Skip to main content

tv   Key Capitol Hill Hearings  CSPAN  October 30, 2015 2:00am-4:01am EDT

2:00 am
young of iowa, ryan. oung of indiana, ryan. zeldin, ryan. zinke, ryan. the speaker: the reading clerk will now call the names of members who did not answer on he first call. the clerk: bishop of utah. yan.
2:01 am
ipinski, pelosi. meeks.
2:02 am
ryan of wisconsin. ryan of wisconsin. webster of florida. ebster of florida.
2:03 am
the clerk: boehner. the speaker: ryan. the clerk: ryan. the speaker: if there are any members who did not answer the call of the roll, they i may come to the well and vote at this time.
2:04 am
2:05 am
2:06 am
2:07 am
2:08 am
the speaker: the tellers agree in their tallies that the total number of votes cast is 432 of which the honorable paul d. ryan of the state of wisconsin has received 236. the honorable nancy pelosi of california has received 184. the honorable daniel webster of the state of florida has received nine. the honorable jim cooper of the state of tennessee has received one. the honorable john lewis of georgia has received one. and the honorable colin poul has received one. -- colin powell has received one. therefore, the honorable paul d. ryan of the state of wisconsin having received the majority of the votes cast is duly elected as speaker of the house.
2:09 am
the chair appoints the following committee to escort the speaker-elect to the chair. the gentleman from california, mr. mccarthy, the gentlewoman from california, ms. pelosi,
2:10 am
the gentleman from louisiana, mr. scalise, the gentleman from maryland mr. hoyer, the gentlewoman from washington state, mrs. mcmorris rodgers, the gentleman from south carolina, mr. clyburn, the gentleman from oregon, mr. walden, the gentleman from california, mr. becerra, the gentleman from indiana, mr. messer, the gentleman from new york, mr. crowley, the gentlewoman from kansas, ms. jenkins, the gentleman from new york, mr. israel, the gentlewoman from north carolina, ms. foxx, the gentleman from new mexico, mr. ben ray lujan, the gentlewoman from missouri, mrs. wagner, the gentlewoman from connecticut, ms. delauro, the gentlewoman from maryland, ms. edwards, the gentleman from texas, mr. sessions, the gentleman from maryland, mr. van hollen, the gentleman from north carolina, mr. mchenry, and the members of the wisconsin delegation -- mr. sensenbrenner, mr. kind, ms. moore, mr. duffy, mr. ribble, mr. pocan, mr. grothman.
2:11 am
the gentlelady from california, mrs. mimi walters. the members will retire from the chamber to escort the speaker-elect to the chair.
2:12 am
2:13 am
2:14 am
2:15 am
2:16 am
the sergeant at arms: mr. speaker, the speaker-elect, paul d. ryan of wisconsin.
2:17 am
2:18 am
2:19 am
2:20 am
2:21 am
2:22 am
2:23 am
>> the 114th congress of the united states. floor strength yen and inspired by the support of our colleagues. the constituents and the love of our families. my special thanks to all of you my children en, nine
2:24 am
grandchildren, and the family for their support. the people of san francisco. the continued honor to represent them here. my heartfelt thanks to my colleagues for extending to me the honor of being nominated to the speaker of the house. thank you very much. said to his constituents and this congress with honor for 25 years. peaker john boehner.
2:25 am
in his story we are reminded of the enduring exceptional promise of america. this hardworking son of an ohio bartender and owner who grew up to be the speaker of the house of representatives. john boehner talked about the american dream. john boehner, you are the personification of the american dream. as you-all know, speaker boehner was a formidable spokesman for the republican agenda. my republican colleagues, i'm sure you know and i can attest to the fact that he was always true and loyal to the members of his caucus in any negotiations we ever had. although we had our differences, and often, i always respected his dedication
2:26 am
to this house and his commitment to his values. thank you, john, for your leadership and courage as speaker. your graciousness as speaker extended and was reflected in your staff under the leadership of mike summers whom we all respect. thank you to john boehner's staff. i know i speak for everyone here, democrats and republicans, when i thank you for making the visit of his holiness, pope francis, such a beautiful and meaningful xperience for all of us. today we extend our thanks and congratulations to debi, your daughters lindsay and trisha, and the entire boehner family,
2:27 am
now including grandson. let's hear it for the family of ohn boehner. ebb behalf of house democrats and personally, i wish you and your family all of god's blessings in the glorious years ahead. last month we witnessed something truly special when pope francis made history addressing a joint session of congress. standing right here pope francis called on us to speak hope, peace, and dialogue for all people. and reminded us of our duties to find a way forward for everyone. a good political leader his holiness said, is one who with
2:28 am
the interest of all in mind seizes the moment in a spirit of openness and pragmatism. with that -- with the interest in mind of all. pope francis echoed the principle of our founders that placed at the heart of our democrat -- democracy the saying so many one. the founders could ever have imagine how vast our country would become, how diverse and many we would be ethnically, gender identities, beliefs, and priorities, but they knew we had to be one. every day in this house and across the country we pledge allegiance to one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. this is the beauty of america that for all of our honest
2:29 am
differences, prospeck tiffs, and priorities, aired and argued so passionately on this floor, we are committed to being one nation. despite our differences, in fact respecting them, i look forward to a clear debate in this marketplace of ideas, the people's house of representatives. so my fellow colleagues we have a responsibility to act upon our shared faith and the greatness of our country. we have responsibility to be worthy of the sacrifices of our troops, our veterans, and our military families. we have responsibility to make real the promise of the american dream for all. there is important work before the congress and we must do more to promote growth, decrease the deficit, create good-paying jobs, and increase the paychecks of america's working families. page is this house a
2:30 am
turned, a new chapter has begun. today the gavel passes to a proud son of wisconsin. the first speaker from wisconsin. paul ryan has had the full breadth of experience on capitol hill from young staffer , tore waiter, should i say that again, tortilla coast waiter, to congressman, to being a sincere and proud advocate for his point of view as chairman of the budget committee, as a respected leader and chairman of the ways and means committee, and in a minute he will be the speaker of the house of representatives. on behalf, mr. speaker to be, on behalf of house democrats i extend the hand of friendship to you. congratulations to you, paul, to your children, your mother
2:31 am
who is here, how proud she must be. the entire ryan family whom we all know mean so much to you. mr. speaker, god bless you and your family and god bless the nited states of america. this is the speaker's house. this is the speaker's -- this is the people's house. this is the people's gavel, and the people's name it is my privilege to hand this gavel to the speaker of the house, congressman and honorable paul ryan.
