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tv   Key Capitol Hill Hearings  CSPAN  September 8, 2015 6:00am-7:01am EDT

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president for being here, and john and so many others for creating this. if i may close by quoting dr. king, "let justice roll down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream, bless you all." thank you, mr. president. [applause] ♪ >> on today's washington journal, "boston globe" political editor, shirov center on the 2016 presidential campaign. congress returns from its summer recess. summer -- congress debates the iran nuclear agreement. pope francis addresses a meeting later this month. we will talk about all of that with stephen dennis who covers
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the senate. "washington journal," live with today's headlines, every morning on c-span at 7:00 a.m. eastern. a signature feature of book tv is coverage of book fares from around the country. here is the schedule -- new the end of september, we are in new york for the brooklyn festival. at the end of october, the southern festival of books in nashville. near the end of the month, we'll be covering two book festivals on the same weekend. from the nation's heartland, it is the wisconsin book festival. at the start of november, we will be in portland, oregon. the national book awards from
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new york city. we are live for the 18th year in a row for the miami book fair international. that is a few of the fairs and festivals this fall on book tv. >> the house and senate returned from their summer recess this week, and get right to work on the iran nuclear agreement, particularly in resolution of disapproval of that agreement or a getting set to cover that debate is laura barron lopez who covers congress for "huffington post." let's start in the senate, who will be some of the key players on tuesday? laura: thank you for having me. in the senate right now, the administration is pretty confident the democrats will be able to protect this deal that he has crafted with p5+1. what is going to happen is that so far 38 democrats have
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announced their support for the deal. a few shy of the number needed to filibuster if they wanted to. so the debate will be heated and they will start tuesday. it looks like even if it does pass the senate, democrats will have the votes to sustain a presidential veto. >> one of the votes they will not get, and it becomes another one in opposition -- ben cardin, the ranking member. he wrote about his opposition friday and here is his tweet regarding the iran deal -- this is a close call, but after a lengthy review, i will vote to disapprove. how does his opposition, or does it change at all, the nature of the debate in the senate? laura: i think senator ben cardin's opposition very much embodies how difficult this issue has been for all of the senators, all of the congress members, every single person, whether they come for it or against it has said this has been the most difficult decision
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to have ever had to make as a lawmaker. ben cardin didn't really know where he was going to go, so now he is the third democrat on top of senator schumer and senator bob menendez to say that he is going to vote against the deal. when it comes down to the numbers and the process, i do not think the administration is going to be sweating it too much because they know they have the votes in the senate to sustain the veto. >> let's take a look at the house, earlier, nancy pelosi's desk nancy pelosi sent out a colleagues letter about getting everybody on board to support the iran deal, the rules committee takes it up in the house on tuesday evening for a debate beginning midweek. what does the debate look like in the house and who will some of the floor leaders be there? laura: the house is a bit more fluid right now in the colleague letter that you mentioned.
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minority leader pelosi did say that they have well over 100 democrats that have come out in support of the deal, but they need 146 in order to sustain a presidential veto. they are not quite there yet. she has been very aggressive over the august recess and administration has been to make sure that they are trying to get the support that they need. it is going to be very interesting next week. >> let's go back to the senate for a second. we didn't touch on the talk of potential for democrats to be able to filibuster, be able to prevent this from ever coming to a final vote. the number they were talking about was 41 with 38 now in favor of the deal. our democratic leaders in the senate indicating at all that they might have the ability to stop this from coming to a final vote? laura: because they are so close
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to the 41 number, as you said, it will be interesting to see if they decide to do that. people in senator durbin's office have said that the democrats are not planning to filibuster, and senator joe manchin, one of the undecided still left -- there are five undecided democrats left -- said he would not support a filibuster. the rest that are undecided, because it is such an intense debate, they may not end up getting the vote. >> laura lopez covers congress for "huffington post." read more at huffington post.com and follow her on twitter. thank you for the update. >> over the summer, presidents bill clinton and george bush kicked off the leadership scholarship program. we will hear from the former president, but first, also from
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the scholars program, dallas cuban.ks owner, mark >> thank you very much. we are in dallas, so we thought it was only appropriate to start the program with two mavericks. one of them danced with the stars and one of them went to the big dance with president bush. kevin sullivan got his start in communications in the sports world with the dallas mavericks. the lessons he learned ultimately landed him in the west wing where he served as president bush's communications
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director from 2006 to 2009. today, he draws on his experiences to advise leaders all across sectors. he released an e-book called "breaking through." our other panelist has no problem breaking through, especially when it comes to making his voice heard to the referees at his courtside seats. mark cuban is one of america's most successful entrepreneurs. beginning at the age of 12, by selling garbage bags door-to-door, along the way, he learned a lot about the kind of perseverance it takes to survive the ups and downs that any leader must navigate. finally, i think this is an appropriate setting to share that in just two weeks, mark will be adding to his resume president of united states with his acting role in "sharknado 3."
