmerman, a member of congressman giffords staff. i have asked that the flags be flown at half staff in honor of gabe zimmerman.
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such acts of violence has no place in our society. i would like to commend the federal, state, and local officials, as well as the capitol police for all of their efforts. i told the f.b.i. director that the house stands ready to assist in any way possible. last night the majority leader announced that the normal business of the house in the coming week has been postponed so that we can take necessary action regarding yesterday's events. the majority leader will announce a revised schedule. to the members of the house and their staffs i ask that you on this sabbath day that we keep gabby and her staff in our prayers. public service is a high honor, but these tragic events remind us that all of us in our rolls in service to our fellow citizens comes with a risk. this inhuman act should not and
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will not deter us from our calling to represent our constituents and to fulfill our oaths of office. no act, no matter how heinous, must be allowed to stop us from our duty. >> speaker boehner making his comments at about 8:30 eastern time this morning in westchester, ohio. no votes scheduled in the house of representatives. we'll have more tomorrow morning on the "washington journal" and a chance for you to weigh in for what this means in washington in terms of political rhetoric. meanwhile, the f.b.i. director robert mueller speaking to the press about the shooting in
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arizona. this took place in tucson about two hours ago. >> good morning. i am sheriff dupnik. as we told you yesterday, not only our state agencies, but all federal agencies involved in this case, and there are probably a dozen or so, have not
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only been working hand and glove, but joined at the hip. the investigation is still far from over, but it is progressing very, very smoothly. at this time i would like to introduce director mueller from the f.b.i. >> thank you, sheriff, and good morning everyone. first let me express my condolences to the families and the friends of representative gabrielle giffords, judge john roll, and the other victims of this senseless tragedy. this was an attack not only against dedicated public servants, but against our fellow citizens. one being a child who was there to learn more about how our government works. other members of the community who were meeting with their elected officials at the time or were simply running errands on what otherwise would have been an ordinary weekend. this was an attack on our
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institutions and an attack on our way of life. as you know, jarod lee loughner was subdued at the scene and is now in federal custody. federal agents and deputy sheriffs are working around the clock to learn as much as possible and gather the facts as to why someone would commit such a heinous act and whether anyone else was involved. while we do not yet have all the answers to these questions, i can assure you that teams of professionals are working toward a single goal. that is, to piece together the facts, answer those questions, and ensure that justice is done. we are working closely with the sheriff's office, the u.s.
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marshall's service, the capitol police, and others in this ongoing investigation. given this tragedy, all logical precautions are in place to best ensure the safety of other public officials. but i will say and i will emphasize there is no information at this time to suggest any specific threat remains. for those of us on the ground and for all of us, the work goes on, and we will continue to dedicate all necessary resources to every level of this investigation and to do everything that we can to ensure that our elected officials and the citizens we serve are safe. and with that, i would be happy, and i'm sure the sheriff would be happy to answer any questions he might have. the gentleman right here had his hand up first.
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>> i was wanting to know what has anyone found out about the motive. >> as you can expect, the investigation is barely 24 hours old, and it is a little early to speculate on those motives. my expectation is that athere will be a filing in federal court this afternoon that may elaborate somewhat on that, but it is awfully early in the investigation to give a definitive answer. let me go to the next question. yes, ma'am? >> what do you think of the ramifications of this assault? >> i'm not going to comment on particular laws. in this particular case, we have information that he purchased a weapon in november of last year, and we have been following up, along with a.t.f. on that.
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yes, sir, in the back. [question not audible] >> ok. as to the first question with regard to accomplices, that is something we are closely looking at and we are pursuing all leads. we pushed out a photograph of an individual that appeared to be enteringing -- entering the safeway with the suspect, with the subject, and we are hoping to identify that individual. we do not have any belief at this time that that individual was a participant in the shooting. it is somebody we need to identify. as i say, we have put out that photograph. the second part of the question,
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i do believe he will be charged with the assault on the congresswoman, with the killing of judge roll, and with the assaulting of the other staffers. these are preliminary charges, and there may well be additional charges that will be filed. yes, ma'am, in the back. >> it is now 24 hours. what is the next step? >> i cannot get into the details of the time in custody. i will tell you the next step will be the filing of a complaint, quite probably this afternoon, with formal charges, and after that, an initial appearance. i'm not certain when that will occur. i don't think that has been scheduled yet.
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[question not audible] >> again, i cannot speak to the action with him after his arrest by the pima county sheriff investigators. >> is there information about the gun? >> the information is it was purchased in 2010 and it was a glock .9 millimeter. [question not audible] >> this is a joint investigation. the f.b.i. and other federal
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agencies and the pima county sheriff's office, we have been working closely together since yesterday afternoon. his concern was that everything be done to assure that the individual or individuals are brought to justice and that stone remains unturned to that end. yes, ma'am, over here. >> i know there are discussions between the united states attorney and the district attorney as to how you would outline these charges, and i would defer to them in terms of what tcharges are being brought or may be brought in federal or state court down the road. yes, ma'am, in the back. [question not audible]
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>> i don't know where you heard that, but we did say there was a 9-year-old girl that had been shot and is deceased. where that information that you're talking about came from, i have no knowledge. that's not correct. no. >> yes, sir, right here in the black. [question not audible] >> where was the gun purchased? >> it was purchased at a gun shop. we can get you that information. next question. [question not audible]
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>> the package to which you refer did not contain any explosives. it is, i think, premature to determine that it is in no way related to the circumstances relating to congresswoman giffords, but we have that package, and we will be running it through our laboratory to determine whether d.n.a. fingerprints and the like and make sure it didn't have anything to do with it, and to make sure -- determine what was the leaving of that package, the purpose, and who did it. [question not audible]
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>> i can tell you with regard to the record, minimal. there have been postings the media has because they are widely shown on the internet, and in the course of the investigation we will be looking at every one of those postings, any activity had on the internet, any activity he had whether it be e-mail or other communications. we will be looking at every one of his associates to determine whether or not they continue to be a threat. >> is there any evidence that he was involved in some kind of hate group? >> i have seen some allusion to that in the media. clearly that is something we will continue to focus on in the course of the investigation. >> do you know if there is any
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history that he had contact with the congresswoman or that he had attempted to contact her? >> yes, i believe we have an indication that he attended a similar event back in 2007. the specifics of that will quite probably come out in the course of the legal proceedings. yes, way in the back. yes, sir. [question audible] >> i think it is premature to draw general zations --
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generalizations. i will say if it was domestic terror or international terror, hate speech and other insightful -- inciteful speech is more readily available to people than it was 10 years ago. that presents a challenge to us in what would be lone wolves or lone offenders undertaking attacks. let me see. right here. [question not audible] >> we're still doing a search. question here. [question not audible] >> it appears that the target was the congresswoman.
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yes, sir. [question not audible] >> we do not have any information that he was a shooter. we do want to ask him questions to get information on what he may have seen or if he had a secondary role as an accomplice. yes, ma'am, in the back. i'm sorry, i could not hear you. [question not audible]
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>> as we showed you, the individual that was in safeway has been detained. [question not audible] >> i think those are questions to be addressed down the road once charges are filed. >> we will take two more questions for the director. we have other people here who can answer your questions. we have, for example, congressman flake, and we have other individuals from the fubfib. but mr. mueller will only answer
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two more questions. [question not audible] >> will security at future events change due to this event? >> i can assure you that is an issue being discussed in the halls of congress and among of the -- and amongst all the agencies as to how we can increase safety and reduce threats. i can tell you, i have deferred complaints from members of congress. we pursue them until the end until we are certain that the individual or individuals do not constitute a continuous threat. and i know that capitol police, the sargence of -- the sergeants of arms are working with the congressmen and senators to inform them of the course of the investigation but also as to what steps may be taken in the future. >> is there a change in security
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at this point? >> not that i'm aware of. ok. one more. yes, ma'am. >> would be this charged as an act of terrorism? >> the charges today are going to be based on the assault of the congresswoman, the killing of the staffers, the killing of the other individuals, and the killing of judge roll. i am not going to preclude the possibility that charges will be brought as the investigation continues. thank you very much, folks. >> i'm david gonzalez, united states marshall, arizona. [question not audible]
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>> questions pertaining to the shooting i would leave to the sheriff's office or the f.b.i. my role in this is to look at the protection of the judiciary and determine if there was organized plot on judge roll or any of the judges in arizona or any other judges nationally. >> have you determined whether or not that is the case? can you also talk a little bit about what position he was in relation to the shooter? >> i will leave that to the sheriff also. sheriff? >> i think the director addressed the question of the weapon. it was a glock .9 millimeter, model 19. i would like to am identify -- amplify on the weapon, how it was secured, and the bravery of not just two people, but three people. i don't have the names of the people involved, but when the gentleman ran out of the ammunition from his first
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magazine, he was attempting to change magazines, a woman, who we have the name of, but i don't have, went up and grabbed the magazine and tore it away from him. while he was trying to put another magazine in, he was successful in doing that, which also had, i think, 31 bullets in it. there would have been a huge greater catastrophe had he been successful in doing that. fortunately the spring and the magazine failed and the two gentleman were able to get it away from him and subdue him until the law enforcement people arrived. >> sheriff there is con fuge as to the -- confusion as to the number of casualty -- casualties, and is there anyone who has a definitive
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pronunciation of his name. >> the information we have now is there are six deceased and a total of 20 people shot, including the six victims. >> and how do you pronounce his name? >> i don't know how he pronounces it. the way we are pronounce it loughner. >> so are you saying a woman tries to grab the magazine from him? >> yes, and two men overtake him. >> she was also wounded when she did this. she was trying to get the gun away from him.