2:32 am
the speaker: thank you very much. thank you. thank you. thank you, madam leader.
2:33 am
before i begin i would like to thank all of my family and friends who flew in from wisconsin and from all over for being here today. in the gallery i have my mom, betty, my sister, janet, my brothers stan and tobaccoin, and more cousins than i can ount on a few hands. most important, i want to recognize my wife, jana, and our children, liza, charlie, and sam.
2:34 am
i also want to thank speaker boehner for almost five years he led this house, for nearly 25 years he served it. not many people can match his accomplishments. the offices he held, the laws he passed, but what really sets john apart is he's a man of character, a true class act. he is without a question the gentleman from ohio. so please join me in saying one last time, thank you speaker boehner.
2:35 am
now i know how he felt. it's not until you hold this gavel, stand in this spot, look out and see all 435 members of this house as if all america's sitting right in front of you. it's not till then that you feel it. the weight of responsibility. the grambity of the moment. you -- graphity of the moment. as i stand here i can't help but think of something harry truman once said. the day after franklin roosevelt died, truman became president and he told a group of reporters, if you ever pray,
2:36 am
pray for me now. when they told me yesterday what had happened, i felt like the moon, the stars, and all the planets had fallen on me. we should all feel that way. a lot is on our shoulders. so if you ever pray, let's pray for each other. republicans, for democrats, and emocrats for republicans. and i don't mean pray for a conversion, all right. pray for a deeper understanding because when you're up here, you see it so clearly.
2:37 am
wherever you come from, whatever you believe, we are all in the same boat. i never thought i'd be speaker. but early in my life, i wanted to serve this house. i thought this place was exhilarating because here, you can make a difference. if you had a good idea, if you worked hard, you could make it happen. you could improve people's lives. to me, the house of representatives represents what's best of america. the boundless opportunity to do ood. but let's be frank. the house is broken. we're not solving problems, we're adding to them. and i am not interested in laying blame. we are not settling scores. we are wiping the slate clean.
2:38 am
neither the members nor the eople are satisfied with how things are going. we need to make some changes, starting with how the house does business. we need to let every member contribute, not once they've earned their stripes but now. i come at this job as a two-time committee chair. the committees should retake the lead in drafting all major legislation. if you know the issue, you should write the bill. let's open up the process.
2:39 am
let people participate. and they might change their mind. a neglected minority will gum up the works. a respected minority will work in good faith. instead of trying to stop the majority, they might try to become the majority. in other words, we need to return to regular order. now, i know this sounds like process. it's actually a matter of principle. we are the body closest to the people. every two years, we face the voters and sometimes face the music. but we do not echo the people, we represent the people. we are supposed to study up and do the homework they cannot do.
2:40 am
so when we do not follow regular order, when we rush to pass bills that a lot of us don't understand, we are not doing our job. only a fully functioning house can truly represent the people. and if there are ever a time for us to step up, this would be that time. america does not feel strong anymore. because the working people of america do not feel strong anymore. i'm talking about the people who mind the store, and grow the food, and walk the beat, and pay the taxes, and raise the family. they do not sit in this house. they do not have fancy titles. but they are the people who make this country work, and this ouse should work for them.
2:41 am
here's the problem. they're working hard, they're paying a lot, they're trying to do right by their families, and they're going nowhere fast. they never get a raise they never get a break, the bills keep filing up and the taxes and the debt. they're working harder than ever before to get ahead, yet they're falling further behind. they feel robbed. they feel cheated by their birth right, of their birth right. they're not asking for any favors. they just want a fair chance. and they're losing faith that they'll ever get it. then, they look at washington and all they see is chaos.