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mark, if you need some tips, there are a couple of very distinguished gentleman here who would be willing to share some advice. please welcome kevin sullivan and mark cuban. kevin: that was a great introduction. just to show you how far mark really has come, take a look at this photo from his early days in dallas. what was that, about 1982 or 1983. getting involved with personal computers for the first time. you see the american dream taking hold.
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i have seen you quoted as saying is in the doing, not the dreaming. but what is the state of the american dream? mr. cuban: the american dream is alive and well. anybody watch "shark tank?" it is the number one show across all of television watched by families together. now i have eight, 10, 20-year-old telling me about their ideas and companies. i don't think there's any question with the type of people that we have here that the best is yet to come. i think that some of us get the sense that we are down. that is so far from the truth. i'm seeing more and more amazing businesses and ideas every single day and i couldn't be more excited about the american dream.
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kevin: you have to go to silicon valley or new york? mr. cuban: i'll tell you this. there is no media from silicon valley, i'm sure. they are looking over your shoulder for the next six star, big deal. you come to dallas, come to austin, and you get people to come to work. the university system here is amazing. we hire locally. it is less expensive but they are just as smart and driven. i am not here to say that it is the next silicon valley but that texas is the most amazing state when it comes to not just developing talent, but creating new companies. [applause] kevin: the sports fans about us know that you had kind of a
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tough night last night. without rehashing all the details of this deandre jordan commitment. from a leadership standpoint, when you have a setback, what do you say your people? mr. cuban: you think for a second, what have i learned? and then you move forward. you have to look to see whether you have to reinvent your business every single day. all this great talent is out there trying to kick your but. -- trying to kick your butt. if i am going just a ahead, i have to keep on moving forward. that is the way it is with the mavericks.
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we have been fortunate to this point in my 15 years there and i think we have great leadership and a great team and we will keep moving forward. kevin: presidents making a lot of tough decisions. our scholars have the privilege of going to the clinton library and studying the tough decisions that clinton made such as the landmark welfare reform legislation. president bush made a lot of tough decisions. often with other disregard for his personal popularity, based on principles that he brought from here in texas to d.c.. how you handle those really tough decisions, especially when getting conflicting kinds of
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advice? mr. cuban: i tried to be very self-aware and know what i'm good at and bad at. i try to have smart people around me all the time and i cross my fingers. there are just some decisions that you have to trust yourself. preparation is everything. people always say, you are such a risk taker. i never take risks. every business i've ever started, i have always felt like i have done my homework. this isn't a risk. fortunately, i have never been in the same circumstances as our two presidents, and i can't even imagine the stress. in my little world, i tried to be prepared, have great people around me, and be prepared to make the best decision i can. kevin: as a preparation to manage the risk, what kind of things do you do? mr. cuban: i read. i talked to as many smart people as i can. a lot of times we think we know
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something. sometimes success can be her worst enemy. even though i feel confident about something, good about something, i am like, am i sure that is an ace? kevin: in terms of your team of advisers -- i know you're not a big hierarchy guy. flat structure. mr. cuban: in today's day and age, there are so many communication mediums, so you have to figure out what your vision is as a leader, how you can take those people around you and put them in a position to succeed, and really understand how each of them needs to be communicated with. it is not all one-size-fits-all. we are used to seeing everybody with their head down in the phone. i try to do everything the e-mail as much as i can. but when i get bad news, that is when i have to reach out and go face-to-face.
