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tv   U.S. House Debate on the Iran Nuclear Agreement  CSPAN  September 11, 2015 9:00am-5:01pm EDT

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the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered today by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. dear lord, we give you thanks for giving us another day. on this anniversary of the 9/11 tragedy, we ask your blessing of peace upon our nation and our world. may your healing presence continue to help those that were personally assaulted on that momentus day and ease the mourning of those who lost their loved ones. this is a month layden with important matters of policy both at home and abroad for our
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nation. help the members of this house to recognize that you are with them in their deliberations. you are the god of us all. help all to trust that your will for peace and prosperity among your children can move the human heart. and through it all may all maintain a common respect for the good will of those for whom they might disagree. may all that is done this day be for your greater honor and glory. amen. the speaker: the chair has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his approval thereof. pursuant to clause 1 of rule 1 the journal stands approved. the pledge of allegiance today will be led by the gentlelady . om illinois, mrs. bustos mrs. bustos: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god,
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indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain up to five requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from california rise? >> mr. speaker, i rise to ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. he speaker: without objection. mr. lamalfa: thank you, mr. speaker. as we somberly memorialize this week, the tragic attacks of 14 years ago, we can also rejoice in our constitution values being upheld by a federal court this week in that the president's overreach on the affordable care act will be heard under a separation of powers. the court has confirmed the u.s. house has standing to pursue legal claims on the president's overreach once
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again, illegally overstepping his bounds on the affordable care act and handing out $178 billion to insurance companies. this is very important for the people's voice to be heard on an action that was never voted upon or even seen in the public light of day on the affordable care act and its inability to meet its goals of being affordable instead of the prices going up, rates going up and so this action is indeed a strike for our constitutional values, the ones we fought for, the ones we memorialize, the ones that are dear to this country. mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. veasey: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to speak for one minute before the house. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. veasey: mr. speaker, i rise today to honor the anniversary of the september 11 attacks. 14 years ago our nation faced
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an unparalleled tragedy that forever changed us. today our thoughts and prayers remain with the victims that perished with the attacks in new york city, washington, d.c. and pennsylvania on september 11. we mourn the families of the victims and continue to think the selfless -- thank the selfless first responders who rushed to aid those in danger even if it meant risking their own lives. as we remember the lives lost that day, we must commemorate the brave men and women of our armed services who have lost their lives trying to protect us from dangers we still face today. today we must stand more than just democrats and republicans but rather as americans who will work together to ensure that our nation never faces an attack like that ever again. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from california rise? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. >> thank you, mr. speaker. today marks 14 years since
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september 11, 2001, a day when thousands of americans lost their lives in a terrorist attack carried out by al qaeda. on that day we united as a nation in response to a tragedy too terrible to fathom. today i remain thankful for our first responders, our firefighters, police and many others who displayed colonel and strength in helping all impacted by the attacks. this day also reminds us to reflect on the dedication of the men and women in our armed forces, thousands who served honorably in iraq, afghanistan and in the war on terror on september 11. mr. denham: we're thankful for their sacrifice and willingness to stand for the american interest across the globe. we all remember where we were on that faithful day 14 years ago and we all recognize where we stand today. our nation faces greater dangers and higher stakes than ever before. the threat of a nuclear iran remains all too real. that is why any deal with iran or any other country must be
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verifiable, enforceable and accountable. iran has been a chief sponsor of terrorism across the globe. a nuclear iran is a threat to everyone anywhere. it's not just about us. it's about our worldwide stability, the safety of the american people is not a partisan priority. it's an american priority. after closely reviewing the details of the unveiled agreement, it is clear this plan will not adequately deter the threat of a nuclear iran nor safeguard the well-being of our citizens and national security interests. i hope we can remember this today, especially, how crucial it is to protect ourselves, our of dren, future generations this huge threat across the globe. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentlelady from illinois seek recognition? for what purpose does the gentleman from rhode island seek recognition? mr. cicilline: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, you're
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recognized for one minute. mr. cicilline: mr. speaker, last month rhode island and the united states lost a hero in first sergeant p. andrew mckenna, an army green berra serving kabul, afghanistan, was killed during a nato attack on heir facility. during 17 years of service, he completed five tours of duty in afghanistan and iraq. his patriotism, loyalty and sense of duty embodied all of the best values of rhode island and our entire nation. i was fortunate to meet sergeant mckenna at the bristol fourth of july parade where he was presented with a flag flown over the united states capitol and i am grateful that i had the opportunity to thank him for his service to our country. as we remember the september 11 attacks, it's important to remember that there are 10,000 american troops in afghanistan. we owe them and all of our men and women in uniform our gratitude for the sacrifices they've made so we can all enjoy freedom and live safely.
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my thoughts continue to be with sergeant mckenna's patients, carol and peter, and his entire family during this incredibly difficult time. 's my hope that this will be a source of comfort to his family. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. from frelinghuysen: mr. speaker, i rise to mark the 14th anniversary of the terrorist attack of september 11, 2001. a horrific day that changed our nation forever as terrorists killed thousands of innocent people in lower manhattan, the fields of pennsylvania and the pentagon. we saw good rise in the face of hero and the -- evil and the heroes rised in the face of danger. when the day was over we learned that thousands of americans lost their lives, 700 from my own state. we witnessed neighbors and friends consoling one another and watched as americans from all walks of life stood united together side by side.
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as america rebounded, we responded to these acts of terrorism with the skill of our military and our first responders. the war -- this is a war we continue to fight. it began without provocation, without warning. it was not a war of our own choosing, but it became a war of our priority and it continues today. it's a solemn duty of every member of the house to protect the security of the nation and our citizens, and today's dangerous and chaotic world, we begin to honor that responsibility by pledging never to forget that day 14 years ago. may god bless who de-- those who defend america and may god continue to bless the united states of america and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentlelady from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlelady is recognized. ms. pelosi: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning at
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8:46 across america there was a moment of silence in remembrance that on the morning of september 11, 2001, the world witnessed a horrific attack against our nation. the profound, unfathomable tragedy shattered our sense of safety, yet, out of the ashes of the fallen world trade center towers, the crushed pentagon and the burning fields of pennsylvania, americans rose united. we comforted strangers, we strengthened community, hope prevailed over hatred, resilience defeated fear. americans will never forget where we were on that day. we must, though, always remember what happened that day. president lincoln once cautioned of the silent artillery of time wearing away
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at our memories. he was referencing those who had lost their lives in the civil war. we pray that the years might ease the pain of the bereeved and that it would be a -- berieved and that it would be a comfort for them we will never forget. young people born after 9/11 are coming of age knowing that no attack will destroy america's ideals of liberty, freedom and opportunity for every people. that is the goal of terrorists, to instill terror and to instill fear. they failed. we emerged to protect the liberties that have long distinguished our nation from regimes that rely on the divisiveness and hatred. we honor the thousands of people we lost that day and those we lost to 9/11-related illnesses in the years that followed. we must remember those heroes of 9/11 and remembering them we
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must honor our commitment to them, whether it's health -- access to health care for those who were affected by 9/11, the selfless first responders, firefighters, police officers and courageous citizens who helped saved lives, searched for survivors and jeopardized their own safeties to rescue others represent the best of humanity. may we forever remember the spirit of september 11, 2001, and strive to build a future based on the hope and unity that emerged from the ashes that day. and while we always remember that on this day, as we discuss this issue, we are walking on sacred ground. may we treat it with dignity and respect. i yield back, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from indiana seek recognition? mrs. walorski: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the chamber for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the
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gentlelady is recognized for ne minute. mrs. brooks: a day in 2001 when terrorists killed united states citizens on united states soil and today in 2012 when terrorists killed four americans in benghazi, libya, i stand today in strong opposition to the iranian nuclear deal, a deal with iran, a leading state sponsor of terror. every day that goes by another story comes out about why we shouldn't support the deal. the head of iran's military has said they will never accept deals restrictions on their arms capabilities. the a.p. recently uncovered key verification provisions buried under a pair of confident side agreements that congress doesn't even have, that will allow iran to inspect its own nuclear capabilities. and just last week, the supreme leader of iran changed the
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rules of the game saying iran will not comply with their side of the deal unless sanctions are lifted and not merely suspended. this is a deeply flawed deal, and i know we can do better. america is still the most prosperous and powerful country on earth, and the protector of freedom and stability in the world. we must do better for the victims of 9/11 and the victims in benghazi and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, on this very solemn day that we commemorate those who gave their lives, i rise on behalf of the safe climate caucus to bring to the house another unfortunate new reality. mr. lowenthal: there is more frequent flooding that's going to be occurring now because of climate change. we're already seeing sea level rise, that is without doubt, and that has resulted in the frequency of nuisance flooding
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in coastal communities. cities across america are experiencing nuisance flooding. you know, there's a rise in flooding between -- nuisance flooding between 1960 and the present of up to 900% throughout the country, from 300% to 900%, it's more often. when rising sea levels combined with natural climate patterns like this year's el nino, even higher rates of nuisance flooding will occur. for example, in my district, nuisance flooding threatens my entire long beach peninsula and the alameda area, flooded roads means a loss of work or school days and eroded beaches can have a negative impact upon property values. today's floods are tomorrow's high tides. that's why congress must act on climate change. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. . the speaker pro tempore: without
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objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> i want to congratulate the coin rapids lell league baseball team object their great one. at emerging victorious at the minnesota state tournament, they came up one game short at the midwest regional from making the little league world series. while they didn't make it to williamsport, pennsylvania, their deem one had community abuzz with baseball fever. the dedication of these 11 and 12-year-olds to spend their summers at practices and tournaments is outstanding. the skills that baseball often develops focus, commitment, hard work, will surely serve these young players in the future. mr. speaker, the coaches, the parents, the family members, and the players of the coin rapid little league team should be very proud of their tenacity and effort. i want to congratulate them. they make their community proud. yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from maryland seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without
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objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. hoyer: mr. speaker, this morning we had a moment of ilence, but we recognize today 14 years of memories. all of us remember where we were when terrorists attacked our nation 14 years ago. murdering 2,977 of our fellow americans. and shocking the conscience of our country and of the world. none of us will ever forget the tears, the sorrow, and the loss of that day. but neither will we ever forget the extraordinary acts of heroism. the first responders who rushed headlong into burning towers. the passengers who stormed the cockpit. and the air national guard pilot who was preparing to ram her fighter into a hijacked airliner
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to stop the next attack. these, mr. speaker, are the stories that our children and grandchildren must hear. along with those of the brave men and women who donned our nation's uniform in the years since when they ask us to on in what happened september 11, 2001. today, mr. speaker, as we mourn the victims of the september 11 attacks, and pay tribute to the heroes of that day, we should honor them by renewing the sense of unity we felt that morning and in the weeks and months that followed. america, mr. speaker, is strongest when we stand together ideals,se of our common individual freedom, tolerance, quality, justice, which the perpetrators of those acts found
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so objectionable and which were the real objects of their attack. as we gather, mr. speaker, to mark this anniversary, let us remember that our greatest rebuttal to those who attacked us, as well as the most fitting tribute to all those we lost, is to keep defending these principles that bind us together as americans and that will always be the enduring source of our strength. we god bless those who we lost and we commit to their memory and to their cause. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from california, mr. royce, seek recognition? mr. royce: mr. speaker, pursuant to house resolution 412, i call up h.r. 3460 and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of
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the bill. the clerk: h.r. 3460, a bill to suspend until january 21, 2017, the authority of the president to wave, suspend, reduce, provide relief from, or otherwise limit the application of sanctions pursuant to an agreement related to the nuclear program of iran. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution 412, the bill is considered as read. the bill shall be debatable for two hours with 30 minutes controlled by the chair of the committee on foreign affairs or his designee, 30 minutes of the chair controlled by the committee of the ways and means, and one hour controlled by the minority leader or her designee, the gentleman from california, mr. royce, the gentleman from wisconsin, mr. ryan, the gentleman from michigan, mr. conyers, and the gentleman from michigan mr. levin each control 30 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. royce. mr. royce: i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and to submit extraneous materials on this measure. the speaker pro tempore: without
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objection. the gentleman is recognized. mr. royce: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. royce: mr. speaker, i rise in support of this legislation which would prohibit the president from waiving iran sanctions and prevent the implementation of this fatally flawed agreement. last night we spent many hours debating this agreement. we heard from members on both sides of the aisle, members who have deep concerns about where we are headed. mr. speaker, let's be very clear, this isn't just a bad deal. it's a disastrous deal. it's a disaster for the united states. it's a disaster for our allies and friends in the region, including israel. and when you think about it, when we think about the letter that we sent, 84% of us in this house signed the letter asking for four critical things in this negotiation. we got rolled on every one of the four.
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iran won on every point. iran gets to keep its nuclear infrastructure. the obama administration collapsed on the issue of verification. we don't have anywhere, any time inspections in here. we have got self-inspections by the iranian regime with respect to parchin, which is the one military site where we know, we know that the iranians, because of 1,000 pages of documents, did most of their bomb work. and they say now, no, no, no. we'll do the inspections. we'll turn that stuff over, but nobody's going into our military sites. that's the argument they are making. and the sunset clause in this means the key parts of this deal expire at the end of the deal. so, we've got prominent sanctions relief for the iranian regime, relief that's going to go into their military in exchange for temporary constraints on iran's nuclear
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program. and the restrictions on iran's missile program designed to deliver those weapons -- now, this came up in the 11th hour of this negotiation, no one anticipated it being in the agreement. at the 11th hour the russians came forward and on behalf of the iranians said we want the lifting of the sanctions, international sanctions that the community has on the icbm program and on the arms transfers. with respect to iran. and unbelievably we ended up getting rolled on this as well. as the secretary of defense told congress, the i in icbm stands for intercontinental, meaning flying, from iran to the united states. that is why, that is why we never wanted this lifted. it also provides resources and legitimacy to the iranian
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revolutionary guard corps. the very same organization that has killed 500 u.s. troops in iraq. this nuclear deal really needs to be put in a larger context of the administration's iran policy. it is very dangerous, very risky. i'd say doomed to fail as a policy given the fact that we haven't seen any adjustment out of iran other than a recommittal on the part of the regime in iran where they say we are not going to be bound by any of the ballistic missile constraints. we don't intend to follow that. and by the way, we're advancing new ballistic missiles and targeting and putting that into the hands of hezbollah and into the hands of hamas. that's the messaging we have seen this week out of iran. so i reserve the balance of my time.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. conyers: thank you. mr. speaker and members, i strongly oppose h.r. 3460 because it is another attempt to derail diplomacy and set the united states on the path to war. h.r. 3460 suspends until january 21, 2017, meaning through the rest of president obama's term, the authority of the president to waive, suspend, or reduce sanctions pursuant to the iran nuclear agreement. this legislation was introduced less than 48 hours ago, and has
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absolutely no committee process. while the foreign affairs committee has held 30 hearings since the announcement of the joint plan of action in november , 2013, this legislation has never even been a topic of committee discussion. so this is not a serious attempt to legislate. put simply, it's a political attack on the president of the attempt to s and an derail a good deal that is in the best interest of the our ation. but iran -- the iran deal represents the cumulative effects of countless diplomats after imposing some of the toughest sanctions in the the ry, the p 35 plus one,
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u.s. -- the p5+1, the u.s., united kingdom, germany, france, russia, were able to bring iran to the table and strike a deal that achieves our core strategy objectives. president obama and secretary of state kerry deserve our respect and thanks for this achievement. they kept together a coalition that forced iran to make serious concessions in how they operate their domestic nuclear program. redid not get everything that we wanted, but we achieved a verifiable deal that is our best hope to prevent iran from developing a nuclear weapon. details of the deal are
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commendable, among other things, iran will reduce its uranium stockpile by 98%, and lower its enrichment level below weapon levels. this will increase the breakout time or how long it takes to create a weapon to one year. in addition, the international atomic energy agency will oversee testing and inspections and cheating will be severely punished with snapback provisions that reimpose the crippling sanctions that brought iran to the table. unfortunately, it appears that the majority does not understand progress in diplomacy. those who are trying to undermine this historic
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agreement are motivated by the same naive approach to negotiation that has paralyzed this congress. this time unless they get everything they want, they will not accept the deal that forestalls war and prevents iran from becoming a nuclear power. it this intransigence may be new in its degree, but it is an old and regretful approach taken by critics of diplomacy. i remember almost 30 years ago when a president late in his second term reached out his hand in peace. attempts to constrain and ultimately reduce the nuclear stockpiles were mocked. i rarely saw eye to eye with
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that president, but nearly three decades later i'm glad that he stood up when he did. that president was ronald reagan . when he signed the treaty with mr. gorbachev, he faced the same fury we face today. however, the soviet union was replaced by a growing number of free and independent states and 28 years later the united states is still standing and remains as strong as ever. the lesson in all of this is that diplomacy is rarely clean and it develops in its own time. there are stops and starts. things move forward. sometimes backwards.
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and even often sideways. but repeatedly we have shown that a step in the direction of peace will be met in kind, whether a republican or democratic president seeks that piece -- peace, congress has an obligation to support those efforts. i'm proud of our president's efforts to forge a new path with iran. the iran deal prevents iran from developing a bomb, creates new foundation for diplomacy and and stands as a proud tradition of progress. i urge my colleagues to carefully consider and oppose i . 3460, and mr. speaker,
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reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: mr. speaker, i'd make the point with respect to ronald reagan, when president reagan was presented a bad deal in his negotiations with the russians, at that point -- at that point he walked away from that deal. he pushed away from the deal because in his mind we could come back and get a better deal if we stood our ground. this was not the circumstance with respect to our negotiations with iran. with iranian negotiations, we had four points that this congress, 8 % of us sent a -- 84% of us sent a letter to the secretary of state. those points was to be anywhere, anytime inspections. it was supposed to last multiple decades. we were not supposed to lift the sanctions upfront but do it over the entirety of the
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agreement in order to get compliance, to ensure we had compliance. it was to make certain that those 12 questions that the iaea had asked were answered. these were all important because, again, as reagan ointed out to the russians, he threw their own expression back to them. there is an old russian expression, trust but verify, and that's what we need to apply to the agreement. that's the last point i would make here, the verification component of it. when you have side agreements, which congress has not seen, and those side agreements allow, in the case of parchin, where we have ample evidence of their past bomb work, allow the iranians to do their own inspections. i mean, i always thought it was going to be international inspectors that did the international inspections. not the iranians themselves. and for these reasons i do not think it's anational just.
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i think we -- analogous. i think we should do what reagan did, no, we need a tter negotiation and we need to trust but verify. i yield to the gentleman from montana for two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. zink: we are talking about billions of dollars into iran. at least 500 troops, which i served with in yirke, died as a result of iran. mr. zinke: iran is not our friend. they are our enemy. at this -- at least this regime. you cannot say that hezbollah or hamas, the surrogates of
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iran, would not do the same on 9/11 as what occurred today in 2001. let's look at this deal. general dempsey, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff said upped no circumstances do we send missile technology to iran and yet for five years we relax sanctions to include missile systems, to include the same missile systems that iran has given to hamas. at least 1,000 of them directly and as many 10,000 into israel from gaza. in eight years we will relax sanctions on icbm's. there is only one purpose for an icbm and that is to strike america. yet, in 10 years -- remember, part of the deal, dismantle for dismantle. dismantle the sanctions. iran was going to dismantle their nuclear facilities, their capabilities and their ambitions. in 10 years the centrifuges
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that are not dismantled come out, they're upgraded and in 13 years, by experts, iran will have the capability of having at least 100 nuclear-tipped icbm's. how is that in the best interest of america? how is that in the best interest of our allies in the middle east? how is that in the best interest of america and the world? it is not. the policy of the united states has been to reduce our stockpiles, reduce the countries that hold these incredible, destructive weapons -- ukraine, south africa are examples. lastly -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. royce: i yield the gentleman an additional minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. zinke: lastly, how could anyone vote for a deal in which full disclosure of documents is not delivered? no member of this body has been privy to the secret deal
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between the international atomic energy agency and iran. no member has read this. and yet the verification is so incredibly critical and yet we're willing to cede our sovereignty. no americans on it for a verification process that is 24 days that even general hayden says you can only monitor what you can see. this is a bad deal. the argument is take this deal or go to war. i say this deal promotes war. it promotes nuclear proliferation. it's not the best interest of the united states and it puts ourselves, americans, and the world at risk. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: thank you. i yield to the distinguished gentleman from california, mr. huffman, two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman from california is recognized for two minutes. mr. huffman: i thank the gentleman. mr. speaker, i rise in support of the joint comprehensive plan of action because we cannot allow iran to have a nuclear weapon and this is the smartest, most responsible way to prevent that. nuclear experts, our own military and intelligence communities and all five nations that have negotiated with us, countries that have a direct interest in preventing an iranian bomb, all agree this deal will work. t does it by restricting their enrichment to nonthreatening level and has an unprecedented of inspections, mechanisms that are not built on trust, they are built on distrust and verification. is this deal perfect? no. i would prefer a deal that permanently bans all enrichment. however, experts agree that this deal can and will keep iran's nuclear program in a box for at least the next 15 years. now, opponents think we should blow this deal up, walk away
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and try for a better deal. with all due respect, i think they're in denial. all of our negotiating partners tell us that's not going to happen. we'd go forward with a much weaker hand, without any, perhaps, sanctioned partners at all with a huge loss of credibility for abandoning our own deal. blowing this deal up only makes sense if you're prepared to go to war. and i know that across the aisle -- i'm distressed to say -- many think that's a good idea. i'm concerned across the aisle there is a outbreak of dick cheney fever and apple neshia. they want to -- amnesia. they want to take us back to the years where militarism made us less safe. there is a smarter way forward to prevent iran from having a bomb. let's give diplomacy and peace a chance. let's support this agreement. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from north carolina, mr. george holding.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from north carolina is recognized for two minutes. mr. holding: i thank the chairman. the chairman is one of the most brightest and inciteful foreign policy minds that this congress has ever produced. i rise in support of the legislation in front of us. mr. speaker, for years our nation, in conjunction with partners across the globe, built up a robust sanctions package against the regime in tehran for their illegal nuclear work, among other illicit actions and activities and these sanctions worked, mr. speaker. iran's economy crumbled which forced them to the negotiating table. only trouble is, mr. speaker, on the other side of that negotiating table was the obama administration, a group so eager to sign a deal that they gave into the iranians at every turn and forgot the true nature and evil of who they were dealing with. to get a deal the administration walked back many of their initial demands, demands that actually might have made this a better deal. mr. speaker, it is all too
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clear that this deal must be reworked and rejected. now, i certainly believe that there is a role for diplomacy, but diplomacy must come from a source of strength, not weakness and capitulation, which is why the legislation before us today is so important. the waivers built into our sanctions were not meant to be used by any president to force and reement, pass congress the majority people. we should not be relaxing sanctions and giving iran more money. more money to spread terror, more money to execute civilians, more money to support murderous proxy regimes. mr. speaker, this deal cannot stand, and i urge support of this deal and yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield two minutes to the distinguished the gentlelady from california, ms. chu. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentlelady from california is recognized for two minutes. ms. chu: i rise today against this measure to restrain president obama from lifting sanctions and to support the iran deal, the most important step that we could take to secure the future of this planet by stopping iran's nuclear program for 15 years. a nuclear iran is an unacceptable danger. iran's support of terror and aggression throughout the world, its stated threats to israel and the nuclear arms race they would trigger are the reasons the world's major powers came together to put crushing sanctions on iran in the first place. currently iran could produce enough material for a nuclear weapon in two to three months. under this deal, iran must take several unprecedented steps that would prevent them from having a nuclear weapon in 15 years. this deal goes further than any agreement in history by including inspections of iran's entire uranium enrichment
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supply chain for up to 25 years. additionally, iran will be subject to inspections under the additional protocol forever. it is those crushing economic sanctions that brought iran to the table to finally accept the nuclear deal. what is critical to remember is that our terrorism sanctions a ll remain in place, and if military strike is necessary, the u.s. will have the time and temmings to intervene but -- intelligence to intervene but without the threat of a nuclear bomb in 15 years. without this deal, sanctions will be lifted anyway and we will be left with nothing but fear, uncertainty and an unfettered iran. considering the anxiety of recent years when the prospect of a military strike on iran felt imminent, this deal is a welcomed alternative, and the risks of rejecting it are too great. for the sake of our -- the security of our allies and our position as a trustworthy global leader, i urge my
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colleagues to support the deal and reject this resolution. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from south carolina, mr. jeff duncan, chairman of the foreign affairs subcommittee on the western hemisphere. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from south carolina is recognized for two minutes. mr. duncan: thank you, mr. chairman. let me just pause to say that i remember the events of 9/11/01 and i want to thank the first responders and those men and women in uniform and those that protect us every day. mr. speaker, i strongly oppose the nuclear agreement with iran. i strongly oppose giving the president the ability to unilaterally lift sanctions, congressional sanctions. our allies don't trust us and our enemies don't fear us. i think we ought to take iran at its word. here's some quotes. during the negotiations, ayatollah said this, the
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enemies are talking about the options they have on the table. they should know that the first option on our table is the annihilation of israel. the ayatollah khomeini said this, the iranian people and leadership with god's help will increase their defensive capacity, capability each day. through the iran deal we're getting ready to give iran $150 billion. they can do a lot of damage with that. they're the largest state sponsor of terrorism. they're responsible for killing people in indonesia, in india and all across the globe. . the ayatollah has said we will not stop supporting our allies. that's hamas, that's hezbollah, and other terrorist groups. they have said their own words, take them at their word, they will continue to support materially and financially the
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terrorism groups like in yemen. there's nothing we can do to stop it. they have also said that we, western powers, will not have access to secret military sites or secret nuclear sites. yet we are going to give them 24 days in this agreement? america, i didn't say 24 hours, i said 24 days advance notice. 24 days advance notice before we are going to inspect a site. are you kidding me? we are going to allow them to self-regulate. that means they can go out in the desert and get clean dirt and air and provide that. that's like telling a regular drug user you can bring somebody else's urine and hair sample to a drug test. this is crazy that we are giving iran $150 billion and an opportunity to get a nuclear weapon in 10 years or less. 10 years or less assuming they are going to adhere to every line of the agreement which nobody i talked to believes iran will adhere to the agreement. they will have a nuclear weapon.