2:42 am
what a relief to them it would be if we finally got our acts together. what a weight off their shoulders. how reassuring it would be if we actually fixed the tax code, put patients in charge of their health care, grew our economy, strengthened our military, lifted people out of poverty and aid down our debt. at this point, nothing could be more inspiring than a job well done. nothing could stir the heart more than real, concrete results. the cynics will scoff. they'll say it's not possible. you better believe we're going to try. we will not duck the tough
2:43 am
issues. we will take them head on. we are going to do all we can do so that working people get their strength back and people not working get their lives back. no more fares for the few. opportunity for all. that is our motto. you know, i often talk about a need for revision. -- for a vision. i'm not sure i ever really said what i meant. we saw problems -- we solve problems here, yes. we create a lot of them too. but at bottom, we vindicate a way of life. we show by our work that free people can govern themselves. they can solve their own
2:44 am
problems. they can make their own decisions. they can deliberate, collaborate and get the job done. we show that self-government is not only more efficient and more effective, it's more fulfilling. in fact, we show it as that struggle, that hard work, that very achievement itself that makes us free. that is what we do here. and we will not always agree. not all of us, not all of the time. but we should not hide our disagreements. we should embrace them. we have nothing to fear from honest differences, honestly tated. if you have ideas, let's hear them. i believe that a greater clarity between us can lead to greater charity among us. and there's every reason to have
2:45 am
hope. when the first speaker took the gavel, he looked out at a room of 30 people. representing a nation of three million. today, as i look out at each and every one of you, we represent a nation of 300 million. so when i hear that america doesn't have it, we're done, we're spent, i don't believe it. i believe with every fiber of my being that we can renew the american idea. now our task is to make us all believe. my friends, you have done me a great honor. the people of this country, they've done all of us a great honor.
2:46 am
now let's prove ourselves worthy of it. let's seize the moment. let's rise to the occasion. and when we are den, let us say that we left the people, all the people, more united, happy, and free. thank you.
2:47 am
i am now ready to take the oath of office. i ask that the dean of the house of representatives, the honorable john conyers jr. of michigan, to administer the oath of office. mr. conyers: if the gentleman from wisconsin would please raise his right hand. do you, sir, solemnly swear or affirm that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to
2:48 am
enter, so help you god? r. ryan: i do. the speaker: thank you. thank you. for what purpose does the gentleman from california, mr. mccarthy, seek recognition? mr. mccarthy: i offer a privileged resolution and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk will first number the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 503. resolved, that the clerk be instructed to inform the president of the united states that the house of
2:49 am
representatives has elected paul d. ryan, a representative from the state of wisconsin, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker: without objection the resolution is agreed to and the motion to reconsider is laid pon the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from california, mr. mccarthy, seek recognition? mr. mccarthy: mr. speaker, i offer a privileged resolution ask for its immediate consideration. the clerk: the clerk will reminority resolution. the clerk: house resolution 504, resolved, that a message be sent to the senate to inform that body that pall d. ryan, a member from the state of wisconsin, has been elected speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: without objection -- the speaker: without objection, the resolution is agreed to and the motion to reconsider is laid n the table.
2:50 am
the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk: the honorable the clerk, house of representatives, madam, as a result of my election today as speaker, this letter is to inform you that i re-sign as chairman of the committee on ways and means and from further service on that committee. i also resign as chairman and a member of the joint committee on taxation. signed, sincerely, pall d. ryan. -- paul d. ryan. >> monday, california
2:51 am
representative anna has shoe -- anna eshoo discusses how congress should this us cyber security and data breaches as well as the upcoming spectrum auction. she is joined by politico's technology reporter. by cyber security that needs to be honored. breaches arethese due to two factors -- and lack of hygiene in the system and a lack of security management. night at 8:00 eastern on "the communicators" on c-span2. coverage ofs your the road to the white house 2016 , where you will find the candidates, the speeches, the
2:52 am
debates, and your questions. this year we are taking our coverage across the country, contest,student cam giving students the opportunity to discuss what important issues they want to hear the most from candidates. follow the contest and the road to the white house coverage on tv, the radio, and online, at c-span.org. >> the u.s. house elected a new speaker, congressman paul ryan. he is the fifth 54th speaker of the house, the first from wisconsin. boehner, who is held the post since 2011. speaker boehner gaveled in the house for the last time and delivered his farewell address.
2:53 am
>> you have entrusted to us a great nation founded on life and liberty. we stand before you ready to fulfill a mission that will give glory to your name and insure the dignity of all humanity. we plead for your wisdom. give us the courage to open our eyes to see, give us the fortitude to endure when the demands of our office seem overwhelming. bless us with prudence when all pathway seem troublesome. help us to discern and seek the common good when comfort and empt and back in.an
2:54 am
challenge our minds and steady our hands and remind us that all good things come from you. transform our lives and we will remember that life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness is the greatest work we will perform on behalf of all people. amen. >> amen. [applause] [cheers] the speaker: all right. speaker boehner: all right. thank you.