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you always have to be in a position where it is not about you, but about putting people in a position to achieve your goals. if that point comes when you go your separate ways, that ends up being a contact for you to network with. kevin: here is a question from one of our scholars. she is all about empowering women. she has a great project to empower women with business skills. she asks for your advice on better partnering with the private sector as someone in a nonprofit world. mr. cuban: there is no business small or large that doesn't have
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its own social conscience. you are not going to be in situations where you are the only person knocking on the door or picking up the phone and talking to them. you have to recognize that it truly is a numbers game in every no gets you closer to a yes. there will come a time when you think they are going to say no. that is when they say yes. whether it is women's issues. it is not supposed to be easy, it is supposed to be hard. you putting the energy to be prepared. i always have a test. do you dream about? it is right for you. if you wake up and you are taking notes about your business because that is what you are thinking about, then it is right for you. if you have that much commitment and conviction, who cares if it is one more door you have to
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knock on. kevin: as an entrepreneur and investor, what are the biggest obstacles for starting or growing a business? mr. cuban: companies don't fail for lack of money 99% of the time. they fail the lack of brains and effort. the one thing in business you can control, and i say this to athletes as well. the one thing that you can control is your effort. that is the one thing no one can ever take away from you and that you can control. that is the key. if you are putting in the effort, you got a shot and you can be successful.
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kevin: you have another kind of famous mark cuban shark tank contestant who had a patent, he was basically just trying to license a patent. mr. cuban: there was a gentleman who came on the show who had an outdoor coat. he had a lot of pockets and in his pockets, he had patents, so that if you ran a wire up your sleeve and connected them to something to listen. how do you patent that? when i was a kid growing up in pittsburgh, i would listen to the pittsburgh pirates and i would have a transistor radio that i would hide from my teacher. i would run one of those old-school headphone things that had a wire. i would run it up my shirt and lean way so the teacher wouldn't see me. i'm like, how do you patent that?
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i went off on it and he created this big uproar and led to me funding a chair at the electronic freedom foundation called the mark cuban chair. people are going to think it's crazy and i said, that's exactly the point. to me, that is an inhibitor to progress. when you go back to the 80's and computers where there was ibm, if you did it in a clean room and independently created it, you could run with it and that led to the start of the internet and the computer book. -- boom. now, it is a race for the patent office. back in 2006 -- i had a movie distribution company called magnolia and a theater company called landmark. we decided we needed to change
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things up so we wanted to put movies on tv, dvd, and online before they are in theaters. natural course of business. we got sued because somebody patented that after reading what i had done. they reference for i was doing and turned around and sued me for it. i think there is things that we need to do because it does inhibit progress. kevin: another scholar question. shelley asks. her project is teaching teenage girls in the gambia have a start photography businesses so they can earn money to stay in school. she asked on "shark tank", you measure roi, but how do you
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measure the social good? mr. cuban: roh, return on your heart. what else is there. there is no i, it is about heart. it is something special. kevin: we talked about how she made her product personal. and i think that is the roh, making it personal. another question from a scholar in the chartered school network. dallas-fort worth whose project is -- she asked, how do you find the time or just the mental space to
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think? you are a big idea guide, how do you think? mr. cuban: there is not a lot of mental space there so it rolls over very quickly? everything is a progression. i forget the exact steve jobs quote where everything is a remix. the more you learn, the more open to learning, the more ideas you have. i will put it in a different way -- and i say this to dirk and other mavericks players. the most competitive sport there is is business. it is incredibly competitive because you are competing 24/7/365/forever. i love the competition of it.
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my basketball game isn't so good anymore, but the business is a sport. it is nonstop. that is what gets me excited and keeps me going. that is why i love to continue to learn. kevin: i heard you say in a radio interview not too long ago that your biggest fear is that your kids would grow up to be jerks. there's no chance that is going to happen. what you mean by that time about how you manage. mr. cuban: we drive our kids to school, we put our kids to bed. we have help during the day, but at night we tried to be by ourselves as much as possible and we tried to make our kids appreciate. it is hard to explain, but i
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wanted to have a little bit of struggle but not too much. i want them to learn, appreciate, not feel entitled. that is what we tried to do as best we can to always make them feel appreciative of everything around them. some of you got to meet jake and hopefully came across as somebody who is going to grow up to be that way. kevin: you read three hours a day? mr. cuban: you can ask tiff. >> you read on your tablet? mr. cuban: phone, tablet, newspapers. i could read them online but i feel sorry for newspapers and you just want something different. you don't want to always be staring at a screen. i don't get to read books as much as i would like to, so it
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is more content driven, online relative to all the different topics i'm interested in. kevin: this project is teaching critical life skills, an impressive prospect. what should he be reading? mr. cuban: that is not a fair question. read what gets you excited. there are no business books that it is all you need to know. there is no one class, one thing that you can do that is just a shortcut. experience is literally the best teacher. as you dip your toes, or as you move forward with your endeavors and challenges, you recognize the things that are going to be a little bit more difficult. when i run into those difficulty factors, that is when the intensity goes up.