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the immediate concern is $150 billion and lifting sanctions. money given to iran so they can continue to fund terrorism around the globe. people will die as a result of this agreement. $150 billion can buy a lot of weapons, financial support for terrorist groups, continue attacking our allies and americans anywhere they are in the world. mr. chairman, i strongly oppose that as you can tell by my passion today, it's time for us to really talk in real terms about what this agreement is. with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yield back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, i'm pleased now to recognize the gentlelady from california, ms. sanchez, for two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from california is recognized for two minutes. ms. sanchez: thank you, mr. speaker. thank you, mr. chairman. they sound like warmongers, don't they? those iranian leaders.
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so we sit here today humbled at the task before us. we sit here as members of the world's greatest legislative body debating the future of our country and the future of the world. because iran with a nuclear weapon is a threat to the world. after months of intense review and passion and conversation with the people i represent and with advisors, with my colleagues, after 19 years on the armed services committee, 17 of those on the committee that deals with nuclear proliferation and nonproliferation, chairing that committee for the democrats , i believe that diplomacy first is the best path for the united states and our allies. we stand here to discuss the issues of war and peace.
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of whether we believe in diplomacy with verification or armed engagement. we sit here and we reflect on all of those that will be affected by our votes. my family, our family, the soldiers, and countless others. but can we look them directly in the eye and say we did all that we could do? can we tell them we did not give diplomacy a chance? so don't get me wrong. i'm no fan of iran. when some many in this chamber rush to war in iraq, i stood up and said no. and i said, at that time, iran is where we need to keep our focus. we need to ensure that this deal is implemented, and we need to
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hold those accountable to implement it correctly. and that's our role as members of congress. no deal is perfect. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. ms. sanchez: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california can is recognized. mr. royce: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. meehan. the eaker pro tempore: gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized for two minutes. mr. meehan: i want to thank the chairman for his leadership. mr. speaker, i raise rise in opposition to the iran deal. i believe the inspections regime is weak. i don't think the iranians can be trusted. nor can we reasonably assume that iran will hold up its end of the deal. a broad swath of sanctions is lifted all at once and the deal lists the arms embargo. iran will further destabilize an already dangerous middle east by trafficking more weapons and rockets to its terrorist proxies like hamas and hezbollah.
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iran's coffers will be flush with cash to fund iranian terror around the world. but iranian terrorism isn't new. iran is the leading state sponsor of terrorism. its support and influence was there in beirut in 1983, khobar 1998. in 1996, nairobi in on this day, 9/11. it's been there at suicide bombings on buses at shopping malls and pisa shops. it supported hostage takings and assassinations around the world. and to this we are to look to diplomacy? u.s. law allows victims these attacks to sue iran for damages in u.s. courts. over the last 15 years the united states courts have handed down more than 80 judgments against iran with $43 billion in damages. of course not a penny has been paid. i know there's disagreement on this overall issue, but truly we
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can agree that iran should have to pay out these damages to its victims' families before iran benefits from u.s. sanctions leaf. i have introduced a justice for victims of iran act. it requires the president to certify that iran has paid all judgments owed to its victims before u.s. sanctions can be lifted. our position is, not one cent. and sanctions relief for iran until it pays up to its victims. not one cent. mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, i'm pleased to yield to a distinguished member of the judiciary committee, the gentlelady from texas, ms. jackson lee, four minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from texas is recognized for four minutes. ms. jackson lee: i thank the gentleman very much. what a weighty responsibility to stand on this floor on september 11. for those of us who were here in this body on that day, there's
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no more solemn responsibility than the national security of this nation. for that reason i'm gratified to my ranking member for being able to serve with him through those very difficult times and to be one of the original members of the new homeland security committee. i state on both those -- stayed on both those committees who hold in their hands the constitutional rights but also the national security. so i rise today with a heavy very to speak to this difficult decision. so i start by saying, i stand here as a mother. i will choose to speak to that child in israel and the child in urban and rural america, and the children around the world, and i would ask my colleagues the question, what is our burden and responsibility to those children that if we have an opportunity not for peace but an opportunity
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to stop a potential nuclear rogue. would we not take that opportunity? or would we find all kinds of obstacles? i rise in opposition to the underlying bill and i rise today in support of this nonnuclear proliferation agreement. i thank the president and secretary kerry, but i thank more importantly, republicans and democrats and independents. i thank the negotiators. mr. speaker, what we have is the statement and the agreement signed by iran that it will never, never become a nuclear power. this agreement creates an enforceable road map for dismantling iran's nuclear program. before the interim joint agreement in 2013, iran went from operating approximately 164 centrifuges to 10,000. and then they went to 19,000. but this agreement brings them
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down to 6,000. is that not a standing in the gap against a known actor of terrorism? and then of course we have them at 300 k.g. enriched uranium and they are only allowed to ebb rich 3.67. we have a road -- enrich 3.67. we have a road map for the various entities that contributed to their ability to make a nuclear bomb. make no mistake about it. you cannot take away knowledge. even if you bomb iran through war, you cannot take away knowledge. they will ultimately have the ability to come back again. now we have an agreement with the p5+1. this is not munich. for munich was a capitulation. no one in this agreement is capitulating to iran. we are demanding that iran cease and desist. tell the american people the truth. this is the best pathway to
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ensuring that the scientists and all. and for those who say that it is a reckless regime or scheme, rather, of inspection, they are wrong. because the only 24-day process deals with the undeclared. and even that has an ultimatum that the sanctions will snap back. but the iaea inspectors trained by the united states, the united states will be present on site at the iaea, and many members travel there and got a direct briefing of the intenseness of their inspection process. america will be on site when they come back with their inspection materials, and we will be at the table. we'll also be engaged in the redesign of some of those facilities in iran for more civilian uses. i ask you, mr. speaker, that if we have the opportunity to take away -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. ms. jackson lee: if we have the
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opportunity -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. ms. jackson lee: to save a child from a speeding train, would we not take that opportunity to -- you the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. ms. jackson lee: i think we would. we need to save the children. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is no longer in recognition. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i'm pleased to yield one minute to our majority leader, mr. mccarthy. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. mccarthy: i thank the gentleman for yielding. i want to take a moment and thank the chairman. for his work that was done to the american public that they have been able to see directly through what this iran agreement's about. interesting thing is happening on this floor as i sit around and listen. i'm hearing republicans and democrats on the same side. those that are opposed to it are bipartisan.
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those that support this all come from one place. when i came to congress the one thing you were always told is, find a committee and stick with that committee because what happens is you get expertise. you care about banking you go to financial services, you get expertise year over year. taxes, ways and means. comes to foreign affairs, you get the expertise of something like this. you know what? i have listened to those who sit on those committees. and i look to the chairmen and the ranking member on the democratic side. you know what i heard from both of them? they are in the same position. they are opposed to this agreement. they took their years of expertise, they read through it, they did the hearings, and they came to the same conclusion. so i wonder, could that happen on the other side of this building inside the senate,
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because they have committees as well? the same bipartisan conclusion ame. it just didn't even come from the committees. the next democratic leader in the senate, the number two is opposed to the iran agreement. the american public always asks us for bipartisanship. this has brought us together. but it's not just in this house. it's almost in the majority of houses across america. you see, in the latest poll, only 21% of the american people actually approve of the deal. 49% oppose. more than two to one. only 2% of americans are confident that iran will abide by the agreement. why? because they never have before.
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iran has a history of not living p to their promises. it's clear today that what the president said he did not achieve. r. speaker, just in april it president obama said he will, and i quote, do what is necessary to prevent iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon. he said he would implement this deal, and i quote, to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. he did the opposite. in 13 years iran can have a nuclear weapon, not just because iran wants it, but america will say, then, it's ok. 13 years is not that far away.
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but that's not all iran gets in this deal. while we had sanctions on iran, the only reason they wanted to come to the table, what did they do with their money, even though it was scars, but they didn't have much? it funded terrorism around the world. well, what does this deal do? it gives them as much or maybe even more than the bailout that greece got. so what will iran become? they will become the central bank for terror in the world. that's what we're voting on today. if you want to know the truth about the deal, you go even further because there are side secret agreements we do not know. so on this side of the aisle we think we should keep with the law. we think when 400 people on this floor voted for the
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corker-cardin bill that said you had to have all agreements. we felt when there was 98 senators and only one opposed that you'd want to hold to the same agreement. why would anybody want to vote on something without having all the facts? especially after you read the do ts that maybe iran can self-inspection. well, if that's the case, why don't we wring to the floor and change the olympic committee and those athletes should be able to test them 70's -- themselves? i look for the education committee, maybe students should grade themselves. maybe that's facetious, but this is probably the most important bill you will vote on . your term in congress don't fall to political pressure because you don't need to. the bipartisanship, the
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majority of americans stands opposed. the expertise in this house hat you respect, regardless of what party you're in, because you elected them to head those committees, are opposed. if that's not enough, study history. history always repeats itself. have we not learned peace without freedom is meaningless? the president said he would not agree to any bad deal. well, i believe we can have a better deal. you know, history has shown chamberlain just wanted peace. history has shown at other times in america where presidents have stood up and stepped back and got a better agreement. ronald reagan wanted to end the nuclear weapons when it came to the soviet union.
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in the end of ronald reagan's second term he sat in iceland with gorbachev. he sat down across the table and he got almost everything he had asked for, but gorbachev asked for one more item. he asked that america would end their f.d.i. investment. ronald reagan had a choice. ronald reagan said no, but he said, i'll do something even better. i'll provide you the technology as well so everyone in the world could be safe. gosh shaff said no -- gorbachev said no. so that's a defining moment, not for that man but for this world, and ronald reagan got up and walked away. some people criticized on political basis, but i ask you this -- would the soviet union have collapsed with the berlin -- or the berlin wall collapsed
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at the time it did had reagan kept his firm and word for a better deal? peace without freedom is meaningless. this deal does not bring greater freedom to the world. it brings a nuclear missile race. this is not just about america, iran or a few other countries. no country in the middle east will sit back after this action . the world will not be safer. we will not be freer, but there's still an opportunity. history has shown if we're willing to stand up, take a step back and get a better agreement, we can have peace and freedom. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california yields back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is
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recognized. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, how much time remains on each side? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan has 13 minutes. the gentleman from california minutes. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: thank you. i'm pleased now to recognize the distinguished gentleman from illinois, mr. gutierrez, for two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois is recognized for two minutes. mr. gutierrez: mr. speaker, i'm -- i have a proud record, a record as strong as any member in congress in supporting israel and it's because of this support that i backed the deal that the president and our allies have negotiated. if i thought that this agreement made the state of israel more vulnerable, i would not support it. but that's just not the case. every security expert i trust, like colin powell, supports this deal, and almost every former government official i deeply distrust, like vice president dick cheney, opposes the agreement. this is one of the most detailed international agreements of its kind in memory, and it was no small task of american diplomacy,
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statesmanship and good old-fashioned negotiating that brought the deal to reality. the power and position of the united states as a world leader brought our allies to the table. it achieved an outcome our country working alone could not have achieved. it is not something that europeans, the russians, the chinese or even the united nations could have achieved. it is not something sanctions alone could achieve, and not something that war alone could achieve. the united states working with our friends and in some cases our rivals brought about this end to iran's nuclear weapons program with an agreement for verifiable, enforceable, effective curbs on iran's nuclear ambitions and it is in iran's interest to abide by this agreement. with this one step forward, the u.s. has helped erase our record of international shortsightedness. it gets us back on track as a leader who leverages our economic power, our military power, our powers to persuade and compromise and bring people together. there are not many times in a person's congressional career,
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in the course of history, for that matter, when a person can cast a vote literally for war or peace. voting to support the iran agreement is a vote to give peace a chance. stand up for men and women in uniform and their families and our nations by avoiding war. let us support a deal that is good for israel, good for america, good for peace and good for the world. mr. speaker, i'd like now to ask unanimous consent, representative yarmuth and i wrote an op-ed peace for "the hill" newspaper saying that iran deal is a good deal for america and a good deal for the world. i ask that be entered in the world. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from indiana, mr. todd young. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from indiana is recognized for two minutes. mr. young: i thank the chairman for yielding. mr. speaker, i rise to join the
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bipartisan opposition to the president's nuclear deal with iran. i didn't arrive at this decision lightly. as a former marine corps intelligence officer, i know the difficulty of detecting covert military activity, and i fully expect iran to cheat. for years president obama has said no deal would be better than a bad deal. now as the sun sets on his final term, he's jammed congress with an agreement riddled with dangerous concessions. no matter the verification arrangements, this deal does not block iran's pathway to a nuclear weapon. this much we know. rewarding the largest sponsor of international terrorism with billions of dollars and long-range missiles requires americans to compromise our nation's security. it's too high of price and one this marine's unwilling to pay.
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so as sure iran will continue chanting "death to america, "death to israel," i will oppose this agreement and i will resolve to work in a nonpartisan basis to proserve peace by projecting -- preserve peace by projecting strength. mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. speaker, i'm pleased now to recognize the distinguished gentleman from california, mr. thompson, for two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for two minutes. mr. thompson: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, a nuclear armed iran is certainly unacceptable. and there are two ways to prevent iran from developing a nuclear weapon -- diplomacy and military force. as someone who served in combat, i believe our nation's first choice should always be diplomacy. i say first choice because
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nothing in this deal takes military action off the table. but before we go down that road, we need to give diplomacy a shot, and this deal is the best way forward. i'm not new to the issue. i just finished serving eight years on the intelligence committee. i reviewed the intelligence, i've read the classified documents and i've had numerous briefings with experts from every side of this issue. there is no other deal to be had. it's this or it's the status quo, and make no mistake, the status quo leaves iran just a short time away from a bomb. all of the intelligence clearly points towards the fact that this agreement is far better than doing nothing, better than the status quo. iran is already a nuclear threshold state. if we reject this deal, iran will keep getting closer and closer towards the development of their nuclear weapon. if we accept the deal, we will
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be able to halt iran's activities. the iaea will have enormous access to conduct inspections, and iran must forever honor the conditions of the nonproliferation treaty or face the consequences. this deal isn't about trust. i don't trust iran, and i don't like their leadership, but as has been pointed out, you don't negotiate peace agreements with those you know, like and trust. this deal is about verification. it's about making iran prove it's not developing a nuclear weapon. it's about keeping america and our allies safe. it's our best and only peaceful path forward. i urge the house to approve the iran nuclear deal, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from illinois, mr. adam kinzinger. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman from illinois is recognized for two minutes. mr. kinzinger: thank you, mr. chairman. thank you, mr. speaker. first question is, has iran earned the right to be trusted? now, if the answer to that is yes, then i'd ask how. tell me how iran has earned this right to be trusted? if the answer is no, then obviously you would have to verify if you trust. if you don't trust. but if you actually look at the verification in this deal, in many cases we're finding out from these secret agreements, it's actually iran varyfying for themselves that in fact they are going to be nuclear-free. you know, i'm a veteran of yirke iraq, and one of the things largely forgotten in this debate is that iraq is responsible for the deaths for the hundreds, if not thousands of american soldiers both directly and indirectly through the explosive foreign penetrators they send to iraq to kill american troops. you know, the other thing is iran in this deal -- there's all this talk about iran cheating. we know it's in the d.n.a. of iran to cheat anyway, but they
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don't even need to cheat. they can follow this deal to the t and become a zero-time breakout nuclear state. you don't even need to have nuclear weapons to have the same kind of power if you're a zero-time breakout nuclear state. you just need to have the threat to marry a nuclear weapon to an intercontinental ballistic missile, which by the way we give iran the right to have in year eight. icbm's married up to a nuclear-tipped weapon. and iran can take weapons from russia, europe, frankly the united states if we wanted to sell it to them, because we lifted the arms embargo against them. south korea, the united arab emirates asked us to enrich uranium, friends of the united states and we told them know because of our dedication to keeping nuclear weapons out of the wrong hands. so we denied our best friends the right to enrich uranium and we're getting ready to give it to our worst enemy. this deal will in effect end the nuclear nonproliferation
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treaty for the world because we can never deny anybody the right to enrich uranium in the future. with that i urge the rejection of this deal, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. . mr. conyers: i'm pleased to recognize the gentleman from washington, mr. mcdermott, for two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized for two minutes. -- mcdermott: mr. speaker the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized for three minutes. mr. mcdermott: mr. speaker, by now i should be used to the wild and spurious charges my republican colleagues will level at the administration when they know they are about to lose a big battle. this is an extremely well conceived arms agreement that does exactly what needs to be done when it comes to preventing iran from getting a nuclear weapon.
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if it's enforced. that is not -- there is not an argument or an objection against it that has not been debunked by actual regional and nuclear experts, on both sides of the aisle. not yet a single republican in the entire united states congress is willing to consider the deal's exceptional merits. not a single one. now, that's politics. that's not policy. instead we spent two days watching the republicans trip over themselves on how best to unanimously disapprove of this deal. if we disapprove, where does it lead? you heard either to war or -- let's go get another deal. that's not going to happen. everyone told us that's not going to happen. it's the same neocons that led us into 15 years of war in the middle east now want us to leave
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the thing open with iran. don't settle it. we have seen secondary -- secretary kerry and secretary moniz go toe to toe with the iranians for months during the through the night meetings and countless strained arguments, our diplomats ultimately delivered the most far-reaching, far-reaching nuclear agreement in history. there's nothing that compares with what we have here. that's real leadership. of course we have seen this shameful campaigns of misinformation and vitriol before. obamacare, if you were to play the obamacare arguments, they are the same ones you are hearing today. fear, fear, folks. you're going to lose your doctor. lose everything. and yet we now have it in place and 20 million people have more health care. now, we are seeing it again. a republican, teddy roosevelt,
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said it best. credit goes to the man who is actually in the arena whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood and who survives valiantly who at best knows in the end triumph of high achievement and at the worst if he fails at least fails while daring greatly so his place shall not be with these cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat. the president has gone out of the line. he's listened to this stuff for two years and came back with an agreement which is -- you got experts in israel. you got experts around the world saying that this is a good deal. now, imagine we were making this agreement 70 years ago with the japanese. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. mcdermott: we would have the same argument. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. mcdermott: vote against this bill.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. yielding myself such time as i might -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. royce: i yield myself two minutes. i want to underscore the point the gentleman from illinois made a few minutes ago. this deal effectively shreds the bipartisan nonproliferation treaty. . bipartisan accomplishment an accomplishment that has served to curtail proliferation for 50 years now. as a consequence of this action, for the first time, we are going to make an exception for iran, an exception that everyone else is going to demand. and we are going to see an arms race if this deal goes through.
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not just in the middle east but threaten s going to the wider world as well. i yield one minute to the gentleman from missouri -- the gentlelady from missouri, mrs. hartzler. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from missouri is recognized for one minute. mrs. hartzler: i rise today to voice my strong opposition to the president's nuclear agreement with iran. it is not good for america or her allies. the administration would have us believe that the only alternative to this deal is war. those of us saying this is a bad deal are not advocating for war. we are advocating for a better deal. one that effectively prevents iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon now, 15 years from nourks and into the future. instead of preventing a nuclear weapon capable iran, this deal allows iran to keep its nuclear infrastructure, gives iran
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billions of dollars in sanctions relief to promote terrorism and throughout the region, does not allow for any time, anywhere inspections, lifts the arms embargo, allows iran to aguirre intercontinental ballistic missiles, and does nothing, nothing to free the four american hostages being held by iran. quite simply, this is a bad deal that aims to solidify a legacy rather than prevent a nuclear weapon capable state sponsor of terrorism. i urge my colleagues to reject this deal. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, i'm pleased now to recognize the gentleman from minnesota, mr. nolan, two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from minnesota is recognized for two minutes. mr. nolan: thank you, mr. speaker. thank you members of the house. first of all i want to compliment all my colleagues for all the time that everyone has spent going through the classified, the documents,
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listening to the hearings, to the ambassadors from all the other nations, listening to people on every side of this issue. the decision we have to make right here now today is what does this decision ultimately -- what are the consequences ultimately of this decision? and the fact is we have learned that iran is only several weeks away from the possibility of developing a nuclear weapon. those are the hard cold facts we have been told. they haven't because of the sanctions and the restriction that is are in place. they have enough fissile material to make eight to 10, maybe as many as 12 nuclear weapons. so what does this deal do? it makes them give up 98% of that fissile material. they won't have enough to build one bomb if this agreement is fully implemented. it makes them get rid of 2/3 of the centrifuges. they will not be able to develop one bomb if this deal is implemented. if this deal is implemented, we retain the support of the international community, all of
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whom are committed to seeing to it that iran does not have a nuclear weapon. and for those who prefer a military option, it is not taken off the table. we need to remind ourselves that until all of these conditions are met, none of the sanctions are lifted. and they can be snapped back in a minute. we've got 24 hours, seven day a week, camera inspection. we have unprecedented inspection. if they violate this agreement, we'll know about it. we can snap back the sanctions, and for those who want a military option, that is still on the table. this agreement gives peace a chance. this agreement gives diplomacy a chance. it's something that we can ill afford. the opposite may very well be, may very well be something that forces us into another war in the middle east costing us trillions in treasuries. costing us blood and creating
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the prospects of a conflageration that is unimaginable and unacceptable. we must give diplomacy a chance. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i yield one minute to the gentleman from arkansas, mr. steve womack. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from arkansas is recognized for one minute. mr. womack: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the chairman for his leadership. on this issue. mr. speaker, over the last few days our nation has heard from its elected representatives on the joint comprehensive plan of action, affectionately known as the iran nuclear deal. i stand here today to add my name to the list of members who recognize what a terrible deal this is and the grave danger a yes vote creates for humanity. it's been said by most that this will be one of the most important votes a member will cast in his or her term in congress. i agree. it's been said by many it paves the way for a nuclear armed iran. i agree. it's been said by many that lifting of sanctions will
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further destabilize an already troubled region. i agree. and it's indisputable, mr. speaker, as most have admitted, that iran is the largest state sponsor of terror. i could go on and on. self-inspections, biffles, retention of centrifuges, side deals. mr. speaker, this is not just a bad deal. it's unconscionable that we would consider anything that leaves a path for iran to possess a weapon as this agreement does. a yes vote, mr. speaker, will be on the wrong side of history. i urge my colleagues to stand with the american people. defeat the resolution. and stop -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. r. conyers: mr. speaker, i recognize -- yield two minutes to mr. pascrell of new jersey. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey is recognized for two minutes. mr. speaker, with
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all the rhetoric invoked around this agreement, i am reminded of what president ronald reagan since his name was used just a few moments ago by the leader, when he told soviet leader gorbachev in november of 1985 when they discussed the nuclear arms reduction. go back to history. and not have selective history. president reagan said this, i bet the hardliners in both of our countries, as he spoke to mckale, are leading when we shake hands. if that doesn't resonate, what will? and when the united states ruck an agreement with the
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soviet union, two years later to reduce the size of our nation's nuclear arsenals, president reagan received much criticism, including as conservative columnist george will put it, for accelerating -- listen to this. the moral disarmament of the west by elevating wishful thinking to the status of political philosophy, unquote. almost 30 years later we see president reagan's actions were not a capitulation to an entrenched enemy, but instead of underpinnings of a larger strategy that reduced the nuclear threat. look, this agreement should not be judged on its ability to curb iran's hateful rhetoric or role in destabilizing the middle east because that was never the goal of the agreement.