2:55 am
mr. speaker a rise today to inform you that i will resign as speaker of the house effective upon the election of my successor. i will also resign as the representative from ohio's eighth district at the end of this month. regrets, no burdens. if anything, i leave the way i started. just a regular guy, humbled by the chance to do a big job. that's what i'm most proud of. i'm still just me. the same guy who came here 25 years ago as a small business man and spent all these 25 years trying to just be me. sometimes my staff thought i was too much like me, but it really is i'm most proud of. the same regular guy that came here to try to do a good job for my district and my country. but before i go, i want to express what an honor it's been to serve with all of you. the people's house is in my
2:56 am
view the great embodiment of the american dream. everybody here comes from somewhere and everybody here's on some mission. i come from a part of the world where we are used to working. as far back as i can remember, i was working, my staff was asking me the other day, on november 1, you're not going to have a job. when was the last time you didn't have a job? i thought about it and thought about it and thought about it. i thought, i had to be 8 or 9 years old because i was throwing newspapers back then and working at my dad's bar. as a matter of fact, i used to work from 5:00 a.m. on saturday morning until 2:00 p.m. for $2. not $2 an hour. $2. i never thought about growing up as the easy way or the hard way. it was just the cincinnati way. you know our city takes its name from a great roman general, a man who answered the
2:57 am
call of his nation to lead. and then surrendered his power to go back to his plow. for me it wasn't a farm it was a small business. and it wasn't so much a calling as it was a mission. a mission to strive for a smaller, less costly, and more accountable federal government here in washington. how did we do? here are some facts. for the first time in nearly 20 years we have made some real entitlement reforms. saving trillions of dollars over the long term. we have protected 99% of the american people from an increase in their taxes. we are on track to save taxpayers $2.1 trillion over the next 10 years. the most significant spending reductions in modern times. we have banned earmarks all together. sorry. we have protected this institution. we have made it more open to
2:58 am
the people. and every day in this capital city there are hundreds of kids from the toughest neighborhoods who are finally getting a hance at a decent education. i'm proud of these things. but the mission is not complete but the truth is it may never be. one thing i came to realize over the years that i have been here is that this battle over the size and scope and cost of our government in washington has been going on for more than 200 years. and the forces of the status quo do -- good for an awful lot of trouble to prevent change from happening. real change takes time. yes, freedom makes all things possible, but patience is what makes all things real.
2:59 am
so believe in the long slow struggle. believe in this country's ability to meet her challenges and to lead the world. and remember, you can't do a big job alone. especially this one. so i'm grateful to my family, deb and my two girls, my two girls were 3 and 1 when i first ran for office. now they are a lot older. so they have been through a lot. you-all know what your families go through. it's one thing for us to take the boards and everything gets thrown at us, but it's another thing for our families. their skin isn't as thick as ours. i'm also grateful to all my colleagues. my fellow leaders, mr. mccarthy, mr. scalise, mrs. , and many on rs
3:00 am
my side of the aisle, our committee chairs, people i have worked with for a long time. i'm just as grateful to ms. pelosi, mr. hoyer, mr. clyburn, and becerra, and others for all of the work that we have done together. over these last five years we have done an awful lot of work together. probably more work done across the aisle over the last five years than in the 25 years that i served in this institution. now, as much as i enjoy working with all of you, some of you still could learn to dress etter. ou know who you are. i saw one of the culprits, one of the usual suspects that shows up here once in a while without a tie, but this morning he didn't dress very well but he did have a tie on. i'm grateful to the people who work in this institution every day. whether it's the reading clerks -
3:01 am
there are a lot of people, thousands of people that allow us to do our jobs and to help make this institution what it is. and whether it's the people you see here today or the people in the capitol police or leg counsel, there are thousands of people that do allow us to do our job. i'm grateful to my staff. now, you-all know i'm a big believer in staff. none of this can be what we are without the good staff. i certainly would never have gotten to this job without having built a great team. so really am grateful to my
3:02 am
staff as they like to say to each other, once you're part of boehner land, you're always part of boehner land. and that certainly goes for me as well. i'm especially grateful to all my constituents and the volunteers over the years. that includes a student at miami university in oxford, ohio, in 1990, who was putting up campaign signs for me. his name was paul ryan. i don't think he could pronounce my name back -- he was putting signs up for me. but cincinnati understood there is a difference between being asked to do something and being called to do something. . ul is being called i know he'll serve with grace and with energy and i want to wish him and his family all the best.
3:03 am
my colleagues, i describe my life as a chase for the american dream and that chase began at the bottom of the hill just off the main drag in redding, ohio, right outside cincinnati. top of the hill was a small house with a big family, a shining city in its own right. the hill had twists. the hill had turns, and even a few tears. nothing wrong with that. but let me tell you, it was just perfect. never forget we're the luckiest people on the earth. in america, you can do anything that you're willing to work for, willing to work hard at and things -- anything can happen if you're willing to make the necessary sacrifices
3:04 am
in life. if you falter, and you will, you can just pick yourself up, dust yourself off and go do it again because hope always brings eternal and if you do the right things for the right reasons, good things will happen. and this, too, can really happen to you. god bless you and god bless our great country.
3:05 am
>> the house held its vote to elect-- two's test to paul ryan speaker. other candidates received report -- received support from 12 members.
3:06 am
we will hear from past minority leader, nancy pelosi. this is half-an-hour. the sergeant at arms: mr. speaker, the speaker-elect, paul d. ryan of wisconsin.
3:07 am
3:08 am
3:09 am
3:10 am
3:11 am
3:12 am
3:13 am
>> the 114th congress of the united states. floor strength yen and inspired by the support of our colleagues. the constituents and the love
3:14 am
of our families. my special thanks to all of you my children en, nine grandchildren, and the family for their support. the people of san francisco. the continued honor to represent them here. my heartfelt thanks to my colleagues for extending to me the honor of being nominated to the speaker of the house. thank you very much. said to his constituents and this congress with honor for 25 years. peaker john boehner.
