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tv   Key Capitol Hill Hearings  CSPAN  September 9, 2014 5:00pm-7:01pm EDT

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the chair: on this vote the yeas are 163. the nays are 248. he amendment is not adopted. the unfinished business is the request for a recorded vote on amendment number 3 printed in house report 113-581 by the gentleman from new york, mr. bishop, on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the noes prevailed by voice vote. the clerk will redesignate the amendment. the clerk: amendment number 3 printed in house report 113-581 offered by mr. bishop of new york. the chair: a recorded vote has
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been requested. those in support of the request for a recorded vote will rise and be counted. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this will be a two-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the chair: on this vote the yeas are 170. the nays are 240. the amendment is not adopted. there being no further amendments, under the rule the committee now rises.
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the speaker pro tempore: mr. chairman. the chair: mr. speaker, the committee of the whole house on the state of the union has had under consideration h.r. 5078 and pursuant to house resolution 715 i report the bill back to the house. the speaker pro tempore: the chair of the committee of the whole house on the state of the union reports that the committee has had under consideration the bill h.r. 5078 and pursuant to house resolution 715 reports the bill back to the house. under the rule the previous question is ordered. the question is on engrossment and third reading of the bill. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. third reading. the clerk: a bill to preserve existing rights and responsibilities with respect to waters of the united states and for other purposes. for eaker pro tempore: what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i have a motion
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to recommit at the desk. the speaker pro tempore: is the gentleman opposed to the bill? >> i am opposed in the current form. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: mr. huffman of california moves to recommit the bill h.r. 5078 to the committee on transportation and infrastructure with instructions to report the same back to the house forthwith with the following amendment, at the end of the bill add the following -- section. protecting the quality of waters for public water supply for agriculture uses to mitigate against drought. nothing in this act directs the authority of the secretary or administrator to protect the quality of surface waters that is available. one, for public water supply which are a significant source of drinking water for municipalities. two, for agriculture uses, including irrigation or, three, to mitigate against the harmful mpacts of drought. the speaker pro tempore: the ouse will come to order.
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he house will come to order. members will please take their conversations off the house floor. he house will come to order. the gentleman from california is recognized for five minutes. mr. huffman: thank you, mr. speaker. this is the final amendment to the bill. it will not kill the bill or send it back to committee. if adopted, the bill will immediately proceed to final passage, as amended. mr. speaker, the underlying
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bill before us today will make it harder for the army corps of engineers and the e.p.a. to clarify the jurisdictional coverage of the clean water act, leaving watersheds across the country in continued legal limbo. now, i visited with ranchers and landowners from my district. i understand the -- >> mr. speaker, the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman will suspend. he house will come to order. mr. huffman: thank you, mr. speaker. i have visited with folks around my district. i understand the anxieties that have been expressed about what the waters of the united states rulemaking means, but the solution to this situation is to seek tighter definitions and clearer rules, not to prohibit agencies from further developing an important proposal. in particular, i'm concerned that h.r. 5078 could have unintended consequences for those who rely on healthy watersheds. we need clarity in the law so that we can protect water quality for drinking water supplies and for agricultural
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uses. we're suffering a historic drought in california, and the current legal mess, the ambiguity of what qualifies as waters of the u.s. under the clean water act actually makes it harder to know which water bodies are covered by the law. it makes it harder to protect upstream wetlands and recharge groundwater supplies. and the importance of these intermittent streams and wetlands is most notable during torrential rains or droughts because wetlands and streams can absorb and then release water gradually to surrounding streams and aquifers. this underlying bill will keep regulatory uncertainty in place and could leave upstream water sources subject to long-lasting litigation. that situation is not good for the communities in my district who need clean drinking water and clean water for their businesses. it's not good for my downstream ranchers who are already facing water shortages and hurting from rising feed prices.
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now, remember, mr. speaker and colleagues -- >> the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman will suspend. the house will come toured -- to order. mr. huffman: under president reagan, the clean water act covered any body of water that could serve as habitat for migratory birds, a much more far-reaching standard than one the obama administration is considering. the g.a.o. determined in 2004 that the reagan rule would have allowed the army corps to regulate almost any body of water or wetland. let's remember that when we hear the characterizations of the obama administration's proposal as some vast overreach. it is far more narrowly tail ord than what existed -- tailored than what existed under president agean. the agencies have some things already proposing things with ranchers and with farmers and
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with states. i believe it will be a workable proposal. we should let that process play out. let's not make the current situation worse. let's ensure that this bill doesn't harm drinking water or water supplies for irrigation needs. let's ensure that we aren't making it harder to respond to an extreme drought. i ask my colleagues to support this motion to recommit. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? mr. shuster: mr. speaker, i rise in opposition to the motion to recommit. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. shuster: mr. speaker, i'm strongly opposing this motion to recommit. the purpose of h.r. 5078 is to uphold the federal-state partnership in regulating the nation's waters by maintaining a balance between the states and federal government in carrying out the clean water act. the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman will suspend.
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the house is not in order. mr. shuster: h.r. 5078 restriggets the administration's current administrative efforts to expand federal jurisdiction under the clean water act and requires the agencies to engage in a federalism consultation with the state and local government partners. however, this motion is designed to undermine the legislation by giving the e.p.a. unfettered discretion in making states' water sclault determination in order to allow the administration to i will plement its flawed rule. the amendment says the underlying bill will not apply that the e.p.a. decides that the bill should not apply. this amendment would erode the federal and state partnership that h.r. 5078 seeks to preserve. and i would urge all 435 members of this body to take notice, this is another attempt by the executive branch to take
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congress' constitutional authority away from us and we should take this as a serious challenge. for too long this body has allowed this executive branch to take our authority granted to us by the constitution. i say whether it's a republican or democrat administration, we have to stop that. and with this bill, h.r. 5078, it is a step in the right direction. h.r. 5078 is a good bill that maintains the balance of our nation's water. we must preserve the state and federal partnership that has existed under the clean water act until this administration chose to impose an overbearing e.p.a. on our states. i urge a no vote and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: works the previous question is ordered on the motion to recommit. the question is on the motion to recommit. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the noes have it. the gentleman from california. mr. huffman: i request a recorded vote. the speaker pro tempore: a railroaded vote is requested.
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those favoring a recorded vote will rise, a sufficient number having arisen having risen, a recorded vote is ordered. the chair will reduce the minimum time to any electronic vote on the question of passage. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: the yeas are 177, the nays are 235. the motion is not adopted. the question is on passage of the bill. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. > request a recorded vote. >> i request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. those favoring a vote by the yeas and nays will rise. a sufficient number having arisen having risen, the yeas and nays are ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote.