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no agreement can be perfect. but i am not convinced that a, quote-unquote, better deal which exists only in the abstract at this point, will materialize if congress were to reject the one before us. rejecting this agreement, mr. speaker, would require the world's largest economies who are party to this multilateral agreement to follow our lead and reimpose sanctions. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. pascrell: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i yield one minute to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. ryan costello. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized for one minute. mr. costello: mr. speaker, this is a bad deal. even many of those who have found a way to justify voting for this deal can see it's a bad deal. this deal enables iran more money to fund terror, accumulate more power, and it will lead to a nuclear arms race in the middle east and those points around disputable. this deal authorizes iran so
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much control over the inspection process that it is not possible to say that this deal provides the level of verification that even the administration demanded up until a few months ago. why do i say that? because we can't even see what the inspection procedures are. other than that iran gets to inspect itself. there's not accountability to iran in this deal. mr. speaker, i am perplexed how one can vote for this deal without knowing what the actual inspection and verification procedures are. we are sacrificing our strength and leverage to the unknown. what is known is that the statements coming out of tehran over the past week reinforce they cannot be trusted, that they will play games, and this their motives are evil and that their terror -- terrorist activities will continue. vote no to this deal. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. i yield one minute to
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the gentleman from michigan, representative tim walberg. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan is recognized for one minute. mr. walberg: mr. speaker, i thank the chairman and the ranking member in a bipartisan way for doing the work necessary to inform the american people as well as our body of the concerns here today. so i rise today in strong and bipartisan opposition to the president's dangerous deal with iran. . this gives iran ultimately everything they can, paving a way to build a nuclear build and destabilize the middle east. it gives them billions in sanctions relief that will be used to finance terrorism. it gives iran 24 tace to cover its tracks before inspectors are allowed in. it even includes secret side deals that president, congress and the american people have not seen. meanwhile, four americans tragically languish in iranian prisons, including one michiganian. mr. speaker, in moments like
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this, party politics must take a backseat to the safety of the american people. i urge my colleagues to stand with our ally, israel, stand for security, stand for peace, stand for america. don't reward iran for spreading terrorism, abusing human rights and holding americans hostage. we ject this deal and let's de-- reject this deal and let's demand the right one. i yield become. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: we reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i yield one minute to the gentleman from indiana, mr. todd rokita. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from indiana is recognized for one minute. mr. rokita: i thank the chairman. mr. speaker, constituent, deborah, visited me the other day and owns a restaurant in indiana and she was perplexed about this agreement. one of the things she mentioned, in her restaurant, osha, the e.p.a. and anyone else from the federal government can come and inspect
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her at any time with no notice. such is the case with this upside down administration. our own americans can be inspected at any time, yet, when it comes to the world's biggest sponsor of terrorism, we can't inspect them at all. we have to go through a third party and wait at least 24 days. common sense turned upside down. except in this case, mr. speaker, it's with grave danger to americans and grave danger to our friend, israel. now, the president says it's either this deal or war, and in fact there is no other deal, and i think that's false. in fact, i believe this deal in all likelihood bring war. and why do i think that? we're putting $150 billion back in the hands of iranians, and i want to know who here thinks they're going to build holts, who they'll use that $150 billion to help -- hospitals,
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who will use that $150 billion to help iranians? please reject this deal. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: we reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from california. mr. royce: i yield one minute to the gentleman from maine, mr. poliquin. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maine is recognized for one minute. mr. poliquin: thank you, mr. speaker. the iranian government has american blood on its hands. it vows to kill as many more u.s. citizens as it can. it's committed to destroying israel and it funds, trains and arms terrorists throughout the middle east. this nuclear deal with iran does not dismantle their program. it rewards iran with $100 billion in cash in frozen assets, and there are no anytime anywhere inspections. in five years, iran can develop or buy conventional weapons, and in eight years it can buy
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or develop an intercontinental ballistic missile. now, some members here in the house and in the senate hope hat these radical mullahs will abandon their request to become a military power. i submit to you, mr. chairman, mr. speaker, that hope is not a national security strategy, especially against those who wish to kill us. mr. chairman, the best way to protect our homeland and to keep us safe is to reject this deal. i encourage everybody. thank you, mr. chair. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, we're prepared to close on this side. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: and i'll reserve the right to close then. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: mr. speaker and my
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colleagues, just over half century ago john f. kennedy in an era of difficult engagements with the soviets said, let us never negotiate out of fear but et us never fear to negotiate. president obama's diplomacy with iran is grounded in strength and realism, but it's animated by something all too rare in foreign relations, hope. this is a strong deal that represents our best hope for less -- lasting security and peace. as a veteran, i stand with our president and support this deal. thank you. i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i yield myself the remainder of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. royce: thank you, mr. speaker. president reagan walked away from a bad deal in iceland. he walked away and then he applied pressure and as the consequence of that pressure he then got a good deal. in the case of this administration, they did not walk away from a bad deal during the interim agreement. as a matter of fact, this administration rejected the stronger pressure that this house passed with a vote of 400-20 and held that back up -- that bill up in the senate during its negotiations in the prior congress and did not give us the leverage we needed for a good deal but that is still available to us. and frankly we all have experience with north korea. we remember what happened, but iran won't have to cheat like north korea did to get close to
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a bomb. and that's because the essential restrictions on iran's key bomb making technology expire. they sunset in 10 to 15 years. and after these restrictions expire, iran will be left with an internationally recognized industrial scale nuclear program and that is what the president concedes. as the president said of his own agreement in year 13, 14, 15, iran's breakout times would have shrunk almost down to zero. a former state department official testified to the foreign affairs committee that this sunset clause is a disaster. it will ep able the leading state -- enable the leading state sponsor of terrorism to produce enough material for dozens of nuclear weapons, all under the terms of the agreement. as another expert witness pointed out, the bet that the administration is taking is that in 10 tore 15 years we
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will have a kinder, gentler iran, but we're not going to have a kinder, gentler iran because we are releasing to an $100 billion in immediate sanctions relief. that's the down payment. s iran is guaranteed in this a reconnection to the global economy. now, the point i want to make to the members here, that does not go to the average iranian. it is the quds forces. it is the irgc. it is the clerics that took over the major corporations in iran, and they are the ones that are going to receive that $100 billion, and we already know the impact of that. it is going to solidify the supreme leader's grip on power. that's why he did the deal, to keep his revolution intact. we had the bottom falling out of the price of oil.
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we had hyperinflation in iran. we had -- we were in the position had we exerted the additional pressure to force a real choice between economic collapse and actual compromise on this program rather than what we got. but by removing economic sanctions, the president is withdrawing one of our most successful peaceful tools in confronting the regime and as a result 200 retired generals and admirals concluded this agreement will enable iran to become far more dangerous. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin, mr. ryan, is recognized. mr. ryan: mr. speaker, i will
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yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. ryan: mr. speaker, i think this is a terrible deal. this administration has made a lot of mistakes when it comes to foreign policy. this has got to be the worst one because this deal will not stop iran from getting a bomb. this deal will all but guarantee it. we went into these negotiations saying that iran had to eliminate its nuclear program, all of it, full stop. now they're saying that was unrealistic. too unreasonable. too high in the sky. and we're handing over hundreds of billions of dollars in sanctions relief. so iran gets billions of dollars in exchange for what, for taking up some, not all, just some of its nuclear
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program? and then in 10 or 15 years, all of these limits expire. in other words, they're getting something for essentially nothing. it's a steal, and that's if they don't cheat. now, the administration says that this deal will bring about unprecedented transparency. we'll get regular access, they say. we'll see what iran's up to, they say. but if the inspectors think something's up, iran has 24 days to cover its tracks, and in some cases iran's own inspectors will get to collect the evidence. finally, against all of the advice from our military, we are going to let iran buy ballistic missiles in just eight years. mr. speaker, you only buy ballistic missiles if you're looking to build a bomb. i get why russia and china like this idea.
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they get another big customer. but i don't for the life of me understand why we would ever agree to this. mr. speaker, the president -- the president's taking a huge gamble here. he thinks if we make nice with the iranian regime they'll change their ways, bring them into the global economy and they'll become more like us. now, i think the iranian people, they want democracy. they want freedom. but we are not talking about the iranian people here. we are talking about an extremist regime that is unaccountable to their own people. this is a regime that chants "death to america." this is a regime that funds terrorism all around the world. has is a regime that called for wiping israel off the map. i'm all for diplomacy, but i am not for rewarding a rogue
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regime. i'd also point out that the sanctions we are lifting will let european and asian companies build up iran's economy and they will make the regime even stronger. and should iran start to cheat, which they have a pretty darn good track record of doing so, it will be that much harder to put back in place the sanctions. our trading partners, they'll feel the pinch and they won't want to hold this regime accountable. so i want to stress how firmly i oppose this deal. i know the president may have already lined up enough support to save his deal, but with this vote, with this vote we need to send a message to both iran and to the world the regime, the regime may have bamboozled this administration, but the american people know this is a rotten deal, and i fear that because of this deal the middle
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east and the world at large will only become a much, much more dangerous place. with that, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. levin: before i yield myself such time as i shall consume, i'd like to yield 30 seconds to the ranking member of the budget committee, mr. van hollen. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maryland is recognized for 30 second. mr. van hollen: thank you, mr. speaker. and i thank my friend, mr. levin. this agreement represents the best path to achieving our goal of preventing iran from ever obtaining a nuclear weapon, and it advances the national security interests of the united states and our allies, including israel. i ask that the remainder of my remarks be placed in the record. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. levin: thank you, mr. speaker. for far too long we faced the nightmare of iran with nuclear bombs. impacted by heavy sanctions,
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iran finally agreed to negotiate, led by the united states and five other nations. after agreeing on a framework, which iran complied with, the parties completed the much-detailed joint comprehensive plan of action. when i issued my statement of support for jcpoa six weeks ago, its fate was uncertain. what decisively turned the tide was the impassioned leadership of the president with secretaries kerry and moniz, combined with a momentus outpouring of support outside the political realm from a vast array of scientific experts, experienced diplomats, key figures from all religious faiths, a wide variety of
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military leaders and informed expressions from major former governmental figures of the highest integrity, including colin powell. . it also became increasingly clear that there was no other workable alternative. this point was reinforced by the joint statement yesterday from prime minister -- british prime minister cameron, french president holland, and chairman chancellor merkel. they said among other points, and i quote, this is not an agreement based on trust or any assumption about how iran may look in 10 or 15 years. it's based on detailed tightly written controls that are
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verifiable and long lasting. iran will have strong incentives not to cheat. the near certainty of getting caught and the consequences that would follow would make this a losing proposition. it is now absolutely clear that the jcpoa will go into effect. requiring the initial set of detailed obligations that iran must fulfill. .t is therefore time to go on this institution, which has been a major center of attacks on the jcpoa, would hopefully have those who opposed now join with those who support the agreement and work together to rekindle the kind of overall bipartisanship that senator van denburg of michigan urged should
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apply to key foreign policy issues as they approached the water's edge. surely this kind of rekindled bipartisanship needs to be undertaken in particular to take steps to deepen support for israel's security. to fight and defeat terrorism. and to rekindle efforts for viable peace negotiations. i urge my colleagues to vote yes on h.r. 3461, which is a vote of approval for the comprehensive agreement that would prevent iran from getting a nuclear weapon. i urge my colleagues to vote no on h.r. 3460, which would suspend the president's authority to waive sanctions and in effect prevent him from implementing the comprehensive agreement. i close, it is indeed time to
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move on and to take next steps. tolure to do so with instead perpetuate partisanship will, i strongly believe, be counterproductive for any who try it and for our entire nation. we can and we must do much better. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from california is ecognized. mr. ryan: you mean wisconsin? the speaker pro tempore: wisconsin. mr. ryan: please, please, don't say california. mr. speaker, at this time i'd like to yield 1 1/2 minutes to a member of the ways and means committee, the distinguished lady from kansas, ms. jenkins. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from kansas is recognized for a minute and a half. ms. jenkins: i thank the gentleman for yielding. sanctions are about more than nuclear weapons.
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they are about the principles and values america holds dear. iran continues to hold american prisoners hostage. sponsors terrorism around the world. and american soldiers have died because of the terrorist actions of iran. iran st this week the supreme leader said, israel will be destroyed within 25 years. now, every lawmaker must ask, are we willing to put $150 billion into the hands of an iranian regime who chants death to america and wants to eliminate israel from the earth? we must ask, are we willing to risk american lives on the promises of a leader who believes those same american lives are worth nothing? i refuse to sit idly by while this administration leaves the safety, stability, and security
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of everyone, everywhere at the whim of iran whose neighbors fear them and allies consist of the assad regime and hezbollah. this agreement with iran would threaten all that we hold dear. i encourage my colleagues to join the bipartisan opposition against the iran deal and instead support the security of america above the dangerous desires of iran. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back of the the gentleman from wisconsin reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. levin: it's now my pleasure to yield four minutes to mr. rangel, to put it mildly, a senior member of our committee. mr. rangel: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman from new york is recognized for four minutes. mr. rangel: my fellow members, this is an historic occasion for the house and very emotional
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time for me because unfortunately i have known -- i have known the horrors of war and i speak for all of those that had this horrendous experience to say that we should always give diplomacy a chance before we put any american in harm's way. i don't think any of us with any degree of certainty have any idea whether this agreement is going to hold. or we can contain the criminal and human ambitions of the leadership in iran. what we do know is that the international powers p, not just f china, not just of russia -- powers, not just of china, not just of russia, but the united
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kingdom, france, germany, and thinking the united states of america truly believe that this is the best possible way to avoid war. it would seem to me that now is in the time for us to engage exchanges that separate and bring us apart as a nation. the rules of the house and the senate make it abundantly clear that whether you like it or not this is going to become the policy of the united states of america. this will not be the policy of president obama, of democrats or republicans, but the policy of our great nation. it pains me as i'm about to leave service in this august
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body that we have people in this hamber that have such hatred and disdain for the leadership of this country that they would put this feeling above what is the best policy for the security of this great beloved nation of mine. i know that if the president of the united states was able to walk on water, there would be people in this chamber that would say, see, we told you that he couldn't swim. -- i what i am saying if don't think i can do that because you said that china and russia supporting this because they want to sell arms to iran.
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nd i think that was despicable because that includes united kingdom, that includes france, that includes germany, that includes people that are talking about this is the best way that we are able to do this. so what i am saying is this. 14 years ago a terrible thing happened to my country, to my ity, when terrorists struck on 9/11, and now we have the opportunity to bring our country together the way we did then. 14 years ago there were no republicans, there were no democrats, there were americans that would say we have to come together. we are not going to change this agreement. this is the policy of the united states of america or soon will be. should we not be saying, what is
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the enforcement, what are we going to do, what happens if they violate it? are we here to embarrass presidents, republicans or democrats, or are we here to preserve -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman is recognized for 30 seconds. mr. rangel: thank you, mr. chairman. or are we here to preserve the dignity and the integrity of the united states of america no matter who is the president? if ever there was a time for us to come together and support the policy, the time is now. thank you so much for giving me this opportunity. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan reserves. mr. ryan: i give myself 15 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from wisconsin is recognized. mr. ryan: mr. speaker, the oldest trick in the book, if you cannot win a debate on the merits is to impugn the other person's motives. people who are opposing this agreement, whether they be republicans or many of the
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democrats who are opposing this agreement are opposing this agreement because it's a terrible agreement and there is no other reason. with that i yield 1 1/2 minutes to the gentlelady from tennessee, a member of the ways and means committee, mrs. black. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will remind all persons in the gallery that they are here as guests of the house and that any manifestation of approval or disapproval of proceedings is a violation of the house rules. the gentlelady is recognized. mrs. black: thank you, mr. speaker. this nuclear deal isn't much of a deal at all. it's a gift to the iranian regime. we're sorry we gave them permanent sanction relief to the tune of $150 billion in exchange for temporary enrichment restrictions. mr. speaker, the ayatollah calls the united states a great satan. just this week he said that israel will not exist in 25 years. imagine that evil that this regime can carry out when they cash in their billions. under this agreement iran will
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undoubtedly become the central bank of fear. what's more, with this deal we shrunked off the opportunity for time anywhere inspections. instead we gave iran and opportunity in many ways for investigations of their nuclear sites and conceal the signs of compliance. even worse, under the secret side deals, that was not transmitted here to congress, we learned that iran will be allowed to self-inspect a key military base. so to be clear, members of this body who vote for this agreement will be voting for a deal that they have not seen in full. mr. speaker, i'm not prepared to tell tennesseans that i represent that the world's leading state sponsor of terrorism without knowing every last deal. we cannot and should not leave anything to chance when it comes to the security of the america and our allies. i will be casting my vote on behalf of the tennessee's sixth district against this dangerous
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deal. i urge my colleagues to do the same. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. levin: i now yield 2 1/2 minutes to another so valuable member of our committee, mr. lewis from georgia. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized for two minutes. mr. lewis: i thank my friend, the ranking member, for yielding. mr. speaker, i rise in support of diplomacy, a pathway to peace. for many months i thought long and hard about this decision. attended briefings, red documents, and met with citizens of my district. i even had a long executive session with my staff. i reflected on the words that dr. martin luther king jr. to call upon us to rededicate ourselves to the long and bitter but beautiful struggle for the world. the way of peace is one of those principles as thought and
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reflection, i believe that this is a good deal. no, it may not be perfect, but do not let the perfect be the enemy of the good. i remember standing on this very floor seven years ago and speaking against a war in iraq. i said again and i will say gain today, war is bloody. it destroyed the hopes, aspirations, and the dreams of a people. the american people and the people around the world are sick and tired of war and violence. we do not need more bombs, missiles and guns. when you turn on the news, when you read the newspaper you see a mass dislocation. too many people suffering and many are desperate for a chance at peace.
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i believe in my heart of hearts that this may be the most important vote that we cast during our time in congress. to put it simple, it is nonviolence or nonexistent. it is my hope that my vote today, along with the votes of others will be a down payment for peace toward a world community with itself. maybe with this deal, we will send a message that we can lay down the burden and tools of war. maybe we can come together as a family of human beings. mr. speaker, we have a moral obligation, a mission and a a chance. give peace thank you. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: at this time, mr. speaker, i'd like to yield one minute to the distinguished gentleman from ohio, the speaker of the house. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio, the
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speaker of the house, is recognized for one minute. the speaker: let me thank my colleague for yielding. my colleagues, later today we'll cast two votes and these votes will be amongst the most consequential votes that we'll cast some of us in our careers. our founding fathers charged both the president and the congress with providing for the common defense for good reason. it's the core responsibility of our federal government. it's the key to our freedom and for all of our opportunities. and that's why at the front of the oath every member takes it states, i do solemnly swear that i will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic. so as we consider this nuclear agreement with iran, it's our duty to determine whether it will keep america safe. sadly, this deal is far worse than anything i could have
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imagined. why? because the president and his negotiators broke every one of their promises. does this deal dismantle iran's nuclear program or shut off their path to a nuclear weapon as they promised it would? no. instead, it allows iran to keep thousands of nuclear centrifuges spinning as they are today. and within 10 years in the best case, it allows iran to achieve a nuclear status. was this agreement full-on verification? no. it appears the side deal will trust iran to self-inspect a key site where the regime conducted tests on nuclear detonators. of course, we have not seen that side deal and we don't know if there are other secret components. does this agreement allow
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inspectors to have anywhere 24/7 access as they promised it would? no. inspectors would have to wait up to 24 days of access to suspicious sites. will sanctions snap back? no. the administration admits that nothing at the u.n. happens in a snap. does it shut down iran's ballistic missile program as they promised it would? no. actually the agreement lifts the arms and missile embargos n five and eight years respectively. and they are allowed to build icbm's capable of delivering a warhead right here in the nited states of america. does it help the leading
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sponsor of terror? yes. it gives them billions to support terror around that part of the year and it gives amnesty to the shadow commander responsible for the deaths of hundreds of american troops in raq. and this is all without iran cheating. the ayatollah won't even have to cheat to be just steps away from a nuclear weapon. so today we are going to cast two votes and these votes are aimed at stopping president obama from unilaterally lifting sanctions on iran and ensuring ccountability. my colleagues in pursuing this deal with iran, president obama refused to listen. he ignored the concerns of the american people, national security experts and a bipartisan majority here in the congress. and now he's trying to enforce this deal over our objections.
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never in our history have something with so many consequences for our national security been rammed through with such little support. today is september 11. today for all americans to come together and for us to keep the oath we swore to our constitution. so our fight to stop this bad deal frankly is just beginning. we will not let the american people down. yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan. mr. levin: it's now my pleasure to yield one minute to our leader who indeed, as she goes leader , has been our on this effort, the gentlelady from california. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from california is recognized for one minute. ms. pelosi: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the gentleman for yielding and i thank him for his leadership, for the courage
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it took for him and the humility to listen and to learn what was in this legislation and this agreement and that is something that i commend the members of the house for doing, to listen and to learn. our distinguished speaker just referenced the oath of office that we take when we become members of congress, and it is a vow that we make to the american people, to protect and support our constitution and our responsibility to protect and defend the american people. today, mr. speaker, we will vote on an agreement to make america safer. indeed, to make the world a safer place. so say the nuclear scientists and the diplomats. so say the military and security leaders of both parties or of no party. so does the faith community
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beseach us to do. this morning father conroy offered a prayer to god to, quote, help the members of this house to recognize that you are with us in our deliberations. indeed, as we cast our votes on this historic agreement, we were thankful to god that god was with us to, again, give us the humility to learn and the courage to act. and for that we should all be grateful. it's important to note that support for this agreement, as i have said, comes from both sides of the aisle, hundreds -- more than 100 former diplomats, democrats and republicans, ambassadors, etc., wrote, in our judgment the agreement deserves congressional support and the opportunity to show it will work. we firmly believe that the most effective way, mr. speaker, to
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protect u.s. national security and that of our allies and friends is to ensure that the tough-minded diplomacy has a chance to succeed before considering the more costly risks and alternatives. 36 generals and admirals wrote, there is no better option to prevent an iranian nuclear weapon. if the iranians cheat, as the speaker suggested they might, if the iranians cheat, our advanced technology, intelligence and inspections will reveal it. and the u.s. military options remain on the table. and if the deal is rejected by america, the iranians could not -- could have a nuclear weapon within a year. the choice is stark. what is mysterious to me, when our colleagues come to the floor under this agreement iran can be a nuclear power in 10
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tore 15 years, so we should reject this agreement. no. without the agreement, they are a threshold nuclear power right now and could have a weapon within months or a year. seems to me the choice is clear as the generals and admirals pointed out. it's also interesting to note that our distinguished speaker pointed out that some shortcomings in his view in the agreement. ell, that is disagreed by -- by the best nuclear physicists who wrote to congratulate the president on the agreement. as they wrote, we consider -- now, these are noble laureates, these are engineers, nuclear physicists who work and specialize in nuclear weapons, research and development. they said, we consider the joint comprehensive plan of
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action of the united states and its partners negotiated with iran will advance the cause of peace and security in the middle east and can serve -- this is really important -- this can serve as a guidepost for future nonproliferation agreements. they went on to say, this is an innovative agreement with much more stringent constraints than any previously negotiated nonproliferation framework. that's why they were congratulating the president of the united states. i mentioned the prayer of father conroy this morning. i also this morning saw in "the washington post" that the prime minister of the u.k., david cameron, the french president, holla information de, and german chanceler angela merkel
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said, this is an important moment, these heads of states said, it's a crucial opportunity at a time of heightened global uncertainty to show what diplomacy can achieve. these heads of state went on to say, this is not an agreement based on trust or any assumption of how iran may look in so or 15 years. it's based on detailed, tightly written controls that are verifiable and long lasting. we condemn, they said, in no uncertain terms that iran does not recognize the existence of the state of israel and the unacceptable language that iran's leaders use about israel. israel's security matters are and will remain our key interests too. prime minister cameron, president hollande and chanceler merkel then said, we will not have reached the nuclear deal with iran if we did not think that it removed a threat to the region and the nonproliferation regime as a
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whole. we are confident that the agreement provides the foundation for resolving the conflict on iran's nuclear program permanently. that is why we now want to embark on the full implementation of the joint comprehensive plan of action. today, i urge my colleagues to vote in support of the agreement that enhances our vigilance and strengthens our security. i just always am fond of quoting sol men in the bible. -- solomon in the bible. he was uncertain as to his ability to be king in terms of his wisdom and the rest. and he prayed to god and prayed that god would give him the wisdom because david was such a great king and how could he -- said to god, going to be the king of your people. help me with knowledge.
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wisdom. with wisdom. christ -- excuse me -- god came to him in the night and said, solomon, because you did not ask for longevity, because you did not ask for great riches, because you did not ask for vengeance upon your enemies, i will give you more wisdom than anyone has ever had and you will be renowned for wisdom. the solomon of wisdom which sprang from humility. e humility to pray for enlightenment, for knowledge, for wisdom, for judgment. and that humility is so essential in the job that we do here, that we don't have foregone conclusions. that's why i'm so proud of my members who spent so much time tudying this issue, not only reading the agreement and the classified sections and the rest but seeking answers,
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having information, seeking validation from generals and admirals and scientists and leaders of other countries as to what their actions would be should we unfortunately reject this, which happily we will not do today. they had the humility to open their minds to learn, and when they learned they had the where to take an action some other of their friends may not have arrived at because they didn't have the benefit of all of this information. we know one thing, that we have to come together in the end, to protect our country and stopping the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. . i say that i've had decades of experience track iran and its nuclear ambitions, longer than
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anyone, more than two times longer than anyone on the intelligence committee, so i know of what i speak and i went to the intelligence committee to stop the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. that gave me some judgment as to what the president brought back in this agreement. and still, i want to subject it to the harshest scrutiny as from my experience, if i thought that this was the best possible deal we could achieve. we mustn't judge achievements. -- we mustn't judge agreements by with they don't do but what they do do. this makes our country safer and our friends in the region safer as their own national security experts have attested. i thank my colleagues, i thank you for listening, for learning, for coming to whatever
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conclusion you came to but understanding at the end of the day we have a respect for each other's opinion and a regard for our responsibilities to our people, to people in the region, our friends in israel and also a tpwhrobal responsibility. bop i could join the nuclear physicists in congratulating president barack obama for his great leadership in giving us his opportunity. today we will not just be making history, we will be making progress for the cause of peace in the world. with that, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the entleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: i yield three minutes to the gentleman, mr. roskam. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes mr. roskam: thank you, mr.
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speaker, and thank you, chairman ryan. the leader first said we prayed for wisdom and so he he -- and so the question is she called us to act humbly, the question is, are we willing to submit ourselves to the collective wisdom of a majority of this body and a majority of the other body? i would suggest a majority of this body and a majority of the other body think this is a bad idea. she also admonished us that we should listen and learn. that's not a bad idea. so let's listen to what's in the bill itself. the bill itself gives $150 billion in sanctions relief to the iranian government. then the question is what do we expect with $150 billion is it all going to go to pave roads? is it going to build schools in tehran? is it going to fix water systems? i don't think so. and neither does president obama. listen to his own words. let's stipulate, this is barack
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obama, let's stipulate that some of the money will flow to activities we object to. we have no illusions about the iranian government or the significance of the revolutionary guard. listen to the national security advisor, susan rice, when she says we should expect that some portion of that money would go to the iranian mill tear and could potentially be used for all kinds of bad behavior we have seen in the region up until now. so let's listen to those words. they're clear. they're obvious. they're now -- so now think in term o-- in terms of percentages. is it going to be half? is it going to be a quarter? is it going to be 10%? is it going to be 1%? 1% of that money, $1.5 billion, doing what? fund hag mas. funding hezbollah. killing americans. let's listen and let's learn. now my friend from new york said this is definitely the
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policy of the united states. definitely. it's a fait accompli. there's no reason to have this discussion. it's all over in his world view. i don't buy it. i don't buy that for a second. i'm not going to lay down here and let the president of the united states run roughshod in this probably, let's think about it. is this just a bad idea, or is this the worst bill ever? the worst idea ever? and i think it wins the worst idea ever award. it was a week ago when it was crazy talk at the idea that the president of the united states had standing, i will not yield, that the president of the united states has standing or that -- it was crazy talk a week ago at the house of representatives had standing in the courts and now you know what the courts have said? the house has standing. so the notion that this is all done and that this is just a settled case, it's not.