3:15 am
in his story we are reminded of the enduring exceptional promise of america. this hardworking son of an ohio bartender and owner who grew up to be the speaker of the house of representatives. john boehner talked about the american dream. john boehner, you are the personification of the american dream. as you-all know, speaker boehner was a formidable spokesman for the republican agenda. my republican colleagues, i'm sure you know and i can attest to the fact that he was always true and loyal to the members of his caucus in any
3:16 am
negotiations we ever had. although we had our differences, and often, i always respected his dedication to this house and his commitment to his values. thank you, john, for your leadership and courage as speaker. your graciousness as speaker extended and was reflected in your staff under the leadership of mike summers whom we all respect. thank you to john boehner's staff. i know i speak for everyone here, democrats and republicans, when i thank you for making the visit of his holiness, pope francis, such a beautiful and meaningful xperience for all of us.
3:17 am
today we extend our thanks and congratulations to debi, your daughters lindsay and trisha, and the entire boehner family, now including grandson. let's hear it for the family of ohn boehner. ebb behalf of house democrats and personally, i wish you and your family all of god's blessings in the glorious years ahead. last month we witnessed something truly special when pope francis made history addressing a joint session of congress. standing right here pope francis called on us to speak hope, peace, and dialogue for all people. and reminded us of our duties to find a way forward for
3:18 am
everyone. a good political leader his holiness said, is one who with the interest of all in mind seizes the moment in a spirit of openness and pragmatism. with that -- with the interest in mind of all. pope francis echoed the principle of our founders that placed at the heart of our democrat -- democracy the saying so many one. the founders could ever have imagine how vast our country would become, how diverse and many we would be ethnically, gender identities, beliefs, and priorities, but they knew we had to be one. every day in this house and across the country we pledge allegiance to one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.
3:19 am
this is the beauty of america that for all of our honest differences, prospeck tiffs, and priorities, aired and argued so passionately on this floor, we are committed to being one nation. despite our differences, in fact respecting them, i look forward to a clear debate in this marketplace of ideas, the people's house of representatives. so my fellow colleagues we have a responsibility to act upon our shared faith and the greatness of our country. we have responsibility to be worthy of the sacrifices of our troops, our veterans, and our military families. we have responsibility to make real the promise of the american dream for all. there is important work before the congress and we must do more to promote growth, decrease the deficit, create good-paying jobs, and increase the paychecks of america's
3:20 am
working families. page is this house a turned, a new chapter has begun. today the gavel passes to a proud son of wisconsin. the first speaker from wisconsin. paul ryan has had the full breadth of experience on capitol hill from young staffer , tore waiter, should i say that again, tortilla coast waiter, to congressman, to being a sincere and proud advocate for his point of view as chairman of the budget committee, as a respected leader and chairman of the ways and means committee, and in a minute he will be the speaker of the house of representatives. on behalf, mr. speaker to be, on behalf of house democrats i
3:21 am
extend the hand of friendship to you. congratulations to you, paul, to your children, your mother who is here, how proud she must be. the entire ryan family whom we all know mean so much to you. mr. speaker, god bless you and your family and god bless the nited states of america. this is the speaker's house. this is the speaker's -- this is the people's house. this is the people's gavel, and the people's name it is my privilege to hand this gavel to the speaker of the house,
3:22 am
congressman and honorable paul ryan. the speaker: thank you very much. thank you. thank you.
3:23 am
thank you, madam leader. before i begin i would like to thank all of my family and friends who flew in from wisconsin and from all over for being here today. in the gallery i have my mom, betty, my sister, janet, my brothers stan and tobaccoin, and more cousins than i can ount on a few hands. most important, i want to recognize my wife, jana, and our children, liza, charlie,
3:24 am
and sam. i also want to thank speaker boehner for almost five years he led this house, for nearly 25 years he served it. not many people can match his accomplishments. the offices he held, the laws he passed, but what really sets john apart is he's a man of character, a true class act. he is without a question the gentleman from ohio. so please join me in saying one last time, thank you speaker boehner.
3:25 am
now i know how he felt. it's not until you hold this gavel, stand in this spot, look out and see all 435 members of this house as if all america's sitting right in front of you. it's not till then that you feel it. the weight of responsibility. the grambity of the moment. you -- graphity of the moment. as i stand here i can't help but think of something harry truman once said. the day after franklin
3:26 am
roosevelt died, truman became president and he told a group of reporters, if you ever pray, pray for me now. when they told me yesterday what had happened, i felt like the moon, the stars, and all the planets had fallen on me. we should all feel that way. a lot is on our shoulders. so if you ever pray, let's pray for each other. republicans, for democrats, and emocrats for republicans. and i don't mean pray for a conversion, all right.
3:27 am
pray for a deeper understanding because when you're up here, you see it so clearly. wherever you come from, whatever you believe, we are all in the same boat. i never thought i'd be speaker. but early in my life, i wanted to serve this house. i thought this place was exhilarating because here, you can make a difference. if you had a good idea, if you worked hard, you could make it happen. you could improve people's lives. to me, the house of representatives represents what's best of america. the boundless opportunity to do ood. but let's be frank. the house is broken. we're not solving problems, we're adding to them. and i am not interested in laying blame. we are not settling scores.