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>> sheriff, is there an indication that he was saying good-bye to friends and family? was he planning on getting away? any thoughts on that. >> when the investigation is completed we will be in a better position to answer that question more completely. >> can we talk about the timeline leading up to the event? >> i think the shooting began around 10:00 a.m. maybe 10:10. >> so he went from his house? >> we don't know how he got there at this point. >> sir, can you call this a hate crime? >> you can probably call most murders a hate crime. >> what is your information on
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this person of interest? >> we are still searching for the person of interest, but we are more satisfied in our own minds that this person may not have been involved in this incident at all. but we still need to talk to him to verify that. >> so it is a change from yesterday? >> yes, it is. >> is there any documented information? >> when you say "documented" what exactly is your question? >> has he sought help for mental health questions in the past? >> i don't know the answer to that. >> were those threats made to law enforcement or other deputies? >> i can't answer that question at the moment. i can't answer that question. [question not audible] >> as the director mentioned,
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there will be meetings taking place not only about the people in washington and how they are protected in washington but as most of you, i think, have come to the conclusion now, one local law enforcement, unless there is specific request for specific intelligence that there may be a problem, are not even aware of the numerous appearances by elected officials that take place every day. >> when you talk about the threats, can you give us a time frame in days, weeks, and months? >> yes. >> and my second question is, in 2007 the director said loughne was at a -- loughner was at a similar appearance of giffords? why yes. >> you said he fired off some
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rounds, and then the woman approached him? >> yes. >> the woman, can you describe her in any way? >> i can't, but we can maybe make that available to you after the conference. >> and the director said at the press conference that loughner was the only person involved in it? >> i'm not saying either. we, after the press conference, and the attorneys and the officers had some collaboration about this issue, decided to release this picture, as a person of interest. based on information we have developped since, it would appear to us that the person may not have been involved at all. but we still need to verify that. we are still actively seeking that individual.
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>> what i can tell you is there was some correspondence twens giffords office and him and he was invited -- between giffords office and him, and he was invited to attend. 2007. [question not audible] >> i don't know. [question not audible] >> only when there are threats, if i understand that correctly. >> was judge roll accompanied with -- by u.s. marshals? >> no, he was not. he had some issues he wanted to
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discuss with ms. giffords. he took the opportunity to go discuss some business with her. >> do we now know who he is? >> we do not. we are reasonably certain we will find out. >> what do you know about mr. loughner? >> i am not in a position to discuss that. >> where was the judge when he was shot? >> he was very nearby gabrielle. [question not audible] >> i don't know the answer to that. >> are there other suspects you are in the process of reviewing? >> i'm not able to discuss that at this point.
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>> i vacillate between extreme sadness and sorrow and shock and extreme anger. >> last night you made a general statement that freedom of speech is not something that's always safe. would you care to elaborate? >> i think when there is rhetoric about hatred, mistrust of government, about paranoia of how government operates and to try to inflame the public on a daily basis 24 hours a day, seven days a week, has impact on people, especially who are unbalanced personalities to begin with. >> does he have an attorney, do you know?
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>> i don't know. >> what are your observations about the status of the arizona [inaudible] on what happened? >> well, i think we're the tombstone of the united states of america. >> can you explain? >> i have never been a proponent of letting everyone in this state carry weapons under any circumstances that they want, and that's almost where we are. the legislature at this time is proposing that students and teachers be allowed to have weapons in the schools and in college. you know, colleges ought to be run by college presidents, not the arizona legislature. but that's the ridiculous state to where we have become.
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>> and we have one more question. [question not audible] >> yes, she was shot before grabbing the weapon. >> what about mental health laws? are there any issues involved there? >> that's an everyday issue for the entire united states of america, for the entire world. we have very, very serious problems in this community. back in 1960, when i was a young cop on the beat we put mentally ill people who were threats into a system that encars rated them. today they are out on the streets, and we're paying a price for it. >> we'll have to address that as information becomes available. briefings forally like this, not likely. press releases, yes.
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>> a live picture of the u.s. capitol on your screen. you can see the flag there flying at half staff. that ordered by the president today. president obama signing a proclamation calling for flags to be flown at half staff. also the president today calling for americans at 11:00 tomorrow, eastern time, to observe a moment of silence to honor the victims of the tragedy in tucson, arizona. the president included those fighting for their lives. said president obama there will be a time for the nation to come together in prayer and reflection keeping the victims and their families closely at heart. that is scheduled for 11:00 tomorrow. the president planning to observe that moment of silence with white house staff on the front lawn.
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the associated press reporting that a second man has been cleared of any involvement of that assassination of u.s. representative gabrielle giffords in tucson. a pima county sheriff's deputy said the man was a cab driver who drove the man to a grocery store, so that again according to the associated press. coming up in a while, we'll have a chance for more of your phone calls. your reactions to the events of the last 24 hours or so. in the meantime, a portion this morning's wurnl -- "washington journal" on this subject. a forme to president george w. bush. and bill press, or radio talk- show host. heard in how many radio stations around the country? guest: thousands. good morning.
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host: this is picking up on the comments of the house republican leader, eric cantor -- tragedy for the entire country. guest: i think he is right. i think. and creatures are the ones to put things like this in perspective. -- preachers and pundits are the ones to put things like this in perspective. you see the pictures of the 9- year-old girl, and the federal judge, and the congresswoman that was shot. it is a senseless act, a violent act. it does not appear to be a politically motivated acts. these things happen every day, but we are in washington when public figures get shot, it brings in more vivid way the tragedy of life. ripple effects. as a christian, you pray for the families and as the lord to bring mercy and grace during
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this time. host: is this part of the political discourse, bill press? guest: first, i have to agree with everything he said. i think of that 9-year-old girl, elected to the student council in elementary school, and she goes to see a member of congress in the united states of america because she is interested in politics and interested in learning more about government. she is shot and killed for that very act. this is a senseless tragedy, but i was struck by what the sheriff said, that this is a time for some soul-searching on the part of all must, that particularly in arizona, the political rhetoric has been red-hot, not just in this political race, but on the immigration debate. i wrote a book about this, called "toxic talk," how the
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radical right has poisoned america's airwaves. how talk radio can produce violent actions. and the sheriff last night said that this rhetoric we have heard in the politics lately is free speech, but he said it does have consequences. i think that is the message for the day. one of the messages for the day. host: one of the questions from jonathan martin and political. who in american politics deserves a slice of the blame? and what public officials find themselves with a sudden opportunities for political gain in a tragedy? guest: there is no evidence this is politically motivated. i will say a couple of things. if you go back in history of discourse in america, what we are having today is not nearly as bad as the election in 1800 between jefferson and adams. that is that a product of american political discourse in our founding and for most
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western democracies. secondly, these tend to be very selective on both sides. george w. bush was called a moral coward, a loser, a liar, a war criminal, and so forth. the left said very little about it. there was a movie about an assassination of george w. bush. alan grayson, the most vitriolic member of the congress, he gave a speech on the floor that said that the gop health care plan was to let people die early. to try to convert a human tragedy into politics i think is slightly sickening, especially if there is no evidence is there. the other thing i would say is that for a public official to create a situation -- in which some twisted figure can take political discourse and some doubt interpret that as a green light to kill people, i think -- and somehow interpret that as a
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green light to kill people, i think is absurd. this like to be bothers me. if the republican had been shot, i would not blame alan grayson or people who are harsh critics of president bush. it is kind of depressing that this has happened. blamingi am not anybody but the not that shot her. one other problem that we should talk about is that this nut that shot her got his hands on a glock 19, which should never have been allowed. i think you are dead wrong on this. i am reading the letters of john and abigail adams, wonderful exchanges. it took weeks if not months for abigail to get a letter from massachusetts to philadelphia. today, with the media we have, you have instant communication. you have a guy like michael savage, who has a violent talk all the time. instantaneously he can say
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something ugly and it is out there. if i can finish. we have a situation this summer were glenn beck called george soros the most evil threat facing america. then they arrested a glenn beck file were heading to san francisco to take out the leadership of that foundation. this is a centrist democrat, gabrielle giffords, this was one of the candidates that sarah palin put up and put crosshairs over their names and districts. that, to somebody that is on hand, means, of crosshairs means take out your gun and go after them. host: sarah palin did express her shock at what happened. this is from the daily news -- it showed that representative giffords was one of the
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district. politician she thought needed to go. giffords said that when you represent a district that includes the ok corral, nothing surprises you in terms of political discourse. guest: i do not disagree that civil discourse is important. i have written things critical of glenn beck of michael savage and tea party members, and i am a conservative republican. we wrote a book about politics in the new era, where we talk about the importance as christians in politics. i think it is a valid. you do not hear liberals -- i have yet to find a liberal who went after alan grayson, and his record is deplorable. and the people who criticize the bush record the problem is when you take this issue of political discourse and it had the right to a killing like this,
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when it may not be valid. when "the new york times" writes about the political rhetoric and it appears it has nothing to do with it. the implication is that rhetoric sometimes goes too far, somehow the trigger or green light for a political assassination is sickening. it is unwarranted. guest: in my lifetime, i have seen too many people i have admired starting with ronald reagan and bobby kennedy and john f. kennedy shot for political motivation to deny there is a connection between violent rhetoric and violent action. it does not always happen. but i come back to the sheriff. he said the rhetoric was so red hot that he was not surprised at this, because they all get death threats. that is what hit has come to.
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it is imperative on both sides to say cool the jets. guest: it is fine to say that. i have been saying that. other people have said that before. there have been assassinations throughout american history. the one that you cite are like hinckley. there is no evidence that public discourse was the thing that drove him. what drives people in overwhelming cases to assassinate political leaders is not discourse. it is a twisted, sick mind. they do not a political discourse to give them the green light to do it. and to try and take that kind of thing and to convert it is really a way to try and go after political opponents. it is such a political view of the world appear. lineur're a hammer, every is nail.