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so i think we've got to be very, very clear about what's going on. and we need to listen and we need to learn, and we need to vote no. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan. mr. levin: i yield 2 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for 2 1/2 minutes. mr. blumenauer: our speaker stood before us a few minutes ago and sounded a somber, serious note. i'm sorry the process we're going through does not reflect that somber, serious attitude. it's sad that it's come to this. a parody of what could have been a week-long, thoughtful, thorough debate about our relationship with iran which republicans instead have turned into an incoherent partisan shouting match. it ignores the realities, the complexity, and the opportunity. there's been no discussion, for example, about how the america
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-- about how america seriously mismanaged our relationship with iran since we helped the british overthrow their popularly elected government in 1953 and install the shah. how we backed the murderous saddam hussein against iran which cost million os lives weak rooked the other way when he used poison gas, a real weapons of mass destruction. how we labeled them the axis of evil when they were working with us in a post-taliban afghanistan. it's amazing that the majority of iranians still like us. now, i strongly oppose the current iranian leadership. but for years, i've been working for diplomatic solutions with other countries because sanctions only work when other countries join us. well, they did. and we have an opportunity
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today to enforce a nonnuclear future for iran. the republican talking point is somehow they're going to get $150 billion. that talking point ignores the reality. those five powerful countries that joined with us to help get the agreement, they're going to walk away if america walks away. then, multilateral sanctions will dissolve and iran will get its money anyway and nuclear weapons if it wants in a year or two. and it will be the united states and israel that will be isolated and the world will be less safe. these are some of the reasons that the major independent experts have said this agreement is the best alternative for the united states. not a perfect agreement. but the best agreement. let's use all of our time and energy to make this agreement
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work, strengthen relationships in the middle east to avoid more mistakes by the same people who gave you the disastrous iraq war. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expire thsmed egentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: i yield three minutes to a distinguished member of the ways and means committee, mr. kelly of pennsylvania. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognize for three minutes. mr. kelly: i thank think chairman. -- i thank the chairman. this is a horrible deal. you never get what you deserve in a deal, you get what you negotiate. let me give you a contract between what two presidents say when they talk about deals. president obama said it's either this agreement or war. president reagan said there's no argument over the choice between peace and war. but there's only one guaranteed way you can have peace and you can have it in a second. surrender. now i want you to let your mind drift back to 14 years ago on the morning very eerily like
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today where america awoke and some americans were going off to work in the world trade center. some americans were going off to work in the pentagon. and some americans boarded flights for destinations that they thought they were going to get. to 3,000 americans said good-bye that morning to their families and their loved ones, thinking they would see them again. never knowing that they would never be able to say that again, would never be able to kiss them good-bye, would never again celebrate a birthday or any other meaningful event in their life because of an act of terrorism. flight 93, and by the way, it 37 united flight 93, with passengers and seven crew members boarded an airplane destinned for san francisco. that is not where the plane landed. that plane is embedded in a smoldering cratering in the peaceful countryside of shanksville, pennsylvania,
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because of terrorists. the members of that flight crew and those passengers performed the greatest act of religious sacrifice that you can do. they gave up their lives for the lives of their fellow americans. they walked away from a future filled with promise and decided it was more important at that moment to sacrifice themselves. how in the world can we sit in america's house and i speak to you today not as a republican but as an american. my friends, as we let our eyes fill with tears over the great loss that day, and as our ears pick up on the message from our enemies in the east, death to israel, death to the great satan, death to america, let us resound with love and strength and say listen never again, never again, never again.
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let those words echo forever and ever. not only in your ears but in your heart. do not cave in. do not sacrifice the safety, the security, and the stability of 330 million americans for the legacy of one man. that is not who we are. that is not who we've ever been. and that's not who we will ever be. my friends, and i mean sincerely my friends and my fellow americans, vote against the greatest betrayal we have ever seen in this country. this is not a deal that protects america. it is unenforceable, unverifiable. this is a horrible deal. mr. chairman, thank you so much. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan. minute n: i pause for a .
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i now yield two minutes to the gentleman from texas, mr. doggett. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. doggett: as the last speech indicates, it is hardly by chance that the house republican leadership has scheduled these votes on 9/11. votes on a proposal, an agreement, to prevent iran from developing a nuclear weapon ever. the justifiable fear of another terrorist attack and the justifiable outrage about the terrorist attack of 9/11 have been exploited before today. they were exploited to justify the disastrous invasion of iraq. while few americans today will recall that actually after 9/11, there was some early support in iran against al qaeda terrorism, few can forget
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the of the repeated and rather deceitful warning that promoted the rush to war in iraq. we don't want the smoking gun to be a mushroom cloud. nce again, the specter of this mushroom cloud is being raised with those who would interfere with an international diplomatic success. an agreement that would avoid putting us on another path to war. and the same kind of folks that urged us to rush into baghdad are the same folks that told us back before we even had this agreement that it wouldn't work and we ought to begin bombing in tehran and the surrounding area. who said it will only take a few days of bombs and it'll all be over. the same poor logic that took us into a disaster in iraq that cost so many families. the ultimate sacrifice and the
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waste of over $1 trillion. this is not a debate about the trinh towers. t is -- about the twin towers. it is a debate that would be a twin wrong if we follow the same approach we took last time. i've supported sanctions against iran. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognize for 30 seconds. mr. doggett: supported them at each opportunity. but this is not about sanctions. this is about a last ditch effort to undermine a diplomatic victory. those who reject this victory, are weak on alternatives. they talk about a secret, the biggest secret is what they would do other than bomb first and ask questions later. he director of the mossad, the israeli c.i.a. said we're putting in place a verification system which is second to none and has no precedent. ultimately, reason will prevail this week in congress the president will be sustained, and families here and in israel
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will be safer. i yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from wisconsin. i yield two minutes to the gentleman from new york, mr. reed. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized for two minutes. mr. reed: thank you, mr. chairman. thank you, chairman, for yielding. i listened to this debate. i read this agreement. and i heard my colleague from illinois say something that resonates with me. we should listen. first and foremost, we should listen to the american people. they are overwhelmingly saying this is dangerous, reject this deal. let's listen to the leaders that say this puts us in more jeopardy of going to war. we all want peace. there's not a human being in america that wants to go to war, and to classify us on this
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side of the aisle as having a esire to go to war, shame. you get peace through strenk and you need to put the -- through strength and you need to put the american citizens first. what about our four fellow american citizens that are sitting in iranian jail right now and the president said we tried to negotiate it but they wouldn't talk to us? well, then you walk away. at about the families that are represented in the $47 billion worth of judgments that have been filed against iran because they suffered terrorist acts at the hands of iran? and we're going to give $150 billion to iran without paying those fellow american citizens, those families who suffered and lost their loved ones? stupidity. american citizens always must be first. iran has made no confusion --
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raised no confusion as to what its intention is here. it wants a nuclear weapon. it wants to destroy israel. it wants to destroy america. listen to their own words, and if you do, we would say we want peace but it will be on our terms from a position of strength. vote no on this deal. nd i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from. mr. levin: i yield to another member of our committee, mr. crowley of new york. mr. crowley: i like mike, i admire him but i think he is it a disservice to the house and this debate to bring up the issue of 9/11. i do thank him for his honesty to say this is all about, having this debate today and this vote today to stir the emotions of the american people. my emotions always start on
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this day. 14 years ago i knew people who died that day. my cousin died. my friends died. i don't need to be reminded of that but it will not cloud my decisionmaking on this important issue. today i stand in support of a joint comprehensive plan of action. this has been a difficult decision for me and i know it's been for many of my colleagues as well. there are those who came out against this deal before you even read it. for those that took the time to read the agreement and came to a given conclusion, you have my deep and profound respect because we both share the same goals. but after carefully studying this agreement, i believe it is important to give diplomacy the opportunity to succeed. the agreement takes important steps to address iran's nuclear program. under this agreement, both the current unirain yum and plutonium paths to a bomb --
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uranium and plutonium paths to a bomb is put to rest and it will be centralized in a single facility that is pen trabble by u.s. -- penetrateable by u.s. airpower and it does not constrain the united states by bolstering our allies and by pushing back iran's other nefarious activities. there is more we can do and must do including strengthening israel, jordan and our other allies in the region. israel is the only country being threatened with annihilation. i know that. o it needs and deserves a quat -- quantitative and qualitative military advantage. and if this deal doesn't work or iran's leadership somehow gets the idea that they can attack us or wipe out our friends, the united states and our allies will have the capability, the will and the power to confront iran's
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nuclear program and destroy it. we have the best military in the world. we have the best intelligence service in the world. and america will always be prepared. the fact is no one here can predict whether iran will give up its program, not republicans nor democrats, and if they tonight, we have options. but we can do this and give this plan the opportunity to work, and i am prepared to do that. now, after all this discussion and talk about bipartisanship, a real profile of courage would be for one of you to support your president. one republican to stand and support your president. 13 -- i ask for an additional 30 second. levin letch i yield one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. crowley: 13 years ago i stood in the house of representatives and i gave the benefit of the doubt to the
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then president and he took us to war. i will give today the benefit of the doubt to your president to take us to peace, and with that, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman -- the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: at this time i'd like to yield a minute to the distinguished member from the ways and means committee, the gentleman from texas, mr. brady. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized -- will the entleman restate -- one minute . the gentleman is recognized. mr. brady: thank you, mr. speaker. i didn't take an oath of office to defend my president. i took an oath of office to defend my country. the world is a dangerous place and nothing makes it more dangerous than a nuclear armed iran. versus t a republican democrat issue. this is truth versus false.
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i read the agreement. i studied it. you have to ask yourself three key questions. does it stop iran's nuclear capability for the long term? no. does it stop the spread of nuclear weapons in the middle east? no. more importantly, does this make america and our allies, like israel, safer? no. even supporters believe that to be true. no. america deserves, israel deserves, our world deserves an agreement that dismantles iran's nuclear capability, not just delays it for a small while, at best. that's why i oppose this agreement. it makes our country and our allies at risk. that's why i support stopping the president, suspending the president from lifting the sanctions in this agreement. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan. mr. levin: could the speaker indicate how much time there is on both sides? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan has 8 1/2 minutes remaining. the gentleman from wisconsin has 12 3/4 minutes remaining.
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mr. levin: i'll reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: at this time, mr. speaker, i'd like to yield two minutes to the gentleman from illinois, a distinguished member of the ways and means committee, mr. dold. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois is recognized for two minutes. mr. dold: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank the chairman for yielding. and i've had an opportunity to listen to the debate and some of the things going on, yes, they're heated, but as we look at this agreement, historic agreement -- my good friend from new york just asked, will you stand with your president? i have stood with the president before, but i think it's also important that we take a look at this agreement. this is an historic mistake. this is one that will jeopardize the safety and security of the united states. and i want to echo that this is a bipartisan opposition, so this is not about left versus right. this is about right versus wrong. and ultimately when i tuck my children in bed at night, a 13-year-old and 11 yorlede and 8-year-old and i look in the
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faces of those that are here, these young americans and i wonder what type of country they will inherit with a nuclear-armed iran, for me that is unacceptable. our stated objectives, our goals were to make sure that iran never has the ability to achieve a nuclear weapon, and yet this agreement, according to bob menendez, all but preserves it. a nuclear-armed iran, one that shouts "death to america," they want to wipe israel off the face of the map, this agreement, ballistic missile embargo is lifted in eight years and arms embargo in five, my friends, what do you use a ballistic missile for? i would argue it's not to drop leaflets, it's not for humanitarian purposes, it is to rain terror down on the united states of america. and for me that is completely unacceptable. and, again, i don't care where you come from, what district you're in. this is about, will we be safer, and the answer is simply no. i believe that this agreement
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ultimately will be an arms race in the middle east. we talked about france. we talked about the u.k. we've talked about germany. has anybody asked the neighborhood, the saudi arabia, the u.a.e., egypt or israel? the answer is no because they're uniformerly against this because they know iran's ultimate goal is to not only devastate that region but to devastate the united states of america. this is one of the things that, again, must unite us. this is not about partisanship. mr. ryan: i give the gentleman another 30 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for an additional 30 seconds. mr. dold: this is not about partisanship. please hear me. we don't want to bring up 9/11 in the sense we want to do it on this day, 9/11, but i do think it smacks the idea we never want to see that dirty bomb that comes into a containership, that goes into new york or miami or washington, d.c., because you know what, no one wants to relive what happened on that day 14 years ago. and yet if we do not step up in
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a united front and stop this, my fear is that we will relive that day again. that for me is unacceptable, and i implore you all, my colleagues, my friends, to stand up against this awful, historic mistake. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan. mr. levin: i'll reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman continues to reserve his time. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: at this time i yield two minutes to the distinguished chairman of the budget committee, member of the ways and means committee, mr. price. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized for two minutes. mr. price: thank you, mr. speaker. this week iran's supreme leader ayatollah khamenei, the person who president obama and his administration said reached agreement and doubled down and declared the united states the great satan and he said, quote, after negotiations there will be nothing left of israel in 25
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years and then jihaddi more alwill not leave a moment of -- morale will not leave a moment of sirenity. this is who the president of the united states say he's blindly trusting. this is -- there are no anytime, anyplace inspections. there's no accountability for past iranian nuclear activities. conventional armament bans will be lifted. ballistic missile bans will be lifted. and to put it plainly, mr. speaker, this agreement paves a shiny yellow brick road to death and destruction around the world, not to mention an unprecedented nuclear arms race across the entire middle east. we should have made sure that not a single resource or benefit received by iran funds islamic terrorism. we should have made sure that iran publicly accept israel's right to exist. that genocide is unacceptable, that stated goals of wiping entire groups of people and
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nations off the earth is unacceptable. and at the very least, we should have made certain that four american hostages, including a christian pastor, being held in iran were released. of course not a single one of these objectives were achieved. the administration thought that compelling iran to renounce nuclear holocaust or islamic terrorism or genocide were simply far too unreasonable to request. if this deal goes through, time will surely demonstrate that it will be a shameful stain in the history of the world. now, we pray that terrible ramifications do not come to fruition. however, if past is prologue, this agreement may very well make any further action or concerns voiced by anyone too little too late. a nuclear iran spells nothing but disaster for safety at home and abroad. this agreement must be rejected. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan. mr. levin: i yield 2 1/2
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minutes now to the gentleman from illinois, a distinguished member of our committee, mr. davis. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois is recognized for 2 1/2 minutes. mr. davis: thank you, mr. speaker. and i thank the gentleman for yielding. after listening to this debate, i commend president obama and secretary kerry for their leadership in crafting the joint comprehensive plan of plus reached twheep p-5 one nations and iran. i do so because this is a plan which promotes peace and security not war or a continuous threat of war. yes, no agreement is perfect and no agreement will fully satisfy everyone but i can tell you that for me and the constituents of the seventh district of illinois, we say
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let's give peace a chance. we say, let's support the position of our president. but we also say, let's support the position of our experts. let's support the position of our allies. let's heed the words of the prophets who say come and let us reason together. we shall all be utterly -- or we shall all be utterly destroyed by the edge of the sword. so yes, we say let's support the most rational, the most logical, the most comprehensive, and the most effective path to peace that we know. and yes, it's not about supporting the position of any single individual. but it's about supporting what
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is good for america. it is about supporting what a good to help stabilize our world. so we can exist with the idea that peace is indeed possible and war is not inevitable. yes, i support the president nd i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: at this time i yield one and a half minutes to the distinguished member from nebraska, mr. smith. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one and a half minutes. mr. smith: mr. speaker, i rise today in strong opposition to lifting economic sanctions on iran. throughout august, i spoke with many nebraskans all across my district at public meetings, in addition to their frustration over the reach of the federal government, the most common concern they shared with me involved the iran deal.
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the ramifications of this agreement will impact not only our country's future but also, i believe, the stability of the world. i'm opposed to this deal and believe congress must reject it and allow u.s. negotiators to go back to the table. permanently lifting economic sanctions on iran as this deal does would allow global financial resources to flow into a country still included on our list of state sponsors of terrorism. not only does this deal end long-held sanctions, it also lifts arms embargos as we have heard. the embargo ends in five years under this agreement and the ballistic missile ban is lifted in eight years. we should be mindful of our closest ally in the region, israel, whose leaders continue to warn us of the dangers of trusting the iranian regime. the president said our options are accepting this deal or going to war. i think that rhetoric is irresponsible. economic sanctions have served as one of the most effective peaceful methods of suppressing
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the iranian regime. when our national security is on the line, reaching no deal is certainly better than advancing a bad deal. congress must stop this bad deal and pursue a stronger agreement which enforces greater measures on iran and ensures the safety of our country and our allies. thank you, mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan. mr. levin: how much time is there. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan has 6 1/2 minutes remain, the gentleman from wisconsin has 6 3/4 minutes remaining. mr. levin: i yield three minutes to the gentlelady from michigan, mrs. dingell. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for three minutes. ms. din fwell: thank you, mr. speaker. thank you, mr. levin, for yielding me the time. first, i rise with so many of my colleagues today in remembrance of one of the worst days in our nation's history. it is a solemn day of remembrance and prayer for
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those who lost their lives on that fateful day. as americans, we must be united as a nation in fighting terrorism which we know remains a threat every single day in this country. september 11 is a day burned in the hearts and souls of all americans and we must work hard together, together, to ensure that we never witness such a horrific tragedy in our homeland ever again. we all agree never again. and i say that like my colleagues from new york, mr. crowley, as a woman who lost a cousin and a -- in a terrorist act and watched a woman i love never recover from her son's death. we all care. congress and this country as a whole have a responsibility to work with nations across the
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world in pursuant -- in pursuit of peace. my district is home to one of he largest populations of arab americans in the country who, like is many of us -- who, like so many of us, came to the united states as immigrants. they are among the most patriotic americans i know. they are proud to be americans and have made numerous contributions to this great nation. and today, i ask you to also remember this. i rise in support of the joint comprehensive plan of action. like so many, it was not an easy decision and it was made with the most -- utmost respect for my colleagues and friends on both sides of the aisle. this process has shown me that no matter what decision one reaches on this issue, almost
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everyone shares the same concern. and they've been named and reviewed many times so i'm not going to go over them. but what i do want to say is, and we've said many times, it's not based on trust. it's based on verification. and that's the last point i want to address today. congressional oversight of the iran deal will not end with this vote. in fact, it will just be the beginning. this effort must be bipartisan and i hope it will be divorced from the acrimonious politic that was dominated too much of this discussion. mr. levin: i yield the gentlelady 30 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. mrs. dingell: to my colleagues
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on both sides of the aisle let's work together for peace in the middle east and across the aisle. politics and rhetoric only complicate an already difficult decision. september 11 should be a day we used to remind us of what binds us together, the values we share, the love of america that every one of us in this institution has, and let's work together to protect this nation we so dearly love. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: at this time i would like to yield 2 1/2 minutes to the distinguished member from minnesota, mr. paulsen. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognize for 2 1/2 minutes. mr. paulsen: several years ago, 400 members of congress in this body a huge bipartisan majority, voted to increase sanctions on iran because they recognized that smart, targeted sanctions would curtail the iranian economy and help unite the world against the iranian
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nuclear weapons program. desperate for sanctions relief, iran came to the negotiation table. i support diplomatic efforts, it was hopeful that the president would be able to bring back a good deal. in fact, 365 representatives, 84% of the house, sent a letter to the president saying we could accept the deal that accomplished four things. this a long-lasting deal that ensured iran had no pathway to a bomb, that it fully disclosed the military aspects of its program, that we had any time, anywhere inspections, and that we addressed iran's ballistic missile capabilities and its destabilizing role in the region. sadly none of these principles were met in this deal. the president claimed thises the strongest nonproliferation deal ever negotiated. that isn't true. in our nonproliferation agreement with libya, we demanded they completely eliminate sentry fuges, halt all advanced centrifuge development, completely
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eliminate its uranium stockpile, give unfettered access to the iaea and completely eliminate its long range missile program and would ratify the safest safeguards known as the additional protocol. under this agreement, iran doesn't have to do any of this. will a nuclear iran make the world a safer place? instead of giving the world's largest state sponsor of terrorism hundreds of billions of dollars and more intercontinental ballistic missile tknology and weapons, we should demand a better bay. the president should be working with congress in a bipartisan way because the world deserves a verifiable, enforceable, and accountable agreement that enhances safety, stability, and security. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan. mr. levin: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: at this time i yield two minutes to the gentlelady from arizona, ms. mcsally.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognize for two minutes. ms. mcsally: mr. speaker, i rise today on behalf of those who do not have a voice today in this debate, that's the over 500 service men and women who died in iraq because of the export of vehicle-borne i.e.d. technology by iran. by the brutal terrorist leader suleimani who used money from iran and who will be get manager money to export with the sole purpose to kill american troops and the thousands who are wounded. i deployed to this region six times in my military career. and our military is concerned about this administration turning their back on the men and women who died. and the strength that they need in order to keep that region safe and secure. this is a slap in the face to those who paid that sacrifice. suleimani is a brutal man, we
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have studied him throughout my military career. he's exporting terror all over the region, not just in the region, he's responsible for deaths in india and latin america. he's funding money to the assad regime. over 250,000 dead. hezbollah and hamas. i said a few -- i stood a few weeks ago on the oming they have gaza strip where thousands of rockets were lauged last summer, killing innocent civilians in israel. israelis have seven to 30 seconds to run to shelter. they are funded and exported by suleimani in iran. we stood on the northern border near where hezbollah, funded by on -- by iran is stockpiling over 100,000 rockets. this is a dangerous deal. and this is not about a choice between this deal or war. those of us who served in the military, we want war less than anybody else. we know the price. we want diplomacy. those sanctions were working. we just cranked them up in the last 18 months. they are cash-strapped in iran.
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they are fighting in between their desires and different factions of how will they use that money to continue to move their nuclear program forward or export terror. we have them exactly where we wanted and then gave up. if we give them -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for an additional 15 seconds. ms. mcsally: with the icbm embargo, it is going to be a more dangerous military action and more american lives will be lost. -- it is potentially war. i ask you to please vote against this deal. it is dangerous for the many reasons my colleagues have mention bud do it on bhf of those who dway the ultimate sacrifice. thank you, mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan has three minutes. mr. levin: are you ready to close? i yield myself the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. levin: we've had a vigorous debate. this agreement is going into
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effect. as we have debated here this morning, that's a fact. and so this is the challenge before this body. and that is whether we will try to recapture some real bipartisanship or if we essentially will forfeit it. there's work to be done implementing this agreement. that's acknowledged by all. and the question is, whether we will join together to try to make it work, an agreement that i support, but i think the same responsibility is incumbent pon those who oppose it. or as the speaker said, he says they've just begun to fight.
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that, i think, is the wrong approach in a very important way. both to this agreement but also beyond. because there's work to be done in terms of efforts to reinforce security in the middle east, especially for israel. there's work to be done in the middle east and beyond in terms of fighting terrorism. there's work to be done outside of the middle east, everywhere, so i think it's a deep mistake to leave this moment here with this agreement going into effect saying the fight will continue. no, the fight should be with all
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of us together to make this work and to address the continuing challenges that face this country and the middle east and eyond. so i close as someone with everybody else who worked so hard on this, who has come to a conclusion each on our own, but i think the tenor here sometimes is deeply troubling. and i thank the -- think the speaker's statement, the fight has just begun, over what? i hope not over the effort to continue the flames of partisanship that sometimes have captured this debate and before. we all took the pledge. we have a solemn obligation, i
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think, to work together. and i think it would be a deep mistake to have it forfeited for reasons of political advantage. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: mr. speaker, i yield myself the remainder of the time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for 2 1/2 minutes. mr. ryan: mr. speaker, it's no secret that we believe that the president has exceeded his authority in so many ways. that he stretched the separation of powers on lots of issues. and on most of those issues i believe we can fix those problems. on most of those issues, whether it's regulations or domestic laws, i believe we in this body with the next administration will have the power and ability to fix this. this is one where i don't think we can. i think he stretch the constitution because this should be a treaty. this is an executive agreement. when asked why, they said we
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couldn't pass a treaty. so much for the constitution that we all swore to uphold. mr. speaker, i don't think the president's going to get the legacy that he thinks he's going to get or that he's hoping he's going to get. i'd like to ask unanimous consent to put in the record a letter from 194 former military officers. it says this agreement is unverifiable. as military officers, we find it unconscionable that such a windfall could be given to a regime that even the obama administration has acknowledged will use a portion of such funds to continue to support terrorism. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. ryan: this is an agreement that waives the sanctions against terrorism. this is a regime that funds terrorism. it said nothing about stopping further terrorism. it lifts the bans on conventional weapons so they could arm back up. it lifts the bans on
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intercontinental missiles. the only reason you have an icbm is to put a nuclear weapon on it. it guarantees iran becomes a nuclear power. and it gives them $150 billion up front to finance it. about a decades ago -- about a decade ago i was in debate in a tank graveyard, spent the morning walking through acres of destroyed m-1 abram tanks, humvees, mraps and they had the same kind of signature blast, a whole right through it, killing whoever was inside, our soldiers. then we went up to baghdad and met with one of our senior commanders, and we asked, what is killing all of our service members? hat is doing this? e.f.p.'s, explosively formed penetrators. he got one of them they conif i stated. he showed us what it was. a highly sophisticated machine
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explosive device with wiring on it that said, made in iran. brought by a gentleman maimed solely manny -- solely mainy. this is not a person for some person's legacy. this is a vote to put yourself on the right side of history. vote to kill this agreement. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. all time for debate has expired. pursuant to house resolution 412, the previous question is ordered on the bill. the question is on engrossment and third reading of the bill. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. third reading. the clerk: h.r. 3460, a bill to suspend until january 21, 2017, the authority of the president to waive, suspend, reduce, provide relief from, or otherwise limit the application of sanctions pursuant to an agreement related to the nuclear program of iran. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on passage of the bill. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the aye vs. it. the gentleman from michigan. le recorded vote is requested.