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[captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of epresentatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 262. the nays are 152. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the
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gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i send to the desk praveragede report for the committee on rules for filing under the rule. -- a privileged report for the committee on rules for filing under the rule. the clerk: resolution providing for consideration of the bill h.r. 3522, to authorize health insurance issuers to continue to offer for sale current group health insurance coverage inside a faction inside the minimum health insurance coverage requirement and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the house calendar and ordered printed. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, the chair will postpone further proceedings today on motions to suspend the rules on which a recorded vote or the yeas and nays are ordered or on which the vote incurs objection under clause 6 of rule 20. recorded votes on postponed questions will be taken later.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. burgess: mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the les and pass the bill h.r. 4067. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: union calendar number 431, h.r. 4067, a bill to provide for the extension of the enforcement instruction on supervision requirements for outpatient therapeutic services in critical access and small ural hospitals through 2014. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from texas, mr. burgess, and the gentleman from
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new jersey, mr. pallone, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and xtend their remarks and insert extraneous materials in the record on the bill. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. burgess: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. burgess: mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 406, to provide for the extension of the enforcement instruction on supervision requirements for outpatient therapeutic services in critical access and small rural hospitals through 2014. this was a bill introduced by congresswoman jenkins of kansas. this is a commonsense solution to a problem that has the potential to limit or delay access to health care for america's seniors in rural communities. the bill would delay until the end of the year enforcement of
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supervision requirements for outpatient therapeutic services in critical access hospitals. this delay would give the center for medicare and medicaid services and provider groups time to identify which services will eventually fall under the requirement. i ask my colleagues to support this important piece of legislation and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. mr. speaker, h.r. 4067 would suspend current enforcement of medicare rules relating to hysician supervision requirements for outpatient therapeutic services in critical access and small rural hospitals through 2014. it began again in january of this year. my understanding is there has not been any issue to
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enforcement to date and that the medicare program has not taken any action against a facility for failure to meet physician supervision standards since january. this bill did not follow regular order through the committee process, we have not had an opportunity to hear from interested parties about the i shall auto ue and bring to light -- issue and bring to light. frankly, the lightly result of a bill would be confusion for hospitals. medicare's physician supervision requirement places a premium on patient safety, and i understand that rural facilities sometimes face difficulty in securing staffing. however, it seems reasonable to me that outpatient clinics that provide services to medicare beneficiaries should meet some basic standards for having supervisory physicians available when an emergency arises. for example, when patients are receiving potentially lethal medicine. emotherapy and they could devote their
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time on the recent effects of ebola, ecigarettes or vaccinations that have led to preventable diseases like measles. the bill only seems to respond to the fears of certain health care providers that someone could file a complaint that a facility was allowing staff to practice medicine on medicare patients without any supervision. isn't that the kind of thing we might be concerned about? what about a whistleblower to report? that is what this bill would prep vent. it remains un-- prevent. it remains unclear to me why this policy is needed. simply saying the senate passed this bill by unanimous consent in february is not sufficient justification and makes even less sense now that the calendar year is nearly over. so mr. speaker, we should be finding time to address the real and pressing public issues facing our nation rather than those that merely cause an inconvenience or anxiety for certain health care providers. i will yield -- i would reserve the balance of my time at this
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time, mr. speaker. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: mr. speaker, at this time i'd like to yield three minutes to the author of the bill, congresswoman jenkins of kansas. ms. jenkins: thank you. i thank the gentleman for yielding. i rise today in support of h.r. 4067, a bill to provide for the extension of the enforcement instruction on supervision requirements for outpatient their buttic -- therapeutic services in critical access and small rural hospitals through 2014. i was proud to introduce this legislation in february, and i'm pleased that chairman upton and the energy and commerce committee reported it favorably and brought it to the house floor today. the 83 critical access hospitals in kansas are the lifeblood of our rural communities and one of the many challenges these communities face is access to health care. the presence of a facility such as a critical access hospital
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in a community could be the deciding factor in whether or not the next generation of children decide to raise their family in their home town or perhaps whether or not a business decides to locate there. the centers for medicare and medicaid services made a decision on january 1 of this year that will make it more difficult for these rural hospitals to serve their communities. c.m.s. enformed these hospitals that physicians are now required to directly supervise outpatient services, such as drawing blood and activity therapy. this is a change in policy that will put a strain on providers while providing no quality improvements for the patients they serve. this bill will correct that problem by reinstating the moratorium on enforcement of these unnecessary regulations. it has broad bipartisan support in congress and the support of key stakeholders.
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mr. speaker, i ask permission to enter into the record letters of support for h.r. 4067 from the american hospital association, the national rural health association, the kansas hospital association and anderson county hospital, which is a critical access hospital in garnett, kansas, one of 1,300 nationwide. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. jenkins: i was born and raised in a small town in kansas, and i feel strongly that folks in rural communities deserve access to quality health care. i urge my colleagues to support this legislation, and i'm hopeful that the senate will soon act on it so it may become law. with that i'd yield back. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: reserve my time, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: mr. speaker, i have no other speakers at this time.
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so i would -- i would yield the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to support the bill and yield back the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 4067. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. burgess: mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 669, as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 669, a bill to amend the public health service act to improve the health of children and help better understand and enhance awareness about unexpected sudden death in early life. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the
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gentleman from texas, mr. burgess, and the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous material into the record on the bill. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. burgess: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. mr. burgess: i rise in support of h.r. 669 sudden yep unexpected death data enhancement and awareness act. prevention of stillbirth and sudden unexplained death in children depends upon the collection of data related to the biological, social and environmental factors associated with these outcomes. the centers of disease control collects data through existing surveillance systems in order to identify the extent of the problem and risk factors.