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bill clinton was saying that it was rush limbaugh and talk radio. guest: denial is not just a river in egypt. i think i'm hearing a lot of denial. . . arizona would go over the top. host: let me read to you from "the new york times". new focus on vitriol in politics. while the exact motor visions --
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motivations of the suspect remain unclear, his writings contained anti-government ramblings. regardless of what led to the shooting, he quickly focused his attention on the degree to which inflammatory language, threats, and implicit instigations to violence have become prevalent in our society. caller: we are talking about legislative action, and we have the two congressmen from georgia on the appropriations committee. my congressman, who hopefully i think will be president some day, and then we have tom price on the ways and means, and begin gingrich served with this wonderful lady who was in the tragedy. my comments to these two fine gentlemen, based on what happened in arizona, long before this, we decided in our home
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county to make our county the friendlyest county in the history of the world for capitalism and free enterprise. we preach love down here in gilbert county. i'm a conservative, i'm a member of the tea party, but i love people. just like steve scully, bill, we donal -- i'm concerned and i don't believe in -- i believe in less government, less taxes, but we would never attack you. i have a lot of good liberal friends who i love and respect. that's how we operate here in gilbert county. we are working to make gilbert county the most friendly county in the world. we don't care if they are libertarians, democrats, or anything else. we want to be kind to them. >> well, god bless america, and i look forward to my next visit to gilbert county, arizona.
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caller: bill, i met you when you were in ithica last time. i am a democrat, and i don't agree with a lot of things in my party and within the republican party, but i want to keep you to your word. maybe from here on out, you know, there is a lot of hatred that comes from progressive talk radio toward republicans, and i don't like the way republicans do things in general, but i think we all need to cool our jets. the comments by peter, you know, the psychology behind why people do certain things, it doesn't always correlate to a political event. growing up we had the texas tower shooter. we had all kinds of people that do crazy things like that that kill people and snipe people and stuff like that, and it doesn't always correlate to a political
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thing. the actual psychology behind that person doing that event is what we need to understand. and somebody brought this up in our local religious services. we were talking around the table, and there was a guy there who is a facilitator for listening. people go to public meetings, and they have their three minutes, but the people on the panel, whether it is a city council, a school board, whether it is a town hall, they never really fully interact with the speaker. there are some kooks out there you just don't have time to talk to. but we never have full interest action between the -- interaction between the speakers and the public, and it gives an avenue for these people on the fringe to do things. but i think you need to tone things down on your show. i think you need to go backwards and say you disagree with some of these more nutty people like
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rush and some of these other people, but you need to be more kind, like that previous caller said, and show more love. guest: i guess two things. one, i think the person is very twisted. the second is the caller makes a good plan. if you listen to msnbc, you can line up ed schultz, keith olberman, you know, the rhetoric used against republicans is pretty out there crazy stuff. i don't like it, but i would never, in 100 years, try and take that and say this is the thing that's driving political assassinations. and he wish -- and i wish other
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people would as well. guest: i rejeck the moral equivalencey argument. first of all, scott, i'm glad i don't have to put you on my radio show because you just got five minutes on c-span. in terms of showing the love, e-mail me at billpress.com and tell me any one time you have heard one hateful word out of me or any time i have suggested that people use violent means to make their point, and i will allow you to make your point, but you won't find one. readings on thursday. as we pointed out thursday, gabby gifford delivered the first amendment which is
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freedom of speech and assembly. and also reading the constitution, the speaker of the house, john boehner. >> we, the people of the united states in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, ensure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity do ordain and establish this constitution for the united states of america. host: and yet on your blog you say the controversy of the members of the 112th congress reading the constitution is not about that. it's about something much deeper and much more significant. how so? guest: it's really a debate about the meaning and relevance of the constitution in our lives. and there are a lot of people actually in the health care today in the last year, there were a number of leading democrats who said that the constitution was irrelevant to that debate.
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and indeed the implication was to public life in general. there's a big divide today. it's a complicated issue because the constitution itself, how it applies at a particular moment in time and to the issues of our day isn't always self-evident. there's a kind of disposition a cast of mind which is what do you think of the constitution, the place that ought to have the constitution does many things but maybe above all it's a check on power. and a check on federal power. that's why you have the different divisions of government, separation of powers, why you have federalism and so forth. and the modern liberal sensibility is for the government to have more and more control in our lives. the interesting thing that is one of the ironies of american history is that barack obama, nancy pelosi and harry reid would have given rise to this debate about constitutionalism and the ascendancy of this.
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it's a real and important debate to have. i think that the comparison to scalia is quite right. i think there is a -- written about there's a debate about whether the constitution is a living breathing document meaning that it evolves and more fs and is interpretted by judges to say what it is wanted to say or whether it is a text that sort of anchors our views. i'm a constitutionalist in general. i think it's really a remarkable document, really one of the great political documents in american history. not perfect but really quite amazing. and i think for liberals to go after and mock the constitution, which some did when the republicans opened the first day of business as leading the house, to mock it is a plit can i perilous thing. guest: i think you can count on one hand the liberals who mocked the constitution. it's a marvelous document.
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it's gotten us through all these years. but just a couple points. scalia is dead wrong on this issue that the constitution has to be taken literally and it is a dead document which i have heard him say. i saw a cartoon yesterday where somebody was outside of a rest room trying to say and saying sir you can't go in there because it's not in the constitution. governments have had to say there have to be as many rest rooms for women as many. you won't -- men. >> that's not what he is arguing. guest: i think he's dead wrong. i think this was a hollywood stunt, frangely. but i liked it. i hope they learned something from it. i hope when they were reading the constitution which by the way they showed themselves it was not a perfect document because they left out the part where the vote wasn't given to women. they left out the part where the vote wasn't given to african americans because they
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didn't want people to know there are things here that wasn't perfect. so that was funny games. but i hope they heard that only congress can declare war and that we get away from the republican or democratic president taking us to war without a vote of congress. that would be a big step forward. and the fourth amendment. i hope they listened to those strong words about the right of privacy, even though that phrase does not appear there. and maybe they would have learned something. guest: and maybe from the fourth amendment. host: if scalia has his way, this is from the "new york times," the supreme court begins its new session this week we'll go to jim joining us from michigan our line for
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independents. caller: hi, steve. how are you? host: fine, thank you. caller: listen, joe in georgia i'll put my mushrooms and dinner against his barbecue any day. but anyway. guest: it's full of love. caller: absolutely. i'm a socialist, he's a republican. that's fine. but any way, it's not surprise what's happening. i mean, ever since reagan initiated the class war and redistributed the wealth from poor and the middle class to the wealthy with his tax cuts and making it up by taxing unemployment benefits and taxing waiters and waitresses, and a few other examples of the class war, i'm not going to
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mention any names but you know you've got a guy that shoots somebody in the face, nothing happens. you've got a guy that's got more oxycotin in his bathroom than the local cvs, nothing happens. a guy in wisconsin shoots his own television in his own h over some dance show and to post a $1500 bond to get out of jail? now, like i said i'm not going to mention any names but their initials were dick cheney, rush limbaugh, and i'm not familiar with the gentleman from wisconsin. but there's basically been a class war and i'm not surprised. and bill, if you could have like an ed schultz flash the address for msnbc because we all don't have computers. i wouldn't mind writing him to get stuff off my mind.
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and i think everybody there does a bangup job. thanks a lot. and you gentlemen have a great day. host: from john who says guest: this is a debate and this is a serious one and people have to engage in it, which is can the constitution do only what is enumerated. now, i think you have to give some wide berth to the interpretation, trying to apply the constitution to the issues of the day is not self-evident. does that mean that the new deal was unconstitutional? i don't think so. let me just say to the -- but, there's a very serious debate which is are there limits to the federal government and the powers that it may have. and in fact, judge hudson, federal judge that just ruled that the individual mandates were unconstitutional, that was
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a 42-page opinion even if people disagreed with it, it basically said, the thrust of the argument, are there any limits to what the federal government can demand of people and citizens? and a lot of liberals seem not to be able to draw that line of conservatives tend to want to do it and how that works its way out in real life is one of the important political debates of our time and i think we should have it and continue to have it. guest: to this extent i agree. i said this is a fundamental question that we've wrestled with since the days of the continental congress, which is are -- or the constitutional congress, the convention. what powers belong to the states and what powers belong to the federal government? it's been there from the beginning. it exists today. and the constitution is our guiding document. but you won't find everything in the constitution. and when the general welfare
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clause is pretty broad. it can't be limited to what existed in the 18th century. look at the whole debate over net neutrality. but the supreme court is going to have to tackle that. they can't go to any article of the constitution and find specific language. they're going to have to apply it. and i think that's the importance, that we apply the constitution to the realities of today and we have to do so. and this debate will continue long after we're gone. host: cover story. guest: this is going to be the
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adult moment, if you will, for the tea party, particularly. look, i wish we didn't have to raise the debt ceiling, we did it 92, 94 times. host: and we've gone from 13 to 14 trillion in sen months. guest: now it's appalling the size of the deficit and debt. we do have to deal with it. at the same time, i think it would be catastrophic not just for this country but worldwide to let this country go into default and basically to shut do you know the government i think would be catastrophic. the least of my concerns, it would be catastrophic for the republican party. but for tea partiers it's going to be a reality test. and by the way, i would say i think the vote on repeal of health care is a reality test, too, because that would add $230 billion according to the congressional budget office to the deficit and the extension of tax cuts for the wealthy added another and the estate tax added another $430 billion.