3:28 am
we are wiping the slate clean. neither the members nor the eople are satisfied with how things are going. we need to make some changes, starting with how the house does business. we need to let every member contribute, not once they've earned their stripes but now. i come at this job as a two-time committee chair. the committees should retake the lead in drafting all major legislation.
3:29 am
if you know the issue, you should write the bill. let's open up the process. let people participate. and they might change their mind. a neglected minority will gum up the works. a respected minority will work in good faith. instead of trying to stop the majority, they might try to become the majority. in other words, we need to return to regular order. now, i know this sounds like process. it's actually a matter of principle. we are the body closest to the people. every two years, we face the voters and sometimes face the music. but we do not echo the people,
3:30 am
we represent the people. we are supposed to study up and do the homework they cannot do. so when we do not follow regular order, when we rush to pass bills that a lot of us don't understand, we are not doing our job. only a fully functioning house can truly represent the people. and if there are ever a time for us to step up, this would be that time. america does not feel strong anymore. because the working people of america do not feel strong anymore. i'm talking about the people who mind the store, and grow the food, and walk the beat, and pay the taxes, and raise the family. they do not sit in this house. they do not have fancy titles. but they are the people who make this country work, and this ouse should work for them.
3:31 am
here's the problem. they're working hard, they're paying a lot, they're trying to do right by their families, and they're going nowhere fast. they never get a raise they never get a break, the bills keep filing up and the taxes and the debt. they're working harder than ever before to get ahead, yet they're falling further behind. they feel robbed. they feel cheated by their birth right, of their birth right. they're not asking for any favors. they just want a fair chance. and they're losing faith that they'll ever get it. then, they look at washington
3:32 am
and all they see is chaos. what a relief to them it would be if we finally got our acts together. what a weight off their shoulders. how reassuring it would be if we actually fixed the tax code, put patients in charge of their health care, grew our economy, strengthened our military, lifted people out of poverty and aid down our debt. at this point, nothing could be more inspiring than a job well done. nothing could stir the heart more than real, concrete results. the cynics will scoff.
3:33 am
they'll say it's not possible. you better believe we're going to try. we will not duck the tough issues. we will take them head on. we are going to do all we can do so that working people get their strength back and people not working get their lives back. no more fares for the few. opportunity for all. that is our motto. you know, i often talk about a need for revision. -- for a vision. i'm not sure i ever really said what i meant. we saw problems -- we solve problems here, yes. we create a lot of them too. but at bottom, we vindicate a way of life. we show by our work that free
3:34 am
people can govern themselves. they can solve their own problems. they can make their own decisions. they can deliberate, collaborate and get the job done. we show that self-government is not only more efficient and more effective, it's more fulfilling. in fact, we show it as that struggle, that hard work, that very achievement itself that makes us free. that is what we do here. and we will not always agree. not all of us, not all of the time. but we should not hide our disagreements. we should embrace them. we have nothing to fear from honest differences, honestly tated. if you have ideas, let's hear them. i believe that a greater clarity
3:35 am
between us can lead to greater charity among us. and there's every reason to have hope. when the first speaker took the gavel, he looked out at a room of 30 people. representing a nation of three million. today, as i look out at each and every one of you, we represent a nation of 300 million. so when i hear that america doesn't have it, we're done, we're spent, i don't believe it. i believe with every fiber of my being that we can renew the american idea. now our task is to make us all believe. my friends, you have done me a great honor. the people of this country,
3:36 am
they've done all of us a great honor. now let's prove ourselves worthy of it. let's seize the moment. let's rise to the occasion. and when we are den, let us say that we left the people, all the people, more united, happy, and free. thank you.
3:37 am
i am now ready to take the oath of office. i ask that the dean of the house of representatives, the honorable john conyers jr. of michigan, to administer the oath of office. mr. conyers: if the gentleman from wisconsin would please raise his right hand. do you, sir, solemnly swear or affirm that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that
3:38 am
you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? r. ryan: i do. the speaker: thank you. thank you. >> c-span presents a landmark cases. the book, a guide to our landmark cases series which explores 12 supreme court decisions, including mulberry versus madison. brown versus the board of education, miranda versus arizona. and roe versus wade. landmark cases, the book,
3:39 am
features introductions and the impact of each case. written by tony morrow. published by c-span in cooperation with cq press. formark cases is available $8.95 plus shipping. get your copy today at c-span.org. >> on wednesday, secretary of state, john kerry, talked about u.s. policy in the middle east, focusing on the conflict israelis and palestinians and the syrian civil war. he spoke for about 45 minutes. lestinian conflict and the syrian civil war. from the carting the endowment washington d.c. this is 45 minutes. >> thank you all, very much. [applause]. bill, thanks. thanks so much for welcoming me
3:40 am
to your new home. i very touched to hear the comments from bill's caliber because as you know, he really was the state department premier career diplomat. now that you have been away almost a year i know you are missing all of the travel, the early morning meetings, the late-night calls, and you are just dying to return, right? but all kidding aside,ads and gentlemen, the door to the state department for bill burns is always open. from pres. obama to the entire security team, to
3:41 am