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sudden unexpected death rates of infants decreased, but remained unchanged since then. it is time for us to address this problem. h.r. 669 authorizes activities at the centers for disease control to help improve the understanding of stillbirth, sudden unexpected infant death and unexplained death in children by improving data collection, increasing surveillance strategies and setting guidelines and protocols. i ask my colleagues to support this important piece of legislation and reserve the balance of the time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i rise with great pride to be speaking in support of h.r. 669, the sudden unexpected death data enhancement and awareness act. this is an issue i have worked
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on many years in congress and one of the bills that i partnered with senator frank lautenberg and i want to thank congressman peter king since he worked on this with me. stillbirth and unexpected infant death affect thousands of families according to data and sudden infant death syndrome is the leading cause of death for infants up to 12 months old. too many families suffer these tragic events but what makes matters worse is their struggle with the process to help find answers. there is a lack of comprehensive high-quality data to best understand why these events occur in the first place. the intent has been to utilize the federal government's activity in this area, specifically, it would expand and standardize surveillance collection for stillbirth and sudden unexpected death at the centers for disease control and prevention and improve the
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development of standard protocols for use of death scene investigations and autopsies surrounding these deaths and allow the secretary of h.h.s. to conduct training activities regarding these protocols. the bill requires c.d.c. to submit a report to congress on current activities related to stillbirth and evaluate the possibility of expanding programs relating to these specifically. let me close by thanking laura, co-founder and co-director of the s.u.d.c. program. this issue hits close to home for laura and she decided to work to help others who suffered. she has been a great advocate for this bill and spread awareness all across the country and i thank her for strength, determination and dedication. this bill is everything that the c.d.c. can be doing and represents a critical step on a
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tragic issue that deserves our attention and i urge my colleagues to support its passage. and i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: i have no further speakers, so i will reserve the time for closing. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: i would yield the balance of my time and again urge passage. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: i urge my colleagues to support the bill and yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 669 as amend the. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended and the bill is passed and the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? burg burgs i move the house suspend the rules and pass the
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bill h.r. 4290 as amended. the clerk: union calendar number 419, h.r. 4290, a bill to amend the public health service act to re-authorize the emergency medical services for children program. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from texas, mr. burgess, the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone will each stroll 20 minutes, the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous materials into the record on the bill. and i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. burgess: i rise today in support of h.r. 4290 the wakefield act of 2014 introduced by mr. matheson of utah and mr. king of new york. children have special health needs especially in the field of emergency medical services. the emergency and trauma care system has been slow to develop an adequate response to these
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unique needs. some problems are endemocratic such as fragmentation and poor coordination, hospitals and public health. the public is worse for children when hospitals lack the appropriate medical personnel for appropriate pediatric supplies or transfer agreements that lead to better care within the golden hour when chances of survival of an accident are higher. in 1984, congress passed the emergency medical services for children as a part of the preventive health amendments of 1984. last re-authorized in 2010, the program aims to reduce child mortality caused by illness and trauma. h.r. 4290 re-authorizes the emergency medical services for children program through 2019. the program supports education and training of e.m.s. providers and identifies models that can increase pediatric care in rural
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and tribal communities. the bill also supports the pediatric emergency care applied research network that facilitates collaborative research on pediatric emergency services of the i ask my colleagues to support this bill by voting for this important piece of legislation. and i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. . the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: i yield myself such time as i may consume. i rise in support of h.r. 4290, the wakefield act of 2014, a bill to re-authorize the emergency medical service for children program. the emergency medical service for children program was established 30 years ago. the program includes a number of grant programs to help states assess and improve pediatric emergency care, improve emergency services for children in rural, tribal and other communities and support research in pediatric emergency medicine.
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it will re-authorize the emergency medical services for children program for another five years so this critical program can continue its lifesaving work. and i offer my thanks to congressman matheson and congressman king and to chairman upton and ranking member waxman and our staffs for working on this bill. i urge members to support the legislation and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: i reserve at this time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: i yield to the sponsor of the bill, mr. matheson of utah. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah is reck niesed. mr. matheson: i thank the chairman for yielding me the time. the wakefield act will re-authorize the emergency medical services for children program. for the past 30 years, the
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emergency medical services for children program has been the only federal program focused solely on improving emergency medical care for children and adolescence. in that time, emergency care has gone from treating critically-injured children, simply as little adults, to provide more appropriate and specialized care as children. the program is focused on ensuring the appropriate medical care is given to sick or injured children no matter where they live, attend school or travel. all states and the territories receive grant funding to educate and train medical professionals in trauma care for children. this funding and training has dramatically increased the quality of care at our nation's emergency rooms and the quality that first providers provide in doing so, it has saved lives. the program's coordination and data analysis of pediatric
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researchers across the country with the continued advancement of emergency pediatric care, a critical component of the program. the emergency medical services for children program has long held bipartisan support in congress through its 30-year history and it is certainly worthy of being re-authorized because this is a federal program that truly works. and it has data to back that up. it has dramatically helped improve the quality of emergency medical care for children and this bill ensures it will continue to do so. in closing, i thank the majority and minority staffs on the energy and commerce staffs for working with me. i want to thank my friend and colleague, congressman peter king, for introducing the pill with me. i urge my colleagues to support this critical program by voting yes on h.r. 4290 and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman from utah yields. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: i have no additional speakers at this time. so i would urge passage of the bill and yield the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: i urge my colleagues to support the bill and yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 4290 as amend the. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. burgess: mr. speaker, i move the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 4701 as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: a bill to provide for scientific frame works with respect to vector-borne