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but the key is going to be the debt ceiling. host: and you say the argument for limiting the size of the federal government and reducing spending is strong but refusing to raise the debt ceiling isn't the way or the place to do it. why? guest: well, several things. because raising the debt ceiling has to do with existing obligations, not tute ones. that is even if you were able magically in the next week to get the republican cuts in place and you went do you know to the 2008 discretionary spending limits, within a couple of weeks you'd still have to raise the debt ceiling. that's existing not future obligations. you've got to do it. it's a catastrophe if you don't. i don't for the life of me understand why jim demint and michelle balkman want to make this a point of debate. you can't win it. you're going to raise the debt ceiling. you've got to do it. i'm perfectly happy to have someone like paul ryan, i'm a
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great fan of congressman ryan's try and use it for leverage to get real spending cuts in place but this is not the place to do it. and if republicans say, as senator demint did, which is no matter what i would get if i was able to get a constitutional amendment to balance the budget, you should still vote against it, i think is extremely unwise and i can't imagine that the leadership in the senate or the house agree with it. guest: i think it is going to happen, it is going to pass. guest: it is going to pass. it is worth pointing out that barack obama in 2006 voted against raising the debt ceiling. now he's asking that people do it and that just shows when you're president sometimes your obligations change. so since i agreed with bill on one thing, let me disagree on the cbo issue of the scoring of
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the health care bill. the way it works, you know this when you're in government, bill knows it as well. the c.b.o. score was essentially given to them based on the assumptions that you have. if you examine the assumptions for the health care bill and the scoring that if you repeal health care that the deficit would go up, it's really ludicrous. this is one of the most outrageous examples. there's several things it doesn't take into account. it doesn't take into account the $115 billion that it takes to implement the program. it double countsmaker and social security cuts. it takes ten years of taxes to pay for six years of expenditures and doesn't take into account the dock fix, that is payments to physicians that democrats themselves have already said are going to go into effect this year, which is some $200 billion. when you take all of those things together and do a reality check, you would see that over that ten-year period
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of time the health care plan would increase the debt by around $700 billion. so this effort to try and say, on a common sense, that you have an open-ended entitlement and that would somehow lower the debt and deficit is ludicrous on its face. guest: i think to impune the integrity the people at the guest: i just said i'm not. guest: and say they took the numbers they were handed. let me say, look, these guys are researchers, these guys are profebruaryals. they work at this stuff. and in season and out of season, republican or democrat, you go to whoever is in charge you go to the congressional budget office and you get their take and then that's the basis, kind of the people then decide they agree or disagree with it. but john boehner pulled this out of his butt when he said he told brian williams that nobody in washington believes that
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repealing health care adds to the deficit. hello. the most respected financial office in washington does. the congressional budget office. and you're ignoring the savings that are there for example from the fact that if more people have health insurance we're not going to be paying for them when they got to the emergency room. you're ignoring the savings that come from the new more efficient delivery of medicare and medicare. i say take the officials at their word but don't say they're just flunkies. guest: point of personal privilege. i didn't say that. i think the c.b.o. is a terrific office. what i said is that congress has rigged the game, and this has happened for both sides, where they give c.b.o. a piece of legislation and they build in the assumptions and cb overpb doesn't have any choice other than score it based on the assumptions that they get. i don't blame c.b.o. i blame the political class for doing that. all the things that i listed
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are empirical. bill can check it out after the show to see whether that's in fact the case. this is an old trick to say you're going after the c.b.o. i think the c.b.o. -- guest: i disagree that the head of the c.b.o. would put out a number that he or she could not stand we hind with the facts. i think they're professionals. they would not do that. guest: look, they did the same thing when congressman ryan put forward legislation with certain assumptions, too. and that came out with a completely different number. the head of the c.b.o. will stand behind those numbers based on the assumption that they're given. the question becomes how valid are the assumptions that you're getting? and my argument is that anybody in an intellectually honest way would look at these assumptions that the c.b.o. was given on the scoring, couldn't come away from it and believe that you would cut the deficit. guest: i think the real problem
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is that the republicans have hooked their wagon to the star that is fallings and they're going to regret that they dit it. host: one of the editorials this morning. called about that $100 billion. also from one of our viewers. john adams said that parts of the constitution were too vague and congress is supposed to go back and tighten the loose ends. so the debate over the constitution. cynthia is joining us from iowa. thanks for waiting. good morning. caller: good morning. i was calling to discuss another topic but since you're on the constitution, i think we would be well served to use the powers of the constitution to have public debate to change the constitution rather than to do it legislatively. that wasn't the point i wanted to make. i wanted to talk about ethics and journalism.
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and 24 hour a day news is not serving us well. they ask a lot of questions and when tragedy strikes like it did in arizona they title it as if it's a movie and they promote it as though it is fiction rather than the real horrible violence. and that isn't good. and journalists do have ethics. they ought to follow them. and when it's entertainment it should be labeled as entertainment. and it's a travesty to take violence like this and then try to find out why. we need to understand why he did it. there's no reason that's good enough. it was a horrible violent event. whether it was motivated by his dislike of an individual. it touched many lives. it's wrong. and to cnn has titled it, so has fox already, as if it's a movie title, not a horrible violent event. host: thanks for the call.
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bill, author of toxic talk, how the radical right has poisoned american air waves. guest: this is a whole other discussion but i happen to agree with what cynthia said. i think the 24 hour news cycle has destroyed american politics and cable news has destroyed american politics in the sense, certainly changed it for the worse because we don't have any time to step back and think. we just, it's just 24/7 automatic opinions, opinions moving on. and we do take one story, blow it up, cover that nonstop. host: and yet you're part of that dialogue. guest: i am part of it. i'm a guest, i'm not paid by msnbc. i happen to appear on some of their shows maybe two or three times a week. but i'm part of it and i still say that. i just think that political dialogue has not been helped by
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the nonstop nature of the news cycle today. and it's not just cable now. it's -- i mean, cable is actually old news, the blogs that were first and the twitter and facebook. guest: look, i accept some of that but i guess i would make some caveyats on it. there are certainly extremes on all of this venues we're talking about. i think overall that the revolution in news and technology has been good. because i think a lot of voices that once upon a time were not in the public debate now are. and there are bad blogs but there are good blogs. there are smart people who in the past would not have written things. including liberal people. and i disagree with them on a lot of things but he's an intelligent guy. for conservatives, the reality is that there was a de facto monopoly in terms of mindset in world view that dominated the
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news for many years and now there's an outlet. there's a way for people with different views to get their voices heard. i think that's good. we're taking as an example the dan rather story on george bush and his time in the national guard. 15 or 20 years ago, that story could have destroyed bush's reelection because there would not have been a capacity to offer counter argument or counter facts. it happened that some bloggers used -- took the story and within hours showed that it was fabricated and so bush did not suffer for a false story and it was indeed dan rather who was eventually fired for his conduct in that story. if that had happened pre-blog, that wouldn't have happened. but look, the political debates can be contentious, and again, it's been like that since the founding of the country. it's quite right that now there's an instantaneous quality to it and now you have
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tweets and twitters that exceed what the space of the blog was doing. up to take things in the totality of their acts. and my view if you take it in the totality, the different voices that you have, the different arguments, the different facts that are out there make public dialogue more informed, not less. inchingtsdz i don't think you get my point. i'm not depiss agreeing. i blog myself. i'm just saying this 24 hour news cycle. john boehner's weeping. back in the days when you had an evening forecast, that would not have gotten the attention it did. but when you have 24 hour -- guest: host: let me stop you there. we're listening to the speaker of the house. >> with congressman giffords and her family. we're also praying for the families of judge roll and all of those who were takingen from us yesterday so senselessly. among the fallen is gabe
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zimmerman, a member of congresswoman giffords' staff and i've directed that the flags on the house sigh of the capitol be flown at half mass in honor of his death in the line of duty. an attack on one who serves is an attack on all who serves. such acts of violence have no place in our society. i want to commend the federal state and local officials as well as the capitol police for all of their efforts. and i told the f.b.i. director that the house stands ready to assist in any way possible. last night, the majority leader announced that the normal business of the house in the coming week has been postponed so that we can take necessary action regarding yesterday's events. the majority leader will announce a revised schedule. to the members of the house and their staffs, i ask that you on this sabatsdz day that we keep
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gabby and her staff in our thoughts and prayers. public service is a high honor but these tragic events remind us that all of us in our roles in service to our fellow citizens comes with a risk. this inhumeyain act will not deter us from our calling to represent our constituents and to fulfill our oaths of office. no act, no matter how hainyuss, must be allowed to stop us from our duty. host: the comments of the speaker of the house john boehner in his congressional district just outside of cincinnati in ohio. we're joined here by pete and bill. any final thoughts? guest: i think that was a very nice statement, decent, appropriate, modest. and i hope other people follow his lead.
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guest: well said, very appropriate to do that. he is the speaker of the members of the house. he showed some real leadership there. host: also instructing and 11:00 a.m. eastern time, america should observe a moment of silence to observe the innocent victims in tucson, arizona. those were the president's words, whereas the president says he will observe that with observers on the south lawn.
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here is a story moving on the associated press wire at this hour. there are charges today against the gunman accused of attempting to assassinate representative gabriellr higgotfd and killing six people in arizona -- gabrielle giffords. there were messages, such as "i plan ahead," and there were signatures. a federal public defender -- offender does not have a lawyer, but they are working to get one. also, the ap reporting that a second man has been cleared in and involvement in the assassination. the sheriff's deputies says this man drove the man to the grocery store. also, this from house speaker
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bayer, the house in a pro-forma session -- house speaker john boehner. when the house is in session, they will consider a resolution honoring congresswoman giffords and those who were killed. we expect a voice acclamation of that on wednesday, coverage, of course come here on c-span. in the house, representative difference -- giffords was on the house floor last week. this started with democrats and republican leaders, and this was the first reading in the house, although the document had been entered into the record. this one is about one hour 35 minutes, and we will hear from representative giffords a bit further into the reading. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] [captioning performed by national captioning institute]
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ld remind all members that they should not traffic the well while members are under recognition. the gentleman from virginia is recognized for the reading of the constitution. the gentleman may inquire. >> thank you. mr. speaker, appreciate the leadership shown to bring this document for reading today, but i do want to i iuire of the chair and perhaps the gentleman who is the author of this effort today, mr. goodlatte, the language as i understand it that we will be reading today does not include some of the original language of thee constitution o the united states. mr. inslee: on multiple occasions amendments have purported to change some of the intent of the original document. the speaker pro tempore: does the gentleman have a parliamentaryry inquiry? mr. inslee: i do. will we be reading the entire
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original document without deletion, or will we be rding a document with deletions that may or may n have be accomplished by respective amendments? the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to section 5- of house resolution 5, the chair recognizes the gentleman from virginia to read the constitution of the united states. mr. inslee: may i inquire of the gentleman,f i may inquir before we start this process, of the gentleman, if he would explain to us so that we will all be on the same page -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is not recognized for that purpose. mr. inslee: if i may ask gentleman -- unanimous consent if i may ask the gentleman the question. i ask unanimous consent to ask the gentleman would yield. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is not recognized for debate. this is not a debate. mr. inslee: i'll wait until mr.