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what can i read? some people are more what can my mentor tell me? i need to be able to consume it and internalize it. i love to read biographies, people who have done things before like our presidents here. i will still walk through bookstores and look for a magazine because if i find one idea or one thought, it is worth the five dollars or $10. you never know when that next idea -- that the lightbulb goes on. you have to keep that might open. kevin: one idea that you had the last couple of years is -- it is an app in your text disappears on a 24 second shot clock.
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i know lots of people who could benefit from disappearing social media content. talk about the way we live our life so publicly now. mr. cuban: will begin on social media, we think our friends, our family, but then it kind of has spread. it gets bigger and our networks expand. you get to a point where all of a sudden your social media network says more about you than you realize and it may say things about you that you don't realize. if you go back and look at your facebook friends of friends, in this day and age, people hold you accountable for that. there is an app called expire that allows me to go back and delete all my tweets. people don't need to see what
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you wrote two years ago. there is just no point. the app cyber dust, when you think about messaging this day and age, the minute you get sent on a text, e-mail, you don't own it anymore. if you are a visible person or someone with a lot of responsibility, there is a good chance that the person you're sending it to his keeping it. think about the consequences. they own it but you still have responsibility for it. it is scary. over the course of time, many of us have thousands of tax that we have sent that might have seemed like the coolest, no problem at all. it is like the old seinfeld episode -- just old acquaintances.
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sony owns the show "shark tank." so while the sony hack was going on, i made sure my negotiations were done on cyber dust, not knowing that this was going on. every other employee of sony was frantic and scared but we were safe. that is called cyber dust and it is in the app store and you want to reach me, my username is mcuban. kevin: always selling. mr. cuban: always selling. kevin: we have a room full of media here. you like to conduct interviews when you can the e-mail. why is that? mr. cuban: there is reporters and opinion.
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in reporting, i learned early on that what you say in an e-mail -- the full transcript may not be used and that is their job to try and create a story. having a full e-mail transcript has given me the chance to post on my blog the real story. now, i try to do more of this via cyber dust, so it is a digital version. historically, it was a live interview i would use e-mail to protect myself because you just don't know how media is going to take anything that you tell them. particularly in social endeavors, all it takes is one misstep or one misstatement of an interview and you are toast. if all you do is sit down and they have a table where -- this is what i thought you meant. as you have the ability to have all that context.
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kevin: what advice you have by our scholars? mr. cuban: be honest about your time. it sounds so good to be a mentor and have a mentor. i was never a big mentor person, i was more like, get my hands dirty. it is hard to mentor 20 people or 30 people. be honest. as a young person looking for a mentor, realize that they don't live their lives to mentor you. it is a resource that is very valuable and make sure that it is a resource. there is also friendships and relationships that go with it better amazing. kevin: secretary spellings and i
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attended an event at microsoft years ago. bill gates was asked about how we control to schedule and he said he has steve ballmer check it and cross check it. what advice do you have about the way you commit your time and build your schedule? mr. cuban: i have somebody who runs my life who does my schedule. but i don't commit so far in advance simply because i still think the best is yet to come. i am still excited about all of the opportunities that are in front of me, so i want to bring -- i don't want to preclude myself from something. like i said, i am such a strong believer in the american dream, such a strong believer that today is the youngest you will ever be and you have to live like it. i'm a strong believer that the best is yet to come for me. if that is the case, i'm not
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going to lock anything in. kevin: we have 30 seconds. many in our scholars asked, what is the next big thing? mr. cuban: the next big thing is a big center for the mavs. i would say personalized medicine. our bodies basically our equations and as computers get faster and faster, we begin to understand more about them. my son jake, who is five, maybe it will be what he has kids. but the concept of walking into a drugstore in buying over-the-counter medicine that has a warning that you might be the one unlucky schmuck that dies from this will seem barbaric.