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diseases. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from texas, mr. burgess, and the gentleman from new jersey, mr. pallone, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days within which to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous materials into the record. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. burgess: i yield myself such time as i consume. rise in support of h.r. 4701 the vector-borne disease research accountability and transparency act of 2014. lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the united states. prior to 2012, the senters of disease and control reported 95% of cases in 13 states concentrated in the northeast and upper midwest. the centers for disease control now estimates that around 300,000 people in the united
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states are diagnosed each year in lyme disease making it a substantial public health program. it is an important bill that addresses the growing threat of lyme disease in the united states. it prioritizes federal research on lyme and related diseases and gives patients a seat at the table. the bill would establish a working group at the department of health and human services report ld prepare a summarizing federal activities, identifying the latest scientific advances and making recommendations to the secretary and to congress. it also ensures that federal government consults with patients and physicians in their work on the disease. i would like to thank mr. gibson for his hard work and dedication on this issue, and urge my colleagues to support h.r. 3701 and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. pallone: i yield myself such time as i may consume. mr. speaker, i think we can all
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agree that lyme disease is a concerning public health issue. the c.d.c. estimates there are 300,000 lyme disease cases in the united states. creates a new working group to develop a summary of research and advances related to lyme disease, monitor federal activities and make recommendations to the secretary of h.h.s. and hold annual public meetings. i support ensuring that research in the area of lyme disease is productive and significant. however, there are still a number of other changes that need to be made to this bill, particularly regarding apointments to and responsibilities of the working group. additionally, we do not want the resources to maintain this working group to take away from the already strained budgets of current federal research and surveillance efforts related to lyme disease. at the full committee markup of h.r. 4701 in july, the chairman
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committed to continue to work with myself and other members to address these concerns before bringing the bill to the floor and i'm disappointed to say that commitment wasn't honored. while i have reservations, i will not object to considering it on suspension and advancing the bill here today but i will continue to advocate to resolve these issues in the bill as we move forward. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: i yield to the gentleman from new york, mr. gibson, for four minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. gibson: i rise today on behalf of thousands of american who was been affected by lyme disease and tick-borne illnesses, including in upstate new york in my district where it's a scourge. this is truly constituent driven and represents a significant
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step forward in what's been an extensive process. for the past few years, i have worked with physicians, patient advocates, patients and their families throughout new york and the united states on a bill that focuses on solutions. i'm proud to be joined by two of my colleague who was been national leaders on this issue, chris smith of new jersey who is our leader and has been for several decades a tireless advocate for our sufferers and frank wolf of virginia who has added his significant voice to this issue and has made incredibly meaningful contributions to this bill and the cause. i thank them both. likewise, i thank dr. richard horwiths, pat smith, david roth, holly andra auerbach, other lyme advocate leaders from pennsylvania and across the nation for their significant and persuasive engagement and
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unyielding commitment to change the direction of u.s. policy to bring solutions and relief for chronic lyme sufferers. mr. speaker, i'd like to thank chairman upton, chairman pitts and their ranking members and their dedicated committee staffs. thank you all for your great work. in august of 2013, the centers for disease control and prevention estimated that the number of americans diagnosed with lyme disease each year is now over -- is now over 300,000. while other researchers such as holly ahern have shown we are significantly underestimating the number of cases in the u.s. it's clear that the increase of lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases is rapidly becoming a public health crisis in the united states. while the c.d.c., n.i.h. and other federal agencies have recognized this threat to public health, regrettably, we have made far too little progress in improving prevention, dige know circumstances and treatment this legislation before us seeks to
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make a positive difference, coordinating federal tick disease research through an interagency working group made up of relevant federal agencies as well as nonfederal partners, such as experienced physicians, researchers, patient advocates and chronic lyme disease patients themselves. the working group is tasked with ensuring interagency coordination, accountability, transparency, minimizing overlap, examining research priorities and ultimately making policy recommendations. the working group is required to reflect a broad spectrum of viewpoints and ensure patients and their advocates have a seat at the table. the bill increases oversight and accountability over tick-borne research assuring all stake holders are aware of all existing research before making policy recommendations. importantly, this bill also requires the secretary of health and human servicings, informed
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by the working group report, to submit a plan to congress to clear our chronic lyme sufferers. this will include benchmarks to measure progress, ultimately ensuring we spend taxpayer dollars wisely, and finding solutions and cures long overdue. finally this bill is dedicated to chronic lyme sufferers out there who have been ill for year, at times seemingly without hope, wondering if anyone in washington was lnching or cared. we hear you. we do care. and today we pass this legislation to help you get better. i urge my colleagues to support this bill and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the gentleman from texas recognize. mr. burgess: i vemb. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from new jersey is ecognized. mr. pallone: i yield to the gentleman from new york, many --
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the -- the gentleman from new york, mr. maloney. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. maloney: just a month ago, my colleague and i were working to lower energy prices in the hudson valley across the aisle, now here we are working on another bill of tremendous importance to our regionism support this bill along with so many others and i want to acknowledge mr. gibson's leadership on this issue. i'm proud we're working across the aisle because lyme disease is an epidemic in the hudson valley and it's hurting our kids, our friends, our family, and it's happening everywhere. on our playgrounds, our back yards, on trails in the woods. it's the invisible, silent disease that so many find themselves developing and far too many find out too late. it's not one of the -- now one of the most common and fastest growing infectious diseases in our country and every year there are hundreds of thousands of cases nationwide with 96% of
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those cases in only 13 states. in new york, thousands of my neighbors in hudson valley are suffering from lyme disease every day. four counties in the hudson valley, including dutchest and putnam county, have reported the highest rate of lyme disease in the country. one man said he's been suffering for years. i spoke with a man with a tree cutting business, he has 12 guys working for him, i asked how many had gotten lyme disease and he said every single one. all of my guys have lyme disease. a member of my own staff spent a month injecting himself through his eter inserted in heart, because of this disease. thank god he caught it in time and will make a full recovery. but i came up to -- put i met a woman in poughkeepsie, probably 30 years old, had a cane.
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she said our life is ruined because of this my husband and i had big plans, we were going to have a family. but now i can't get better. another constituent wrote to me, no one listens, i hope you will listen. we are listening. i urge my colleagues to listen and pass this critical bill this bipartisan legislation makes a landmark investment in lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses so our friends and families in the hudson valley no longer have to suffer in silence. when folks are suffer, they aren't thinking about partisan politics. there's no republican or democratic lyme disease and americans expect taos work together. that's why i'm proud we're doing so today. we can stand up, stand shoulder-to-shoulder, and say the health of our community is too important to waste. and for all the constituents i mentioned and so many i've never met, i want you to know we're listening. i urge my colleagues to support h.r. 4701 because our