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goodlatte is recognize the. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia is recognized for the reading of the constitution, not debate. mr. i.n.s. ln: if i may ask unanimous consent to ask mr. goodlatte to yield for justa question so we all understand the reading. the speaker pro tempore: does the gentleman from washington have a parliamentary inquiry? mr. i.n.s. ln: yes, may i ask the gentleman -- mr. inslee: yes, may i ask the gentleman to yield to ask a question about this language we will all be reading in good faith and spirit today? the speaker pro tempore: that is not in order at this point. the gentleman from virginia. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker, as a part of the opening remarks i will explain and i hope answer the question of the gentleman from washington. this morning for the first time in the history of the house of representatives, we are read allowed the full text of the constitution of the united states. we hope this will inspire many more americans to read the constitution. the text we are reading to reflects te changes to the document made by the 27 amendments to it.
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those portions superseded by amendment will not be read. in order to ensure fairness for all those interested in participating, we have asked members to line up on a first come, first served basis. i will recognize members based on this guidance in order to assure relative parity and fairness, iay recognize members out of order to ensure bipartisanship and balance. two members, one from each party, will be recognized out of order. each member will approach the podium and read the passage laid out for him or her. the speaker and two members of thleadership of each party, will begin the reading and then i will recognize members in order. i thank the members of both parties in advance for their participation in this historic evt, and i thank -- the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california rise?
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mr. honda: thank you, mr. chairman. point of parliamentary procedure. now thathe process has started, would the gentleman from washington's original question about parliamentary procedure, would his question be in order at this time? the speaker pro tempore: in light of the gentleman's modicum of debate, that would be appropriate. mr. honda: thank you. mr. inslee: if i may make a unanimous consent to ask mr. goodlatte a question so that we all do understand the nature of the language that we will be reading. i think it would be very helpful to us on a bipartisan basis. i uld like to ask mr. goodlatte if he could -- the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from virginia may yield for that purpose. mr. inslee: mr. goodlatte, could you explain to us the decisionmaking process about which language to read today? the reason i ask is throughout american history we had a series of amendments that were intended
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to change the original document. but the amements do not make specific deletions to specific language in the original document. and it's been up to us to ascertain to find out which language is s operative or not. but the language has not been specifically deleted by the amendment. so it could be subject to some interpretation of wch language really has been removed and which has not. and so i think it would be lpful to the members if you would explain to us how the determinations of what to read has been made or not made so that we all be on the same page as to congressional intent. mr. goodlatte: i thank the gentleman for his question. we have consulted with the coressional research service of the library of cgress. the library of congress actually maintains a copy of the constitution which includes those sectns that have been superseded by amendments, so we e not reading those sections
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that have been superseded by amendment, and we have arrived at that determination based uponur consultation with the congressional research service. mr. inslee: and would the gentleman accepthe premise that since we have not been ableo review the exact language we will be reading today, that this is not -- this is not -- thank you, gentleman, but, mr. goodlatte, i'll wait for a moment, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. mr. inslee: we do want to have a good, bipartisan success for us today. this is a special moment for us all. so i guess the question is, i take it since we have not had discussion about which language to read or not that this is not intended to create any statement of congressional intent about the language but rather to do ourest to have a moment of comity to read the language as best as we can, is that correct? mr. goodlatte: i that i the gentleman stated that well.
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mr. inslee: thank you for bringing it to our a aention today. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from virginia. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois rise? >> i'd like to ask mr. goodlatte a parliamentary inquiry. the speaker pro tempore: is the gentleman asking unanimous consent? mr. jackson: i ask unanimous consent. the speaker pro tempore: will the gentleman yield? mr. goodlatte: i yield. mr. jackson: every member of this body is approaching the reading of this constitution with the most sacred possible spirit in what is clearly an unprecedented moment in the history of the congress of the united states. and i don't take it very lightly when my colleague or when others before we begin the reading of our sacred document are raisi questions about what we will specifically be reading, what specifically will be dacted based upon amendments or based upon the recommendations of libraries of congress, but i also want to be
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very clear, mr. speaker, and mr. goodlatte, i recognize that this is a request, that in reading those dedacted -- this is very emotional for me. this ivery emotional for many members given the struggle, and i am not trying to take a shot at the process. mr. goodlatte knows me and he knows the spirit which i am approaching this. given the struggle of african-americans, given t struggle of women, given the struggle of others to create a more perfect document while t perfect a more perfect document to hear that those elements of the constitution that have been dedakotaed by amendment are no less -- dedacted by amendment are no less serious to improve the country and to make the country better and r sense in our struggle in whom we are at the congress of the united states at this pnt in american history and our desire to continue to improve the constitution, many of us don't want that to be lost upon the
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reading of our sacred -- of our sacred document. and so with that said, i thank the gentleman for yielding, and i just wanted to indicate that this is done with sincerity. it is not done to take a shot at the idea of reading the constitution, but certainly when we were informed, for example, that the 3/5 clause would not be mentioned and that other elements of the constitution which justify why some of us fig for programs in the congress will not be written in the dedacted version, is a consequence of who we are. thank you, mr. speaker. mr. goodlatte: i thank the gentleman for his comment and i take them very much to heart as our leadership. in recognition of the gentleman's concern, i mentioned in my comment that only two members would be recognized out of order to read sections. one is the gentleman from texas, mr. smith, the chairman of the judiciary committee, who will read the first article of section 3 dealing with the judiciary. the other is the gentleman from georgia, mr. lewis, who many
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regard as the foremost advocate for civil rights in the congress, he will read the 13th amendment. and in that gard, we hope to address the concerns that you raise. mr. gohmert: i ask the gentleman to yield for moment. the speaker pro tempore: does the gentleman ask for unanimous consent? mr. gohmert: yes. the speaker pro tempore: will the gentleman yield? mr. goodlatte: i yield. mr. gohmert: out of respect for this document that we revere, i think it is important that we use the language of the constitution itself. they are not deletions. they are amendments. and that respect we go by the amended document, not by e deleted document. there are too many that have fought and died for those amendments to callhem deletions. with that i yield back. mr. goodlatte: it is an amended document. we are going to read the document as amended.
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i thank the members of both parts in advance for their participation in this historic event. i thank the leadership and members for providing for this reading in the rules of the house. it is now my distinct honor to yield to the speaker of f e house to begin the reading. the speaker:we the peoe of the united states, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic anquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this constitution for the united states of america. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the minority leader, the gentlewoman from california, ms. pelosi. ms. pelosi: article 1, section
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1, all legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a congress of the united states, which shall consist of a senate and house of reesentatis. mr. goodlatte: iow yield to the majority leader, the gentleman from virginia, mr. cantor. mr. cantor: article 1, section 2. the house of representatives shall be composed of members chosen eve second year by the people of the several states, and the electors in each state shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the state legislature. no person shall be a representative who shall not have attained to the age of 25 years and been seven years a citizen of the united states, and who sll not, when elected, be an inhabitant of that state in which he shall be chosen. the actual enumeration shall be made within three years after the first meeting of the
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congress of the united states and within every subsequt term of 10 years in such manner as they shall by law direct. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the minority whip, the gentleman from maryland, mr. hoyer. mr. hoyer: article 1, continuation of section 2. the number of representatives shall not exceed one for every 30,000, but each state shall have at least one representative, and until such enumeration shalbe made, the state of new hampshire shall be entitled to choose three, massachusetts eight, rhode isla and providence plantations one, connecticut five, new york six, new jersey four, pennsylvania eight, delaware one, maryland six, virginia 10, north carolina five, south carolina five, and georgia three.
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when vacancies happen in the representation from any state, the executive authority thereof shall issue writs of election to fill such vacancies. the house of representatives shall choose their speaker and other officers, and shall have the sole power of impeachment. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from california, the majority whip, mr. mccarthy. mr. mccarthy: article 1, section 3. the senate of e united states shall be composed of two senators from each state, chosen by the legislature thereofor six years, and each senator shall have one vote. immediately after th shall be assembled in consequence of the first election, they shall be divided asqually as may be into three classes. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from new jersey,
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mr. rothman. i would ask members to read the page right in front of them and not continue. mr. rothman: the seats of the senators of the first classhall be vacated at the expiration of the second year, of the second class at the expiration of the fourth year, and of the third class at the expiration of the sixth year, so that one third may chosen every second year. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from texas, mr. conaway. mr. conay: no person shall be a senator who shall not have attained to the age of 30 years and if no nine years a citizen of the united states and who shall not en elected be an inhabitant of that state for which he shall be chosen. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to thgentleman from virginia,
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mr. scott. mr. scott:the vice president of the united states shall be president of the senate, but shall have no vote, unless they be equally divided. the senate shall choose their other officers, and also a president pro tempore, in the absence of the vice president, or when he shall exercise the office of president of the ited states. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from michigan, mr. walberg. mr. walberg: the senate shall have the sole power to try all impeachments. when sittingor that purpose, they shall be on oath or affirmatio when the president of the united states is tried, the chief justice shall preside, and no persoshall be convicted without the concurrence of two thirds of the members present.
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mr. goodlatte: i now yield to e gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. critz. mr. critz: judgment in cases of impeachment shall not extend further than to removal from office, and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under the united states, but the party convicted shall vertheless be able and subject to indictment, trial, judgment, and punishment, according to law. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from texas, mr. poe. mr. poe: section 4. the times, places, and manner of holding elections for senators and representatives, shall be prescribed in each ste by the legislature thereof, but the congrs y at any time by law make or alter such regulations, except
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as to the places ochoosing senators. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from new york, mr. weiner. mr. weiner: section 5. each house shall be the judge of the elections, returns, and qualifications of its own members, and a majority of each shall constitute a quorum to do business, but a aller number may adjourn from day to and may be authorized to compel the attendance of absent members, in such manner, and under such penalties as each house may provide. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from georgia, mr. woodall. wamack, i apologize. mr. womack: ch house may determine the rules of its proceedings, punish its members for disoerly behavior, and, with the concurrence of two thirds, expel a member.