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they take one little bit of blood into a complete analysis in seconds. as we learn more and more about the wondrous body that we have and all the variables that are in it, we will be able to more certainly determine what it takes to cure. that is going to create a folder set of questions that are bigger than me. all these discussions we have about the cost of medicine, people try to pretend years out, they are wrong. there will be people like you that will invent even better ways. kevin: thank you again to the the moody foundation and mark cuban. [applause] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2015]
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[captioning performed by the national captioning institute, which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] >> on today's washington journal, "boston globe" political editor, shirov center on the 2016 presidential campaign. congress returns from its summer recess. summer -- congress debates the iran nuclear agreement. pope francis addresses a meeting later this month. we will talk about all of that with stephen dennis who covers the senate. "washington journal," live with today's headlines, every morning on c-span at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the house and senate returned from their summer recess this week, and get right to work on the iran nuclear agreement, particularly in resolution of disapproval of that agreement or a getting set to cover that debate is laura barron lopez who covers congress for "huffington post." let's start in the senate, who will be some of the key players on tuesday? laura: thank you for having me.
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in the senate right now, the administration is pretty confident the democrats will be able to protect this deal that he has crafted with p5+1. what is going to happen is that so far 38 democrats have announced their support for the deal. a few shy of the number needed to filibuster if they wanted to. so the debate will be heated and they will start tuesday. it looks like even if it does pass the senate, democrats will have the votes to sustain a presidential veto. >> one of the votes they will not get, and it becomes another one in opposition -- ben cardin, the ranking member. he wrote about his opposition friday and here is his tweet regarding the iran deal -- this is a close call, but after a lengthy review, i will vote to disapprove. how does his opposition, or does
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it change at all, the nature of the debate in the senate? laura: i think senator ben cardin's opposition very much embodies how difficult this issue has been for all of the senators, all of the congress members, every single person, whether they come for it or against it has said this has been the most difficult decision to have ever had to make as a lawmaker. ben cardin didn't really know where he was going to go, so now he is the third democrat on top of a crowd on top of senator schumer and senator bob menendez to say that he is going to vote against the deal. when it comes down to the numbers and the process, i do not think the administration is going to be sweating it too much because they know they have the votes in the senate to sustain the veto. >> let's take a look at the use, earlier, nancy pelosi's desk nancy pelosi sent out a colleagues letter about getting everybody on board to support the iran deal, the rules committee takes it up in the
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house on tuesday evening for a debate beginning midweek. what does the debate look like in the house and who will some of the floor leaders be there? laura: the house is a bit more fluid right now in the colleague letter that you mentioned. minority leader pelosi did say that they have well over 100 democrats that have come out in support of the deal, but they need 146 in order to sustain a presidential veto. they are not quite there yet. she has been very aggressive over the august recess and administration has been to make sure that they are trying to get the support that they need. it is going to be very interesting next week. >> let's go back to the senate for a second. we didn't touch on the talk of potential for democrats to be able to filibuster, be able to
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prevent this from ever coming to a final vote. the number they were talking about was 41 with 38 now in favor of the deal. our democratic leaders in the senate indicating at all that they might have the ability to stop this from coming to a final vote? laura: because they are so close to the 41 number, as you said, it will be interesting to see if they decide to do that. people in senator durbin's office have said that the democrats are not planning to filibuster, and senator joe manchin, one of the undecided still left -- there are five undecided democrats left -- said he would not support a filibuster. the rest that are undecided, because it is such an intense debate, they may not end up getting the vote. >> laura lopez covers congress for "huffington post." read more at huffington post.com
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and follow her on twitter. thank you for the update. >> our coverage of the iran nuclear deal continues latest day with former vice president, dick cheney. we have live on c-span2 at 9:00 a.m. eastern. at 10:00 today, harry reid explains why he supports the deal and why he thinks it will prevent iran from getting a nuclear weapon. we have it live here at 10:00 a.m. at 1:00 p.m. eastern on c-span, a senator on the other side of the issue, lindsey graham, he speaks at the national press club on why he opposes the deal. see that life here on c-span at
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1:00 p.m. the house rules committee begins -- the resolution that formally declares that congress disapproves of the iran deal. it is at 5:00 p.m. today, live on c-span3. vice president biden spent labor day in pittsburgh. his remarks are just over 10 minutes. vice president biden: hey, folks. [applause] my name is joe biden and i work for leah gerard. she was not joking.