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constituents deserve a government that's working for them. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york yields. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. pallone: i have no additional speakers at this time. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. burgess: mr. speaker, at this time, i'm pleased to recognize the gentleman from new jersey, mr. smith, who will provide our closing, so all the time you may consume is now yours, mr. smith. mr. smith: thank you very much, i say to my good friend from texas, distinguished subcommittee leader, chair, and doctor. i rise in support of the tick-borne disease act of 2014, a historic bill offered by pli good friend, congressman chris gibson. for all who suffer from this hideous disease, thank you, chris. i would also like to extend my
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very special thanks to chairman fred upton and joe pitts as well as their staff and for their tireless efforts to ensure the final bill brought before the floor today establishes a means to address the gap, and i mean the huge gaps, that exist in the great unmet need in the lyme community. mr. speaker, in 1992, i met with the two top medical officials at the national institutes of health and the centers for disease control working on lyme with an extraordinary woman named pat smith. we laid out a case and she did most of the talking. they listened. they were responsive. however, 22 years later, far too little has been accomplished. i raise the apparent ineffectiveness of a month-long antibiotic treatment that for a sizable percentage of people, and c.d.c. says 15% to 20% of
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the people, suffering from this disease, don't seem to get better. because we call it chronic lyme. dr. richard horwiths notes in his best el -- horwiths notes in his best sell -- horowitz notes in his best-selling book "why can't i get better?" that a maximum 30 difes antibiotics is the accepted standard of care for lyme disease. if patients report back they're not getting better, they're likely diagnosed as having post-lyme syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, or fibromyalgia. he then described how children are treated for other diseases or disorders and continues this may help some of the symptoms, yet fail to address the root problem. unfortunately, without better information on chronic lime and thousand treat it, we will continue to fail to address the root of the problem and in so
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doing, fail to assist patients in need. mr. speaker, i fully understand that there are concerns about the prolonged use of antibiotics. i share the global health committee -- i chair the global health committee and have chaired numerous hearings on multidrug resis tapt tuberculosis and many other diseases that are increasingly being treated with antibiotics with less effectiveness. yet the isda in their final report on lyme disease review panel found that there is yet to be a study that demonstrated comparable benefits to prolonged antibiotic therapy beyond one month. there have been fa too few studies. that's an engraved invitation, to my colleagues, there needs to be those studies. you could fit on half a page the numb of studies that have been done other these many years. however in that same report, they went on to say, and i quote them, this is their conclusion was reached, despite the large
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volume of case reports, case series, anecdotes and patient testimony reviews that tested the perceived clinical improvement during antibiotic therapy. large volume. all of it just dismissed. laid aside as if it was trivial and it was dismissed and didn't make it into the final report except for that sentence. dr. horowitz has said new york fact, increasing the dose of antibiotics and/or extending the length of treatment clearly did help a certain percentage of his patients. their fatigue, headaches, joint and muscle pain and cognitive symptoms improved, quote-unquolet. among clinicians, and i've met with dozens of clinicians, dr. horowitz is not alone at all in those findings. so mr. speaker, we need scientifically based answers and comprehensive rule that goes
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wherever the data suggests and this is especially important for my own constituents. in new jersey over the last 15 years, about 55,000 people have had cases of lyme. this bill before us accelerates the process of helping lyme patients by establishing an interagency working group on lyme disease with the first opinion, very important, in a transparent and open manner and creates a strategic plan to guide existing federal lyme disease research and treatment programs. of particular significance, the house bill that we'll vote on today for the first time identifies and seeks to address chronic lyme disease. mr. speaker the c.d.c. says, and i quote them, approximately 10% to 20% of patients treated for lyme disease with the recommended two to four-week course of antibiotics will have lingering symptoms.
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of fatigue, pain, or joint and muscle aches. i would respectfully submit their simple -- they're symptoms of something that has a root cause. the c.d.c. refers to chronic lyme as, quote, post-treatment lyme disease syndrome. and many people have been dismissed, said, oh, you're a hypochondriac. it's all mental. and yet they don't -- there's just so many cases, it can't be dismissed. this intill a great step forward for chronic lyme patients. especially those who have suffered for decades with this debilitating disease. again, only to be told that their illness does not exist. again mitigating circumstance good friend chris gibson, i want to thank him for his leadership, for the leadership of our house republicans and our friends on the other side of the aisle. it's a bipartisan bill and i do hope members will support it. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of the time. the question is, will the house
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suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 4701 as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. without objection, the title mended. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? burg >> i move the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 3670 as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: union calendar number 423, h.r. 3670, a bill to amend the communications act of 1934 to expand the prohibition of
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provision of inaccurate caller identification information and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from texas, mr. barton and the gentleman from utah, mr. matheson, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. barton: i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and insert extraneous material on the bill. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. barton: mr. speaker, i yield myself -- actually i'm going to yield to mr. lance such time as he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. lance: thank you very much, mr. speaker and my thanks to represent tive barton on this issue. ller implet d. spoofing is
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growing at an alarming rate. this new technology allows criminals to falsify deliberately the telephone number and the name relayed on caller i.d. information. to make it appear as though those criminals are calling from our bank or our credit card company, or even from a governmental agency. imagine that. i get a telephone call on my cell telephone and under caller i.d., i think it comes from my bank. or my credit card company or even worse, i suppose, from a local governmental agency. a recent case in new jersey resulted in a resident reportedly being scammed out of
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more than $5,000 500 by a caller, a criminal, falsely claiming to be a federal tax agent amendmenting to collect back taxes. what a frightening experience of the innocent receiver of that telephone call. the victim's caller i.d. showed the number of the local police department. this has got to stop. today's bipartisan legislation will strengthen and improve the truth in caller i.d. law to help protect consumers in a greater ay from scammers, spasmers and unscrupulous telemarketters.
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, commend representative barton republican, and congresswoman grace meng, democrat, of queens new york, for their hard work and leadership on this issue. and i want the american people to know that on the energy and commerce committee where chairman barton and i serve, more bipartisan legislation is passed out of that committee, and reaches the floor of the house and then goes over to the united states senate and is passed in the united states senate and goes to the president of the united states for his signature than legislation from any other committee of congress. now much of what we do on the energy and commerce committee does not make the headlines, because much of what we do is bipartisan in nature.