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mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlewoman from maryland, ms. edwards. ms. edwards: each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as may in their judgment require secrecy, and the yeas and nays of the members of either house on any question shall, at the desire -- discretion of one fifth of those present, be entered on the journal. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlewoman from michigan, mrs. miller. mrs. miller:neither house, during the session of congress, shall, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor to any other place than that in which the two houses shall be sitting. .
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mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlewoman from texas, ms. jackson lee. ms. jackson lee: section 6. the senators and representatives shall receive a compensation for their services, to be ascertained by law, and paid out of the treasury of the united states. they shall in all cases, except treason, felony, and breach of the peace, be privileged from arrest during their attendance at the session of their respective houses, and in going to and returning from thsame, and for any speech or debate in either house, they shall not be questioned in any other place. . mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. pitts. mrpitts:no senator or presentative
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shall, during the time for which he was elected, be appointed to any civil office under the authority of the united states, which shall have been created, or the emoluments whereof shall have been increased during such time, and no person holding any office under the united states, shall be a member ofither house during his continuance in office. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pascrell. mr. pascrell: section 7, all bills for raising revenue shall originate in the house of representatives but the senate may propose or concur with amendments as on other bills. the speaker pro tempore: i yield to the gentleman from south caroli, mr. wilson. mr. wilson: every bill which
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shall have pasd the house of representatives and the senate, shall, before it become a law, be presented to the president of the ited states. if he approve he shall sign it, but if not he shall return it, with his objections to that house in which it shall have originated, which shall enter the objections at large on their journal, andndroceed to reconsider i mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from texas, mr. green. mr. green: every bill which shall haveassed the house of representatives and the senate shall be -- if after such consideration 2/3 of the house shall agree to pass the bill, it
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shall be sent, together with the objeionsto the other house, by which it shall likewise be recoidered, and if approved by 2/3 of that house, it shall become a law. mr. goodlatte: i thank the gentleman. i now recognize the gtleman from south carolina, mr. gowdy. mr. gowdy: butin all such cases e votes of both houses shall be determined by yeas and nays, and the names of the persons voting for and against the bill shall be entered on the journal of each house respectively. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlewoman from california, mrs. davis. mrs. davis: if any such bl shall not be returned by the president within 10 days, suns exaccepted, after it shall have been presented to him, the same
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shall be a law, in like manner as if he had signed it, unless the congress by their adjournment prevent its return, in which case it shall not be a law. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from new jersey, mr. lobiondo. mr. lobiondo: every order, resolution, or vote to which the concurrence of the senate and house of representatives may be necessary, except on a question of adjournment, shall be presented to the president of the united states, and before the same shall take effect, shall be approved by h, or being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by 2/3 of the senate and house of representatives, according to the rules and limitations prescribed in the case of a bill. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from rhode island, mr. langevin.
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mr. langevin: section 8, the congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposes, and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare of the united states, but all duties, imposes, and excises shall be uniform throughout the united states. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from new jerery, mr. lance. mr. lance: to borrow money on the credit of the united states. , to regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several states, and with the
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indian tribes, to establish a uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform laws on the subject of nkruptcies throughout the united states. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlemafrom michigan, mr. kildee. mr. kildee: to coin money, regulate the value of there, and of foreign coin, and fix the standard of weightsnd measures, to provide for the punishment of counterfeiting, the securities and current coin of the united states, to establish post offices and post roads. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from texas, mr. hensarling.
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mr. hensarling: to promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limit times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from washington, mr. inslee: -- washington, mr. inslee. mr. inslee: to constitute tribunals inferior to the supreme court, to define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and offensesgainst the law of nations. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from south carolina, mr. duncan. mr. duncan: to declare war,
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grt letters of maree and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water, to raise and support armies, but no appropriation of money to that use e all be for a longer term than two years. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from new jersey, mr. holt. mr. holt: to providend maintain a navy, to make rules for the government and regulation of the land and naval forces, to provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the union, spress insurrection and repel invasions. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from texas, mr. canseco. mr. canseco: to provide for organizing, arming and
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discipling, the militia, and for governing such part of them as may be eloyed in the service of the united states, reserving to the states respectively, the appointment of the officers, and the authority of training the militia according to t discipline prescribed by congress. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the leman from virginia, mr. scott. mr. scott: t exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever, over such district, not exceeding 10 miles square, as may, by secession of particular states, and the acptance of congress, become the at of government of the united states, and to exercise like authority over all places purchased by the consent of the legislature of the state in which the same shall be, forhe erection of 40's, magazines, arsenals, dock yards, and other
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needful buildings. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from florida, mr. west. . west: and to make all laws which shallbe necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by this constitution in the government of the united states, or in any department or office of there. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. keating. mr. keating: section 9. the migration or importation of such persons as any of the states now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not be prohibited by the congress prior to t year one thousand eht
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hundred and eight, but a tax or duty may be posed on such importation, not exceeding $10 for each person. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlewoman from tennessee, mrs. black. mrs. black: the privilege of habeas corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion, the public safety may require it. no bill of attainder or ex-post cto law shall be passed. mr. goodlatte: i now yield t the gentman from colorado, mr. perlmutter. mr. perlmutter:o capitation, or other direct, tax shalle
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laid, unless in proportion to the census or enumeration herein, before directed to be taken. no tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any state. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlewoman from washington, mrs. mcmorris rodgers. mrs. mcmorris rodgers: no preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce or revenue to the ports of one state over those of another, nor shall vessels bound to, or from, one state, be obligated to enter, clear, or pay duties to another. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from california, mr. honda. mr. honda: no money shall be drawn from the treasury, but in
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consequence of appropriations made by law, and a regular statement and account of the receipts and expenditures of all public money shall be published from time to time. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the geleman from colorado, mr. garver. mr. garver: no title of nobility shall be granted by the united states and no person holding any office or profit or trust under them shall without the consent of the congress except of any present, office, or title of any kind whatever, from any king, prince, or foreign state. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlewoman from california, miss loretta sanchez. ms. sanchez: no state shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or confederation, grant letters
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of marquee and reprisal, coin money, emit bills of credit, make anything but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of debts, pass any bill of attainder, ex-post cto law, or law impairing the obligation of contracts, or grant any title of nobility. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from kansas, mr. pompeo. mr. pompeo: no state shall, without the consent of the congress, lay any imposes or duties on imports or exports, except what may be absolutely necessary for executing its inspection laws, and the net produce of all duties and imposes, laid by any state on imports or eorts, shall be for the use of the treasury of the united states, and all such laws shall be subject to the revision and control of the congress.
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mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from new york, mr. rangel. mr. rangel: no state shall, without the consent of congress, lay any duty of tonnage, keep troops, or ships of war in time of peace, enter into any agreement or compact with anothestate, or with a foreign power, or engage in war, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent danger as will not admit of delay. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlewoman from new york, ms. hayworth. ms. hayworth: article 2, section 1, the executive power shall be vested in a president of the united states of america.
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he shall hold his office during the term of four years, and, together with the vice president, chosen for the same term, be elected, as follows -- mr. goodlatte: i now yieldo the gentleman from new jersey, mr. payne. mr. payne: each state shall appoint, in such manner as the l lislature thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal to the whole number of senators and representatives to which the state may be entitled in the congress, but no senator or representative, or person holding an office of trust or profit under the united states, shall be appointed an elector. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from indiana, mr. young.
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mr. young: the congress may choose the electors and the day which shall give their vote, the same will be throughout the united states. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from n jersey, mr. pallone. mr. pallone: no person, except a natural born citizen at the time of the adoption of this constitution shall be eligible for the office of the president -- the speaker pro tempore: the chair will remind persons in the gallery -- the chair will remind all perns in the gallery that they are here at guests of the house and that any manifestation of approval or disappral of the proceedings is in violation of the rules of the house.
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the chair notes the disturbance in the gallery in contravenges of the law and rules of the house. the sergeant at arms will remove persons responsible for the disturbance and restore order in the gallery. the gentleman from virginia. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: neither shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained to the age of 35 years and have been 14 years a resident within the united states. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentman from virginia, mr. griffith. mr. griffith: the president shall receive for his services a compensation which shall neither be increased nor diminished during the period for which he shall have been elected and he shall not receive within that period any other money from the united states or any of them.
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fwood goode i now yield to the gentlewoman from california, ms. richardson. -- mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlewoman from california, ms. richardson. ms. richardson: before he enter on the execution of his office, he shall take the following oath or affirmation. i do solemnly swear or affirm that i will faithfully execute the office of the president of the united states and will to the best of my ability preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the united states. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from ohio, mr. latta. mr. latta: section 2. the president shall be commander in chief of the army
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and navy of the united states, and of the militia of the several states, when called into the actual service of the united states, he may require the opinion, in writing, of the principal officer in each of the executive departments, upon any subject relating to the duties of their respective offices, and he shall have power to grant reprieves and pardons for offences against the united states, except in cases of impeachment. mr. goodlatte: now yield to the gentleman from virginia, mr. connolly. mr. connolly: he shall have power, by and with the advice and consent of the senate, to make treaties, provided 2/3 of the senators present concur, and he shall nominate, and by and with the advice and consent of the senate, shall appoint ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges of the supreme court, and all other officers of the united states, whose appointments are not herein otherwise provided
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for, and which shall be established by law. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from louisiana, mr. cassidy. mr. cassidy: but the congress may by law vest the appointment of such inferior officers, as they think prer, the president alone, in the courts of law, or in the heads of departments. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlewoman from colorado, ms. degette. ms. degette: the president shall have power to fill up all vacancies that may happen during the recess of the senate, by granting commissions which shall expire at the end of their next session.