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those favoring a recorded vote will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this question will be postponed. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, proceedings will resume on questions previously postponed. votes will be taken in the following order. passage of h.r. 3461, and passage of h.r. 3460. the first electronic vote will be conducted as a 15-minute vote. the remaining electronic votes will be conducted as five-minute votes. the unfinished business is the question on passage of h.r. 3461 on which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 3461, a bill to approve the joint comprehensive plan of action signed at vienna on july 14, 2015, related to the nuclear program of iran. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on passage of the bill. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a 15-minute vote.
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[captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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soup on this vote the yeas are 162. on this vote the yeas are 162. the nays are 269.
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with one voting present. this bill is not passed. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. the unfinished business is the question of passage of h.r. 3460 on which a recorded vote is ordered. the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 3460, a bill to suspend until january 21, 2017, the authority of the president to waive, suspend, reduce, provide relief from, or otherwise limit the application of sanctions pursuant to an agreement related to the nuclear program of iran. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on passage of the bill. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the ayes have 247, the nays are 186. the bill is passed. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from michigan rise? >> i ask unanimous consent to remove my name as a co-sponsor of h.r. 381. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mrs. dingell: thank you.
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the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia rise? >> i rise to report that on roll call vote number 493, i was unfortunately detained and missed that roll call vote, i simply want to announce that had i been present and voted, i would have voted aye. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman's statement will ppear in the record. >> thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from maryland rise? mr. hoyer: i ask unanimous consent to speak out of order for one minute for the purposes of inquiring of the majority leader mr. mccarthy the schedule for the week to come. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. hoyer: i thank the speaker and i yield to my friend, mr.
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mccarthy. mr. mccarthy: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, on monday and tuesday, no votes are expected in the house. on wednesday, the house will meet at noon for morning hour and 2:00 p.m. for legislative business. votes will be postponed until 6:30. on thursday, the house will meet at 10:00 a.m. for morning hour and noon for legislative business. on friday, the house will meet at 9:00 a.m. for legislative business. last votes of the week are expected no later than 3:00 p.m. members are advised that given the shortness of the week, due to the jewish holiday, members should be prepared for a full legislative day on friday. mr. speaker, the house will consider a number of suspensions next week, the complete list of which will be announced by close of business today. in addition the house will consider h.r. 758, the lawsuit
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abuse reduction act of 2015, sponsored by representative lamar smith. this bill will ensure the innocent americans -- that innocent americans are protected against frivolous lawsuits. mr. speaker, the house will also consider two measures that respond to the horrific videos released throughout the summer on planned parenthood practices. the first is h.r. 3134, sponsored by representative diane black, which places a one-year moratorium on funding to planned parenthood while congress investigates these videos. three committees in the house are currently looking into planned parenthood activities, funding, and adherence to the law. the second will be a bill sponsored by representative trent frank, which adds criminal penalties to people -- for people who violate the born alive act. for medical providers who fail to provide medical care to a baby who survives the abortion
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procedure. americans are rightfully outraged by what was depicted in these videos and congress and the american have a right to know exactly what has happened. these two critical bills will ensure we get all the facts and protect those who cannot protect themselves. i thank the gentleman and yield back. mr. hoyer: i thank the gentleman for the information. we ld just observe that -- you view of the used the term horrific videos. i understand these videos were heavily edited, i don't want to get into debate about them, we'll have that debate next week. but we are certainly concerned about the, as the gentleman knows, the 97% of the health care delivered by planned parenthood has nothing to do
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in the issues raised video, edited or not. and we would hope that we could come to an agreement on making sure that those health care services that are provided to literally thousands and thousands of women are not interrupted. but i understand that we'll have that debate next week. . leader, you do not include in your schedule a continuing resolution. for the funding of government. we have ntleman knows, essentially, as i count it, five full legislative days left. we have eight or nine days left but there are many partial days. we have five full legislative days left before the government
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runs out of authority and funds to continue. as the gentleman knows, i have been urging the majority leader and your side of the aisle to enter into discussions on levels of funding and funding itself. we suspended the appropriations process approximately in the middle of july when the interior bill was pulled from the floor. presumably, it was pulled because there were a possibility of amendments being offered regarding the confederate battle flag, but notwithstanding that, half of the appropriations bills have not been brought to the floor. no appropriations bills have passed the senate. i've been urging for at least two months now that we have discussions.
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i discussed with mr. van hollen today, there have been discussions between mr. van hollen and mr. price with ference to resolution of the funding levels for a c.r. for the length -- or the length of term of the c.r. i had an opportunity to talk to ranking member nita lowey today of the appropriations committee, she informs me that there have been no substantive discussions between herself and mr. rogers and that mr. rogers in fact has no indication of what funding levels will be going forward or what a c.r. would look like or the length or period of time it would be for. in addition to that, i've discussed with the leader's office, leader pelosi's office, i know that neither my office, nor leader pelosi's office have been in discussions either with the speaker's office or your office in any substantive way
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with how we might be moving orward on a c.r. i frankly thought that this coming week would be the week for us to consider a continuing resolution so that given the very, very short number of days available in september for taos meet that there would be time for the senate to receive a continuing resolution to consider that and pass it so that we would not again confront a crisis of confidence, a crisis in terms of ongoing government operations, but also a crisis of confidence not only in our country but around the world that the united states of america could manage its finances in a responsible way. with that said, mr. majority leader, can you share with us some insights again, i know that it's not on the schedule and this is about scheduling
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but we have five full days and three partial days, and a ninth day on which the pope is going to be here, i know we'll have having voting on that day. but we have such a minimal time before the government runs out of authority and funding for its operations that it seems to me that it's critical that today or tomorrow ormond we decide how we're going to proceed. i'll be pleased to yield to my friend the majority leader. mr. mccarthy: i thank the gentleman for yielding. as the gentleman know the fiscal year does end on september 30678 the gentleman knows we have had this iscussion often. becauses no our intention, our intention was always to solve this problem very early. as history shows, this is the earliest we have ever started the appropriations process for congress. i had grave concern during the summer reading many of the
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headlines from some on your side of the aisle and over on your side of the aisle in the senate, that it was a strategy to make sure the appropriations process would not work. when votes came to the floor, ry strongly you were able to have many of your members. counterpart with the number two member on the senate side, senator schumer, his strategy for the summer, he was more effective. none of them came up. we know the number of days we have left. we are continue -- we are continuing conversations with government funding and we will inform members when action is planned for the house. i yield back. mr. hoyer: mr. leader, there are five days, full days left to go. you're right we've been discussing this for some period of time but with all due respect to any strategy we have, you only brought six bills to the floor and passed six bills through this house, and that's only half of the
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appropriations bills. the milcon bill got 255 vote the energy and water got 240, the legislative branch, 357. the commerce-justice-science, 242. t-h.u.d. which we didn't like and apearntly a lot of your members didn't like either, got 216 votes and the defense bill got 278 votes. so nothing on our side that stopped the appropriations process from going forward. you chose not to bring six of those bills to the floor. so i don't take any blame on our side of the aisle, whatever our strategy might be. our strategy has been consistent with very frankly the chairman of the appropriations committee's strategy. and that is to have funding levels on both the defense and nondefense side of the ledger which were rational and reasonable. i repeat, add nauseam, as you
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know, and you're tired of hearing me repeat it, i'm hour -- i'm sure, mr. rogers' comments that the sequester levels given to the appropriations committee to meet their responsibilities were ill-conceived and unrealistic. that is mr. rogers' quote, not mine. not our strategy. that is what the chairman of the appropriations committee on your side of the aisle characterizes the funding levels that you have provided the committee for, i don't mean you individually, but the house has provided the chairman with to write his bills up. and as a result of being unable to do that, every time you brought a bill to the floor, it's gotten a majority of the votes, forget about us. we can't control. we have 188 members. you can pass anything you want. the appropriations bill process came to a dead halt for two reasons, number one, because there are no negotiations for a
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well conceived and realistic alternative to sequester. that's what hal rogers says, not me. you're chairman. d i continue to be extraordinarily disappointed that we have not undertaken any discussions, i mentioned mrs. lowey on the appropriations committee, mr. van hollen on the budget committee, leader pelosi's office, my office, any discussions which have allowed us to come to some agreement so that we might in a bipartisan way, move forward. i understand there are a lot of members on your side of the aisle who won't vote for anything if it funds planned parenthood. i get that. they don't come close to making a majority of this house. and until such time as we start acting with a majority will prevailing, as opposed to a
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faction prevailing, i think we're going to be in this gridlock that we -- that undermines the confidence of our country, of our government, and of our international partners. so i would hope that in the next, perhaps, few days, mr. leader, and i'm prepared to pend time today, this weekend, monday, tuesday, and we're not coming back until wednesday, to try to work with you and with the relevant committees with the speaker and with the leader of my party to try to get taos a point where we can do exactly what you wanted to do and what we want to do. and that is not have this government by crisis where we have now, this is the third time on unrelated issue where
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there has been a problem with funding government as is our responsibility, whatever levels we agree upon. . i would hope that we could pursue those discussions, been urging that for months now. we haven't done that. you also did not mention something that i've discussed with you and discussed with the speaker and i bring up all the time. as a result of our failure to fund the export-import bank and to re-authorize the export-import bank, we are losing jobs. and we have lost substantial umber of jobs already. speaker boehner indicated in a quote not too long ago that, in fact, and he said, there are thousands of jobs on the line that would disappear pretty
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quickly if the ex-im bank were to disappear. essentially in terms of new loans and new products that could be sold abroad, the ex-im bank has disappeared as of july. is there any expectations, and i have had discussions with the speaker, i think he's quoted publicly as saying that he thought the ex-im bank was in fact in some form going to be considered on this floor this month. i ask my friend, the majority leader, it's not on the schedule, but again it's not as if we have months to go. we have five days to go before he end of the fiscal year. funding for ex-im bank expires. can the gentleman tell me whether there's any possibility of that being considered within the next five -- or eight if you want to count eight, legislative
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days we have left this month? i yield to my friend. mr. mccarthy: i thank the gentleman for yielding. would not feel these colloquies were complete if i didn't get this question. i admire the gentleman's consistency in asking it and -- but my answer remains to be just as consistent. there is no action scheduled in the house on ex-im, and i yield back. mr. hoyer: well, with that answer the gentleman can be assured that i'll keep asking the question. i keep asking the question not to vex the majority leader. i keep asking the question because the speaker and i agree we are losing jobs. we are putting ourselves in a noncompetitive position with the rest of the world. to thebringing something floor that, mr. leader, i have intercountered specifically, i will at the time beth you,
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however, there are over 275 votes on this floor to pass a re-authorization extension of the ex-port import bank. and the failure to bring it to the floor is not because it doesn't enjoy majority support, it does. and when it last came to the floor when mr. cantor and i worked on the legislation and brought it to this floor, it got well over 300 votes. now, i understand there are some in your party who don't like it. but very frankly, we've got to get over because there are some in your party don't like things that we gridlock the congress of the united states and make america uncompetitive and undermine confidence in this country. so, yes, mr. leader, you're veryle to rent and i will keep asking the question -- you're veryle toent -- you're veryle to rent -- veryle toerent and i'll
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keep asking this question. a small majority of the united states is holding good policy possage. -- hostage. on october sk you 29 the highway bill will lose its authorization, which we have been extending in very short periods of time. the gentleman knows no governor, no mayor, no county commissioner, no contractor can possibly plan san francisco improvements, highways, bridges, sewer systems, whatever on the basis of 90 day or 60-day extensions of authority and funding. can the gentleman tell me, he didn't mention it, but not coming up next week i understand that, but we have a longer time, but not a long time, between now and october 29, when the highway bill will expire.
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that also, as the gentleman i'm sure knows, and agrees, the failure to do that will have a significant adverse effect on jobs for americans. and a significant adverse effect on the infrastructure of this country. can the gentleman tell me whether or not he expects a highway bill to come to the floor any time within the time frame prior to october 29? i yield to my friend. mr. mccarthy: i thank the gentleman for yielding. as the gentleman did mention that the highway program is currently authorized through the end of october. the relevant committees are at work. i even met with them today. developing the best path forward. i will keep you apriced as well as the members and i expect it to be done before the deadline. i yield back. mr. hoyer: that is good news that the highway bill at least will be done before the deadline. i will tell my friend like the
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majority leader, i had discussion today with mr. defazio, who is the ranking democrat on the relevant committee, mr. shuster being the chairman. i know they have had some discussions. i also know they are not very close to agreement. i know that neither one of them like the senate bill that was sent to us. the majority leader and i had discussions on that. we didn't take that up. i thought that was probably the right thing for the majority leader to do, not take it up. but i would hope that, again, the majority leader says he's engaged. i would hope he uses his good office to get us to a place where we can pass a bill in a bipartisan fashion as during my 34 years has normally been the case that extends for a significant period of time no less than five years can at levels that are necessary to meet the infrastructure needs of this country, both from an economic standpoint and a national security standpoint. i yield to my friend if he wants
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to say anything further. if not, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? mr. mccarthy: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that when the house adjourns today, it adjourn to meet at 3:00 p.m. on tuesday, september 15, 2015, and further, when the house adjourns on that day it adjourn to meet at noon on wednesday, september 16, 2015, for morning hour debate and 2:00 p.m. for legislative business. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the chair will now entertain requests for one minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend.
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the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. thompson: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today in recognition of national suicide prevention week. unfortunately, the past several years we witnessed an increase in suicide among our active duty members of the armed forces and our veteran populations. prior to my tenure in congress, i served nearly three decades addressing the mental health needs of individuals who suffered life changing disease and disability. this is an issue i remain passionate about, particularly when addressing the mental health of those who placed their lives on the line serving this great nation. mr. speaker, i remain confident this body can do right by our service members and veterans. a part that have is advancing the commed cal evaluation parity for service members act, which is intended to improve suicide prevention by instituting a mental health assessment for all new military recruits which will then be used as a baseline throughout their military careers. this was included in the 2016
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national defense authorization. our dedication to this cause is the least we can do for those who have sacrificed so much for their nation. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my ime. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to commemorate the brave men and women lost on september 11. last week i visited a windswept meadow in summerset county, pennsylvania, which 14 years ago had little meaning for this contry. t 10:00 a.m. that day, the world was shattered as 40 americans thwarted an attack on the nation's capital. they lost their lives as a
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result of acts that brought evil. quiet has returned to that field but today their exists at the site of a memorial a new visitor center opened yesterday. i visited the site last week and amazed me produce howe fresh the memories of that horrible day remain. the remembrances are unforgettable from the timeline embedded in the walk that follows flight 93's path. 9:37 a.m. to the words of passengers from phone calls that were made that day. let's draw inspirsation from the grave sacrifice made by so many americans that day and let's today renew the commitment we felt in the dates after september 11 to reinvigorate, heal, and strengthen our nation. thank you, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker.
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on this day the 14th anniversary of this terrible attack, 9/11, 2001, i rise to strongly oppose the deeply flawed, dangerous and unacceptable deal that president obama has struck with islamic republic of iran and its leader, ayatollah khamenei. to seen stand here in the people's house, the greatest nation on earth and discuss this course of action taken by the president is both shameful and embarrassing for our country. the islamic republic of iran is the world's leading sponsor of terrorism. they have the blood of thousands of american soldiers on their hands. they lead chants of death to america who they call the great satan and burn our flag in their streets. they declared just last week with certainty that israel, who they call the little satan, will be wiped off the map in no less than 25 years. this plan allows iran to build a nuclear bomb in no less than 15
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years. you do the math. the president's deal with a terrorist nation allows them to continue their nuclear program and gives them over $150 billion to fund worldwide terrorism. a vote for this deal with all of its dire implications for the future of our children and grandchildren could well be the most regrettable vote that a member of congress will ever take in his career. mr. chairman, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the the gentlewoman from the state of washington seek recognition? mrs. mcmorris rodgers: permission to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlewoman is recognized for one minute. mrs. mcmorris rodgers: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today in memory of three brave firefighters. m, andrew, and richard who were killed after their vehicle crashed near twist, washington. leaving the men in the path of a raging fire.
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washington state has faced record forest fires this season. nearly a million acres have burned. there has been a lot of loss, including the lives of these three men. tom, the youngest, at 20 years old, was a rising junior at whitman college who followed his parents' footsteps and accepted the call to fight fires during the summer. now he and his colleagues died is really a testament to the type of men they were. brave and generous. fiercely dedicated to protecting their home and willing to put their lives at risk to protect it. my prayers continue to be with their families and those and all that have been impacted by these fires. we are eternally grateful for the young men and their service to our beloved state. you are our heroes. rest in peace. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired.
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for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> i rise today to call tention to the 9/11 health compensation re-authorization act and call attention to our duty to the heroes who have already sacrificed so much. as americans we have pledged to never forget the terrible events of 9/11. as americans, we have a duty to never forget those who risk their lives to save others. well over 1,000 9/11 first responders have been diagnosed with cancer caused by their exposure to toxins at ground zero. because of the act, over 70,000 9/11 first responders and survivors around the contry, including 6,000 in my district, are being monitored for cancer and other ground zero related
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incidentses. . over 7,600 are already receiving treatment. mr. speaker, i ask that we honor our commitment to those brave men and women by permanently re-authorizing this important program. i yield back the balance of my time. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: the entleman's time has expired. under the speaker's announced the of january 6, 2015, gentleman from arizona, mr. franks, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the majority leader. mr. franks: thank you, mr. speaker. you know, mr. speaker, coincidental to the message or the speech that i'm about to give, i am reminded, as so many
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of you are, that this is september 11. and 14 years ago, terrorists in an evil, devastating act against our country, designed to destroy us as a people, attacked the very fabric -- fabric of the nation and killed almost 3,000 innocent americans. and i pray for their families, i pray for those who loved those people and still feel the loss within their souls today. mr. speaker, i also believe that one of the best ways we can honor the people who lost their lives that infamous day is to remember that the price of freedom has always been eternal vigilance. and we still face a world where jihad has designs on destroying
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this, the greatest and freest republic in the history of the world. and in the name of those we've lost, in the name of those generations still to come, god help us to be vigilant people s americans. mr. speaker, the blood, sacrifice and noble principles of millions of gallant souls across america's history have made this nation the unipolar superpower of the entire world. our international policies now significantly impact the peace and security of the entire human family. the very first responsibility of this nation's government and especially its commander in hief is to protect america's national security. the only two ways we have to do that or to prevent any enemy or potential enemy from having the intent and capacity to do us
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harm. we must make sure that if there is an enemy with the intent to do us harm, that they do not have the capacity to proceed. the intent of the islamic republic of iran has been crystal clear since they took and held 52 american hostages 444 days at the beginning of their radical revolution, those 36 years now ago. they have ever since been waging war on america and their own neighbors. but the only way the iranian leaders can ever truly achieve their ultimate goal is to become a nuclear armed nation. consequently they have proceeded in that direction, both secretly and openly and
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obviously for decades. until america and the western world came together with resolutions, sanctions and warnings of military intervention, to halt and dismantle this unspeakably dangerous threat. this pressure finally brought iran to the negotiating table. but now instead of increasing and using that pressure, president barack obama has completely ignoreded the original commitment that the -- ignored the original commitment that the sanctions would only be dismantled when iran's nuclear weapons program was dismantled. the president blindly accepted whatever deal iran put on the table and completely forgot who was at the other end of that table. mr. obama then proceeded to capitulate on every red line and minimum requirement that both he and the united nations had previously required. the president has now squandered away every form of
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leverage we had against this theocratic, radical regime, which has broken every promise it has ever made to us. and what did we get in return? we got an insane due police to us, unverifiable, astonishingly unenforceable deal. we got a deal that legitimatizes and empowers the most prolific state sponsor of terrorism in the world. it obligates america's -- it obligates america to lift all sanctions, lift bans on iran's weapons and imports of weapons, and ballistic missile programs, it allows iran a protected protocol to enrich uranium and research. it gives them tens of billions of dollars with which they can continue to spread their terror and destabilizing expansionism throughout the world. it aa louis them to continue their human rights -- it allows them to continue their human
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rights abuses including illegally holding american citizens hostage. and it allows them to keep their entire nuclear infrastructure. all the while the supreme leader and ultimate authority in iran is publicly reaffirming his hatred toward the united states and publicly leading throngs of his supporters in shouting death to america and death to israel. unbelievable. mr. speaker, bill clinton made a far better deal than that and the result was that the police state of north korea proceeded to develop nuclear weapons only a few years later and some of our most loyal allies live under that nuclear threat to this day. and now this deal will place erica and our vital ally israel under that same nuclear threat tomorrow. mr. speaker, the iranian mullah as were intently listening when
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barack obama proclaimed before the united nations, he said that no nation has the right to pick and choose what nations have nuclear weapons. but i remind him that iran is a nation that has threatened to destroy america and destroy israel. these same mullahs were watching as barack obama knowingly stood by and idly watched as thousands of innocent civilians in iraq were either butchered, tortured, raped, beheaded, cruisified or burned alive by eye sills. -- isis. they then knew they had nothing to fear from barack obama. so the jihadist leaders of iran came to the nuclear negotiating table with nothing and walked away with everything. these are the same iranian mullahs that openly bragged how
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their bounties and weapons have killed hundreds of americans and marines, american marines and soldiers on the battlefield. shattering their families in an unbelievable way. what will these leaders do if they have nuclear weapons? instead of making sure they never get a nuclear weapon, barack obama's politically motivated peace in our time capitulation empowers the most dangerous sponsor of terrorism on this earth and places them on the path to obtain an entire nuclear arsenal. mr. speaker, unless this congress or the next president is able to stop this madness, barack obama will be on trajectory to be remembered as the father of the iranian atomic bomb. and the one who ultimately nuclearized the entire middle east. and our children will start down a path that leads through
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the shadow of nuke loo doctor nuclear terrorism. whatever the cost there -- nuclear terrorism. whatever the cost there might have been will pail in comparison to the cost of dealing with a nuclear armed iran. we must not let that happen. astonishingly, democrat senators are now arrogantly filibustering any attempt for the senate to regain this -- or to reject this inexpressably dangerous deal. it is time for the majority leader of the senate to use the nuclear option in the senate rules to bring this inexpressably dangerous nuclear deal with iran to the senate floor and vote on and reject it as the treaty that it actually embodies under the constitution of the united states. if republicans do not use the nuclear option in our rules, iran may someday use their nuclear option against our nation. it's september 11, mr. speaker.
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god help us to remember. and for the sake of our children and future generations, god help this congress to reject this treacherous deal and god help us all to focus on the unspeakable importance of the coming elections in america. with that i would yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the chair will receive a message. the secretary: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the senate has passed s. 1629, cited as the district of colombia ports act of 2015, in which the concurrence of the house ishouse is requested. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from arizona seek recognition? mr. franks: i move that the house do now adjourn. the speaker pro tempore: the question son the motion to adjourn. those -- is on the motion to adjourn. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it.
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the motion is adopted. accordingly, the house stands ageorge bushed until 3:00 -- adjourned until 3:00 p.m. on tuesday next.
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we're going to show you some of the debate today. we'll show you about 35 minutes or so. and then open up our phone lines. in one of the votes, the vote on approving the iran nuclear agreement, the vote again was 162-249. here's the breakdown on that. a tweet from one of our viewers. a vote breakdown, republicans, yes, 244, democrats -- in terms of no, republicans no, 244, democrats, 162 in favor of that iran agreement. 25 against. and one voting present, that was thomas massie of kentucky. a viewer says, how do you vote present on this? thomas massie tweeting, my statement on the iran nuclear deal, part of his statement reads, and we'll read some of this to you, he says that i voted present pursuant to the
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constitution treaties must be approved by a 2/3 concurrence of the senate. as a member of the house of representatives, i have no authority to approve a treaty, so if you watch the vote and you saw that one present vote there, that was thomas massie of kentucky. so here's the plan. in about 35 minutes or so, a little bit after 2:00, we'll be back to hear from you your thoughts on the iran nuclear deal, the handling of the deal in particular by the u.s. house republican leadership. we'll hear from you on the phone, we'll follow your posts on facebook. facebook.com/cspan. as you saw, a number of people also tweeting about it as well. @cspan is how you send us a tweet. until then, we're going to show you some of the debate, including paul ryan, charlie rangel and john lewis in this coming half hour. mr. ryan: mr. speaker, i will yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized.