me, to the secretary of state there is no better diplomat, no one who could be better led by then the carnegie foundation of peace then by bill burns. please join me everybody for same thank you for a remarkable career for this man. [applause]. now, if i have behave myself, which is never for certain i am going to try to restrain my voice, not be as passionate as i want to be about every word i am muttering today. i am trying to save a little case of laryngitis and make sure i do not exasperate it. i leave tonight to be enough for two days of important meetings that i want to make sure i can actually talk during those meetings. i appreciate the chance to speak today, to you. an audience of experts and
3:42 am
students who are on their way to being experts, but all of you who spend a lot of time thinking about some very serious issues. the truth is, for generations carnegie has been training the foreign-policy leaders of the future and generating, at the same time real time solutions for those of us who are practicing at that time. it is an understatement to say today that we are facing a very different worlds. a world of remarkable complexity all of you have probably read henry kissinger and diplomacy, and countless other books, as i have an henry would be the first to tell you, i've had the privilege of having lunch with him during the united nation meetings, he never had it coming
3:43 am
at him with a number of different places in crisis and in a world that is as multipolar as it is now. a bipolar cold war with the former soviet union and the united states and west was pretty clear about what choices were in many ways. it did not mean they were not tense or difficult and there were not some proxy wars avenue we have seen in vietnam and elsewhere, but it truly was not see what we see today which is a world of violence which is not state on state. with a few exceptions, it is non- state actors who are confounding states and the global order. that presents very different challenges. so, i can tell you that despite the complexity, that i am
3:44 am
certain of this, the united states of america is more deeply engaged today in more places, on more important issues, with impact, then at any time before in our history. i could document, i am not going to run around the whole world, i, i could start with north korea, south china sea, and then afghanistan, pakistan, india, and roll around the world, i am not going to do that. i want to focus on one particular and particularly important area of the globe today, that is the middle east. i am not even going to go into all the aspects of it. twenty years ago, next week after attending a peace rally israeli prime minister was murdered by an extremist who claim to be doing god's will. at the funeral, king hussein of
3:45 am
jordan, the one time enemy turned partner in peace. declare, i quote let us not keep silent, let our voices rise high enough to speak of our commitment to peace for all times, and and let us tell those who live in darkness, who are the enemies of life and truth faith that this is where we stand, this is our camp. at the same ceremony rob means granddaughter, a teenager said that quote others a greater than i have already eulogized you but they never had the pleasure to feel the caresses of your warm, soft hands, to merit your warm embrace, to see, to see your half smile that always told me so much, that same smile which is no longer frozen in the grave
3:46 am
with you. these quotations remind us that beyond all of the cold statistics, beyond the headlines of the daily newspapers, beyond the clapping, talking heads on one show or another, and each early, perpetual talkshow circuits, the impact of violence in the middle east, there is humanity. there is a humanity of people just like us who you're simply to help one another and to share affection for one generation to the next. beyond all of the complexities of the region, there is also something very basic going on, a struggle between people who are intent of opening wounds or leaving them open and those who want to close them and who want to heal and build a future
3:47 am
this is the glue that holds the components of our strategy together. we do have a strategy. whether we are backing an electoral process electoral process in tunisia, mobilizing a coalition against terrorist, trying to halt a sudden outbreak of violence, as i was last last weekend with respect to the temple, or striving to put in place new foundation for prosperity and stability. our goal is to help ensure that builders and healers throughout the region have the chance they need to accomplish their tasks. now, i've i've heard some americans wonder aloud, why should we care about the middle east? after all, we are on the verge of independence so why not just
3:48 am
walk away. the answer is it would be directly and profoundly contrary to our nation's interest to try to do that. we have to remember that the middle east is home to some of america's oldest friends including our ally, israel and also our many arab partners in this now, more complicated world. we also learned from 911 that regional threats become global very quickly. we have seen that id is transmitted by terrace in rocca and most will can reach impressive bull mines in minneapolis and mississippi. we are aware as well that events in the middle east can affect perception on every single continent. people on every continent are influenced by the spiritual and ethical traditions that have their roots in those ancient lands. i hear about this everywhere ago, people are amazed.
3:49 am
it is good to see the former prime minister here. i am amazed. he knows what i am talking about, all over the world. or and ministers, prime ministers, presidents, they say to me no matter where i visit, you have to do something about the middle east. you have you have to change this because it affects us. it is true of course that we rely less on middle east oil than we used to. but it is also true that the energy market is global. any serious disruption of gulf oil supplies can quickly harm our financial systems, lower lower exports, cost millions of jobs, that's an interest. so the middle east matters and it matters way beyond oil my friends, it matters a lot. in the context of this world when we're trying to bring people together to see the future.
3:50 am
that is why it is so important that carnegie is launching this ambitious project this week called arab world horizons. to examine trends that will shape the middle east for decades to come. i encourage you to begin this project with a healthy degree of optimism. before you conclude that i have had too much caffeine. [laughter] let me emphasize that i mean what i just said. i mean it. a couple of years ago we asked the mckenzie company to study the economic prospects of jordan, syria, israel, egypt and the west bank, a good starting place for all of you is to go back to the arab report, study report report on economic growth a number of years ago which was stark in its appraisal of what had not happened that should have happened in many of the arab countries in the region.