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mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from ohio, mr. johnson. mr. johnson: section 3, he shall from time to t te give to the congress information of the state of the union, and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient, he may, on extraordinary occasions, convene both houses, or either of them, and in case of disagreementetween them, with -- between them. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from ohio, mr. kucinich. mr. kucinich with -- mr. kucinich: with respect to
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the time of adjournment, he may adjourn them to such time as he all think proper, he shall receive ambassadors and other public ministers, he shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed, and shall commission all the officers of the united states. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlemafrom ohio, mr. chabot. mr. chabot: the president, vice president and all civil officers of the united states, shall be removed from office on impeachment for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors. the judicial power of the united states shall be vested in one supreme court, and in such inferior courts as the
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congress may from time to time ordain and establish. the judges, both of the supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices during good behavior, and shall, at stated times, receive for their services a compensation, which shall not be diminished during their continuance in office. mr. goof goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from georg, mr. bishop. mr. bishop: soaks 2. the judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law and equity, arising under this constitution, the laws of the united states, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their authority to all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, to all cases of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction,
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-- jurisdictio ploo good lalt: i now yield to the gentleman from -- mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from texas, mr. farenthold. mr. farenthold: to controversies to which the united states shall be a party. to controversies between two or more states, between a state and citizens of another state, between citizens odifferent states, between citizens of the same state claiming lands under grants of different states, and between a state, or the citizens thereof, and foreign states, citizens or subjects. in all cases affecting -- subjects. mr. goodlatte: now yield to the gentleman from indiana, mr. donnelly. mr. donnelly: in all cases affectingambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, and those in which a state shall be party, the supreme court shall have original jurisdiction. in all the other cases before
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mentioned, the supreme court shall have appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, with such exceptions, and under such regations as the congress shall make. goo goodlatte: i now yield -- forbes force mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from new mexico, mr. pares. -- mr. pearce. mr. pearce: the trial of all crimes except in cases of impeachment, shall be by jury, and such trial shallbe held in the state where the said crimes shall have been committed, but when not committed within any state, the trial shall be at such place or places as the congress may by law have directed. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. altmire. mr. altmire: treason against the
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united states shall consist only of levying war against them or in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort. no person shall be convicted of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in open c crt. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from ohio, mr. turner. mr. turner: the congress shall have power to declare the punishment of treason, but no attainder of treason shall work corruion of blood, or forfeiture except during the life of the person attainted. ploo goodlatte: -- mr. goodlatte: you now yield to the gentleman from delaware, mr. carney. mr. carney:article iv section 1 full faith and credit shall be given in each state to the public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every other state.
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and the congress may by general laws prescribe the manner in which such acts, records and proceedings shall be proved, and the effect thereof. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from maryland, mr. harris. mr. harris: section 2 the citizens of each state shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of citizens in the several states. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from california, mr. schiff. mr. schiff: a person charged in any state with treason, felony, or other crime, who shall flee from justice, and be found in another state, shall on demand of the executive authority of the state from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the state having jurisdiction of the
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crime. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to thgentleman om ohio, mr. gibbs. mr. gibbs: section 3, new states may be admitted by the congress into this union, but no new state shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other state, nor any state be formedy the junction of the two or more states, or parts of states without the consent of the legislatures of the states concerned as well as for the congress. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from new york, mr. nadler. .
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mr. nadler: nothing in this constitution shall be so construed as to prejudice any claims of the united states or of any particular state. mr. goodlattei now yield to the gentleman fr nebraska, mr. fortenberry. mr. fortenberry: or by conventions in 3/4 there of as the one or other mode of ratification may be proposed by the congress provided that no amendment may may be made prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight shall affect northernreland manner the fourth clauses of the ninth section of the first article and no state without its consent shall be deprived of its equal suffrage in the senate. .
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mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlewoman from california, ms. matsui. ms. matsui: article 6. all debts contracted and engagements entered into, before the adoption of this constitution, shall be as valid against the united states under this constitution, as under the confederation. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from new jersey, mr. garrett. mr. garrett: this constitution, and the laws of the united states which shall be made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the united states, shall be the supreme law of the land, and the judges in every state shall be bound thereby, any thing in the constitution or laws of any state to the contrary notwithstanding.
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mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer. mr. blumenauer:the senators and representatives before mentioned, and the members of the several state legislatures, and all executive and jucial officers, both of the united states and of the several states, shall be bound by oath or affirmation, to support this constitution, but no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the united states. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from colorado, mr. lamborn. mr. lamborn:the ratification of the conventions of nine states, shall be sufficient for the establishment of this constitution between the states so ratifying the same. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to
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the gentlewoman from hawaii, ms. hirono. ms. hino: the word, the, being interlined between the seventh and eighth lines of the first page, thword 30 being partly written on an erasurin the 15th line of the first page, the words "is tried" being interlined between the 32nd and 33rd lines of the first page and the word "the" being interlined between the 43rd and 44th lines of the second page. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from colorado, mr. tipton. mr. tipton: done in convention
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by the unanimous consent of the states present the 17th day of september in the year of our lord, 1787, and of the independence of the united states of america the 12th in witness whereof we have hereunto subscribed our names. goode i now recognize the gentleman from missouri, mr. carnahan. mr. carnahan: signers of the constitution -- george washington, present and deputy from virginia, delaware, george read, gunning bedford, john dickinson, richard bassett, jacob broom maryland, james mchenry, daniel
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of st. thomas jenifer, daniel carroll virginia, john blair, james madison, jr. . mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from california, mr. mcclintock. mr. mcclintock: north carolina -- william blount, richard dobbs spaight, hugh williamson south carolina - john rutledge, charles cotesworth pinckney, charles pincey, pierce butler georgia -- william few, abraham baldwin mr. goodlatte: now yield to the gentleman from washington, mr. mcdermott. mr. mcdermott: new hampshire --
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john langdon, nicholas gilman massachusetts -- nathaniel gorham, rufus king connecticut -- william samuel johnson, roger sherman new york -- alexander hamilton mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from kansas, kansas. >>new jersey -- will livingston, david brearley, william paterson, jonathan dayton pennsylvania -- benjamin franklin, thomas mifflin, robert morris, george clymer, thomas fitzsimons, jared ingersoll, james wilson, gouverneur morris . -- governor morris.
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mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from michigan, mr. levin. mr. levin: the preamble to the right of rights. congress of the united states, begun and held at the city off new york, on wednesday, the fourth of march, one thousand seven hundred eight nine. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlewoman from alabama, mrs. roby. mrs. roby: the conventions of a number of the states, having at the time of their adopting the
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constitution, expressed a desire in order to prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that further declare torrey and restrictive clauses should be added, and as extending the ground of public confidence in the government, will best ensure the ben fits -- befishent ends of its institution. mr. goodlatte: i yield t the gentleman from arkansas, mr. ross. mr. ross: resolved by the senate and house of representatives of the united states of america, in congress assembled, twohirds of both houses concurring,hat the following articles be proposed to the legislatures of the several states, as amendments to the constitution of the united -- united states. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from alabama, mr. bonner. mr. bonner: all, or any which
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articles, when ratified by 3/4 of the said legislatures, to be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of the said constitution. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the the gentlelady from hawaii, ms. hanabusa. ms. hanabusa: articles in addition to, and amendment of the constitution of the united states of america, proposed by congress, and ratified by the legislatures of the several states, pursuant to the fifth article of the original constitution. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to
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the the gentlelady from arizona, . giffords. ms. giffords: congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press, or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from new hampshire, mr. guinta. mr. guinta: the second
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amendment. a well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infriried. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from california, mr. sherman. mr. sherman k4r0 -- mr. sherm: the third amendment. no soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from texas, mr. gohmert. mr. gohmert: amendment iv the right of the people to be
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secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. lynch. mr. lynch: amendment v no person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the ld or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service in time of war or public danger. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the
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gentleman from california, mr. denham. mr. denham: -- i now yield to the gentleman from arizona, mr. franks. mr. franks: nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be put twice in jeopardy of life or limb, nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law, nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation. mr. goodlatte: i now eld to the gentlelady from california, ms. speier. ms. speier:
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>> in to be informed of the nature and cause of the acquisition. to be confronted with the witnesses against him. and how complex toward process when obtaining witnesses in his favor and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.
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>> i yield to the gentleman from illinois, mr. le pen's the. -- mr. lipinsky. >> amendment seven. in suits of common law, where the value shall achieve -- shall exceed $20, the right of trial shall be observed. no trial by jury shall be otherwise reexamined in another court of the united states and accordinto the rule of the common law. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from texas, mr. flores. >> i now yield to the gentlem from texas, mr. flores. excessive bail shall not be required, nor cessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.
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mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from minnesota, mr. walls. mr. walz: the ninth amendment. the enumeration in the constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people. mr. goodlatte: amendment 10. the powers not delegated to the united states by the constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the people -- are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people. i now yield to the gentleman from rhode island, mr. cicile
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nembings. >> the judicial power of the united states shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the united states by citizens of another state, or by citizens or subjects of any foreign state. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from georgia, mr. gray. -- graves. mr. graves: amendment number 12. the electors shall meet in their respective states and vote by ballot for president and vice-president, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves; they shall name in their ballots the person voted for as president, and in distinct ballots the person voted for as vice president. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from new york, mr. engel.
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mr. enl: and they shall make distinct lists of all persons voted for as president, and of all persons voted for as vice-president, and of the number of votes for each, which lists they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the se of the government of the united states, directed to the president of the senate. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from indiana, mr. stutzman. mr. stutzman: the president of the senate shall, in the presence of the senate and house of representatives, open all the certificates and the votes shall then be counted. the person having the eatest number of votes for president, shall be the president, if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed; and if no person have sh majority, then from the persons having the highest
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numbers not exceeding three on the list of those voted for as president. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from north carolina, mr. price. mr. price: the house of representatives shall choose immediately by ballot the president. but in choosing the president, the votes shall be taken by states, the representation from ea state having one vote. a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall be necessary to a choice. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from florida, mr. suerlin. -- mr. souterland.
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>> if no person have a majority, then from the two highest numbers of the list, the senate shall choose the vice president. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentlewoman from california, ms. chu. ms. chu: a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be necessary to a choice. but no person constitutionally eligible to the office of president shall be eligible to that of vice-president of the united states. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from georgia, mr. lewis.
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mr. lewis: amendment 13, section 1. neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the united states, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. congress shall have power to enforce th article by appropriate legislation.