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mr. ryan: mr. speaker, i think this is a terrible deal. this administration has made a lot of mistakes when it comes to foreign policy. this has got to be the worst one because this deal will not stop iran from getting a bomb. this deal will all but guarantee it. we went into these negotiations saying that iran had to eliminate its nuclear program, all of it, full stop. now they're saying that was unrealistic. too unreasonable. too high in the sky. and we're handing over hundreds of billions of dollars in sanctions relief. so iran gets billions of dollars in exchange for what, for taking up some, not all, just some of its nuclear program? and then in 10 or 15 years, all
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of these limits expire. in other words, they're getting something for essentially nothing. it's a steal, and that's if they don't cheat. now, the administration says that this deal will bring about unprecedented transparency. we'll get regular access, they say. we'll see what iran's up to, they say. but if the inspectors think something's up, iran has 24 days to cover its tracks, and in some cases iran's own inspectors will get to collect the evidence. finally, against all of the advice from our military, we are going to let iran buy ballistic missiles in just eight years. mr. speaker, you only buy ballistic missiles if you're looking to build a bomb. i get why russia and china like this idea. they get another big customer. but i don't for the life of me understand why we would ever
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agree to this. mr. speaker, the president -- the president's taking a huge gamble here. he thinks if we make nice with the iranian regime they'll change their ways, bring them into the global economy and they'll become more like us. now, i think the iranian people, they want democracy. they want freedom. but we are not talking about the iranian people here. we are talking about an extremist regime that is unaccountable to their own people. this is a regime that chants "death to america." this is a regime that funds terrorism all around the world. has is a regime that called for wiping israel off the map. i'm all for diplomacy, but i am not for rewarding a rogue regime. i'd also point out that the
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sanctions we are lifting will let european and asian companies build up iran's economy and they will make the regime even stronger. and should iran start to cheat, which they have a pretty darn good track record of doing so, it will be that much harder to put back in place the sanctions. our trading partners, they'll feel the pinch and they won't want to hold this regime accountable. so i want to stress how firmly i oppose this deal. i know the president may have already lined up enough support to save his deal, but with this vote, with this vote we need to send a message to both iran and to the world the regime, the regime may have bamboozled this administration, but the american people know this is a rotten deal, and i fear that because of this deal the middle east and the world at large will only become a much, much
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more dangerous place. with that, mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. levin: before i yield myself such time as i shall consume, i'd like to yield 30 seconds to the ranking member of the budget committee, mr. van hollen. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maryland is recognized for 30 second. mr. van hollen: thank you, mr. speaker. and i thank my friend, mr. levin. this agreement represents the best path to achieving our goal of preventing iran from ever obtaining a nuclear weapon, and it advances the national security interests of the united states and our allies, including israel. i ask that the remainder of my remarks be placed in the record. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. levin: thank you, mr. speaker. for far too long we faced the nightmare of iran with nuclear bombs. impacted by heavy sanctions, iran finally agreed to negotiate, led by the united
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states and five other nations. after agreeing on a framework, which iran complied with, the parties completed the much-detailed joint comprehensive plan of action. when i issued my statement of support for jcpoa six weeks ago, its fate was uncertain. what decisively turned the tide was the impassioned leadership of the president with secretaries kerry and moniz, combined with a momentus outpouring of support outside the political realm from a vast array of scientific experts, experienced diplomats, key figures from all religious faiths, a wide variety of military leaders and informed expressions from major former
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governmental figures of the highest integrity, including colin powell. . it also became increasingly clear that there was no other workable alternative. this point was reinforced by the joint statement yesterday from prime minister -- british prime minister cameron, french president holland, and chairman chancellor merkel. they said among other points, and i quote, this is not an agreement based on trust or any assumption about how iran may look in 10 or 15 years. it's based on detailed tightly written controls that are verifiable and long lasting. iran will have strong incentives
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not to cheat. the near certainty of getting caught and the consequences that would follow would make this a losing proposition. it is now absolutely clear that the jcpoa will go into effect. requiring the initial set of detailed obligations that iran must fulfill. .t is therefore time to go on this institution, which has been a major center of attacks on the jcpoa, would hopefully have those who opposed now join with those who support the agreement and work together to rekindle the kind of overall bipartisanship that senator van denburg of michigan urged should apply to key foreign policy issues as they approached the
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water's edge. surely this kind of rekindled bipartisanship needs to be undertaken in particular to take steps to deepen support for israel's security. to fight and defeat terrorism. and to rekindle efforts for viable peace negotiations. i urge my colleagues to vote yes on h.r. 3461, which is a vote of approval for the comprehensive agreement that would prevent iran from getting a nuclear weapon. i urge my colleagues to vote no on h.r. 3460, which would suspend the president's authority to waive sanctions and in effect prevent him from implementing the comprehensive agreement. i close, it is indeed time to move on and to take next steps.
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tolure to do so with instead perpetuate partisanship will, i strongly believe, be counterproductive for any who try it and for our entire nation. we can and we must do much better. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from california is ecognized. mr. ryan: you mean wisconsin? the speaker pro tempore: wisconsin. mr. ryan: please, please, don't say california. mr. speaker, at this time i'd like to yield 1 1/2 minutes to a member of the ways and means committee, the distinguished lady from kansas, ms. jenkins. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from kansas is recognized for a minute and a half. ms. jenkins: i thank the gentleman for yielding. sanctions are about more than nuclear weapons. they are about the principles
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and values america holds dear. iran continues to hold american prisoners hostage. sponsors terrorism around the world. and american soldiers have died because of the terrorist actions of iran. iran st this week the supreme leader said, israel will be destroyed within 25 years. now, every lawmaker must ask, are we willing to put $150 billion into the hands of an iranian regime who chants death to america and wants to eliminate israel from the earth? we must ask, are we willing to risk american lives on the promises of a leader who believes those same american lives are worth nothing? i refuse to sit idly by while this administration leaves the safety, stability, and security of everyone, everywhere at the whim of iran whose neighbors
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fear them and allies consist of the assad regime and hezbollah. this agreement with iran would threaten all that we hold dear. i encourage my colleagues to join the bipartisan opposition against the iran deal and instead support the security of america above the dangerous desires of iran. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back of the the gentleman from wisconsin reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. levin: it's now my pleasure to yield four minutes to mr. rangel, to put it mildly, a senior member of our committee. mr. rangel: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman from new york is recognized for four minutes. mr. rangel: my fellow members, this is an historic occasion for the house and very emotional time for me because unfortunately i have known -- i
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have known the horrors of war and i speak for all of those that had this horrendous experience to say that we should always give diplomacy a chance before we put any american in harm's way. i don't think any of us with any degree of certainty have any idea whether this agreement is going to hold. or we can contain the criminal and human ambitions of the leadership in iran. what we do know is that the international powers p, not just f china, not just of russia -- powers, not just of china, not just of russia, but the united kingdom, france, germany, and thinking the united states of
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america truly believe that this is the best possible way to avoid war. it would seem to me that now is in the time for us to engage exchanges that separate and bring us apart as a nation. the rules of the house and the senate make it abundantly clear that whether you like it or not this is going to become the policy of the united states of america. this will not be the policy of president obama, of democrats or republicans, but the policy of our great nation. it pains me as i'm about to leave service in this august body that we have people in this
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hamber that have such hatred and disdain for the leadership of this country that they would put this feeling above what is the best policy for the security of this great beloved nation of mine. i know that if the president of the united states was able to walk on water, there would be people in this chamber that would say, see, we told you that he couldn't swim. -- i what i am saying if don't think i can do that because you said that china and russia supporting this because they want to sell arms to iran. nd i think that was despicable
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because that includes united kingdom, that includes france, that includes germany, that includes people that are talking about this is the best way that we are able to do this. so what i am saying is this. 14 years ago a terrible thing happened to my country, to my ity, when terrorists struck on 9/11, and now we have the opportunity to bring our country together the way we did then. 14 years ago there were no republicans, there were no democrats, there were americans that would say we have to come together. we are not going to change this agreement. this is the policy of the united states of america or soon will be. should we not be saying, what is the enforcement, what are we going to do, what happens if
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they violate it? are we here to embarrass presidents, republicans or democrats, or are we here to preserve -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman is recognized for 30 seconds. mr. rangel: thank you, mr. chairman. or are we here to preserve the dignity and the integrity of the united states of america no matter who is the president? if ever there was a time for us to come together and support the policy, the time is now. thank you so much for giving me this opportunity. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from michigan reserves. mr. ryan: i give myself 15 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from wisconsin is recognized. mr. ryan: mr. speaker, the oldest trick in the book, if you cannot win a debate on the merits is to impugn the other person's motives. people who are opposing this agreement, whether they be republicans or many of the democrats who are opposing this agreement are opposing this
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agreement because it's a terrible agreement and there is no other reason. with that i yield 1 1/2 minutes to the gentlelady from tennessee, a member of the ways and means committee, mrs. black. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will remind all persons in the gallery that they are here as guests of the house and that any manifestation of approval or disapproval of proceedings is a violation of the house rules. the gentlelady is recognized. mrs. black: thank you, mr. speaker. this nuclear deal isn't much of a deal at all. it's a gift to the iranian regime. we're sorry we gave them permanent sanction relief to the tune of $150 billion in exchange for temporary enrichment restrictions. mr. speaker, the ayatollah calls the united states a great satan. just this week he said that israel will not exist in 25 years. imagine that evil that this regime can carry out when they cash in their billions. under this agreement iran will undoubtedly become the central bank of fear.
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what's more, with this deal we shrunked off the opportunity for time anywhere inspections. instead we gave iran and opportunity in many ways for investigations of their nuclear sites and conceal the signs of compliance. even worse, under the secret side deals, that was not transmitted here to congress, we learned that iran will be allowed to self-inspect a key military base. so to be clear, members of this body who vote for this agreement will be voting for a deal that they have not seen in full. mr. speaker, i'm not prepared to tell tennesseans that i represent that the world's leading state sponsor of terrorism without knowing every last deal. we cannot and should not leave anything to chance when it comes to the security of the america and our allies. i will be casting my vote on behalf of the tennessee's sixth district against this dangerous deal. i urge my colleagues to do the same. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. levin: i now yield 2 1/2 minutes to another so valuable member of our committee, mr. lewis from georgia. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized for two minutes. mr. lewis: i thank my friend, the ranking member, for yielding. mr. speaker, i rise in support of diplomacy, a pathway to peace. for many months i thought long and hard about this decision. attended briefings, red documents, and met with citizens of my district. i even had a long executive session with my staff. i reflected on the words that dr. martin luther king jr. to call upon us to rededicate ourselves to the long and bitter but beautiful struggle for the world. the way of peace is one of those principles as thought and reflection, i believe that this is a good deal.
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no, it may not be perfect, but do not let the perfect be the enemy of the good. i remember standing on this very floor seven years ago and speaking against a war in iraq. i said again and i will say gain today, war is bloody. it destroyed the hopes, aspirations, and the dreams of a people. the american people and the people around the world are sick and tired of war and violence. we do not need more bombs, missiles and guns. when you turn on the news, when you read the newspaper you see a mass dislocation. too many people suffering and many are desperate for a chance at peace. i believe in my heart of hearts that this may be the most
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important vote that we cast during our time in congress. to put it simple, it is nonviolence or nonexistent. it is my hope that my vote today, along with the votes of others will be a down payment for peace toward a world community with itself. maybe with this deal, we will send a message that we can lay down the burden and tools of war. maybe we can come together as a family of human beings. mr. speaker, we have a moral obligation, a mission and a a chance. give peace thank you. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: at this time, mr. speaker, i'd like to yield one minute to the distinguished gentleman from ohio, the speaker of the house. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from ohio, the speaker of the house, is recognized for one minute. the speaker: let me thank my
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colleague for yielding. my colleagues, later today we'll cast two votes and these votes will be amongst the most consequential votes that we'll cast some of us in our careers. our founding fathers charged both the president and the congress with providing for the common defense for good reason. it's the core responsibility of our federal government. it's the key to our freedom and for all of our opportunities. and that's why at the front of the oath every member takes it states, i do solemnly swear that i will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic. so as we consider this nuclear agreement with iran, it's our duty to determine whether it will keep america safe. sadly, this deal is far worse than anything i could have imagined. why?
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because the president and his negotiators broke every one of their promises. does this deal dismantle iran's nuclear program or shut off their path to a nuclear weapon as they promised it would? no. instead, it allows iran to keep thousands of nuclear centrifuges spinning as they are today. and within 10 years in the best case, it allows iran to achieve a nuclear status. was this agreement full-on verification? no. it appears the side deal will trust iran to self-inspect a key site where the regime conducted tests on nuclear detonators. of course, we have not seen that side deal and we don't know if there are other secret components. does this agreement allow inspectors to have anywhere 24/7 access as they
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promised it would? no. inspectors would have to wait up to 24 days of access to suspicious sites. will sanctions snap back? no. the administration admits that nothing at the u.n. happens in a snap. does it shut down iran's ballistic missile program as they promised it would? no. actually the agreement lifts the arms and missile embargos n five and eight years respectively. and they are allowed to build icbm's capable of delivering a warhead right here in the nited states of america. does it help the leading sponsor of terror? yes. it gives them billions to
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support terror around that part of the year and it gives amnesty to the shadow commander responsible for the deaths of hundreds of american troops in raq. and this is all without iran cheating. the ayatollah won't even have to cheat to be just steps away from a nuclear weapon. so today we are going to cast two votes and these votes are aimed at stopping president obama from unilaterally lifting sanctions on iran and ensuring ccountability. my colleagues in pursuing this deal with iran, president obama refused to listen. he ignored the concerns of the american people, national security experts and a bipartisan majority here in the congress. and now he's trying to enforce this deal over our objections. never in our history have something with so many consequences for our national
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security been rammed through with such little support. today is september 11. today for all americans to come together and for us to keep the oath we swore to our constitution. so our fight to stop this bad deal frankly is just beginning. we will not let the american people down. yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan. mr. levin: it's now my pleasure to yield one minute to our leader who indeed, as she goes leader , has been our on this effort, the gentlelady from california. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from california is recognized for one minute. ms. pelosi: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the gentleman for yielding and i thank him for his leadership, for the courage it took for him and the humility to listen and to learn
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what was in this legislation and this agreement and that is something that i commend the members of the house for doing, to listen and to learn. our distinguished speaker just referenced the oath of office that we take when we become members of congress, and it is a vow that we make to the american people, to protect and support our constitution and our responsibility to protect and defend the american people. today, mr. speaker, we will vote on an agreement to make america safer. indeed, to make the world a safer place. so say the nuclear scientists and the diplomats. so say the military and security leaders of both parties or of no party. so does the faith community beseach us to do.
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this morning father conroy offered a prayer to god to, quote, help the members of this house to recognize that you are with us in our deliberations. indeed, as we cast our votes on this historic agreement, we were thankful to god that god was with us to, again, give us the humility to learn and the courage to act. and for that we should all be grateful. it's important to note that support for this agreement, as i have said, comes from both sides of the aisle, hundreds -- more than 100 former diplomats, democrats and republicans, ambassadors, etc., wrote, in our judgment the agreement deserves congressional support and the opportunity to show it will work. we firmly believe that the most effective way, mr. speaker, to protect u.s. national security and that of our allies and friends is to ensure that the
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tough-minded diplomacy has a chance to succeed before considering the more costly risks and alternatives. 36 generals and admirals wrote, there is no better option to prevent an iranian nuclear weapon. if the iranians cheat, as the speaker suggested they might, if the iranians cheat, our advanced technology, intelligence and inspections will reveal it. and the u.s. military options remain on the table. and if the deal is rejected by america, the iranians could not -- could have a nuclear weapon within a year. the choice is stark. what is mysterious to me, when our colleagues come to the floor under this agreement iran can be a nuclear power in 10 tore 15 years, so we should
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reject this agreement. no. without the agreement, they are a threshold nuclear power right now and could have a weapon within months or a year. seems to me the choice is clear as the generals and admirals pointed out. it's also interesting to note that our distinguished speaker pointed out that some shortcomings in his view in the agreement. ell, that is disagreed by -- by the best nuclear physicists who wrote to congratulate the president on the agreement. as they wrote, we consider -- now, these are noble laureates, these are engineers, nuclear physicists who work and specialize in nuclear weapons, research and development. they said, we consider the joint comprehensive plan of action of the united states and its partners negotiated with iran will advance the cause of
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peace and security in the middle east and can serve -- this is really important -- this can serve as a guidepost for future nonproliferation agreements. they went on to say, this is an innovative agreement with much more stringent constraints than any previously negotiated nonproliferation framework. that's why they were congratulating the president of the united states. i mentioned the prayer of father conroy this morning. i also this morning saw in "the washington post" that the prime minister of the u.k., david cameron, the french president, holla information de, and german chanceler angela merkel said, this is an important moment, these heads of states said, it's a crucial
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opportunity at a time of heightened global uncertainty to show what diplomacy can achieve. these heads of state went on to say, this is not an agreement based on trust or any assumption of how iran may look in so or 15 years. it's based on detailed, tightly written controls that are verifiable and long lasting. we condemn, they said, in no uncertain terms that iran does not recognize the existence of the state of israel and the unacceptable language that iran's leaders use about israel. israel's security matters are and will remain our key interests too. prime minister cameron, president hollande and chanceler merkel then said, we will not have reached the nuclear deal with iran if we did not think that it removed a threat to the region and the nonproliferation regime as a whole. we are confident that the agreement provides the
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foundation for resolving the conflict on iran's nuclear program permanently. that is why we now want to embark on the full implementation of the joint comprehensive plan of action. today, i urge my colleagues to vote in support of the agreement that enhances our vigilance and strengthens our security. i just always am fond of quoting sol men in the bible. -- solomon in the bible. he was uncertain as to his ability to be king in terms of his wisdom and the rest. and he prayed to god and prayed that god would give him the wisdom because david was such a great king and how could he -- said to god, going to be the king of your people. help me with knowledge. wisdom. with wisdom. christ -- excuse me -- god came
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to him in the night and said, solomon, because you did not ask for longevity, because you did not ask for great riches, because you did not ask for vengeance upon your enemies, i will give you more wisdom than anyone has ever had and you will be renowned for wisdom. the solomon of wisdom which sprang from humility. e humility to pray for enlightenment, for knowledge, for wisdom, for judgment. and that humility is so essential in the job that we do here, that we don't have foregone conclusions. that's why i'm so proud of my members who spent so much time tudying this issue, not only reading the agreement and the classified sections and the rest but seeking answers, having information, seeking validation from generals and
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admirals and scientists and leaders of other countries as to what their actions would be should we unfortunately reject this, which happily we will not do today. they had the humility to open their minds to learn, and when they learned they had the where to take an action some other of their friends may not have arrived at because they didn't have the benefit of all of this information. we know one thing, that we have to come together in the end, to protect our country and stopping the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. . i say that i've had decades of experience track iran and its nuclear ambitions, longer than anyone, more than two times longer than anyone on the intelligence committee, so i
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know of what i speak and i went to the intelligence committee to stop the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. that gave me some judgment as to what the president brought back in this agreement. and still, i want to subject it to the harshest scrutiny as from my experience, if i thought that this was the best possible deal we could achieve. we mustn't judge achievements. -- we mustn't judge agreements by with they don't do but what they do do. this makes our country safer and our friends in the region safer as their own national security experts have attested. i thank my colleagues, i thank you for listening, for learning, for coming to whatever conclusion you came to but understanding at the end of the day we have a respect for each
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other's opinion and a regard for our responsibilities to our people, to people in the region, our friends in israel and also a tpwhrobal responsibility. bop i could join the nuclear physicists in congratulating president barack obama for his great leadership in giving us his opportunity. today we will not just be making history, we will be making progress for the cause ofized. mr. royce: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. royce: mr. speaker, i rise in support of this legislation which would prohibit the president from waiving iran sanctions and prevent the implementation of this fatally flawed agreement. last night we spent many hours debating this agreement. we heard from members on both sides of the aisle, members who have deep concerns about where
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we are headed. mr. speaker, let's be very clear, this isn't just a bad deal. it's a disastrous deal. it's a disaster for the united states. it's a disaster for our allies and friends in the region, including israel. and when you think about it, when we think about the letter that we sent, 84% of us in this house signed the letter asking for four critical things in this negotiation. we got rolled on every one of the four. iran won on every point. iran gets to keep its nuclear infrastructure. the obama administration collapsed on the issue of verification. we don't have anywhere, any time inspections in here. we have got self-inspections by the iranian regime with respect to parchin, which is the one military site where we know, we know that the iranians, because of 1,000 pages of documents, did
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most of their bomb work. and they say now, no, no, no. we'll do the inspections. we'll turn that stuff over, but nobody's going into our military sites. that's the argument they are making. and the sunset clause in this means the key parts of this deal expire at the end of the deal. so, we've got prominent sanctions relief for the iranian regime, relief that's going to go into their military in exchange for temporary constraints on iran's nuclear program. and the restrictions on iran's missile program designed to deliver those weapons -- now, this came up in the 11th hour of this negotiation, no one anticipated it being in the agreement. at the 11th hour the russians came forward and on behalf of the iranians said we want the lifting of the sanctions, international sanctions that the community has on the icbm program and on the arms
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transfers. with respect to iran. and unbelievably we ended up getting rolled on this as well. as the secretary of defense told congress, the i in icbm stands for intercontinental, meaning flying, from iran to the united states. that is why, that is why we never wanted this lifted. it also provides resources and legitimacy to the iranian revolutionary guard corps. the very same organization that has killed 500 u.s. troops in iraq. this nuclear deal really needs to be put in a larger context of the administration's iran policy. it is very dangerous, very risky. i'd say doomed to fail as a policy given the fact that we haven't seen any adjustment out
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of iran other than a recommittal on the part of the regime in iran where they say we are not going to be bound by any of the ballistic missile constraints. we don't intend to follow that. and by the way, we're advancing new ballistic missiles and targeting and putting that into the hands of hezbollah and into the hands of hamas. that's the messaging we have seen this week out of iran. so i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. conyers: thank you. mr. speaker and members, i strongly oppose h.r. 3460 because it is another attempt to derail diplomacy and set the united states on the path to
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war. h.r. 3460 suspends until january 21, 2017, meaning through the rest of president obama's term, the authority of the president to waive, suspend, or reduce sanctions pursuant to the iran nuclear agreement. this legislation was introduced less than 48 hours ago, and has absolutely no committee process. while the foreign affairs committee has held 30 hearings since the announcement of the joint plan of action in november , 2013, this legislation has never even been a topic of committee discussion. so this is not a serious attempt
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to legislate. put simply, it's a political attack on the president of the attempt to s and an derail a good deal that is in the best interest of the our ation. but iran -- the iran deal represents the cumulative effects of countless diplomats after imposing some of the toughest sanctions in the the ry, the p 35 plus one, u.s. -- the p5+1, the u.s., united kingdom, germany, france, russia, were able to bring iran to the table and strike a deal that achieves our core strategy objectives. president obama and secretary of state kerry deserve our respect and thanks for this achievement.
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they kept together a coalition that forced iran to make serious concessions in how they operate their domestic nuclear program. redid not get everything that we wanted, but we achieved a verifiable deal that is our best hope to prevent iran from developing a nuclear weapon. details of the deal are commendable, among other things, iran will reduce its uranium stockpile by 98%, and lower its enrichment level below weapon levels. this will increase the breakout time or how long it takes to create a weapon to one year. in addition, the international
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atomic energy agency will oversee testing and inspections and cheating will be severely punished with snapback provisions that reimpose the crippling sanctions that brought iran to the table. unfortunately, it appears that the majority does not understand progress in diplomacy. those who are trying to undermine this historic agreement are motivated by the same naive approach to negotiation that has paralyzed this congress. this time unless they get everything they want, they will not accept the deal that forestalls war and prevents iran from becoming a nuclear power. it this intransigence may be new
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in its degree, but it is an old and regretful approach taken by critics of diplomacy. i remember almost 30 years ago when a president late in his second term reached out his hand in peace. attempts to constrain and ultimately reduce the nuclear stockpiles were mocked. i rarely saw eye to eye with that president, but nearly three decades later i'm glad that he stood up when he did. that president was ronald reagan . when he signed the treaty with mr. gorbachev, he faced the
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same fury we face today. however, the soviet union was replaced by a growing number of free and independent states and 28 years later the united states is still standing and remains as strong as ever. the lesson in all of this is that diplomacy is rarely clean and it develops in its own time. there are stops and starts. things move forward. sometimes backwards. and even often sideways. but repeatedly we have shown that a step in the direction of peace will be met in kind, whether a republican or democratic president seeks that piece -- peace, congress has an obligation to support those efforts. i'm proud of our president's efforts to forge a new path
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with iran. the iran deal prevents iran from developing a bomb, creates new foundation for diplomacy and and stands as a proud tradition of progress. i urge my colleagues to carefully consider and oppose i . 3460, and mr. speaker, reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: mr. speaker, i'd make the point with respect to ronald reagan, when president reagan was presented a bad deal in his negotiations with the russians, at that point -- at that point he walked away from that deal. he pushed away from the deal because in his mind we could
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come back and get a better deal if we stood our ground. this was not the circumstance with respect to our negotiations with iran. with iranian negotiations, we had four points that this congress, 8 % of us sent a -- 84% of us sent a letter to the secretary of state. those points was to be anywhere, anytime inspections. it was supposed to last multiple decades. we were not supposed to lift the sanctions upfront but do it over the entirety of the agreement in order to get compliance, to ensure we had compliance. it was to make certain that those 12 questions that the iaea had asked were answered. these were all important because, again, as reagan ointed out to the russians, he threw their own expression back to them. there is an old russian expression, trust but verify, and that's what we need to
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apply to the agreement. that's the last point i would make here, the verification component of it. when you have side agreements, which congress has not seen, and those side agreements allow, in the case of parchin, where we have ample evidence of their past bomb work, allow the iranians to do their own inspections. i mean, i always thought it was going to be international inspectors that did the international inspections. not the iranians themselves. and for these reasons i do not think it's anational just. i think we -- analogous. i think we should do what reagan did, no, we need a tter negotiation and we need to trust but verify. i yield to the gentleman from montana for two minutes.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. zink: we are talking about billions of dollars into iran. at least 500 troops, which i served with in yirke, died as a result of iran. mr. zinke: iran is not our friend. they are our enemy. at this -- at least this regime. you cannot say that hezbollah or hamas, the surrogates of iran, would not do the same on 9/11 as what occurred today in 2001. let's look at this deal. general dempsey, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff said upped no circumstances do we send missile technology to iran and yet for five years we relax sanctions to include missile systems, to include the same missile systems that iran has given to hamas.