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and that is the history of the committee. the oldest standing committee in the house of representatives, having been first established in 1795, and that is the tradition of bipartisanship when the chairman, mr. barton, was the chairman of that committee. it continues under the chairman ship of mr. upton, and this includes the ranking member, mr. waxman, and ranking member of the subcommittee on both sides of the aisle, we have a tradition on energy and commerce to make sure that our legislation is bipartisan in nature. i came to this issue as a result of the situation in new jersey. i also came to this issue at the request of congresswoman meng of new york city. and i want to thank the congresswoman for coming to me
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and i certainly believe that this legislation is in the interest of the american people. i urge all of my colleagues to vote for this consumer protection legislation, and mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. barton: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from utah is recognized. mr. matheson: thank you, mr. chair. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. matheson: i rise in support f h.r. 3670, this is a ipartisan pro-consumer bill. these bad actors scramble or spoof caller identification information for the purpose of impersonating legitimate individuals or institutions such as law enforcement officials or a bank then use this information
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. vulnerable populations such as seniors, veterans and recent immigrants have been especially targeted by these attacks. the bill makes three important changes to strengthen existing law and protect consumers. first, it broadens current law to address spoofing in the context of international calls and changes the definition to cover new reforms of technology criminals have employed making internet-based calls. the bill broadens the scope of existing law to cover text-message spoofing. these changes will make the 2009 truth in caller i.d. act an effective tool in protecting consumers. before yielding back, i do want to commend congresswoman meng for her work on this issue. i want to commend mr. lance. and i want to congratulate congressman barn for -- barton
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on working on this bill. the sponsors worked closely with industry and stakeholders and consumers groups to develop true consensus around this proposed legislation. this is why the legislation ought to work. and i urge my colleagues to support h.r. 3670 and i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. barton: i'm the only other speaker and i reserve the right to close. and i would yield to the gentleman from utah or the gentlelady from new york if they wish to speak. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. mr. matheson: we have one more speaker and i yield such time as she may consume to congresswoman meng. the messenger: mr. speaker, i rise in -- >> i rise in strong support of the anti-spoofing act which i
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offered along with congressman barton and congressman lance. it addresses the problem of caller i.d. spoofing which is a scrambling of identification numbers and a tool to defraud recipients of phone calls and text messages. it is often stated that a measure of a society is how it treats its most vulnerable. ms. meng: i receive reports of caller i.d. spoofing that hurts immigrants, seniors, veterans and those in need of help from law enforcement are all primary victims here. that is why this bill is endorsed by senior citizen groups, law enforcement groups, and consumer production groups. shortly after entering congress i pursued this issue because of complaints from a local civic organization and seniors in my district. i realized, it is affecting
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americans in all corners of our country in all of our districts. i think the fact that this is plaguing so many of our communities is a big reason why we have so much bipartisan support here for this bill. h.r. 3670 is an update to the truth in caller i.d. act of 2009. that legislation first criminalized malicious caller i.d. spoofing. since the passage of that law, scammers have used new technologies to circumvent it. thus malicious calling i.d. spoofing is on the rapid rise again. it's time to strengthen and tighten existing law and shut down the roots by which it is being circumvented. h.r. 3670 sets forth three important changes to current law. number one, the bill broadens current law to prohibit caller
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i.d. spoofing from foreigners. this is crucial because u.s.-based companies spoof calls to u.s. residents with intent to do harm but originate such calls from outside the united states. number two, the bill broadens current law to include new internet-based voice-over i.t. ervices from computers and tablets and land-line phones. this was a technology that was undeveloped in 2009 when the truth in caller i.d. act was adopted and unaccounted for in the law but has now grown and contributed to the problem. number three, finally, our bill broadens current law to include text messaging. in closing, i would like to thank mr. barton and mr. lance working with me to write this
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bill. the chairman and ranking member for all their guidance and leadership. the communications and technology subcommittee members, most of whom gave this support and all the other co-sponsors and i would like to thank the committee and staffs for all of their hard work. i urge a yes vote and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. barton: are they through, are you ready to yield back? mr. matheson: i yield back. mr. barton: the congress is not spoofing when we say we are going to do something to those individuals that spoof the american public. we passed a law back -- actually, it was a 2009 act but passed it in 2010, the truth in caller i.d. act to mitigate the
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effects of caller spoofing. as you well know, you look on your caller i.d. and you see an innocent or innocuous individual or company is calling you, it could be the police department, pizza hut, could be anything, so you take the call, and that's not what it is. in many cases, they are trying to defraud our elderly in some scam or something like this. so we passed a law that we thought would handle it, but it needs to be updated and that's what this bill does. as has been pointed out, it makes it illegal to initiate these calls from outside the united states. makes it illegal to do it over the internet, voice-over internet protocol, and also broadens the jurisdiction to
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include text messaging. and as we well know, mr. speaker, text messaging is on our blackberrys and our ipads and iphones and all of our personal telecommunication devices. this bill has bipartisan support. the subcommittee chairman, mr. walden, original co-sponsor, mrs. eshoo is a co-sponsor, john dingell is a co-sponsor, i'm an original sponsor. so this is one of these incidents, mr. speaker, that republicans and democrats are united. chairman upton, the full committee chairman and mr. waxman, full committee ranking member is very supportive. if this bill passes this bill this evening will go to the senate and we expect them to
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pass it. this is one of those rare birds in this congress that actually might be signed by the president of the united states. there is no known opposition to the bill. our stakeholders, as mr. matheson pointed out. google sports it. f.c.c. supports it. microsoft, u.s. telecom, verizon, aarp are some of the more popularly known stakeholders that support the bill. i rise in strong support, mr. speaker, that we unanimously pass h.r. 3670 and send it to the senate for their consideration. and with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 3670 as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is
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passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. . for what purpose does the gentleman from ohio seek recognition? >> i move that the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 5161. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: union calendar number 426, h.r. 5161, a bill to promote the nonex-cleesive use of electronic labeling for guyses -- devices authorized by the committee. >> i ask unanimous consent that all members have five lennell slative days to revise and extend their remarks and incrude extraneous material. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from ohio, mr. latta and the gentleman will each control 30 minutes. mr. latta: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without
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objection. mr. latta: i rise today in support of h.r. 5161, the e-label act this legislation i introduced is a bipartisan and bicameral measure that marks an important step forward in modernizing our laws to reflect today's information and communications technology marketplace. over the past 20 years there's been tremendous growth and innovation in the manufacturing industries. smart phones, tablets and other devices come equipped with functionalities we can only -- we could connell imagine a short time ago. in the midst of this innovation era, it is critical that our laws recognizing advancements this are updated to foster continued investment and opportunities for future dwhofmente e-label act will facilitate this effort. the e-label act establishes a timeline for the s.e.c. to move forward with rule making to promote electronic labels
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instead of physical labels to show that devices are approved this -- for commercial use. not only does it give greater flexibility to design consumer products but by soom estimates e-labeling will save manufacturers over $80 million a year. consumers will benefit from efficiencies created by e-labeling. e-labeling can expand consumer access to device information and enhance the overall quality and availability of equipment identification records through supporting software. the e 46 label act represents good policy for moat manufacturers and consumers and should be advanced without delay. i thank ranking member eshoo, congressman welch and wongcome -- congresswoman blackburn for their support on this measure. i also thank chairmen upton and walden for their continued support and leadership in modernizing our laws for the digital age.
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i urge my colleagues to support this bipartisan legislation. mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from utah. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i rise in support of h.r. 5161, the e-label act this bipartisan bill will modernize the federal communications device certification rules by eliminating the requirement for device manufacturers to include etched labels on the outside body of each electronic device. mr. matheson: instead they'll have the flexibility to display s.e.c. sfirt case information hrough software on -- f.c.c. information through the software on the device. there is much more than can be placed on labels today. it will lower production cost for device manufacturers since afictioning labels can require significant design time and
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expensive comment. we should commend the chairman and his staff for taking steps to update the commission's elabeling policies. by working together with the f.c.c., we can speed the delivery of new devices in the marketplace. i want to thank my colleague, mr. latta, for his leadership on this issue. i urge my colleagues to join me and support h.r. 5161, the e-label act. mr. chairman, i have no addition -- additional speakers on my side so i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah yields back. the gentleman from ohio. mr. latta: any of other speakers on our side. i urge the house to support this legislation and i yield back the balance of my time the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio yields back. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 5161? those in favor say aye. those opposed, no.