3:51 am
interestingly, my good friend the foreign minister recently also commissioned a separate study which similarly showed what we looked at through mckenzie company where we looked at every sector from farming, tourism, my friends, the potential for growth is simply extraordinary. the potential of this region to be a driving financial center, harnessing incredible technology and capacity in people in many of the countries is simply extraordinary. just imagine the future where people from the nile and other places are free to work and travel as they please. where every boy and girl has access to a quality education. where. where visitors are able to flock without fear to the world's greatest tourist attractions. i mean, think about that.
3:52 am
the world's greatest tourist attractions. i have driven by them, i have not even had time to stop at some of them. the place where john the baptist christened so many people, including jesus. the temple near it, a muslim mosque which is one of the oldest in the region and most important. the extraordinary history of the generation of struggle that has taken place in the middle east. there there is something there for everybody. even an atheist as a budding architect would have trouble not having an interesting time. where you have neighboring countries are actually eager to trade, i hear this. i hear it from the ministers in the each of the surrounding countries, how much they wish
3:53 am
things could change so they could begin to engage in a normal commerce of the region. they are ready to cop rate on projects that link their economies together. now sadly, we have become so accustom of dwelling on the problems in the middle east that we sometimes forget what is staring us in the face is incredible opportunities and we all ought to be doing more to focus on those opportunities, because those people and all the countries are beginning to lose it believe in any of their leaders. palestinians do not have believed, israelis do not have beliefs, people in the surrounding arab countries do not believe. what it takes is real leadership, real decisions, real events real events on the ground to begin to change those hopes. so we ought to be doing more, all of of us. here i specifically include governments in the region, we need to take advantage of these huge opportunities that exist today. let's be honest with each other, apart from petroleum, middle eastern countries right now simply do not produce enough of what the rest of the world
3:54 am
wants. they do not trade, efficiently even among themselves. they are are not making wise use of their human capital. only about one woman in four participates in the economy, and employment is at 25% or higher. this leads many young people because of the pervasiveness of social media are completely aware of what everybody else in the world has and they do not. everybody is connected 24/seven. you can be impoverished but they still have a smart form phone, they can still google and facebook, they can still figure out what the other person has and they can talk to those people, and they do. and very simple declarative sentence. so what happens happens to all that energy and ambition? in the united states the average age is 35, the middle east and north africa it is under 25.
3:55 am
many of those countries have populations where it is 60 or 65% under the age of 30 or 35. so the region's future really depends on the choices that these young men and women are going to get to make. but who are they going to listen to? we need to talk about that as you have this conference. what ideas will command their loyalty? what might excite their imagination? individually, each one of these young people is a story that will end either in frustration or opportunity. collectively they present a profound challenge because of the combat rate,. [inaudible] there is no single way, not just one way.
3:56 am
[inaudible] there is a gap between what graduates actually know and when they leave school. [inaudible] [inaudible] it is time we remain so engage. that is why we have invested in a variety of worthwhile programs, everything from the rule of law initiatives and jordan to public, private partnerships in the palestinian
3:57 am
authority. we had worked so hard and i had the pleasure of working with him to implement. we also know the pace of progress will depend in part on improved security. that is a major goal of u.s. policy in the middle east, we do not just mean security of one country or another, israelis have to be secure, palestinians have to be secured, people in gaza have to be secure. everyone has to be secure. it is our common enterprise now to fight for that security. so here i go back to the struggle i mentioned earlier about the destroyers and the builders. if the builders are going to succeed, they will have to be protected from the dangers imposed by dangers, strife, weapons of mass distraction, and america's security strategy in the middle east is precisely designed to try to aid in each of these areas.
3:58 am
that is why pres. obama play such importance on achieving a negotiated solution to iran's nuclear program. as all of you know, this this man over here, bill burns played a critical role in helping get those talks with iran off the ground. and in helping forge the interim plan that set the stage for the final agreement that we have reached. that is an agreement that is imposing dramatic constraints on all aspects of iran's nuclear activities. ten days ago the deal became official, the implementation began. that implementation will require two thirds of iran's centrifuges, the shipment abroad of 98% of its stockpile of enriched uranium, the destruction uranium, the destruction of the core of the heavy water plutonium reactor. the whole process will be monitored by the iaea and no
3:59 am
sanctions will be lifted until that agency verifies that iran has done exactly what it promised to do. now, this gives iran every incentive to lives up to its commitment. just as it did, by the way during the 18 month leading up to the final agreement. people don't realize is that almost more than two years of iran's compliance with the interim agreement has now taken place, you have not heard of major breaches or anything because it has been adhered to. so, i hope now that everyone who is for the agreement and for those who were against it will come together to support its a full and verifiable implementation, that is the goal. i promise you, i am absolutely
4:00 am
convinced that he the united states will be safer, our allies will be safer, and the world will be safer if iran doesn't have and isn't anywhere close to getting a nuclear weapon. we believe, as our energy department, intelligence community, and military know, that because of the verification measures and transparency of this agreement, we will know whether or not they are. as you recall, when negotiations were going on there speculation about what an agreement might mean for relations between washington and iran. was it possible that a breakthrough in the nuclear issue would be able to open the door to broader cooperation? somewhat welcome that prospect, some to be truthful, were, were alarmed by that process. so, i want to be clear, we meant exactly what we said, the iran deal was considered on its own terms, not what is he going to do here, just nuclear terms, it was it was the right thing to do whethe

7 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on