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the only reason i am standing here is because in 1972, richard nixon ended up winning my state the vote and i could not get help anywhere. i was working like the double. there was a big boy named emory. he was 6'6", 260 pounds. he represented the steelworkers at what used to be called work steel. he took me up to see a guy who was the regional director in philadelphia. he said we are backing this boy. are."d "like hell we he said if we are not, you do not have me. he came out to speak to the international president here and the next thing i know i was endorsed. at that time, i was losing in the most recent poll, but i won.
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i won because of the steelworkers. you go an expression -- home with them that brought you to the dance and you all brought me to the dance. it is great to be here. i do not know where he is right good to seedoyle -- you. it is nice to have someone in congress who actually knows what a steel mill looks like. and where is mack? mack does all of the heavy lifting. thanks for having me back. and my buddy rich. you know, rich and i go back a long way. he is the kind of guy, and i am not joking, like all of you. you know, in the neighborhood, you always knew who the person was who had your back. you knew it, and this is the guy who would have your back. he would have your back in a fight.
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he would have your back in an argument. he would have your back no matter what. and he has had my back, and i have had his, and i can't tell you how much i appreciate it, and i really mean it. you know, it is good to be back. i am almost home. i am further from scranton now than i was in wilmington, but at any rate, it is good to be here. i would like to tell you. you have done a remarkable job here in pittsburgh. labor has been clobbered. some of you heard me say 15 years ago that they flat out declared war. not a joke, not an exaggeration, because you are the only one with the power to keep the barbarians from the gate. no, no, no. not a joke. without the ability to sit down with the most powerful entities
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in the world, without that ability to negotiate, without that ability, and there is no shot, no shot for any american worker. i don't mean labor. i mean any american worker, and, ladies and gentlemen, what happened, productivity, that is what you do. you make their products more valuable. you do it better, you do it cheaper, and you get it out there. it used to be when productivity went up in america, people would share, and they got a piece of the action. they got a piece of the action, but it went up about 73%, but yet wages only went up about 9% all of across america. something is wrong, folks. at the end of world war ii, from world world war i to 1970, the standard of living went up. why in god's name should a man making $50,000 a year pay higher
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rates than someone who makes tens of millions of dollars on wall street? i mean, i am serious? by the way, this is not politics. this is real. this is what has changed. what has changed out there, folks, is we cannot let it stand. we cannot let the changes take place that have creeped in over the last 20 years. they have a devastating to workers. look. i hope everybody in america has a chance to be a millionaire, and we need some billionaires, but let me tell you, man. the tax code is not fair. it simply is not fair. the wealthy are not paying their fair share. it used to be everybody was in on the deal. when we were doing back, everybody chipped in. when we are doing well, everybody was. that is not the case anymore.
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in the 1970's, the top 1% own 20%. today, they own 40% of all of the wealth in america. they are not bad people. here is the deal, folks. it is set up that way. it is the way the tax code has been set up. it is the way everything was secured. back in the 1970's when you were getting started in the steel mills, the situation was that the ceo made on average 25, 26 times the average employee. now they make 400 times as much -- what happened? did american workers get less productive? every study shows they have been more productive, so, folks, the fact of the matter is we are in
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a position now -- look. let me give you one example. you hear your republican friends saying biden and obama and all of those democrats, they want to provide free community college to everybody. 12 years is not enough anymore. 14 years is the minimum we need, and they say all that will happen his will raise the deficit. everything is a choice. right now, we give a tax break of $110 billion per 10 years to so-called trust fund babies. they do not pay any tax on the value of what they inherent. the stock they inherit, when it goes from $10 million to 100 millions. they do not pay that increase. if that increase occurred before they, in fact, were given the stock. you know how much it costs for nine million people in trinity college for free, give them a better chance at a better life?