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i have to call the vote first. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. wait a minute. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from ohio rise in mr. latta: thank you, mr. speaker. i request the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman qus the yeas and nays. -- requests the yeas and nays. those in support of taking this vote by the yeas and nays will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having risen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause of rule 20 further proceedings on this question will be post-tone -- pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this uestion will be postponed.
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under the speak's -- speaker's announced policy of january 3 20, 13 the gentlewoman from minnesota, mrs. michele bachmann is recognized for of minutes as the designee of the majority leader. he gentlelady is recognized. mrs. bachmann: thank you, mr. speaker. i am so profoundly grate to feel
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stand in the well of the united states house of representatives there is no greater bastion for free speech than here in this house. what a wonderful gift this is. not only just for people here in the united states, but also for people around the world. there's one thing that we learned from tiananmen square, and i had the privilege in august of being able to travel to china and visit and stand in the midst of tiananmen square, where people from around china had come to take a stand for speech. if we remember from that infamous photo that was taken, one very brave student held up a copy of a little pamphlet in front of a tank, when a tank was going to run this student over, and the document that the student held up was a copy of the united states declaration of independence. as he spoke about freedom and what freedom meant to him. you see, mr. speaker, we have always been in this couldn't --
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we have always been, in this country a standard bearer for liberty. a standard bearer for freedom. a standard bearer for the expression of free speech rights. that's why we take this opportunity so seriously to be able to keep safe this ability to be table speak out on the issues of the day. and if there's anything that has captured america's attention with horror, i believe, especially over these summer months, as the united states congress has take an recess, the members of the house of representatives and of the united states senate, had gone back into their districts, met with people on the ground who allows them to come and serve here in this congress. when they went home, they also saw on their televisions at night a fairly horrific sight. something that we thank god with everything within our being that we don't see frequently here in the united states. it was terrorism. and terrorism on a level that we
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were unfamiliar with and hadn't seen before. we heard of a group named isis. and we saw as they had -- continued to make wild gains both in iraq and in syria. so much so that they were robbing banks to fill their own pockets. then they began to steal oilfields and take those oilfields over. then they took over oil refineries. then they began to take over electric grids. and then with just seemingly a very few men they took over entire cities. in fact, we were shocked when the city of mosul, which is the ancient city of nineveh, the prophet jonah was sent to the city of nineveh, where he preached to the city and the holy bible records that the entire city repented and turned to god, that ancient city is the modern day city of mosul. in northern iraq.
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that was the city that the leader of the islamic state, the jihaddists we have seen every night on our national news programs, that was the city that they chose to come against. that's -- that particular city had a population of well over a million people and some estimates, 1.7 million people. and mr. speaker, if i could just ask, would the gentlelady like me to yield to her for five minutes? at this time? mr. speaker i would be more than delighted to yield to the wonderful gentlelady from the great state of north carolina, ms. virginia foxx. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for five minutes. ms. foxx: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank the gentlewoman from minnesota for yielding. i know she has an important message to bring tonight and i appreciate her sharing a little of her time with me.
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mr. speaker, the recent -- at a recent event i had the privilege of learn manager about a remarkable organization in winston-salem, north carolina. 24e childress institute for pediatric trauma at wake forest baptist medical center. the institute was established due to the leadership and generous financial support of richard and judy childress who saw that while trauma was taking the lives of thousands of children every year, pediatric trauma was not a focus of medical research. in 2010, according to the centers for disease control, pediatric trauma took the lives of 9,523 children. making it the largest cause of childhood death by a significant margin. as a comparison, cancer, heart disease, and birth defects, combined, take the lives of
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about 3,300 children every year. tragically, 3,300 is a very similar number of children who were killed in 2010 due to traumatic injury from child abuse. an additional 6,190 children died that year from unintentional traumatic injuries. fully 52% of those injuries were caused by vehicle accidents followed by drawning -- drowning, poisoning, fire, gun, and falls. in addition to the nearly 10,000 fatalities, another 175,000 children were hospitalized due to injuries. dr. c. everett koop who served as u.s. surgeon general under president reagan once said that, quote if a disease were killing our children in the proportion
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that injuries are, people would be outraged and demand that this killer be stopped. despite trauma being the overwhelming cause of childhood death, the federal government spends only about one cent on pediatric trauma research for every dollar spent to study pediatric cancer. the childress institute has been working to pick up where federal dollars drop off. the institute uses its resources for research, education, and awareness about pediatric trauma and to improve the treatment for critically injured children in the u.s. mr. speaker, richard childress is a lifelong resident of the winston-salem area and is a nascar pioneer. rich and -- richard and his wife judy are civic and philanthropic leaders in the community. through their determination to fight the number one cause of pediatric death, children worldwide are benefiting from the generosity that those of us
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in north carolina have long witnessed. the remarkable people 240e6 childress institute for -- people of the childress institute for pediatric trauma work tirelessly to discover and share the best ways to prevent injuries and treat severely injured children work the ultimate goal -- ultimate goal of i ensuring that all, quote, injured kids get the best care when they need it most, end quote. today i thank richard and judy childress for their foresight and generosity and i thank the wake forest baptist medical cent for the winston-salem for its expertise and dedication to this mission. finally, i want to recognize the dedicated men and women of childress institute for pediatric trauma for working every day to keep our children safe and to help them recover when they get hurt. and again, mr. speaker, i want to thank the gentlewoman from minnesota for so graciously
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yielding me some of her time this evening and i yield back to the gentlewoman. he speaker pro tempore: mrs. bachmann: i would like to give words of praise to the gentlewoman from north carolina, mrs. foxx, she is a stalwart on every topic on every subject that there is in this chamber. one of the few women that you will regularly see here almost on a daily basis take the debates to the american people so they can understand that our society can be in conformity with what the creators of this society wanted, a place that was first of all that was peaceful and welcoming and a nation that would allow everyone who comes here to realize their dreams in a way that would even stretch their own imagination. she has been a stalwart.