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at least 1,000 of them directly and as many 10,000 into israel from gaza. in eight years we will relax sanctions on icbm's. there is only one purpose for an icbm and that is to strike america. yet, in 10 years -- remember, part of the deal, dismantle for dismantle. dismantle the sanctions. iran was going to dismantle their nuclear facilities, their capabilities and their ambitions. in 10 years the centrifuges that are not dismantled come out, they're upgraded and in 13 years, by experts, iran will have the capability of having at least 100 nuclear-tipped icbm's. how is that in the best interest of america? how is that in the best interest of our allies in the middle east? how is that in the best interest of america and the world? it is not. the policy of the united states
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has been to reduce our stockpiles, reduce the countries that hold these incredible, destructive weapons -- ukraine, south africa are examples. lastly -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. royce: i yield the gentleman an additional minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. zinke: lastly, how could anyone vote for a deal in which full disclosure of documents is not delivered? no member of this body has been privy to the secret deal between the international atomic energy agency and iran. no member has read this. and yet the verification is so incredibly critical and yet we're willing to cede our sovereignty. no americans on it for a verification process that is 24 days that even general hayden says you can only monitor what
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you can see. this is a bad deal. the argument is take this deal or go to war. i say this deal promotes war. it promotes nuclear proliferation. it's not the best interest of the united states and it puts ourselves, americans, and the world at risk. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: thank you. i yield to the distinguished gentleman from california, mr. huffman, two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for two minutes. mr. huffman: i thank the gentleman. mr. speaker, i rise in support of the joint comprehensive plan of action because we cannot allow iran to have a nuclear weapon and this is the smartest, most responsible way to prevent that. nuclear experts, our own military and intelligence communities and all five nations that have negotiated with us, countries that have a direct interest in preventing an iranian bomb, all agree this deal will work. t does it by restricting their
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enrichment to nonthreatening level and has an unprecedented of inspections, mechanisms that are not built on trust, they are built on distrust and verification. is this deal perfect? no. i would prefer a deal that permanently bans all enrichment. however, experts agree that this deal can and will keep iran's nuclear program in a box for at least the next 15 years. now, opponents think we should blow this deal up, walk away and try for a better deal. with all due respect, i think they're in denial. all of our negotiating partners tell us that's not going to happen. we'd go forward with a much weaker hand, without any, perhaps, sanctioned partners at all with a huge loss of credibility for abandoning our own deal. blowing this deal up only makes sense if you're prepared to go to war. and i know that across the aisle -- i'm distressed to say
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-- many think that's a good idea. i'm concerned across the aisle there is a outbreak of dick cheney fever and apple neshia. they want to -- amnesia. they want to take us back to the years where militarism made us less safe. there is a smarter way forward to prevent iran from having a bomb. let's give diplomacy and peace a chance. let's support this agreement. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from north carolina, mr. george holding. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from north carolina is recognized for two minutes. mr. holding: i thank the chairman. the chairman is one of the most brightest and inciteful foreign policy minds that this congress has ever produced. i rise in support of the legislation in front of us. mr. speaker, for years our nation, in conjunction with partners across the globe, built up a robust sanctions package against the regime in tehran for their illegal nuclear work, among other
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illicit actions and activities and these sanctions worked, mr. speaker. iran's economy crumbled which forced them to the negotiating table. only trouble is, mr. speaker, on the other side of that negotiating table was the obama administration, a group so eager to sign a deal that they gave into the iranians at every turn and forgot the true nature and evil of who they were dealing with. to get a deal the administration walked back many of their initial demands, demands that actually might have made this a better deal. mr. speaker, it is all too clear that this deal must be reworked and rejected. now, i certainly believe that there is a role for diplomacy, but diplomacy must come from a source of strength, not weakness and capitulation, which is why the legislation before us today is so important. the waivers built into our sanctions were not meant to be used by any president to force and reement, pass congress
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the majority people. we should not be relaxing sanctions and giving iran more money. more money to spread terror, more money to execute civilians, more money to support murderous proxy regimes. mr. speaker, this deal cannot stand, and i urge support of this deal and yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield two minutes to the distinguished the gentlelady from california, ms. chu. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from california is recognized for two minutes. ms. chu: i rise today against this measure to restrain president obama from lifting sanctions and to support the iran deal, the most important step that we could take to secure the future of this planet by stopping iran's nuclear program for 15 years. a nuclear iran is an unacceptable danger. iran's support of terror and aggression throughout the
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world, its stated threats to israel and the nuclear arms race they would trigger are the reasons the world's major powers came together to put crushing sanctions on iran in the first place. currently iran could produce enough material for a nuclear weapon in two to three months. under this deal, iran must take several unprecedented steps that would prevent them from having a nuclear weapon in 15 years. this deal goes further than any agreement in history by including inspections of iran's entire uranium enrichment supply chain for up to 25 years. additionally, iran will be subject to inspections under the additional protocol forever. it is those crushing economic sanctions that brought iran to the table to finally accept the nuclear deal. what is critical to remember is that our terrorism sanctions a ll remain in place, and if military strike is necessary, the u.s. will have the time and temmings to intervene but --
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intelligence to intervene but without the threat of a nuclear bomb in 15 years. without this deal, sanctions will be lifted anyway and we will be left with nothing but fear, uncertainty and an unfettered iran. considering the anxiety of recent years when the prospect of a military strike on iran felt imminent, this deal is a welcomed alternative, and the risks of rejecting it are too great. for the sake of our -- the security of our allies and our position as a trustworthy global leader, i urge my colleagues to support the deal and reject this resolution. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from south carolina, mr. jeff duncan, chairman of the foreign affairs subcommittee on the western hemisphere. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from south carolina is recognized for two minutes. mr. duncan: thank you, mr. chairman. let me just pause to say that i remember the events of 9/11/01
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and i want to thank the first responders and those men and women in uniform and those that protect us every day. mr. speaker, i strongly oppose the nuclear agreement with iran. i strongly oppose giving the president the ability to unilaterally lift sanctions, congressional sanctions. our allies don't trust us and our enemies don't fear us. i think we ought to take iran at its word. here's some quotes. during the negotiations, ayatollah said this, the enemies are talking about the options they have on the table. they should know that the first option on our table is the annihilation of israel. the ayatollah khomeini said this, the iranian people and leadership with god's help will increase their defensive capacity, capability each day. through the iran deal we're getting ready to give iran $150 billion.
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they can do a lot of damage with that. they're the largest state sponsor of terrorism. they're responsible for killing people in indonesia, in india and all across the globe. . the ayatollah has said we will not stop supporting our allies. that's hamas, that's hezbollah, and other terrorist groups. they have said their own words, take them at their word, they will continue to support materially and financially the terrorism groups like in yemen. there's nothing we can do to stop it. they have also said that we, western powers, will not have access to secret military sites or secret nuclear sites. yet we are going to give them 24 days in this agreement? america, i didn't say 24 hours, i said 24 days advance notice. 24 days advance notice before we are going to inspect a site.
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are you kidding me? we are going to allow them to self-regulate. that means they can go out in the desert and get clean dirt and air and provide that. that's like telling a regular drug user you can bring somebody else's urine and hair sample to a drug test. this is crazy that we are giving iran $150 billion and an opportunity to get a nuclear weapon in 10 years or less. 10 years or less assuming they are going to adhere to every line of the agreement which nobody i talked to believes iran will adhere to the agreement. they will have a nuclear weapon. the immediate concern is $150 billion and lifting sanctions. money given to iran so they can continue to fund terrorism around the globe. people will die as a result of this agreement. $150 billion can buy a lot of weapons, financial support for terrorist groups, continue attacking our allies and americans anywhere they are in the world. mr. chairman, i strongly oppose that as you can tell by my passion today, it's time for us
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to really talk in real terms about what this agreement is. with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yield back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, i'm pleased now to recognize the gentlelady from california, ms. sanchez, for two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from california is recognized for two minutes. ms. sanchez: thank you, mr. speaker. thank you, mr. chairman. they sound like warmongers, don't they? those iranian leaders. so we sit here today humbled at the task before us. we sit here as members of the world's greatest legislative body debating the future of our country and the future of the world. because iran with a nuclear weapon is a threat to the world. after months of intense review
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and passion and conversation with the people i represent and with advisors, with my colleagues, after 19 years on the armed services committee, 17 of those on the committee that deals with nuclear proliferation and nonproliferation, chairing that committee for the democrats , i believe that diplomacy first is the best path for the united states and our allies. we stand here to discuss the issues of war and peace. of whether we believe in diplomacy with verification or armed engagement. we sit here and we reflect on all of those that will be affected by our votes. my family, our family, the soldiers, and countless others. but can we look them directly in the eye and say we did all that we could do?
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can we tell them we did not give diplomacy a chance? so don't get me wrong. i'm no fan of iran. when some many in this chamber rush to war in iraq, i stood up and said no. and i said, at that time, iran is where we need to keep our focus. we need to ensure that this deal is implemented, and we need to hold those accountable to implement it correctly. and that's our role as members of congress. no deal is perfect. the speaker pro t >> they finished up work today and members back tuesday. the senate finished up their
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work yesterday and not quite done with the iran issue and will be back on tuesday as well. open up the phone lines to get your thoughts and how republican leadership in the house handled the procedure in the house this eek. here's how the votes shook out the last couple of days in the house. today, they finished up work by failing to approve the iran nuclear agreement. they did pass today the lifting of preventing the president from lifting the iran sanctions and yesterday approved a sense of the house resolution saying the white house failed to give congress the appropriate paperwork, details on the so-called side deals between iran and the iaea. the senate yesterday failed to
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move forward on their resolution of disapproval and didn't get the 60 votes they needed. and they will try again on tuesday. follow that. the senate returning on tuesday and second attempt at a cloture agreement 6:00 p.m. on tuesday. get to your calls and thoughts on the iran debate this week as the house comes back from their summer recess. if you want to send us a tweet c-span. watching fore been the last two days and it's very boggling what's going on in the senate and the house. my biggest complaint is, the democrats keep bringing up --
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these people have said that and these people have said that and not quoting anybody specifically. and it sounds like, we heard that they said this or they said this. i'm not privy to all the magazines and newspaper articles and that type of thing but i don't have any specifics going on with who says what. you want to get to the truth and you're not getting there because they are not telling the truth. there shouldn't beside deals when it comes to atomic energy. let's ask japan if they want a side deal. that's all i had to say and i appreciate the time. host: the issue of the alleged side deals between the international atomic energy agency and the nation of iran not part of the agreement. but that issue prompted peter
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roskham of illinois and others to bring this to the attention of leadership earlier in the week and changing plans in the u.s. house. here's sherry in alabama. go ahead. caller: there's no way there shouldn't be surprise inspections. you don't let your children police themselves or pets police themselves. any time you make a deal with anyone, you have to have verification and has to be just like checking on your kids. you don't tell them when you are coming back home so you can check on them. doesn't make sense to let everyone police themselves. most people don't have that kind of self-control frankly and we just can't expect that from a long distance. my only other comment as long as people being held in iran, no
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reason to make a deal. that should have been the first concession for them to show good faith is let some of the people they are still holding go. that was just a no-brainer. and i'm disappointed that the president is pushing forward with something that we aren't looking out for our own citizens. i appreciate your time and i turned on the coverage a few minutes ago and very interested in watching it. and thank you for letting people make a comment. host: we are going to show you the date again in just a bit. and we are reairing the debate beginning at 8:00 here on c-span. otto who is in texas, republican line. caller: my opinion it's a bad deal all around. i don't know how you can have secret agreements and have a treaty or whatever they're
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calling it. ut the money, the $150 billion being used for terrorists. it's a bad deal all the way around. host: tweet us at c-span. thankful the house is doing what it can to stop this dangerous bill. the house failing to approve and in the senate, daniel says the senate rejected this yesterday. so the house vote today is meaningless. the senate failing to move forward on their resolution of disapproval. gerard, north carolina. caller: we are giving billions of dollars to a chief adversary in the middle east? i mean it's like financing our enemy, is it not? so i don't know, i find this unconscionable and all the other
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portions of the deal such as the inspections and 24-day delay for inspections and not being permitted to get into their military sites. it's tantamount to suicide, in my opinion. -- san fer valley valley.- san fernando caller: you know, you have to have strength at the table in order to get an agreement that's fair and reasonable to everybody concerned. we did not play the cards we were dealt. they were in such a vulnerable position in terms of their economy. if we took a position of strength we would have come out of this with a deal that is agreeable to everyone. i also agree that you need to trust but verify. and verify means immediate
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inspections without notice, without that tool, we have nothing. we have a word of an enemy that has lied on every issue that has been brought before them. i thank you very much for the opportunity to speak my mind. hopefully there is something we can still do. host: go to facebook.com/cspan and how the republicans handled the debate. this is steve who said, hopefully the 162 democrats who voted for this agreement will be replaced. 25 democrats voted against the iran nuclear agreement. host: theresa from oklahoma.
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caller: if this deal goes through and these people are going to attack israel, israel is going to retaliate and start fighting. and then if we are going to give them all that money, why don't we open up all of our airports and just start bombing or whatever they want to do. i think we should say no and tell the president no. that's it. impeach him, because we don't eed to lose losing men and women in uniform for something that is stupid. host: the israeli leader, benjamin netanyahu is set to meet with president obama in early november.
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taking your calls in reaction to this week's debate in the house and senate about the iran nuclear agreement. the joint plan of action goode to by the p5+1. and iran which will go into effect by september 17, next week. mack is next in texas and on our republican line. mack in texas, go ahead. caller: yes. i just have one question. this is mostly for the senate and mitch mcconnell. when harry reid was the majority leader in the senate, he was real quick to use the nuclear votes tonly needing 51 pass. why can't mitch mcconnell invoke the nuclear option. that's what harry reid would do.
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i have called mitch mcconnell's office, ted cruz and gohmert, my representative in texas. why can't they kill this horrible deal? host: that was a big part of the discussion on the floor of the senate. if you missed any of the senate you have that at c-span dorgan link on the front to this week's debate. richard on the democrats' line. on er: i feel like the talk the republican side is disingenuous when it comes to the 24-daytime period. all the places that are used for nuclear enrichment are supposed to be imimmediate -- immediately
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verified. 24 days are for place aren't cited. it is a little disingenuous and thank you for my calls. host: regina, saratoga springs, california. caller: it's saratoga springs, new york. i'm concerned about the credit built of the republican house. i listened to the debate and based on the nation's experience with this house, i think they lack credibility. i believe given the response of the democrats i was listening to during the debate, they are trying to deal with the reality of the program that iran has right now rather than the rogram we would like them to have. the treaty does try to address
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what's going on at this particular time. and everyone saying it's not the treaty we want but maybe given the best we can get. so i think that what i was hearing from the republicans was that they weren't actually taking into account in their responses the fact that we are right up against it in terms of the iranians. they have all the capacity they have right now. it's not like diplomacy is like kind of a pie in the sky thing. host: regina from new york, appreciate your comments. thanks for all your calls. and tomorrow morning on "washington journal" at 7:00 a.m. eastern. we'll show you the debate from today. a recap of what happened today and the iran debate this week in the house and senate.
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iran nuclear agreement fails to move forward in the house but you tweet about the president's reaction, a shout out on the deal, the lawmakers led by democratic leader pelosi have taken care to judge the deal. tell us how leader pelosi got the votes. 25 went over and voted against the iran deal in the house. guest: this is not a win for president obama and his legacy. but really for the democratic leadership here in congress. leader pelosi was able to keep so many of her democratic lawmakers, they are in the minority, keep them aligned behind president obama. enough members that had the republicans succeeded in sending
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a resolution of disapproval to the president and if he had sent it back with a veto, she would have had the numbers to uphold it and a testament to leader pelosi of keeping folks together on a very, very difficult issue. over the last several weeks, they are taking so much care to make their decisions, talking to so many constituents, having so much pressure. they were releasing pages and pages long statements of their views. it was a very difficult decision but leader pelosi was able to keep her democrats behind the president and that was a real change from what people thought going into this. republicans had the wind at their back and they really came out not with the outcome. host: the house took up and passed two measures, one dealing with their contention that the administration hadn't provided enough information on the so-called side deals and the
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other one preventing the president from lifting those sanctions, so republicans see this as a win, but does this mean in terms of any future action in the senate? guest: this is a slow motion end of the debate. i think we will continue to see votes like this. possibly more in the house and certainly senate majority leader mitch mcconnell has set up another vote in the senate for next tuesday evening to try again to break the democratic filibuster on the senate resolution of disapproval of the deal. those efforts at this point appear to be largely symbolic because it does not seem that republicans are going to be able to change any of their democratic colleagues to join them on this. once these lawmakers have made up their minds again on a very difficult decision, it's difficult for them to switch back.
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so these measures will sort of be out there and will be continued efforts but i don't know that it will result in any changes to the implementation of the iran deal which as you know by september 17 was the original deadline. congress said will flow past that and take up these issues down the road. host: you talk about symbolic, one of the headlines in your piece says that as well. after failing to block iran deal, g.o.p. conducts symbolic votes. take us back to the house and their determination to switch from a resolution of disapproval to this three-prong approach rather than trying to pass an approval. what's the fallout of that and is there any fallout in terms of the rank and file on the republican side? guest: you have had a
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last-minute upsurge of revolt in the house. republican leaders have an agreed upon plan in both the house and senate. and rank and file lawmakers decided not to go along. this shouldn't be surprising because there was a lot of concern among rank and file lawmakers over the plan or the strategy. but it did blindside john boehner and kevin mccarthy and had to switch gears this week. while the senate was passing or was trying to pass this disapproval resolution, they said we'll take this opportunity and disapprove of the resolution and veto showdown with the white house and force president obama to have to veto the bill and send it back to congress. and if congress is unable to overturn that veto, republicans thought it would be a strong
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show of their disappointment in their rejection of this deal. of course that didn't happen. it didn't get out of the senate and the house never voted on that because of their own infighting. the problem with the rank and file were practical and political. they didn't think it was strong enough and had concerns about the side deals that the international atomic energy agency has negotiated with iran. and they wanted more meat to it. they also on a practical level -- they were frustrated by what was happening in the senate and the democrats' ability to filibuster and wanted to do something stronger that would put everyone in the house owe stronger footing. and that didn't pass either and this issue that was in republicans' favor collapsed around them.
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host: follow lisa. thanks for that update. and as lisa talked about, to recap what happened in the house, they passed a measure to prevent the president from lifting the economic sanctions and failed to approve the iran nuclear agreement. and yesterday passed a sense of the house resolution calling out the administration for not providing -- house republicans saying, sufficient paperwork and ackground between the iaea and iran. the senate will be back on tuesday and at 6:00 p.m. another attempt to invoke cloture to move toward ending debate on that resolution of disapproval. following the house on c-span. and part of the seven hours of debate. today's debate on the two iranian resolutions. ntd.
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mr. royce: mr . spke in support of this legi slatio i president from waiving iran sanctions and prevent the implementation of this fatally flawed agreement. last night we spent many hours debating this agreement. we heard from members on both sides of the aisle, members who have deep concerns about where we are headed. mr. speaker, let's be very clear, this isn't just a bad deal. it's a disastrous deal. it's a disaster for the united states. it's a disaster for our allies and friends in the region, including israel. and when you think about it, when we think about the letter that we sent, 84% of us in this house signed the letter asking for four critical things in this negotiation. we got rolled on every one of the four. iran won on every point.
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iran gets to keep its nuclear infrastructure. the obama administration collapsed on the issue of verification. we don't have anywhere, any time inspections in here. we have got self-inspections by the iranian regime with respect to parchin, which is the one military site where we know, we know that the iranians, because of 1,000 pages of documents, did most of their bomb work. and they say now, no, no, no. we'll do the inspections. we'll turn that stuff over, but nobody's going into our military sites. that's the argument they are making. and the sunset clause in this means the key parts of this deal expire at the end of the deal. so, we've got prominent sanctions relief for the iranian regime, relief that's going to go into their military in exchange for temporary constraints on iran's nuclear program. and the restrictions on iran's
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missile program designed to deliver those weapons -- now, this came up in the 11th hour of this negotiation, no one anticipated it being in the agreement. at the 11th hour the russians came forward and on behalf of the iranians said we want the lifting of the sanctions, international sanctions that the community has on the icbm program and on the arms transfers. with respect to iran. and unbelievably we ended up getting rolled on this as well. as the secretary of defense told congress, the i in icbm stands for intercontinental, meaning flying, from iran to the united states. that is why, that is why we never wanted this lifted. it also provides resources and legitimacy to the iranian revolutionary guard corps. the very same organization that
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has killed 500 u.s. troops in iraq. this nuclear deal really needs to be put in a larger context of the administration's iran policy. it is very dangerous, very risky. i'd say doomed to fail as a policy given the fact that we haven't seen any adjustment out of iran other than a recommittal on the part of the regime in iran where they say we are not going to be bound by any of the ballistic missile constraints. we don't intend to follow that. and by the way, we're advancing new ballistic missiles and targeting and putting that into the hands of hezbollah and into the hands of hamas. that's the messaging we have seen this week out of iran. so i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized.
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mr. conyers: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. conyers: thank you. mr. speaker and members, i strongly oppose h.r. 3460 because it is another attempt to derail diplomacy and set the united states on the path to war. h.r. 3460 suspends until january 21, 2017, meaning through the rest of president obama's term, the authority of the president to waive, suspend, or reduce sanctions pursuant to the iran nuclear agreement. this legislation was introduced less than 48 hours ago, and has absolutely no committee process.
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while the foreign affairs committee has held 30 hearings since the announcement of the joint plan of action in november , 2013, this legislation has never even been a topic of committee discussion. so this is not a serious attempt to legislate. put simply, it's a political attack on the president of the attempt to s and an derail a good deal that is in the best interest of the our ation. but iran -- the iran deal represents the cumulative effects of countless diplomats after imposing some of the toughest sanctions in the the ry, the p 35 plus one,
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u.s. -- the p5+1, the u.s., united kingdom, germany, france, russia, were able to bring iran to the table and strike a deal that achieves our core strategy objectives. president obama and secretary of state kerry deserve our respect and thanks for this achievement. they kept together a coalition that forced iran to make serious concessions in how they operate their domestic nuclear program. redid not get everything that we wanted, but we achieved a verifiable deal that is our best hope to prevent iran from developing a nuclear weapon. details of the deal are
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commendable, among other things, iran will reduce its uranium stockpile by 98%, and lower its enrichment level below weapon levels. this will increase the breakout time or how long it takes to create a weapon to one year. in addition, the international atomic energy agency will oversee testing and inspections and cheating will be severely punished with snapback provisions that reimpose the crippling sanctions that brought iran to the table. unfortunately, it appears that the majority does not understand progress in diplomacy. those who are trying to undermine this historic agreement are motivated by the
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same naive approach to negotiation that has paralyzed this congress. this time unless they get everything they want, they will not accept the deal that forestalls war and prevents iran from becoming a nuclear power. it this intransigence may be new in its degree, but it is an old and regretful approach taken by critics of diplomacy. i remember almost 30 years ago when a president late in his second term reached out his hand in peace. attempts to constrain and ultimately reduce the nuclear stockpiles were mocked. i rarely saw eye to eye with that president, but nearly three
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decades later i'm glad that he stood up when he did. that president was ronald reagan . when he signed the treaty with mr. gorbachev, he faced the same fury we face today. however, the soviet union was replaced by a growing number of free and independent states and 28 years later the united states is still standing and remains as strong as ever. the lesson in all of this is that diplomacy is rarely clean and it develops in its own time. there are stops and starts. things move forward. sometimes backwards. and even often sideways.
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but repeatedly we have shown that a step in the direction of peace will be met in kind, whether a republican or democratic president seeks that piece -- peace, congress has an obligation to support those efforts. i'm proud of our president's efforts to forge a new path with iran. the iran deal prevents iran from developing a bomb, creates new foundation for diplomacy and and stands as a proud tradition of progress. i urge my colleagues to carefully consider and oppose i . 3460, and mr. speaker, reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: mr. speaker, i'd make the point with respect to ronald reagan, when president reagan was presented a bad deal in his negotiations with the russians, at that point -- at that point he walked away from that deal. he pushed away from the deal because in his mind we could come back and get a better deal if we stood our ground. this was not the circumstance with respect to our negotiations with iran. with iranian negotiations, we had four points that this congress, 8 % of us sent a -- 84% of us sent a letter to the secretary of state. those points was to be anywhere, anytime inspections. it was supposed to last multiple decades. we were not supposed to lift the sanctions upfront but do it over the entirety of the agreement in order to get
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compliance, to ensure we had compliance. it was to make certain that those 12 questions that the iaea had asked were answered. these were all important because, again, as reagan ointed out to the russians, he threw their own expression back to them. there is an old russian expression, trust but verify, and that's what we need to apply to the agreement. that's the last point i would make here, the verification component of it. when you have side agreements, which congress has not seen, and those side agreements allow, in the case of parchin, where we have ample evidence of their past bomb work, allow the iranians to do their own inspections. i mean, i always thought it was going to be international inspectors that did the international inspections. not the iranians themselves. and for these reasons i do not think it's anational just.