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mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from virginia, mr. ridge ill -- mr. rigell. mr. rigell: all persons born or naturalized the united states and subject to the jurisdiction thereof are citizens of the united states and the state wherein they reside. no state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the united states. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from north carolina, mr. watt. mr. watt: nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or
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property, without due process of law, nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from virginia, mr. wittman. mr. wittman: section 2. representatives shall be apportioned among the several states according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number of persons in each state, excluding indians not taxed. but when the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for president and vice-president of the united states, representatives in congress, the executive and judicial officers a state, orhe members of the legislature thereof, is denied
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to any of the male inhabitants of such state, being 21 years of age, and citizens of the united states, or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebelon, or other crime, the basis of representation therein shall be reduced in the proportion which the number of such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citizens 21 years of age in such state. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlewoman from new york, ms. clarke. ms. clarke: section 3. no person shall be a senator or representative in congress, elector of president and vice-president, or hold any office, civil or military, under the united states, or under any state, who, having previously taken an oath, as a
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member of congress, or as an officer of the united states, or as a meer of any state legislature. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlewoman from north carolina, mrs. ellmers. mrs. ellmers: or as an executive orudicial officer of any state, to support to the constitution of the united states, shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. but congress may by a vote of two-thirds of each house, remove such disability. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from new york, mr. israel.
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mr. israel: section 4. the validity of the public debt of the united states, authorized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall not be questioned. but neither the united states nor any state shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or rebellion against the united states, or any claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave, but all such debts, obligations, and claims shall be held illegal and void. mr. goodlatte: the gentleman from arizona, mr. gosar. mr. gosar: section 5. the congress shall have the power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article.
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amendment 15, section 1. the right of citizens of the united states to vote shall not be denied or abridged by t united states or by any state on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from new york, mr. bishop. mr. bishop: section 2. the congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. amendment 16. the congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several states, and without regard to any census or enumeration. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to
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the gentleman from texas, mr. olson. mr. olson: amendment 17. the senate of the united states shall be composed of two senators from each state, elected by the people thereof, for six years; and each senator shall have one vote. the electors in each state shall have the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the state legislatures. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from washington, mr. larson. mr. larson: when vacancies happen in the representation of any state in the senate, the executive authority of such state shall issue writs of election to fill
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such vacancies, provided, that the legislature of any state may empower the executive thereof to make temporary appointments until theeople fill the vacancies by election as the legislature may direct. mrgoodlatte: i now yield to the gentlewoman from new york, ms. birkle. -- ms. buerkle. ms. buerkle: amendment 19. passedy congress june 4, 1919, ratified august 18, 19 20. the right of citizens of the united states to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the united states or by any state on account of sex. congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
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mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentlelady from pennsylvania, ms. schwartz. ms. schwartz: e terms of the president and vice president shall end at noon on the 20th day of january and the terms of senators and representatives at noon on t third day of january. of the years in which such terms would havended if this article had not been rafied the terms of their successors shall then begin. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from louisiana, mr. scalise. mr. scalise: section 2, the congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and such meeting shall begin at noon on the third day of january, unless
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they shall by law appoint a different day. section 3, if,t the time fixed for the beginning of the term of the president, the prident-elect shall have died, the vice president elect shall become president. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from texas, mr. green. mr. green: if a president shall not have been chosen for te time fixed at the beginning of his term or the president-elect shall have failed to qualify, the vice president elect shall act as president until the president shalhave qualified and the congress may by law for the case written where in neither a president elects or vice president shall have qualified, declaring who shall then act as president or the manner in whicone who is to act shall be selected, and such person shall act accdingly until a president or vice president shall have qualified.
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mr. good lat: i yield to the gentleman from virginia, mr. hurt. mr. hurt: section 4, the congress may by law provide for the case of the death of any of the persons from whom the house of representatives may choose a president whenever the right of choice shall have devolved upon them, and for the case of the death of any of the persons from whom the senate may choose a vice president whenever the right of choice shall have devolved upon them. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentman from new york, mr. serrano. mr. serrano:section sections 1 and 2 shall take effect on the 15th day of october following the ratification of this article. section 6
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this article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the constitution by the legislatures of three-fourths of the seral states within seven years from the date of its submission. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. platts. mr. platts:amendment xxi passed by congress november 20, 1933, ratified december 5, 1933. section 1 the eighteenth article of amendment to the constitution of the united states is hereby repealed. section 2 the transportation or importation into any state, territory, or possession of the united states for delivery or use therein of intoxicating liquors, in violation of the laws thereof, is hereby prohibited.
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mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from oregon, mr. schrader. mr. schrader: section 3 this article shall be inerative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the constitution by conventions in the several states, as provided in the constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the states by the congress. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. mian -- mr. meehan. mr. meehan: amendment xxii
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passed by congress on march 21, 1947. section 1 no person shall be elected to the office of the president more than twice, and no person who has held the office of president,r acted as president, for more than two years of a term to which some other person was elected president shall be elected to the office of president more than once. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from mississippi, mr. nunnely. -- mr. nunnelee. mr. nunnelee: but this article shall not apply to any person holding the office of president when this article was proposed by congress and shall not prevent any peon who may be holding the office of president or acting as president during
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the term within which this article becomes operative from holding the office of president or acting as president during the remainder of such term. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from california, mr. miller. mr. miller: this article shall be not apply to any person holding the office of president when this article was proposed to president. and -- or acting as president during the term within which the art erikle becomes operative from holding the office of president or acting as president during the remainder of su term. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from louisiana, mr. fleming. mr. fleming:section 2
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this article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the constitution by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several states within seven years from the date of its submission to the states by the congress. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from california, mr. garne mendy -- mr. garamendi. mr. garamendi: amendment 23, passed by congress june 16, 1960, ratified march 29, 1961. section 1 the district cstituting the seat of government of the united states shall appoint in such manner as congress may direct a number of electorsf president and vice president
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equal to the whole number of senators and representatives in congress to which the district woulbe entitled if it were a -- if it were a state. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from california, mr. royce. mr. royce: but in no event more thanthe least populous state. they shall be in addition to those appointed by the states, but they shall be considered, for the purposes of the election of president and vice president, to be electors appointed by a ste, and they shall meet in the district and perform such duties as provided by the 12th article of amendment. section 2 the congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriatlegislation.
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mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from connecticut, mr. courtney. mr. courtney: amendment 24, passed by congress, august 27, 1962, ratified january 23, 1964. section 1 the right of citizens of the united states to vote in any primary or other election for president or vice president, for electors for president or vice president, or for senator or representative in congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the united states or any state by reason of failure to pay poll tax or other tax. section 2 the congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. . goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. dent. mr. dent: amendment 25, passed
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by congress, july 6, 1965. section 1 in case of the removal of the president from office or of his death or resignation, the vice president shall become president. section 2 whenever there is a vacancy in the office of the vice president, theresident shall nominate a vice president who shall take office upon confirmation by a majority vote of both houses of congress. mr. goodlatte: i yield to the gentleman from oklahoma, mr. lankford. mr. lank ford -- mr. lankford: whenever the president transmits to the president pro tempore of the senate and the speaker of the house of representatives his written declaration that he is unable to discharge the powers and ties of his office, and until he transmits to them a written declaration to the contrary, such powers and duties shall be discharged by the vice president as acting
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president. the speaker pro tempore: i yield to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. murphy. mr. murphy: section 4 whenever the vice president and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive departments or of such other body as congress may by law provide, transmit to the president pro tempore of the senate and the speaker of the use of representatives their written declaration that the president is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the vice president shall immediately assume the powers and duties of the office as acting president. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentlelady from missouri, mrs. hartzler. mrs. hartzler: thereafter, when
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the president transmits to the president pro tempore of the senate and the speaker of the house of representatives his written declaration that no inability exists, he shall resume the powers and duties of his office unless the vice president and a majority of either the principal officers of the executive department or of such other body as congress may by law provide, -- law provide. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. fitzpatrick. mr. fzpatrick: transmit within four days to the president pro tempore of the senate and the speaker of the house of reprentatives their written declaration that the president is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his
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office. thereupon congress shall decide the issue, assembling within 48 hours for that purpose if not in session. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from new york, mr. gibson. mr. gibson:if the congress, within 21 days after receipt of the latter written declaration, or, if congress is not in session, within twenty-one days after congress is required to assemble, determines by two-thirds vote of both houses that the president is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office, the vice president shall continue to discharge the same as acting president, otherwise, the president shall resume the powers and duties of his office. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to
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the gentleman fromllinois, mr. holt gren -- mr. hultgren. mr. hultgren: amendment 26, passed by congress march 23, 1971. ratified july 1, 1971. section 1 the right of citizens of the united states, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the unitestates or by any state on account of age. section 2 the congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from tennessee, mr. fincher, who will read the last section of the constitution. mr. fincher: amendment 27, originally proposed september 25, 1789, ratified may 7, 1992. no law, varying the compensation for the services of the senators and representatives, shall take effect, until an election of
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representatives shall have intervened. mr. goodlatte: mr. speaker welcome apology to those few members who were waiting to read, we have now completed the first reading aloud of the united states constitution, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. >> several hours after they finish reading the u.s. constitution allowed, it would realize that two pages had been skipped. he then allow them into the
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record. >> during the reading, one of the members, while they were reading from the notebook at the podium, and turned to pages, and two pages of the constitution were not read. and so i ask unanimous consent that i now read those pages and that they be placed into the reading of the constitution as it occurred earlier today so we have a complete reading of the constitution.
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on application of the legislature or of the executive when the legislature cannot be convened against domestic violence. article 5. the congress, whenever two- thirds of both houses showed the mid necessary, shall propose amendments to this constitution or on the application of the legislatures of two-thirds of the several states show call a convention for proposing amendments which in either case shall be valid to all intents and purposes as part of this constitution, when ratified by the legislatures of three- fourths of the several states. that is the portion that was omitted earlier, and that by unanimous consent is not included in the reading of the constitution. i thank the speaker and yelled back. -- yield back. >> i think news organizations have adapted. have adapted.

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