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and i'm grateful she was able to come and speak here this evening. i would like to speak on this important topic because these are extraordinary times and extraordinary days that we live in. as we all know from the news reports, the president of the united states tomorrow night will be addressing the nation on the top of islamic jihad, particularly the islamic state, as they call themselves today as isis or isil. the president will be talking about this threat and the americans are anxious to hear hat he has to say. i serve on the intelligence committee. we deal with the classified secrets with our nation and deal with terrorism and how to keep the nation safe. and as a member of that committee, we have watched this group called the islamic state,
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we have watched it for well over two years, because what we are seeing is nothing new. it is a continuation of the concept known as islamic jihad. while this is a new name and new format, the islamic state, it is merely a continuation is a phenomenon that began in 700 a.d. who took the sword and violently attempted to convert people to his religion to various villages, whether it was mecca or medina, he used the sword to convert individuals to islam. that conversion -- that attempted conversion has continued from 700 a.d. forward. and what we are seeing today isis lambic jihad, the continuation and also at its
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root a religious war. sitting on the intelligence committee, watching the rise of the islamic jihad, we learned and studied about who this leader of the islamic jihad is. he is 43 years old. he is very well educated. he has a doctorate degree and involved in al qaeda as a senior member for decades. again, this is not a new individual. this is not a brand new thought or brand new concept. this is an individual who has dedicated his life to jihad. his name again is baghdaddy. as we watched his rise, something stunned me and i hope everyone in the united states understands this one concept. we in the united states had ntercepted
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>> he was in a united states detention center. the reason he was in detention is because he was a terrorist committing terrorist acts and committed to pursuing terrorist goals. we had him in detention and president obama chose in 2009 to release bagdadi from detention in iraq. he was set free. now was bagdadi rehabilitated? had we confirmed that he had renounced islamic jihad and renounced acts of terror and no longer going to pick up the sword and force people at the threat of their life or beheadings to convert to islam?
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as a matter of fact, at the moment when the united states released bagdadi from the united states prison, camp bucca in iraq, at that moment, bagdadi said to his jailer, i'll see you in new york. that should have been a tipoff right there and then that we should have nabbed him and held him and retained him in detention. this was not a good candidate for release. and today, bagdadi is the head of the islamic state in iraq and syria and self-appointed caliphate. he reconstituted al qaeda in iraq. as a matter of fact, the very first franchise was located in iraq. bagdadi himself was the number three in the organization.
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we in the united states took out and killed the number one and number two in al qaeda of iraq. bagdadi was number three. he was ready to move up obviously to be number one of al qaeda in iraq. but he didn't have the opportunity. didn't have the opportunity when he was in detention in 2009. he had to look for his opportunity and reconstitute himself and his organization and build an organization, which he did. he began in 2009. and he began with what he called break the wall. that was his name. break the wall strategy. it was a campaign whereby he openeded prison doors all across northern iraq and released terrorists from prisons so these are prisoners that we captured, the united states, or that the iraqis working with the united
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states had captured. terrorists who are behind bars, in jail, in iraq, in pursuit of the islamic jihad were behind bars, and the one man that president obama released from jail in iraq went to the other prisons and opened the prison doors and began forming his army. and his army was formed with convicted islamic jihadist terrorists. he broke open so many jails. and he again then recruited other terrorists from the region that today, bagdadi has an army, brutal, savage, animal isic army of 12,000 individuals who are so brutal. we heard the reports that they
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literally buried alive innocent women and children in northern iraq. they chased families up a sinjar. mount they were a peace-loving people but considered devil worshippers. they couldn't have that. so they chased these people and one, two, 10, 100 and thousands were killed by these barbarians in the islamic state. they died of thirst, died of hunger, died of beheadings. women were raped. women were carried away and kidnapped and forced into sexual slavery to serve the nams that beheaded their husbands and sons and hundreds of men were taken away and beheaded, led by
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bagdadi, the man released from prison by president obama. i wonder if president obama will say something about his decision about his decision to release bagdadi. clearly this was a mistake that never should have happened. well once bagdadi had his terrorists released from prison, they began a wave of car bombings across iraq. as he reconstituted his army in 2010 and 2011, he began his strategy and his outward strategy was a series of nationwide car bombings in 2011 and 2013 all across iraq. he destabilized iraq and destabilized the government of iraq and the army, to the point where they were more and more fearful of the islamic state than what they were intending to
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do. so bold did bagdadi become that his aim was not simply on iraq and on syria or just on gaza or just on israel or on jordan or on turkey or on lebanon. he gave a speech in january of this year, 2014, and in this speech, bagdadi spoke to america. this is what he had to say to america, the leader of ice isis. so we will be indirect confrontation. so watch out for us. watching. with you, i repeat, soon we'll be indirect confrontation. so watch out for us, for we are with you, watching. they posted a picture of the al qaeda flag, the black flag flying over the white house. they have intentions all right.
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their intentions are not just in the middle east. their intentions are terrorist activity also in western europe and also in the united states of america. why? they tell us what their goal is. their goal is to force the peoples of western europe and to force the peoples of the united states of america to convert to islam at the tip of a sword, whatever it takes. you see, we are in the shadow of the 13th anniversary of the horrific tragedy of 9/11. when we saw what 19 committed islamic jihaddists can achieve with an airline ticket in one hand and a box cutter in another. they drove the planes on that morning of september 11 directly into tower number one and tower number two in new york city. they felled the towers.
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and 3,000 innocents died. they also took off in a jet here in this city from the airport in this city. that airport went directly went into the pentagon and more, hundreds of innocents died. and that wasn't alone. another jet took off, no one knows if that jet was intended to come into this building, if they were targeting this very well, 13 years ago. were they targeting this well, this rotunda, the capitol, were they targeting the white house, we'll never know. because the brave americans on flight 93 infamously said, let's roll. and they were the first resistance that day, the first american resistance to push back
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you ay not in my nation, don't. we owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to those americans who said, who realized through phone calls with their loved ones when they tragically picked up the phone and found out the horrifying news that what happened in new york city to the world trade towers and what happened to the pentagon and they knew very likely that the plane they were on could be carrying also on a mission. and to the point of losing their own lives, they stood up and said, this is our last chance, but not going to sit here but going to fight back and they did. they fought back. they lost their lives that day, but they saved that jet from ing used as a missile on another target. you see, americans and america
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didn't wait. we didn't wait to be defeated by this evil philosophy and this eff i will enemy. brave americans stood up that day and said no more. the question we have is do we hear their voices. do we still hear their voices? s there bravery among us today to heed their call? cause you see, the islamic jihaddists haven't changed and haven't deficient yated in their ntent or haven't gone across their goal which is to spread their caliphate across the entire world, not just in iraq and syria but across the entire world, including the united states of america. we saw what they did

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