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do you know how much that tax costs? $10 billion a year. we can eliminate that and put everyone in committed to college and cut the deficit by $4 billion a year. folks, it is too high to go into more detail, but here is the bottom line. i am mad. i am angry. because the people i grew up with -- look. we saw too many people in this great recession in pittsburgh and all around make what i call the longest walk a parent has to make up a short flight of stairs to say to their kids, honey, i am sorry. mom lost her job. dad lost her job. you cannot go back to school or play in the same basketball team at church. you cannot play in the same little league team. we have to move. my dad made that walk in scranton, pennsylvania. he made that walk when i was in the fourth grade when i was sitting on the edge of the bed
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at my grandmother's house when we were living there and said, we are going to move. we have to move to wilmington, delaware. there are jobs there. everything is going to be alright though. when i get set up, we're going to have you and your mother and your brothers and sisters down. only 156 miles. i remember him saying that. it was like going to the moon, but when my dad said it was going to be all right, he believed it. how many people in your neighborhoods, how many people in your own neighborhoods are in trouble, can look there kids in the eye and with hearts say, "honey, it is going to be ok. it is going to be ok." not enough, because a level playing field does not exist. our job is to make sure every parent can look their kid in the eye, knowing they have put in a full day's work, and say, "honey, it is going to be ok."
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from a 40 hour week to sick leave. there will not be a single, basic right out there were it not for labor. you built the middle class. that is not an exaggeration. and as you have declined, the middle class has declined. there is a simple correlation. we build labor, we build america. we build labor, we build the middle class. and, folks, let me tell you what i mean about middle class. it is not a number. it is a value set.
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to be middle-class means you have a chance to own your home, not just rent it. it means you can send your kids to the park, and they are going to be able to come home safely, and if you send your kids to school and do well and want to go to school after high school, they will be able to go, and you will be able to pay to get them there, and when you get sick, you can take care of your kids and hope that when it you get sick, they will not have to take care of you. so organize, organize, organize. god love you. [applause] mr. biden: we have got to do it. thank you. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2015] [captioning performed by the national captioning institute,
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which is responsible for its caption content and accuracy. visit ncicap.org] mr. biden: good to see you. how are you guys? good to see you. how are you? nice to see you. hey, how are you? hey, guys. hey, guys. good to see you. good to see you.
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you are kidding me? how are you? good to see you. hi. ok. thank you. good to see you. hey, man. how are you? good to see you. put his hand out? >> yes, i did. mr. biden: hey, guys. good to see you. how are you? >> thank you. mr. biden: it is like home. good to see you. hey, man. how are you? how are you? good to see you. hey, guys.
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how are you, man? how are you? >> tell the guys up front to go slow. mr. biden: good to see you. yes? [indiscernible]
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mr. biden: me, too. >> the director -- [indiscernible] mr. biden: me, too. by the way, i do enjoy it. hi, how are you? hi, how are you? hi. >> thank you. >> she wants to meet you.
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>> i have been a democrat my whole life. mr. biden: hey, guys. how are you? it is good to see you. thank you. hey, folks. how are you? it is good to see you. >> how are you doing? mr. biden: i am doing well. i am doing well. considers year-end
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iran nuclear deal today, and coming up, harry reid speaks at the carnegie endowment for international peace on why he supports the deal. then at 1:00 p.m. eastern, also live on c-span, as senator on the other side of the issue, republican lindsey graham, who is running for president, speaks at the national press club on why he is opposing the deal. at 5:00 p.m., consideration of resolution 64, the resolution formally announcing they disapprove of the nuclear agreement. the rules committee will set the rules for debate on the resolution live on c-span3 at 5:00 p.m. eastern. up next on c-span, "washington journal." at 7:45 a.m., we will talk with political editor shira center on the 2016
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presidential campaign. congress returns from its summer recess. summer -- congress debates the iran nuclear agreement. pope francis addresses a meeting later this month. host: congress returns after a summer break into items are on the agenda, including the iran nuclear deal and avoiding a government shutdown in october. the house rules committee will discuss the debate rules for the resolution of disapproval they want to attach to the iran deal. debate takes place in the senate as well. look for more information on our website at c-span.org. for program this morning in the first 45 minutes with iran and the potential of a government shutdown in the possibility, we want to see if those are your priorities are for congress to tackle between now and the end of the year, or

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