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i think we -- analogous. i think we should do what reagan did, no, we need a tter negotiation and we need to trust but verify. i yield to the gentleman from montana for two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. zink: we are talking about billions of dollars into iran. at least 500 troops, which i served with in yirke, died as a result of iran. mr. zinke: iran is not our friend. they are our enemy. at this -- at least this regime. you cannot say that hezbollah or hamas, the surrogates of iran, would not do the same on
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9/11 as what occurred today in 2001. let's look at this deal. general dempsey, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff said upped no circumstances do we send missile technology to iran and yet for five years we relax sanctions to include missile systems, to include the same missile systems that iran has given to hamas. at least 1,000 of them directly and as many 10,000 into israel from gaza. in eight years we will relax sanctions on icbm's. there is only one purpose for an icbm and that is to strike america. yet, in 10 years -- remember, part of the deal, dismantle for dismantle. dismantle the sanctions. iran was going to dismantle their nuclear facilities, their capabilities and their ambitions. in 10 years the centrifuges that are not dismantled come
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out, they're upgraded and in 13 years, by experts, iran will have the capability of having at least 100 nuclear-tipped icbm's. how is that in the best interest of america? how is that in the best interest of our allies in the middle east? how is that in the best interest of america and the world? it is not. the policy of the united states has been to reduce our stockpiles, reduce the countries that hold these incredible, destructive weapons -- ukraine, south africa are examples. lastly -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. royce: i yield the gentleman an additional minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. zinke: lastly, how could anyone vote for a deal in which full disclosure of documents is not delivered? no member of this body has been privy to the secret deal between the international
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atomic energy agency and iran. no member has read this. and yet the verification is so incredibly critical and yet we're willing to cede our sovereignty. no americans on it for a verification process that is 24 days that even general hayden says you can only monitor what you can see. this is a bad deal. the argument is take this deal or go to war. i say this deal promotes war. it promotes nuclear proliferation. it's not the best interest of the united states and it puts ourselves, americans, and the world at risk. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: thank you. i yield to the distinguished gentleman from california, mr. huffman, two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for two minutes. mr. huffman: i thank the gentleman. mr. speaker, i rise in support
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of the joint comprehensive plan of action because we cannot allow iran to have a nuclear weapon and this is the smartest, most responsible way to prevent that. nuclear experts, our own military and intelligence communities and all five nations that have negotiated with us, countries that have a direct interest in preventing an iranian bomb, all agree this deal will work. t does it by restricting their enrichment to nonthreatening level and has an unprecedented of inspections, mechanisms that are not built on trust, they are built on distrust and verification. is this deal perfect? no. i would prefer a deal that permanently bans all enrichment. however, experts agree that this deal can and will keep iran's nuclear program in a box for at least the next 15 years. now, opponents think we should blow this deal up, walk away and try for a better deal. with all due respect, i think
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they're in denial. all of our negotiating partners tell us that's not going to happen. we'd go forward with a much weaker hand, without any, perhaps, sanctioned partners at all with a huge loss of credibility for abandoning our own deal. blowing this deal up only makes sense if you're prepared to go to war. and i know that across the aisle -- i'm distressed to say -- many think that's a good idea. i'm concerned across the aisle there is a outbreak of dick cheney fever and apple neshia. they want to -- amnesia. they want to take us back to the years where militarism made us less safe. there is a smarter way forward to prevent iran from having a bomb. let's give diplomacy and peace a chance. let's support this agreement. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from north carolina, mr. george holding. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from north carolina is recognized for two minutes.
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mr. holding: i thank the chairman. the chairman is one of the most brightest and inciteful foreign policy minds that this congress has ever produced. i rise in support of the legislation in front of us. mr. speaker, for years our nation, in conjunction with partners across the globe, built up a robust sanctions package against the regime in tehran for their illegal nuclear work, among other illicit actions and activities and these sanctions worked, mr. speaker. iran's economy crumbled which forced them to the negotiating table. only trouble is, mr. speaker, on the other side of that negotiating table was the obama administration, a group so eager to sign a deal that they gave into the iranians at every turn and forgot the true nature and evil of who they were dealing with. to get a deal the administration walked back many of their initial demands, demands that actually might have made this a better deal. mr. speaker, it is all too clear that this deal must be
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reworked and rejected. now, i certainly believe that there is a role for diplomacy, but diplomacy must come from a source of strength, not weakness and capitulation, which is why the legislation before us today is so important. the waivers built into our sanctions were not meant to be used by any president to force and reement, pass congress the majority people. we should not be relaxing sanctions and giving iran more money. more money to spread terror, more money to execute civilians, more money to support murderous proxy regimes. mr. speaker, this deal cannot stand, and i urge support of this deal and yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield two minutes to the distinguished the gentlelady from california, ms. chu. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from california is recognized for two minutes. ms. chu: i rise today against
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this measure to restrain president obama from lifting sanctions and to support the iran deal, the most important step that we could take to secure the future of this planet by stopping iran's nuclear program for 15 years. a nuclear iran is an unacceptable danger. iran's support of terror and aggression throughout the world, its stated threats to israel and the nuclear arms race they would trigger are the reasons the world's major powers came together to put crushing sanctions on iran in the first place. currently iran could produce enough material for a nuclear weapon in two to three months. under this deal, iran must take several unprecedented steps that would prevent them from having a nuclear weapon in 15 years. this deal goes further than any agreement in history by including inspections of iran's entire uranium enrichment supply chain for up to 25
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years. additionally, iran will be subject to inspections under the additional protocol forever. it is those crushing economic sanctions that brought iran to the table to finally accept the nuclear deal. what is critical to remember is that our terrorism sanctions a ll remain in place, and if military strike is necessary, the u.s. will have the time and temmings to intervene but -- intelligence to intervene but without the threat of a nuclear bomb in 15 years. without this deal, sanctions will be lifted anyway and we will be left with nothing but fear, uncertainty and an unfettered iran. considering the anxiety of recent years when the prospect of a military strike on iran felt imminent, this deal is a welcomed alternative, and the risks of rejecting it are too great. for the sake of our -- the security of our allies and our position as a trustworthy global leader, i urge my colleagues to support the deal and reject this resolution.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from south carolina, mr. jeff duncan, chairman of the foreign affairs subcommittee on the western hemisphere. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from south carolina is recognized for two minutes. mr. duncan: thank you, mr. chairman. let me just pause to say that i remember the events of 9/11/01 and i want to thank the first responders and those men and women in uniform and those that protect us every day. mr. speaker, i strongly oppose the nuclear agreement with iran. i strongly oppose giving the president the ability to unilaterally lift sanctions, congressional sanctions. our allies don't trust us and our enemies don't fear us. i think we ought to take iran at its word. here's some quotes. during the negotiations, ayatollah said this, the enemies are talking about the options they have on the table.
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they should know that the first option on our table is the annihilation of israel. the ayatollah khomeini said this, the iranian people and leadership with god's help will increase their defensive capacity, capability each day. through the iran deal we're getting ready to give iran $150 billion. they can do a lot of damage with that. they're the largest state sponsor of terrorism. they're responsible for killing people in indonesia, in india and all across the globe. . the ayatollah has said we will not stop supporting our allies. that's hamas, that's hezbollah, and other terrorist groups. they have said their own words, take them at their word, they will continue to support materially and financially the terrorism groups like in yemen.
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there's nothing we can do to stop it. they have also said that we, western powers, will not have access to secret military sites or secret nuclear sites. yet we are going to give them 24 days in this agreement? america, i didn't say 24 hours, i said 24 days advance notice. 24 days advance notice before we are going to inspect a site. are you kidding me? we are going to allow them to self-regulate. that means they can go out in the desert and get clean dirt and air and provide that. that's like telling a regular drug user you can bring somebody else's urine and hair sample to a drug test. this is crazy that we are giving iran $150 billion and an opportunity to get a nuclear weapon in 10 years or less. 10 years or less assuming they are going to adhere to every line of the agreement which nobody i talked to believes iran will adhere to the agreement. they will have a nuclear weapon. the immediate concern is $150
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billion and lifting sanctions. money given to iran so they can continue to fund terrorism around the globe. people will die as a result of this agreement. $150 billion can buy a lot of weapons, financial support for terrorist groups, continue attacking our allies and americans anywhere they are in the world. mr. chairman, i strongly oppose that as you can tell by my passion today, it's time for us to really talk in real terms about what this agreement is. with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yield back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, i'm pleased now to recognize the gentlelady from california, ms. sanchez, for two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from california is recognized for two minutes. ms. sanchez: thank you, mr. speaker. thank you, mr. chairman. they sound like warmongers, don't they? those iranian leaders. so we sit here today humbled at
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the task before us. we sit here as members of the world's greatest legislative body debating the future of our country and the future of the world. because iran with a nuclear weapon is a threat to the world. after months of intense review and passion and conversation with the people i represent and with advisors, with my colleagues, after 19 years on the armed services committee, 17 of those on the committee that deals with nuclear proliferation and nonproliferation, chairing that committee for the democrats , i believe that diplomacy first is the best path for the united states and our allies. we stand here to discuss the issues of war and peace. of whether we believe in
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diplomacy with verification or armed engagement. we sit here and we reflect on all of those that will be affected by our votes. my family, our family, the soldiers, and countless others. but can we look them directly in the eye and say we did all that we could do? can we tell them we did not give diplomacy a chance? so don't get me wrong. i'm no fan of iran. when some many in this chamber rush to war in iraq, i stood up and said no. and i said, at that time, iran is where we need to keep our focus. we need to ensure that this deal is implemented, and we need to hold those accountable to
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implement it correctly. and that's our role as members of congress. no deal is perfect. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. ms. sanchez: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california can is recognized. mr. royce: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. meehan. the eaker pro tempore: gentleman from pennsylvania is recognized for two minutes. mr. meehan: i want to thank the chairman for his leadership. mr. speaker, i raise rise in opposition to the iran deal. i believe the inspections regime is weak. i don't think the iranians can be trusted. nor can we reasonably assume that iran will hold up its end of the deal. a broad swath of sanctions is lifted all at once and the deal lists the arms embargo. iran will further destabilize an already dangerous middle east by trafficking more weapons and rockets to its terrorist proxies like hamas and hezbollah. iran's coffers will be flush
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with cash to fund iranian terror around the world. but iranian terrorism isn't new. iran is the leading state sponsor of terrorism. its support and influence was there in beirut in 1983, khobar 1998. in 1996, nairobi in on this day, 9/11. it's been there at suicide bombings on buses at shopping malls and pisa shops. it supported hostage takings and assassinations around the world. and to this we are to look to diplomacy? u.s. law allows victims these attacks to sue iran for damages in u.s. courts. over the last 15 years the united states courts have handed down more than 80 judgments against iran with $43 billion in damages. of course not a penny has been paid. i know there's disagreement on this overall issue, but truly we can agree that iran should have
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to pay out these damages to its victims' families before iran benefits from u.s. sanctions leaf. i have introduced a justice for victims of iran act. it requires the president to certify that iran has paid all judgments owed to its victims before u.s. sanctions can be lifted. our position is, not one cent. and sanctions relief for iran until it pays up to its victims. not one cent. mr. speaker, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, i'm pleased to yield to a distinguished member of the judiciary committee, the gentlelady from texas, ms. jackson lee, four minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from texas is recognized for four minutes. ms. jackson lee: i thank the gentleman very much. what a weighty responsibility to stand on this floor on september 11. for those of us who were here in this body on that day, there's no more solemn responsibility than the national security of
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this nation. for that reason i'm gratified to my ranking member for being able to serve with him through those very difficult times and to be one of the original members of the new homeland security committee. i state on both those -- stayed on both those committees who hold in their hands the constitutional rights but also the national security. so i rise today with a heavy very to speak to this difficult decision. so i start by saying, i stand here as a mother. i will choose to speak to that child in israel and the child in urban and rural america, and the children around the world, and i would ask my colleagues the question, what is our burden and responsibility to those children that if we have an opportunity not for peace but an opportunity to stop a potential nuclear
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rogue. would we not take that opportunity? or would we find all kinds of obstacles? i rise in opposition to the underlying bill and i rise today in support of this nonnuclear proliferation agreement. i thank the president and secretary kerry, but i thank more importantly, republicans and democrats and independents. i thank the negotiators. mr. speaker, what we have is the statement and the agreement signed by iran that it will never, never become a nuclear power. this agreement creates an enforceable road map for dismantling iran's nuclear program. before the interim joint agreement in 2013, iran went from operating approximately 164 centrifuges to 10,000. and then they went to 19,000. but this agreement brings them down to 6,000.
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is that not a standing in the gap against a known actor of terrorism? and then of course we have them at 300 k.g. enriched uranium and they are only allowed to ebb rich 3.67. we have a road -- enrich 3.67. we have a road map for the various entities that contributed to their ability to make a nuclear bomb. make no mistake about it. you cannot take away knowledge. even if you bomb iran through war, you cannot take away knowledge. they will ultimately have the ability to come back again. now we have an agreement with the p5+1. this is not munich. for munich was a capitulation. no one in this agreement is capitulating to iran. we are demanding that iran cease and desist. tell the american people the truth. this is the best pathway to ensuring that the scientists and all. and for those who say that it is
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a reckless regime or scheme, rather, of inspection, they are wrong. because the only 24-day process deals with the undeclared. and even that has an ultimatum that the sanctions will snap back. but the iaea inspectors trained by the united states, the united states will be present on site at the iaea, and many members travel there and got a direct briefing of the intenseness of their inspection process. america will be on site when they come back with their inspection materials, and we will be at the table. we'll also be engaged in the redesign of some of those facilities in iran for more civilian uses. i ask you, mr. speaker, that if we have the opportunity to take away -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. ms. jackson lee: if we have the opportunity -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired.
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ms. jackson lee: to save a child from a speeding train, would we not take that opportunity to -- you the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. ms. jackson lee: i think we would. we need to save the children. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is no longer in recognition. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i'm pleased to yield one minute to our majority leader, mr. mccarthy. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. mccarthy: i thank the gentleman for yielding. i want to take a moment and thank the chairman. for his work that was done to the american public that they have been able to see directly through what this iran agreement's about. interesting thing is happening on this floor as i sit around and listen. i'm hearing republicans and democrats on the same side. those that are opposed to it are bipartisan. those that support this all come from one place.
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when i came to congress the one thing you were always told is, find a committee and stick with that committee because what happens is you get expertise. you care about banking you go to financial services, you get expertise year over year. taxes, ways and means. comes to foreign affairs, you get the expertise of something like this. you know what? i have listened to those who sit on those committees. and i look to the chairmen and the ranking member on the democratic side. you know what i heard from both of them? they are in the same position. they are opposed to this agreement. they took their years of expertise, they read through it, they did the hearings, and they came to the same conclusion. so i wonder, could that happen on the other side of this building inside the senate, because they have committees as well?
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the same bipartisan conclusion ame. it just didn't even come from the committees. the next democratic leader in the senate, the number two is opposed to the iran agreement. the american public always asks us for bipartisanship. this has brought us together. but it's not just in this house. it's almost in the majority of houses across america. you see, in the latest poll, only 21% of the american people actually approve of the deal. 49% oppose. more than two to one. only 2% of americans are confident that iran will abide by the agreement. why? because they never have before.
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iran has a history of not living p to their promises. it's clear today that what the president said he did not achieve. r. speaker, just in april it president obama said he will, and i quote, do what is necessary to prevent iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon. he said he would implement this deal, and i quote, to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. he did the opposite. in 13 years iran can have a nuclear weapon, not just because iran wants it, but america will say, then, it's ok. 13 years is not that far away.
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but that's not all iran gets in this deal. while we had sanctions on iran, the only reason they wanted to come to the table, what did they do with their money, even though it was scars, but they didn't have much? it funded terrorism around the world. well, what does this deal do? it gives them as much or maybe even more than the bailout that greece got. so what will iran become? they will become the central bank for terror in the world. that's what we're voting on today. if you want to know the truth about the deal, you go even further because there are side secret agreements we do not know. so on this side of the aisle we think we should keep with the law. we think when 400 people on this floor voted for the corker-cardin bill that said you had to have all agreements.
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we felt when there was 98 senators and only one opposed that you'd want to hold to the same agreement. why would anybody want to vote on something without having all the facts? especially after you read the do ts that maybe iran can self-inspection. well, if that's the case, why don't we wring to the floor and change the olympic committee and those athletes should be able to test them 70's -- themselves? i look for the education committee, maybe students should grade themselves. maybe that's facetious, but this is probably the most important bill you will vote on . your term in congress don't fall to political pressure because you don't need to. the bipartisanship, the majority of americans stands
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opposed. the expertise in this house hat you respect, regardless of what party you're in, because you elected them to head those committees, are opposed. if that's not enough, study history. history always repeats itself. have we not learned peace without freedom is meaningless? the president said he would not agree to any bad deal. well, i believe we can have a better deal. you know, history has shown chamberlain just wanted peace. history has shown at other times in america where presidents have stood up and stepped back and got a better agreement. ronald reagan wanted to end the nuclear weapons when it came to the soviet union. in the end of ronald reagan's
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second term he sat in iceland with gorbachev. he sat down across the table and he got almost everything he had asked for, but gorbachev asked for one more item. he asked that america would end their f.d.i. investment. ronald reagan had a choice. ronald reagan said no, but he said, i'll do something even better. i'll provide you the technology as well so everyone in the world could be safe. gosh shaff said no -- gorbachev said no. so that's a defining moment, not for that man but for this world, and ronald reagan got up and walked away. some people criticized on political basis, but i ask you this -- would the soviet union have collapsed with the berlin -- or the berlin wall collapsed at the time it did had reagan
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kept his firm and word for a better deal? peace without freedom is meaningless. this deal does not bring greater freedom to the world. it brings a nuclear missile race. this is not just about america, iran or a few other countries. no country in the middle east will sit back after this action . the world will not be safer. we will not be freer, but there's still an opportunity. history has shown if we're willing to stand up, take a step back and get a better agreement, we can have peace and freedom. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california yields back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: mr. speaker, how much time remains on each side?
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan has 13 minutes. the gentleman from california minutes. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. conyers: thank you. i'm pleased now to recognize the distinguished gentleman from illinois, mr. gutierrez, for two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois is recognized for two minutes. mr. gutierrez: mr. speaker, i'm -- i have a proud record, a record as strong as any member in congress in supporting israel and it's because of this support that i backed the deal that the president and our allies have negotiated. if i thought that this agreement made the state of israel more vulnerable, i would not support it. but that's just not the case. every security expert i trust, like colin powell, supports this deal, and almost every former government official i deeply distrust, like vice president dick cheney, opposes the agreement. this is one of the most detailed international agreements of its kind in memory, and it was no small task of american diplomacy, statesmanship and good old-fashioned negotiating that
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brought the deal to reality. the power and position of the united states as a world leader brought our allies to the table. it achieved an outcome our country working alone could not have achieved. it is not something that europeans, the russians, the chinese or even the united nations could have achieved. it is not something sanctions alone could achieve, and not something that war alone could achieve. the united states working with our friends and in some cases our rivals brought about this end to iran's nuclear weapons program with an agreement for verifiable, enforceable, effective curbs on iran's nuclear ambitions and it is in iran's interest to abide by this agreement. with this one step forward, the u.s. has helped erase our record of international shortsightedness. it gets us back on track as a leader who leverages our economic power, our military power, our powers to persuade and compromise and bring people together. there are not many times in a person's congressional career, in the course of history, for that matter, when a person can
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cast a vote literally for war or peace. voting to support the iran agreement is a vote to give peace a chance. stand up for men and women in uniform and their families and our nations by avoiding war. let us support a deal that is good for israel, good for america, good for peace and good for the world. mr. speaker, i'd like now to ask unanimous consent, representative yarmuth and i wrote an op-ed peace for "the hill" newspaper saying that iran deal is a good deal for america and a good deal for the world. i ask that be entered in the world. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from indiana, mr. todd young. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from indiana is recognized for two minutes. mr. young: i thank the chairman for yielding. mr. speaker, i rise to join the bipartisan opposition to the
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president's nuclear deal with iran. i didn't arrive at this decision lightly. as a former marine corps intelligence officer, i know the difficulty of detecting covert military activity, and i fully expect iran to cheat. for years president obama has said no deal would be better than a bad deal. now as the sun sets on his final term, he's jammed congress with an agreement riddled with dangerous concessions. no matter the verification arrangements, this deal does not block iran's pathway to a nuclear weapon. this much we know. rewarding the largest sponsor of international terrorism with billions of dollars and long-range missiles requires americans to compromise our nation's security. it's too high of price and one this marine's unwilling to pay.
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so as sure iran will continue chanting "death to america, "death to israel," i will oppose this agreement and i will resolve to work in a nonpartisan basis to proserve peace by projecting -- preserve peace by projecting strength. mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. mr. speaker, i'm pleased now to recognize the distinguished gentleman from california, mr. thompson, for two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for two minutes. mr. thompson: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, a nuclear armed iran is certainly unacceptable. and there are two ways to prevent iran from developing a nuclear weapon -- diplomacy and military force. as someone who served in combat, i believe our nation's first choice should always be diplomacy. i say first choice because nothing in this deal takes
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military action off the table. but before we go down that road, we need to give diplomacy a shot, and this deal is the best way forward. i'm not new to the issue. i just finished serving eight years on the intelligence committee. i reviewed the intelligence, i've read the classified documents and i've had numerous briefings with experts from every side of this issue. there is no other deal to be had. it's this or it's the status quo, and make no mistake, the status quo leaves iran just a short time away from a bomb. all of the intelligence clearly points towards the fact that this agreement is far better than doing nothing, better than the status quo. iran is already a nuclear threshold state. if we reject this deal, iran will keep getting closer and closer towards the development of their nuclear weapon. if we accept the deal, we will be able to halt iran's
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activities. the iaea will have enormous access to conduct inspections, and iran must forever honor the conditions of the nonproliferation treaty or face the consequences. this deal isn't about trust. i don't trust iran, and i don't like their leadership, but as has been pointed out, you don't negotiate peace agreements with those you know, like and trust. this deal is about verification. it's about making iran prove it's not developing a nuclear weapon. it's about keeping america and our allies safe. it's our best and only peaceful path forward. i urge the house to approve the iran nuclear deal, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. royce: i yield two minutes to the gentleman from illinois, mr. adam kinzinger. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois is recognized for two minutes. mr. kinzinger: thank you, mr.
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chairman. thank you, mr. speaker. first question is, has iran earned the right to be trusted? now, if the answer to that is yes, then i'd ask how. tell me how iran has earned this right to be trusted? if the answer is no, then obviously you would have to verify if you trust. if you don't trust. but if you actually look at the verification in this deal, in many cases we're finding out from these secret agreements, it's actually iran varyfying for themselves that in fact they are going to be nuclear-free. you know, i'm a veteran of yirke iraq, and one of the things largely forgotten in this debate is that iraq is responsible for the deaths for the hundreds, if not thousands of american soldiers both directly and indirectly through the explosive foreign penetrators they send to iraq to kill american troops. you know, the other thing is iran in this deal -- there's all this talk about iran cheating. we know it's in the d.n.a. of iran to cheat anyway, but they don't even need to cheat. they can follow this deal to the t and become a zero-time
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breakout nuclear state. you don't even need to have nuclear weapons to have the same kind of power if you're a zero-time breakout nuclear state. you just need to have the threat to marry a nuclear weapon to an intercontinental ballistic missile, which by the way we give iran the right to have in year eight. icbm's married up to a nuclear-tipped weapon. and iran can take weapons from russia, europe, frankly the united states if we wanted to sell it to them, because we lifted the arms embargo against them. south korea, the united arab emirates asked us to enrich uranium, friends of the united states and we told them know because of our dedication to keeping nuclear weapons out of the wrong hands. so we denied our best friends the right to enrich uranium and we're getting ready to give it to our worst enemy. this deal will in effect end the nuclear nonproliferation treaty for the world because we can never deny anybody the
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right to enrich uranium in the future. with that i urge the rejection of this deal, and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from california reserves. the gentleman from michigan is recognized. . mr. conyers: i'm pleased to recognize the gentleman from washington, mr. mcdermott, for two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized for two minutes. -- mcdermott: mr. speaker the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from washington is recognized for three minutes. mr. mcdermott: mr. speaker, by now i should be used to the wild and spurious charges my republican colleagues will level at the administration when they know they are about to lose a big battle. this is an extremely well conceived arms agreement that does exactly what needs to be done when it comes to preventing iran from getting a nuclear weapon. if it's enforced. that is not -- there is not an
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argument or an objection against it that has not been debunked by actual regional and nuclear experts, on both sides of the aisle. not yet a single republican in the entire united states congress is willing to consider the deal's exceptional merits. not a single one. now, that's politics. that's not policy. instead we spent two days watching the republicans trip over themselves on how best to unanimously disapprove of this deal. if we disapprove, where does it lead? you heard either to war or -- let's go get another deal. that's not going to happen. everyone told us that's not going to happen. it's the same neocons that led us into 15 years of war in the middle east now want us to leave the thing open with iran.
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don't settle it. we have seen secondary -- secretary kerry and secretary moniz go toe to toe with the iranians for months during the through the night meetings and countless strained arguments, our diplomats ultimately delivered the most far-reaching, far-reaching nuclear agreement in history. there's nothing that compares with what we have here. that's real leadership. of course we have seen this shameful campaigns of misinformation and vitriol before. obamacare, if you were to play the obamacare arguments, they are the same ones you are hearing today. fear, fear, folks. you're going to lose your doctor. lose everything. and yet we now have it in place and 20 million people have more health care. now, we are seeing it again. a republican, teddy roosevelt, said it best.
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credit goes to the man who is actually in the arena whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood and who survives valiantly who at best knows in the end triumph of high achievement and at the worst if he fails at least fails while daring greatly so his place shall not be with these cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat. the president has gone out of the line. he's listened to this stuff for two years and came back with an agreement which is -- you got experts in israel. you got experts around the world saying that this is a good deal. now, imagine we were making this agreement 70 years ago with the japanese. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. mcdermott: we would have the same argument. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. mr. mcdermott: vote against this bill. the speaker pro tempore: the
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gentleman from michigan reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. yielding myself such time as i might -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. royce: i yield myself two minutes. i want to underscore the point the ge